Hamilton Spectator

                                                       Deaths, July - December, 1899

 

Monday, July 3, 1899

 

KILLACKEY - W.P. Killackey, of Windsor died suddenly.

 

SHAW - Charles Shaw, aged eleven years, of Picton, was drowned while boating.

 

HOLT - The coroner’s jury found that Miss Sadie Holt, of Wheatley, who was found dead in her room on June 16, came to her death by poison administered by herself, for a purpose other than suicide, and believes that the deceased was aided by some person unknown to a jury in procuring drugs for said purpose.

 

POLLARD - Miss Pollard’s death in Toronto was due to carbolic acid. The nurse who administered it was exonerated. The solution administered had been placed in a wrong bottle in the dispensary.

 

Tuesday, July 4, 1899

 

RIDDELL - In this city, on July 4th, 1899, Joseph Riddell, in his 40th year. Funeral on Thursday, at 3:30 from his late residence, 74 East avenue north, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

POWIS - Died this morning, at 190 Catharine street south, Frederick Arthur Powis, in his 43rd year. Funeral notice later.

Frederick Powis, accountant, died at the family residence on Catharine street south this morning. He had been ill about five weeks. He was born in Hamilton 42 years ago, and had lived here all his life. He was exceedingly popular and had a large circle of friends. His services as an elocutionist were frequently given at entertainments.

The deceased was member of the Church of St. Thomas.

 

NICHOLSON - The funeral of George Nicholson, who died at East Flamboro on July 1, took place yesterday and was largely attended. The deceased was 69 years of age, a native of Cork. He came to this country when a boy, and lived in the township for half a century. He had been ill four months. He leaves a widow, two sons - Harry, and Rev. S. of Wellington county - and five daughters - Mrs. Huffman, West Flamboro; Thomas Nicholson, city, and Misses. Emily, Jessie, and Agnes.

 

McCAREY (Waterford, Ont.) July 4 - Mamie McCarey, a young woman of this place, died on Sunday, June 25. She was to have been buried on the following Monday, but the funeral was stopped by order of Coroner Hayes, of Simcoe, pending the result of an inquest, suspicious

circumstances having surrounded the girl’s death. A jury was empanelled and some evidence heard which went to show that the girl was engaged to a young man who had since left the country; that sometime before her death she began taking certain drugs, and that on Saturday, June 24, she gave premature birth to a child, which brought on convulsions. The inquest was adjourned until last evening, to allow of a post-mortem examination being made to ascertain whether Miss McCarrey came to her death by the use of drugs, or whether death was due to natural causes. At the adjourned inquest last night, the doctors who conducted the examination gave their evidence, but it was so


conflicting that the jury brought in a verdict to the effect that Mamie McCarrey came to her death from pre-mature labour, but whether the result of natural causes or the use of noxious drugs could not be determined from the evidence given.

 

GAYLOR (North Seneca) - Miss Fanny Gaylor, who has been lying ill at Mr. Ward’s for some time, died last Sunday afternoon.

 

WILSON (Toronto) July 4 - Frederick Wilson, son of Jacob Wilson, manager of the India and Ceylon, Tea company, 48 East Front street, was killed yesterday morning at Cobourg, while attempting to board a moving freight train. He had been visiting friends at Cobourg for the past few days, and would have returned to his home in Toronto this week. It is thought that, on seeing the approaching train, he decided to take a ride. When trying to board a car, he either missed the step or struck the crane of the water tank and fell to the ground. When found, he was in a dying condition, and despite medical aid, passed away inside of an hour. Deceased was 21 years of age, and well-known in Toronto.

 

Wednesday, July 5, 1899

 

GLASSCO - At his late residence, 194 Hughson street south, on the morning of the 5th inst., Wm. H. Glassco, in his 80th year. Funeral (private) at 2:30 p.m. on Friday.

W.H. Glassco, one of Hamilton’s oldest and most respected citizens, died this morning at his residence, 194 Hughson street south. He had been in good health until January last, when he had an attack of grippe, from the effects he never fully recovered.

The deceased was born in Toronto on July 21, 1819. He was into hat and fur business for a number of years, and removed to Hamilton in 1843. For years he carried on a large and successful business here, retiring about 1886, when he was succeeded by his son, George F. Glassco. Mr. Glassco was always regarded as one of Hamilton’s progressive citizens, and enjoyed a large circle of friends. He was president of the Board of Trade, in 1882 and was a member of the Council at the time of his death. He was also a director of the Hamilton Provident and Loan society. Years ago he held a Commission as Captain in the Field Battery. Mr. Glassco was always a strong Conservative, and the members of the party valued his sound advice. Personally he was a most affable gentleman and in business he was always fair and square in his dealings. He leaves six sons - John T.H.W., George F., Arthur W., Charles B. and Frank S. - and one daughter - Mrs. Campbell Ferrie.

The funeral will be private.

 

GAY - In Buffalo, N.Y., on July 2nd, 1899, at 582 Niagara street, Freda Laurine, dearly beloved daughter of William C. and Eliza A. Gay, aged 6 years, and 3 months. Burial at Forest Lawn cemetery.

 

CORNER - In this city, on July 4th, 1899, John Allen Corner, aged 70 years and 5 months. Funeral, Thursday 2 o’clock p.m. from his late residence, 24 Peter street, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BROWN - In Detroit, John C. Brown, aged 76 years, formerly of this city. Funeral from the residence of his daughter, Mrs. D. Salisbury, 418 Cannon street east, on Thursday at 3 o’clock. Friends please accept this intimation.


POWIS - In this city, on the 4th inst., Frederick Arthur Powis, aged 42. Funeral on Friday afternoon at 4 o’clock, from the family residence, 190 Catharine street south, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

RIDDELL - In this city, on July 4th, 1899, Joseph Riddell, in his 40th year. Funeral on Thursday

at 3:30 from his late residence, 74 East avenue north, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

FENTON - In Toronto on Wednesday, July 5, 1899, Martha Fenton, beloved wife of Robert Fenton of this city, aged 45 years. Funeral from her late residence, 59 McGill street on Friday at 2:30 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

WILSON (Parry Sound ) July 4 - On the night of May 17 last, Jessie Wilson, daughter of John Wilson, who lives on the well-cultivated farm near the junction of the Magnetawan river and Georgian Bay, gave birth to a child. Two days later, her brother Alfred, with the connivance of the mother, purchased a quantity of strychnine and administered it to the babe. John Wilson, the old man, held the infant during its dying struggles, professedly ignorant of what was ailing it, and after its death buried it in a remote corner of the garden.

Shortly after the death of the child, its mother exhibited marked symptoms of insanity, and during this period the concealed facts became known, resulting in an investigation, the apprehension of the brother and sister and their committal to Parry Sound jail on July 1.

Neither of them appeared to realize the position in which they find themselves.

 

Thursday, July 6, 1899

 

GLASSCO - At his late residence 194 Hughson street south, on he morning of the 5th inst., Wm. R. Glassco in his 80th year. Funeral (private) at 2:30 p.m. on Friday.

 

POWIS - In this city on the 4th inst., Frederick Arthur Powis, aged 42. Funeral on Friday afternoon at 4 o’clock from the family residence 190 Catharine street south, to St. Thomas church, thence to Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

FENTON - In Toronto on Wednesday July 5, 1899, Martha Fenton, beloved wife of Robert Fenton of this city, aged 48 years. Funeral from her late residence, 59 McGill street, on Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

Mrs Fenton, wife of Robert Fenton, died yesterday in Toronto from the effects of an operation. The body will be brought to Hamilton for interment. Mrs. Fenton’s death will be regretted by her many friends.

 

STEPHENS - In this city, on Wednesday, 5th July, 1899, James Stephens, a native of Cornwall, England, aged 59 years. Funeral from his late residence, 244 Locke street south, on Friday, at 4 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BOSWELL - Willie Boswell, son of Thomas Boswell, of the Station hotel, Bowmanville, was drowned yesterday. He went out in a canoe with two men, but the craft capsized in the rough water. All three made a desperate struggle, but the boy’s strength gave out.


Friday, July 7, 1899

 

FENTON - In Toronto, on Wednesday, July 5, 1899, Martha Fenton, beloved wife of Robert Fenton, of this city, aged 43 years. Funeral from her late residence 92 McGill street, on Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BURKHOLDER - In Chicago, on Thursday, July 6th, at the residence of his son, David, James Burkholder, formerly of Hamilton, in his 68th year. Funeral Sunday at 2:30 p.m. from Mr. Amos Burkholder’s, Barton, to family burying grounds. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

GREEN - Accidentally drowned at Hamilton Beach on 6th inst., Samuel Seward Green, aged 39 years and 6 months. Funeral Sunday afternoon from the residence of his father, Frank Green, Stony Creek.

When Samuel Green, Charles McCardie, and Hamilton Land left Stony Creek yesterday morning to come to the city with a load of berries, they little thought that when they returned to the village in the evening, one of the party would be missing, gone from this world forever. Such however, was the unfortunate circumstances which surrounded the homecoming of the young men. After selling their berries the three young men decided to go home by way of Fitch’s and enjoy an hour or two fishing on the way. They drove to Fitch’s roadhouse and, securing Mr. Fitch’s boat, started out to try their luck at catching fish. After rowing around for a short time, they pulled in at Dyne’s where they stayed about an hour, and then started back for Fitch’s. When they got into the inlet which leads up to the hotel they again dropped their hooks and allowed the boat to drift. When they got opposite Fletcher’s farm two of the trio started to change places in the boat, which capsized, and threw all of the members of the party into the water. McCardie was the only one who could swim, and as soon as he came to the surface he grabbed the upturned boat and got on top of it. Green came to the surface near McCardie and the latter called to him to catch hold of the boat and climb up. With McCardie’s assistance, he succeeded in getting partly out of the water, but being completely exhausted he fell back and sank, never to rise again. Land, the third member of the party succeeded in catching hold of the boat on arising to the surface the second time, and while he was too far gone to climb out of the water, he succeeded in holding on until assistance arrived.

When McCardie got on top of the upturned boat, he yelled for assistance and Richard Fletcher, hearing his cries; put out in another boat and rescued him from his perilous position. Land was pulled out of the water in an exhausted condition, and some difficulty was experienced in reviving him. It was not until the two were safely ashore that Fletcher learned that a third man was missing, and he went out again to try and find some trace of him. He was unsuccessful and returned to shore to get further assistance. Fletcher, William Depew, and Charles Taafe, secured grappling irons and dragged the inlet and after an hours hard work brought the lifeless body of Green to the surface. Undertaker Green was telephoned for, and went down and brought the body up to the city to be prepared for burial.

The two men who were saved were taken to Fitch’s hotel where their clothes were changed. Doctors Carr and Thompson of Stony Creek were summoned and hurried to the scene and soon had the men sufficiently revived to be taken home. After hearing the circumstances the medical men decided that an inquest was unnecessary.

Samuel Green was the son of Frank Green, the well-known Stony Creek horseman. He was about 33 years of age, and unmarried. At the time of the accident his father was in Windsor and


word was sent to him at once.

The body is now at Green’s undertaking establishment, and will be interred in the Stony Creek on Sunday.

 

WALLER - On July 7th, at her parent’s residence, Bartonville, Ada S., youngest daughter of George Waller, aged 21 years. Funeral Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

Miss Ada Waller, daughter of George Waller, of Bartonville, and sister of Rev. John Waller, died this morning at her home of consumption, after an illness of about two years.

 

IRVINE (Brockville, Ont.) July 7 - Police constable Gerrard Irvine died very suddenly last night. He was standing near the police court at midnight when he complained of a pain in his head, and immediately fell to the ground and expired before medical assistance could be summoned. He was the oldest officer on the force.

 

GLASSCO - The funeral of W. H. Glassco, which was private, took place this afternoon. The pallbearers were the six sons of the deceased. Rev. W.H. Wade conducted the services.

 

POWIS - There was a large attendance of the funeral of the late Frederick A. Powis. The pallbearers were: H. N. Kittson, E.G. Payne, W. Acres, Thos. Barnes, George LaRiche and J.E. Bull. A service was held at the Church of St. Thomas by Rev. W. H. Wade.

 

BOWEN (Delhi Ont.) July 7 - West-bound train 89, engine 67, was wrecked at 1:45 this morning, about two miles east of this station. Driver Frank was instantly killed. His body was found lying between the engine and tender, covered with ties. Fireman Perry and Brakeman Hickinson were badly hurt. Conductor Griffin and the other brakeman, who were in the back coach, escaped uninjured. The engine cab was completely demolished and the remainder of the engine was hurled into the ditch upside down. The tender was turned completely over and four cars were piled up in front of the engine and four behind, all being completely demolished. The track was torn to pieces and the ties were made into toothpicks. The cause of the accident is unknown, but it is supposed that some part of the engine dropped, causing the engine to be lifted and hurled from the track. The condition of the track shows that something had dragged for nearly half a mile.

Bowen’s body was brought to the Delhi station where Undertaker Church was called. Bowen lived at Bridgeburg and leaves a wife and family to mourn his sad and horrible death.

An inquest is not deemed necessary.

When the crew, which was left unhurt, found Fireman Perry, he exclaimed “never mind me; find my mate.”

Dr. R.B. Wells attended the wounded. He reports them in a favourable condition. The wrecking crew from St. Thomas is busily at work clearing the track and it is expected that everything will be cleared by 1 pm.

 

Saturday, July 8, 1899

 

GRIFFIN - At Galt, on July 7th, Mabel Griffin, aged 28 years, daughter of .....Griffin, formerly of Hamilton. Funeral Monday, July 10, from GTR Stuart Street station at 12:30.


WALLER - On July 7, at her parents’ residence, Bartonville, Ada S., youngest daughter of George Waller, aged 23 (?) years. Funeral Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

 

DEAN - In Hamilton, on Friday, July 7th, 1899, C. Morville Dean, aged 16 years and two months, youngest son of W.H. Dean, of this city. Funeral on Monday, July 10th, at 2:30 pm. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

 

GREEN - Accidentally drowned at Hamilton Beach on 6th inst., Samuel Howard Green, aged 29 years and 6 months. Funeral Sunday afternoon at 2 o’clock from the residence of his father, Frank Green to Stony Creek Methodist church for service. Interment at Stony Creek cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this notice.

 

SMITH - Mrs. Smith, mother of ..... Smith, died at West Flamboro on Thursday.

 

TRIPP (Chicago) July 7 - Annie Tripp, 18 years old, committed suicide yesterday morning by taking arsenic in a room of the National Hotel, 28 Van Buren street.

She registered her name “Ida Cunningham” at the hotel office at 1 o’clock yesterday morning. Clerk J.G. Stankey, of the hotel, told the coroner that the girl seemed ill, and when he assisted her to a room, she said: “If anything should happen to me, my true name is Annie Tripp. My parents live at Toronto, Canada. I came to Chicago to find the man who deceived me a year ago at my home. He promised to marry me, but did not keep his promise.”

The dead girl’s sister, Mrs. H.A. Maxwell, lives at 1426 Diversey Avenue. A letter written to the latter by the deceased was introduced in evidence. It was written just previous to taking her life, and reads as follows; “Dear Maggie - Forgive me for killing myself and send for pa at once. Tell him I beg of him to forgive me, and tell him I love him always. Tell Don Golden to forgive me and give my love to all. Your loving chum, ANNIE TRIPP.”

A coroner’s jury returned the verdict of death from arsenic poisoning, self-administered, with suicidal intent.

Miss Tripp was unusually handsome, and her manner and appearance indicated good breeding.

 

DONALD - Donald McDonald, a prominent business man of Dunnville for thirty years, is dead.

 

SERVOS - Miss Amy Servos, of St. Catharines went to bed in good health, was found unconscious during the night and died before morning.

 

GIRARD (Cascade, B.C. Record) July 1 - An unfortunate accident happened Tuesday morning, at one of the Southern Creek Bridges, three miles from town, by which one man, James Girard, lost his life. About 8:30 o’clock, 12 x 12 x 11 battered post was being placed position, when it was noticed to start to fall. Girard, who was near it, jumped, as he thought, to safety, but the heavy timber struck him on the back and head. A messenger was sent post haste to town, three miles away, for surgical aid, but before he got back the poor fellow had expired. He died within fifteen minutes after the accident. Girard, was a young man of 27 years, single, and a native of Arnprior, Ontario, where his people lived.


Monday, July 10, 1899

 

SMALL - In this city, on Monday, July 10th, 1899, George Small, aged 28 years. Funeral from the residence of his aunt, Mrs. L.Foster, Main street west, on Tuesday at 4 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

NIE - In this city, on July 9th, at the residence of her son-in-law, John Patterson, 93 Inchbury street, Sarah Anne, relict of the late William Nie, aged 62 years, and 1 month. Funeral from the above residence, on Wednesday, July 12th, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

After a severe illness of five weeks, Mrs. William Nie, an old and much respected resident, passed away last night at the residence of her son-in-law, John Patterson, 93 Inchbury street.

She was in her 84th year, and with her husband, the late William Nie, came from Leyton, Essex, 46 years ago, since which time she has been a resident of Hamilton. She was much esteemed by all.

She leaves five sons, and two daughters, Mrs. Patterson, and Arthur J. of Hamilton; Mrs. Ross, of Rochester; William, of Toronto; George, of Fenlon Falls; Frank, of Buffalo; and Samuel, of Livingston, Montana.

 

SANFORD (Windemere, Ont.) July 10 - While fishing near his own island this morning at eleven o’clock, Senator Sanford, in company with a young lady visitor, was upset.

Two young girls nearby heard their calls for help. When they arrived they managed to save the young lady. Seeing the Senator’s body which could easily be reached with an oar, they managed to get it to shore, but were unable to resuscitate him. They then crossed the bay to Mr. Baker’s island for help. Mr. Baker immediately sent to Windemere for medical aid. Doctor Cotton, of Toronto

left at once for the Senator’s place, but when he reached there it was too late to render any assistance.

 

GREEN - The funeral of Samuel Green, who was drowned in the bay on Thursday, took place from his late home in Stony Creek yesterday afternoon. The funeral was the largest known during the history of Stony Creek. Fully 2,000 people viewed the remains and the funeral procession was nearly a mile long. Service was held in the Methodist church by Rev. Mr. Davey. The building was packed and hundreds of people were unable to get inside, and stood around the outside. The floral tributes were numerous and beautiful.

 

CHAMBERS (Aylmer, Ont.) July 10 - This morning about 11 o’clock a sad drowning accident occurred at S. Pierce’s mill pond about a mile east of here, the victim being Pemberton Chambers.

 

WALSH (Toronto) July 10 - William Walsh, who met with a railway accident at Strathroy on Friday evening, which resulted in the amputation of his leg, has succumbed to his injuries. The remains were brought to Toronto on Saturday.

 


McMANUS (St. Catharines) July 9 - Daniel McManus, ex-bandmaster of the Nineteenth battalion died at his home here yesterday morning. Sgt. McManus’ career has been an interesting one. He was born at Caledon, County of Tyrone, Ireland, 62 years ago, and when a mere boy joined the regular army, and went to the Crimea. He was in the siege of Sebastopol, the battles of Alma, Inkerman, and Balaclava, and was an eyewitness of the celebrated Charge of the Light Brigade. His breast was adorned with several medals, one in defence of the flag in the Crimea, and recounted many strange experiences of the war. After the Crimea he went to India, and was present in many of the battles of the mutiny, being a member of the army that marched to the relief of Lucknow.

Following these troublous times, Mr. McManus returned to England, and lived in quiet until his retirement from the ranks, in which he won honour and distinction. He came to Canada in 1890, and settled in St. Catharines. In the following year he was appointed bandmaster of the Nineteenth battalion, having held several such positions in England, and held that office till a few years ago, when he was compelled to resign owing to his failing health.

 

McINTYRE - John McIntyre, a well-known resident of Fort William, died yesterday, aged 84.

 

SNEATH - John B. Sneath, aged 63, formerly a G.T.R baggage man, died in the London hospital on Friday after virtually starving himself to death. He attempted suicide a fortnight ago, and, on being adjudged insane, refused all food except milk.

 

HOPKIRK - Thomas Hopkirk, of Toronto, after an illness of four months, died yesterday afternoon. For 20 years he was a conductor on the Grand Trunk railway. For a number of years he was a

conductor on the C.P.R., but for the past five years has been travelling for the Don Brewing company. He was 51.

 

WALLER - The funeral of the late Miss Ada Waller, daughter of George Waller, Bartonville, took place yesterday afternoon at 2 o’clock. The rector, Rev. C.E. Belt, assistant by Rev. C.E. Whitcombe, a former rector, conducted the service in St. Mary’s church. The altar was vested in white. Rev. Mr. Belt, in his sermon, spoke of the loss the church had sustained by the death of

Miss Waller, who was one of its most earnest workers. The floral tributes were beautiful and included gates ajar, sent by the Y.P.S.W.W., of which deceased was a zealous member.

 

Tuesday, July 11, 1899

 

SANFORD (Windemere, Ont.,) July 10 - While out fishing this morning near his own island, Senator Sanford, of Hamilton, was upset from his boat and drowned. The senator was out with Miss Dowry, a guest at his house. The senator found some difficulty in lifting the anchor of his boat, and was about to leave it, when in turning around he lost his balance, upsetting the boat, precipitating both himself and Miss Dowry into the water. Miss Dowry caught a life belt which the senator made a practice of carrying with him, and succeeded in keeping herself up. She tried to hold the senator, but the strain was too much, and he sank, only rising twice, each time beyond the young lady’s reach.

On hearing the cries for help, Miss Knight, a domestic in the senator’s employ, went to the spot and rescued the lady, but could see nothing of the senator. Taking Miss Dowry to shore, about a hundred yards, she got her sister and returned. They found the senator in a standing position with his hands placed on a rock, his head about eighteen inches under water, and about six feet from shore. They raised the body and took it to shore. They went to Mr. Baker’s on Florence Island for help.

All the men on the island being away gathering moss for the senator, Mr. Baker at once rode to T. Eaton’s. He immediately got his yacht and came for Dr. Cotton of Toronto. Dr, Cotton, on arriving, found it was too late to render any assistance. Several people had already worked for some time trying to resuscitate the body, which was supposed not to have been in the water more than half an hour.


Mrs. Sanford and her two daughters are at present in Germany, and were about to sail for Canada, and spend some time at their island. Mrs. E. Jackson Sanford, with some other friends, is visiting the senator.

The Sanford yacht has left for Gravenhurst, where an embalmer from Toronto will be met. The remains will be taken to Hamilton tomorrow for burial. Much sympathy is expressed by all the visitors at this place, as Senator Sanford was so well and favourably known.BURKHOLDER - The funeral of David Burkholder, who died recently in Chicago, took place Sunday afternoon from his boyhood home in Barton. A very large number of relatives and friends gathered to pay their last respects. The pall-bearers were the nephews of the deceased. The singing was led by the nieces of  the deceased. Rev. Mr. Mooney, of Bartonville, conducted the services, choosing for the basis of his address at the church the first six verses of the fourteenth chapter of John. Mr. Burholder was interred in the Burkholder burying ground, in which the first to be placed was an uncle, 104 years ago. The deceased was in his 68th year, and leaves a widow and three children, of whom two live in Chicago, and one is a member of the staff of the Ladies College, of Whitby.

 

WILLIAMS (Toronto) July 11 - Thomas Williams, a bricklayers labourer, fell 45 feet yesterday morning and died four hours after in the emergency hospital from the terrible injuries he received.

He was working on the building now being erected on East Front street, for Gowans, Kent & Co. His particular duty was to assist in running the derrick used to hoist large blocks of stone to the top, for they would be placed in position.

When the accident happened, Williams was standing at the base of the derrick.It is said the men below attached a block to heavy to the chains, and the derrick toppled over.

In the crash that followed, Williams was knocked off his feet and hurled to the ground. He was picked up by his fellow-workmen and removed to the hospital in the ambulance.

His injuries consisted of a dislocated hip and shoulder blade, besides numerous other bruises about his body.

He was 41 years of age, and had only been married about four months.

 

DONALDSON - Miss Donaldson, daughter of Hugh Donaldson, died today. The body will be taken to Dundee, Que., for interment.

 

Wednesday, July 12, 1899

 

POTTS - In this city on Tuesday, July 11th, 1899, Dr. Robert Burns Montgomery Potts, aged 56 years. Funeral from his late residence 218 King street west, on Thursday at 4 p.m., to G.T.R. Stuart street station. Interment at Mount Pleasant cemetery, Toronto, on Friday at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will accept this intimation.

Dr. Robert B.M. Potts, 218 King street west, died at the city hospital yesterday evening. He was taken ill on Saturday last suffering from appendicitis. He was advised to have an operation performed, but put it off until yesterday morning. He never recovered from the shock.

The deceased was about 56 years of age, and was born at Oakville. He taught school for some time, and then went to Toronto University where he received the degree of B.A. He practised

medicine for some time at Essex, where he married a daughter of Dr. Pascoe. He removed to Hamilton about two years ago, and has made many friends since he came here. He was a member of Acacia Lodge, A.F. and A.M., Orange Lodge No. 779, Court Oronhyatekha, I.O.F.: Hamilton Lodge, A.O.U.W.; council No. 1, C.O.O.F.: Court Mapleleaf, A.O.F.: Hearts of Oak, S.O.E., and

Regina tent, K.O.T.M. The remains will be taken to Toronto for internment.


CHISHOLM - Suddenly on the twelve instant, Robert Chisholm of this city, builder, a native of Watten, Caithnesshire, Scotland, in his 75th year. Funeral from his late residence, 278 Main street west, at 3 p.m. on Friday, 14th instant. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Robert Chisholm, who has been a resident of Hamilton over 50 years, dropped dead this morning in front of Ryerson school on Queen street east. He was hurrying to catch a seven o’clock train for Dundas, being superintendent of construction at the new rifle ranges, when death came so suddenly. About five weeks ago he fell while getting over a fence, and injured his spine near the neck. After about two or three weeks treatment at his home, 278 Main street west, he resumed his  work at the ranges, and since then had been in poor health.

Those who saw Mr. Chisholm fall this morning immediately sent for Dr. Metherall, but he could nothing as death had evidently been instantaneous from heart failure. Coroner White was called and he decided that an inquest was unnecessary.

The deceased was in his 75th year, and was a native of Waten Caithnesshire, Scotland. He came to Canada in 1848, settling in Hamilton, and had lived here ever since. A few years later his brother William came to this city and the two carried on an extensive carpenter and building business. Dissolving partnership in 1868, Robert continued the building business, while William gave his attention to lumber. The deceased gave up active business about twenty years ago.

Since then, he acted as superintendent of construction at the Mimico, Brockville, and Hamilton asylum, and at the time of his death had charge of the work at the new rifle ranges.

In the 60's, deceased was prominent in municipal affairs, commencing in 1864 he was an

alderman for fifteen years, a portion of the time being chairman of finance. On three occasions

he ran for mayoral, but failed to reach the chair.

Mr. Chisholm was one of the original members of MacNab Presbyterian church, while he held no official position, he was a faithful attender at the services. The deceased was a member of St. John’s lodge, A.F. and A.M. and was for years a most active member.

The deceased leaves a daughter, Mr. Cormack, who lived with him, and a son James, Mrs.

Donald Nicholson, city, and Mrs. Edward Tinsley, Toronto, are sisters of deceased. James Chisholm of Chisholm & Logie, is a nephew. The funeral will take place on Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock.

 

ELLIS - In this city on the 11th inst., at the residence of his son-in-law, H.T. Eager, D.G. Ellis, broker. Funeral from 86 Wentworth street south, Thursday at 1:15 p.m.

 

SANFORD - At Sans Soucie Island, in Lake Rousseau, by accidental drowning, on Monday, July 10th, 1899, Hon. W,E. Sanford, of Hamilton, Ontario, in the 61st year of his age. Funeral on Thursday, July 13, 1899, at 2:30 p.m., from the family residence, to Hamilton cemetery.

 

BEGG - Mrs. Hugh Begg, of Cardinal, Ont., while lighting a fire with coal oil, was burned to death.

 

O’REILLY (Brantford, Ont.) July - The express man, when driving to Brantford on the Paris road last night, found a man in a critical condition lying on the roadway. He put him in his wagon and brought him to Brantford, where he had expired before reaching here. The body was that of O’Reilly a cigarmaker. It is said O’Reilly and another young man were out driving last evening, and reports of foul play are in circulation. The young man is now in the cells. An investigation will be held.

 

COUSINS - James M. Cousins, ex-mayor of London, died yesterday evening.


RYALL - W.H. Ryall, proprietor of the Scott House, Leamington, died very suddenly yesterday. He had been ailing for some time, but had been able to be around.

 

HOUSTON (Bayfield, Ont.) July 11 - A son of Mr. Houston, principal of the high school at Clinton, one of a picnic party, was drowned while in bathing today. He got beyond his depth, and before assistance could reach him was drowned. His body was found 25 minutes after, too late to be revived. He was fourteen years old.

 

BURNS (Collingwood) July 11 - Today the body of John Burns, teamster, was found in the harbour at the end of the town wharf. He had been missing since Saturday, and was supposed to have been drowned, as he was last seen going toward the bay. He is said to have been intoxicated. He leaves a wife and eight children, the eldest being but fifteen years of age.

 

SANFORD - The remains of the late Senator Sanford now lie in his former beautiful home Westanford, to await the funeral, which will take place to the city cemetery tomorrow afternoon at 2:30. The melancholy party accompanying the remains from Muskoka arrived in the city last

evening about 7 o’clock by the express from Toronto. There were in the party Mrs. E. Jackson Sanford, Miss Dowry, W. Sanford Alley, and W. Sanford Evans, of Toronto, and Rev. George F. Salton.

 

Thursday, July 13, 1899

 

ROUTH - On Wednesday 12th July, 1899, John Tempest Routh, son of the late Capt. Henry Routh, of the 15th Hussars, in the 62nd year of his age. Funeral from his residence, No. 94 Herkimer street, at 8:30 a.m. Friday, 14th inst., to St. Mary’s Cathedral, thence to the cemetery at the Holy Sepulchre

John T. Routh of the firm of Routh & Payne, insurance agents, died at 5:30 yesterday afternoon, having being ill with Bright’s disease for four months.

The deceased was born on the ship Reliance, off the Azores in 1838, being a son of Capt. Henry Routh of the Fifteenth Hussars. He came to Canada in 1858 and was clerk with the hardware firm of R. Juson & Co. He left for East India in 1862. In 1864 he married Pharine Eleanor Forbes, of Purneah, East India. He returned to Canada in 1869 and then went on a trip to Texas, Mexico and other places. In 1879 he returned to Hamilton, and has since has lived here. He entered into partnership with Mr. Payne in 1894.

Mr. Routh was formerly a member of the separate school board, and at the time of his death was a member of the Public Library Board, being an ex-chairman of that body. In politics he was a Conservative.

By the death of Mr. Routh Hamilton loses a good citizen, an honest upright man. He was most affable, a man who enjoyed a large circle of friends, a man who appreciated his worth. The funeral will take place tomorrow morning to St. Mary’s Cathedral. As a mark of respect to the memory of Mr. Routh, the public library will be closed tomorrow morning reopening at noon. The members of the library board with meet at 8:15 to attend the funeral.

 

BARNES - J.W. Barnes, a patient at the asylum, died at that institution yesterday. His remains will be shipped to Palmerston, for interment.


POTTS - The remains of the late Dr. Potts were shipped to Toronto this afternoon where interment will take place tomorrow. A short service, conducted by Rev. W.F. Wilson, was held at the deceased residence, 218 King street west. The pall-bearers were members of Acacia lodge, A.F.and A.N., of which the late doctor was a member.

 

ELLIS - The funeral of the late D.G. Ellis took place this afternoon and was largely attended. Rev. John Young conducted the service, and the pall-bearers were, R.T. Steele, Alexander McKay, —Shirk, C.A. Leaney, A.R. McFarlane, T.J. Doak, W.R. Balfour, and W.G. Reid.

 

McCOY (Marmora, Ont.) July 13 - May McCoy, sixteen years of age, while working in the garden at her home on Thursday morning last, July 6th, died suddenly. The girl had arisen at her usual hour, and harnessed the horses and got the breakfast, and then after doing some other work, had gone out into the garden to hoe. At ten-thirty she fell in a fit and died. The Coroner was called, and making an investigation found a bottle of strychnine in the house. Notwithstanding, no action was taken and the body was allowed to be buried. Yesterday, however, the body was exhumed, and a post-mortem examination was held. A corner’s jury was empanelled, which met last night. After some evidence had been taken an adjournment to allow of further investigation being made.

 

JONES - Frank Jones, aged eighteen, was fatally injured in a saw mill at Odessa yesterday.

 

BEGG - Mrs. Hugh Begg was fatally burned at Cardinal yesterday through using coal oil to light the fire.

 

LUKE - John W. Luke, a well-known farmer of Thurlow township, died suddenly yesterday at the age of 72.

 

CLEMINSHAW July 12 - A young Orangeman, William Cleminshaw, of Britton, Ontario, who was here attending the celebration today was accidentally killed by the train from Stratford, due here at 3:05 p.m. He jumped on a loaded coal car as the train was passing slowly through the Y over William street, and rode to Main street, jumping off and on the car several times between the two streets. When the train stopped at the north end of the yard to back down to the station, he fell off in some manner, and was instantly killed by the train passing over him. The coroner was on the ground in a few minutes and secured the names of witnesses. An inquest will be held tonight. The sad affair cast a gloom over the celebration. The young man’s sister and brother were here with him for the day and recognized the remains.

 

BRETT (Toronto) July 13 - Louis Brett, son of James Brett, who lives near Kinghorn, King Township, died suddenly on Monday afternoon while pitching hay. “Do I look pale”? were the last words uttered by the deceased, the remark being made to a hired man, who was on the load, after which Brett fell back and expired. Medical examination showed death to be due to heart failure.

 

CHISHOLM - Yesterday ex-Ald Robert Chisholm died very suddenly and this morning his daughter-in-law, wife of James Chisholm, was unexpectedly taken away. The deceased had not been ill anytime at all, heart disease being the cause of death.


CHISHOLM - Suddenly on the 13th inst., Maggie Pettit, beloved wife of James Chisholm, aged 44 years. Funeral from her late residence 16 Strachan street. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

Friday, July 14, 1899

 

CHISHOLM - Suddenly on the 13th inst., Maggie Pettit, beloved wife of James Chisholm, aged 44 years. Funeral from her late residence 16 Strachan street, on Saturday at 3 o’clock.

 

RUTHVEN - At his residence Rochester, N.Y., July 13th, Christian W. Ruthven, eldest son of the late Peter Ruthven, and brother of Andrew R. Ruthven of this city.

 

BENNETTS - On the 13th inst., at Greensville, accidentally drowned, Edward Arthur Bennetts. Funeral from the parsonage, Greensville, Saturday at 10 a.m.

Edward Arthur Bennetts, son of Rev. Samuel Bennetts, aged seven years, was drowned this afternoon at Greensville, where his parents had recently settled. The young lad and a companion were fishing in Cockburn’s mill pond. The boy was standing on the apron of the dam which, owing to the lowness of the water in the pond was dry. Evidently he slipped or stumbled off and fell into the pool below. His companion ran to the mill and gave the alarm. The body was soon recovered.

Dr. Smith of Dundas, was telephoned for. The doctor made all possible haste, and worked for an hour but life was extinct. The doctor thinks the body was in the water fifteen or twenty minutes.

Rev. Mr. Bennetts is the English church clergyman at Greensville, having succeeded Mr. MacWilliams., at the beginning of the present month.

The drowned lad was an only son.

 

NEWCOMB - In this city, on July 12th, 1899, Julia Margaret Newcomb, aged 43 years. Funeral from 88 Wellington street north, on Saturday at 2 o’clock. Interment at Waterdown cemetery.

Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

LINNEBORN - In this city, on July 13th, 1899, Agnes Wagner, beloved wife of Henry Linneborn, aged 33 years. Funeral on Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock from her husband’s residence, 114 Augusta street, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

KLEIN (Berlin, Ont.) July 14 - A horrible fatality occurred in the G.T.R. yards here this morning, about 9 o’clock. John Klein, who had been engaged in smoking lumber for H.J. Hall, was in the act of crossing the track to get a drink when he was caught between cars, which were being shunted and crushed to death.

 

QUINLAN (Barrie) July 13 - William Quinlan, a well-known and well-to-do farmer whose home is on the tenth concession of Vespra, a few miles from this town was struck down with awful suddenness last evening.

He was on a visit to his brother, County Commissioner, D. Quinlan. Supper was over and the brothers were standing engaged in conversation, when suddenly William reeled and fell heavily to the ground. He was hastily picked up, but before he could be carried into the house, he had ceased to breathe. It is believed the farmer had over-exerted himself in the fields, and this induced an attack of apoplexy.


O’REILLY (Brantford, Ont.) July 13 - A good deal of light was let in upon the mysterious tragedy on the Paris road yesterday morning, in which James O’Reilly lost his life, when at the inquest held this afternoon several witnesses told their stories. The principal evidence was that given by James Sheppard, of Ayr, the driver of the Dominion Express Wagon, who was on the road at the time the tragedy occurred. Sheppard swore that he was driving towards Brantford, when he overtook a man walking on the road who asked him for a ride. The man was Thomas Cunningham, and he said that he and O’Reilly had been driving from Paris when their buggy broke down. O’Reilly had then told Cunningham, and he would ride the horse into town. These facts were born out when a little further on the road, the wagon overtook O’Reilly on horseback. The rider was having some trouble with his horse, but the others did not think there was any danger, and did not pay much attention to him, and he shortly after fell behind. A few moments later the runaway took place, when the horse tore past the express wagon as a man tangled in the lines dragging behind.

Half a mile further on men in the wagon discovered O’Reilly’s lifeless body lying on the roadside.

The inquest was adjourned until Monday. It now looks as if Cunningham’s strange actions and in fact, the whole tragedy was due to a drunken spree.

 

ORTWEIN (Gravenhurst) July 13 - A fatal accident happened last night in the vicinity of Kilworthy, when Fred Ortwein, clerk in Mr. Semple’s store at Sparrow Lake, lost his life. Mr. Ortwein was walking with the Misses Semple on the track, and when the excursion drew in sight Mr. Ortwein stepped to one side, the young ladies taking the other. As the train approached Mr. Ortwein went to cross over to the side where the girls were on, but misjudged the distance, and the train struck him breaking his neck and leg, also fracturing his cheek bone.

 

ANGER (Welland) July 13 - A heavy thunder storm passed over this section early yesterday morning, lightning striking George Anger’s residence at Sherkston and killing Mr. Anger and rendering Mrs. Anger and Miss Jennie Beam both unconscious. The lightning ran down the stove pipe through the stove and through the wall into the next room, where Mr. Anger was sleeping. Entering one foot, it ran up to his head and down again. He was killed instantly. Mrs. Anger soon recovered but Miss Beam is badly injured. The chimney of the electric light station was also struck, without much damage being done.

 

MILLS - John A. Mills, who was for about twenty years a tax collector for Toronto, died suddenly from heart trouble yesterday.

 

ROUTH - The funeral of the late John T. Routh took place from his late residence, Herkimer street, this morning, and was largely attended. The body was taken to St. Mary’s Cathedral where high mass was said by Rev. Father Maurrent, of Lindsay. Revs. Father Mahony, O’Reilly, and Holden assisted in the service. At the grave Rev. Father Mahony officiated. The members of the public library board, and separate school board attended in a body. The pall-bearers were: Lieut. Col. Moore, E. Furlong, James Shea, F.H. Whitton, John Ronan, and J. Stewart. Special music was sung by the choir.

 

CHISOLM - The remains of the late ex-Ald. Robert Chisholm were interred today. A. large number of mourners followed the cortege to the grave. Rev. Dr. Lyle conducted the service at the house and grave, and the pall-bearers were members of the Masonic Order.


Saturday, July 15, 1899

 

LINNEBORN - In this city, on July 13th, 1899, Agnes Wagner, beloved wife of Henry Linneborn,

aged 35 years. Funeral on Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock from her husband’s residence, 114 Augusta street, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

RICKETTS - In this city, on Friday, 14th July, 1899, of congestion of the lungs, Dashwood Ricketts, late of Leamington, England, aged 80 years. Funeral (private) - from his brother’s residence, No. 250 Main street west, Sunday, at 2:30 p.m.

Dashwood Ricketts died at St. Joseph’s hospital yesterday afternoon. The deceased was about 30 years of age, and was a brother of C.W. Ricketts.

 

DALY - In this city, on Friday, 14th July, 1899, Timothy Daly, aged 58 years. Funeral from his late residence, No. 38 Woodbine Crescent, Sunday at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Timothy Daly, Woodbine Crescent, died last night in the jail, where he had been confined for the past couple of weeks awaiting examination on a charge of insanity. The doctor’s made out a certificate stating that Daly was insane, but his health was otherwise good. About 5 o’clock yesterday afternoon he became brighter than usual and talked freely with his attendants. About half an half later he was taken to the lavatory by one of the jailers. When the official returned for Daly he found him lying on the floor gasping for breath. Assistance was called and Dr. Balfe was summoned, but before he arrived Daly’s spirit had passed from this world forever. The cause of death was heart trouble.

As is usual when a man dies in the jail, an inquest was held this morning. Dr. Philp was Coroner and the jurors where; Robert Wood, H.J. McGregor, Neil Robertson, John Springg. Albert Ardiel, John Mapleback, Robert Stonehouse, James Barry, James McCarthy, John Watt, James Ballett, George Wellwood, and T.S.T. Steinhouse, the last six named being prisoners. After hearing the evidence of Dr. Balfe, and the jail officials, the jury came to the conclusion that Daly came to his death by natural causes, and rendered a verdict in accordance with the evidence. Constable C.C. Myers had charge of the inquest.

The deceased was a member of Commercial lodge, C.O.F. and that body will have charge of the funeral.

 

IVES (Ottawa) July 15(Special) - Hon. W.B. Ives died at 11:30 o’clock this morning. Death took place at St. Luke’s hospital at 11:40 from haemorrhage of the brain. He never regained consciousness. Deceased wife, Mr. Pope M.P., Mrs. Pope and deceased’s nephew, Mr. Ives of Montreal, were present, besides Dr. Powell, the consulting physician of St. Luke’s hospital. The body will be taken to Sherbrooke for interment this afternoon at 2:10 by C.P.R.

Hon. W.B. Ives, was born in the township of Compton, Quebec, on Nov. 17, 1841. He has been a member of the house of commons since 1878. He was minister of trade and commerce in the Thompson, Bowell, and Tupper administrations.

 

MAXWELL, HANNAH (Bancroft) July 14 - A most distressing drowning accident occurred at Long lake, in Mayo township, early yesterday morning, the victim’s being Miss Ella Maxwell, daughter of James Maxwell, who resides a short distance from Bancroft, and a young man named Albert Hannah, who lived in the vicinity of the lake. Some sort of a religious meeting was in progress, and the couple went out on the lake for a sail in a small boat. The water was pretty rough


and in turning around, Miss Maxwell lost her balance and fell overboard. Her companion in his efforts to save her, upset the boat and the waters closed over both of them.

The young lady’s brother and Hannah’s father witnessed the accident from the shore, but were unable to render any assistance. The bodies were in the water about four hours before they were recovered.

 

McGRAW - Mrs. Catharine McGraw died at her home, 119 DeGrasai street, Toronto, on Friday. Deceased, who was 60 years of age, had resided in Toronto nearly all her life.

 

SEAPLES - William Seaples, of Stirling, Ontario, was instantly killed last evening by falling off a load of hay. He leaves a widow and one son and two daughters to mourn his loss.

 

CROSBY - Anthony G. Crosby, of Chicago, died on Friday in Toronto general hospital, after a three weeks’ illness with typhoid fever. Deceased was visiting his brother when he was taken ill.

 

BONE - One of the oldest and most respected residents of St. Catharines passed away on Friday in the person of Agnes Matthews, wife of Rev. Thomas Bone. Deceased was born in Haddington, Scotland, and came with her husband to St. Catharines 46 years ago, where she has resided ever since.

 

Monday, July 17, 1899

 

McKENDRIE - In this city, on Sunday, 16th July, 1899, Clara McKendrie, relict of the late John McKendrie, aged 64 years. Funeral from her late residence, No. 208 John street north, Tuesday, at 2:30 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

FOX - In this city, on July 17th, Millie Fox, youngest daughter of Jrusis and the late John Fox. Funeral on Wednesday, the 19th inst., from 97 Florence street at 4 o’clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DALY - There was a good turnout at the funeral of Timothy Daly yesterday. It was attended by a number of members of Commercial lodge, C.O.F.

 

BISSONNETTE - The funeral of the late Francis Bissonnette took place this morning and was attended by members of branches 37, and 234, C.M.B.A. The remains were taken to St. Mary’s cathedral where mass was said by Rev. Father Mahoney. Rev. Father Holden officiated at the grave. The pall-bearers were three C.M.B.A. members and three lineman.

 

STEVENSON (Russell, Ontario) July 17 - John Stevenson, a prominent farmer and Forester, was accidentally drowned in a well here this morning. He was taking up a can of milk and it is supposed he slipped in head first. When found a short time afterwards life was extinct.

 

SHIBLEY - The remains of H.T. Shibley, barrister, drowned in Salmon lake, near Kingston last fall, were recovered Saturday night. The body was identified by means of a watch and chain.


HAINER - The two-year-old son of George Hainer, who lives on R.W. Gregory’s farm in Louth, fell into the well. His mother heard his screams, but could not get into the well, and by the time she got help the little fellow was dead.

 

McCOY - At the inquest to inquire into the death of the sixteen-year-old daughter of James McCoy, of Marmora, who is supposed to have poisoned herself with strychnine, Laura Maybee (nine-year-old daughter) of Mrs. McCoy was called and questioned but not under oath. She said; “I never was to school. Do not know there is a God. The preacher never visited our house. I can’t read or write.”

 

NOTT (Peterborough, Ont.) July 16 - James Nott, of Chemong Indian reserve, was drowned at the entrance to Buckhorn lake. The little fellow was only five years old, with his brothers, aged eight and ten respectively , and a sister, aged 14, were up the stream picking berries, and on return attempted to shoot the rapids, with the result that the boat upset and all were thrown into the water in the midst of the rapids. The little fellow was drowned before help could come, and it was with difficulty the others were rescued.

 

ANSTEY - Yesterday afternoon a telegram was received by Wm. Anstey, foreman of the city water works department, stating that his son William had died in the general hospital in Toronto. Mr. Anstey had not heard from his son for some years, although he understood that he was living in

Toronto. He was a married man. It is not known what was the cause of death, and today Albert Anstey, a brother of deceased, went to Toronto to look after the remains.

 

Tuesday, July 18, 1899

 

FOX - In this city, on July 17th, Millie Fox, youngest daughter of Jrusia and the late John Fox. Funeral on Wednesday, 19th inst., from 27 Florence street, at 4 o’clock. Friends will please accept this information.

 Therein the Shepherd’s

 White as the drifted snow,

 Is our dear one we missed one morn

 From the household flock below

Miss Millie Fox died yesterday at the residence of her mother on Florence street, having being ill for some months. She was a most estimable young lady, and her death is deeply regretted by her many friends. The boys of her Sunday school class in Zion Tabernacle will act as pall-bearers at the funeral tomorrow afternoon.

 

LINKE - In this city, on July 17th, Anna Elizabeth Hedwig Linke, youngest daughter of Prof. Robt. and Matilda Linke. Funeral Wednesday, July 19th, from 23 Canada street at 1:30 o’clock.

 

WHITNEY - Mr. Whitney, collector of customs at Clinton, died yesterday morning.

 

ISAACS(Cobourg) July 17 - About 8 o’clock Sunday morning William Isaacs, a well-known and popular young business man, dropped dead at his residence on University avenue. He had not been in very good health for a couple of months, but attended to business duties up to the time of his decease and was at his place in the store on Saturday. Mr. Isaacs was a son of Sylvester Isaacs, Haldimand township. He leaves a young widow, nee Miss Edith Dawkins, Port Hope, to whom he was married about two years ago.


O’REILLY (Brantford, Ont.) July 17 - The inquest on the body of the late James O’Reilly, who was killed on the Paris road on Wednesday last by being dragged by a runaway horse, today returned a verdict that the death was purely accidental. Thomas Cunningham, O’Reilly’s companion whose strange story of the affair led to his arrest was discharged.

 

Wednesday, July 19, 1899

 

CHAPPLE - On July 18, Sarah Frances (Sadie) Chapple, second daughter of George and Martha Chapple, aged 10 years, and 2 months. Funeral from the family residence, Barton street east, Thursday, July 20, at 2 o’clock p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

Miss Sarah Chapple, daughter of George Chapple, Barton street east, died yesterday afternoon. She had an operation performed on her for appendicitis yesterday morning, and never recovered from the shock.

 

MYLES - In this city, on Tuesday 18th July, 1899, Lizzie Myles, aged 20 years. Funeral from her mother’s residence, No. 17 Caroline street north, Thursday at 2 p.m.

 

CRAWFORD - On July 19th, 1899, Elizabeth Crawford, age 87 years. Funeral from her late residence 47 Elgin street, on Friday, the 21st inst., at 3 p.m. Funeral private.

 

BALLARD - This morning at DuBois, P.A., Aline Ballard, only daughter of George B. Ballard aged 17 years and 9 months.

 

SILLS, PHILLIPS (Bracebridge, Ont.) July 19 - Yesterday morning two Toronto ladies, Miss Sills, an invalid, and her nurse Miss Phillips, who had been residing for some time with T. Burgess, of Bala, went down the river in a rowboat. They ventured too near the mouth of the Moon chute, and the current, being very strong, they were swept down the chute.

A party, going down the river in a boat, saw their danger, but was too far from them to render any assistance. The boat, cushions, oars, etc., were found at the foot of the rapids, but there were no signs of the unfortunate occupants. The place where the accident happened is very dangerous, the current being very swift and strong, and strangers should never venture near without a guide. This is only one of a number of similar accidents which have happened at the chute.

 

CLARK - Mrs. John Clark, widow, of Tilbury, aged about 80 years, was killed by a shunting engine on the M.C.R., while crossing the track opposite the station yesterday afternoon.

 

GERVIN - The death is reported at Amherst Island, Ont., of a leading resident, Charles Gervin, after a short illness. Five weeks ago he attended his father’s funeral, contracted a cold, and died yesterday.

 

HAYDEN - This morning Larry Hayden, a Dundas labourer got up as usual to go to work. When he was dressing himself he fell down and was dead before medical aid could be summoned. Heart disease was the cause of death.

The deceased lived with his sister and had been a resident of the town for a number of years.


Thursday, July 20, 1899

 

CRAWFORD - On July 19th, 1899, Elizabeth Crawford, aged 87 years. Funeral from her late residence, 47 Elgin street, on Friday, the 21st inst., at 2 p.m. Funeral private.

 

THOMAS - At Welland, on Thursday, July 20, Ethel McMillan, beloved wife of G.L. Thomas. Funeral notice later.

A telegram was received from Welland today announcing the death of Mrs. Lloyd Thomas, nee Miss Ethel McMillan. The deceased was taken ill yesterday morning, but her illness was not considered serious. She kept getting worse, however, and died this morning.

The deceased was married seven or eight weeks ago, and her death was a terrible shock to her friends.

 

SHORER (Westover) - The funeral of the late Mrs. George Shorer, to the Baptist cemetery on Friday last was largely attended.

 

THORPE, BOURDEAN - H. Thorpe, age 14, was lost by the upsetting of his canoe at Rat Portage, and Joseph Bourdean, porter on the steamer Keenora, fell from the boat at Little Falls, Rainy River. The body of the latter has not yet been recovered.

 

SARGEANT (Brantford, Ont.) July 19 - Death came with terrible suddenness to Miss Julia

Sargeant, a widowed lady who resided in Brantford township, five miles east of this city. Mrs. Sargeant, who was 71 years of age, had enjoyed good health all her life, and was as well as usual yesterday. Last evening she was sitting at supper with her family, and had just been handed a plate of berries, and put them down before her, when, suddenly, her head dropped forward, and she fell off the chair to the floor and was dead before anyone could reach her. Heart failure was the cause.

 

SMITH - An old and respected resident of Glanford, Mrs. Maria L. Smith, passed away last Saturday evening. On Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock many relatives and friends gathered at her late residence to pay the last respects. After the usual ceremony at the house, the funeral cortege made its way to the Bowman where the funeral service was held. The high esteem in which the deceased was held was evidenced by the large attendance. Rev. Mr. Collins conducted the services which were of a deeply impressive character, and was assisted by Rev. Mr. Mooney of Bartonville. The deceased was 76 years of age. Her husband, Elijah Smith, died some 30 years ago. She leaves one daughter Mrs. Alexander Marshall, and one son E.J. Smith, both of Glanford. The pall-bearers were; J.W. Forester, Russell Gage, Wesley Spohn, William Marshall, George Binkley, and Henry Bird.

 

FOX - The funeral of Miss Millie Fox took place yesterday afternoon from her mother’s residence, Florence street. The services were conducted by T. Albert Moore, F. Coleman, and Dr. Clark. The pall-bearers were; E. Newson, S. Tribute, J. Danforth, W. Plater, F. Reeves, and R. Montgomery, all members of the deceased’s Sunday school class.

 

Friday, July 21, 1899

 

THOMAS - At Welland, on July 20, 1899, Ethel McMillan, beloved wife of Lloyd Thomas, and daughter of R. and Sarah McMillan. Funeral from her parent’s residence, 296 Park street north,


Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

The body of the late Mrs. Lloyd Thomas, of Welland, was brought to the city this morning, and will be buried tomorrow afternoon, the funeral taking place from her parents’ residence, 238 Park street north. Mrs. Thomas was a daughter of Roderick (Robert) McMillan, G.T.R. tie inspector. Mr. Thomas is a Hamilton man, and formerly was employed by the John Calder company. The following notice of the sad affair is from the Welland telegraph.

A very sad death took place on Thursday about 1:15 a.m. when Ethel, beloved wife of George L. Thomas, passed away. On Tuesday morning Mrs. Thomas complained of a slight pain in the chest and was advised to stay in bed. When Mr. Thomas returned home at noon she was much worse, and a doctor was at once summoned, who gave her every treatment, but no effect, until 5 o’clock, when she went into convulsions. From that time until death released her Thursday morning she was unconscious nearly all the time. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas are both of Hamilton, and have not been married quite a year. When R.B. Jermyn opened his gents’ furnishing store here, Mr. Thomas took the position of clerk.

 

CRAWFORD - The funeral of the late Mrs. Elizabeth Crawford took place this afternoon from deceased residence, 47 Elgin street. It was attended by a large number of friends of the dead lady and her family. Mrs. Crawford was the relict of the late Patrick Crawford, at one time an Alderman for the old St. Lawrence ward. Deceased was born in County Armagh, Ireland, and came to Hamilton many years ago. She was 87 years of age, at the time of her death, which was the result of a general breaking up of her system. During her lifetime she was a valued member of Wesley Methodist church. In the absence of Rev. W.F. Wilson, the funeral service was conducted by Rev. Dr. Clark. The pall-bearers were four sons - John, of Aylmer, William, Lindsay, of Detroit, Henry-and Thomas Mead, and Fred Crawford. The deceased leaves a family of seven children including three daughters to mourn her loss.

 

Saturday, July 22, 1899

 

JOHNSTON - Mrs. Margaret Johnston, relict of the late Robert Johnston of Annandale, Grafton, Ontario, died yesterday at Duneig, Woodstock, in her 99th year. The deceased was bright and active until a few months ago.

 

MULLEN - William Mullen, aged 20, was drowned in the Thames near London last night.

 

HOOEY - John Hooey, the well-known horse buyer of Harriston, died yesterday at Elmvale, aged 51 years.

 

BARRY - Mrs. William Barry died yesterday in the Home of the Friendless, Chatham, aged 104 years. Deceased was a slave in Virginia.

 

ROY - Mrs. Mary M. Roy, a respected resident of the west end of Toronto died yesterday afternoon, after a lingering illness, extending over two months. She was 50 years of age.

 

GORMICAN (Brantford, Ont.) July 21 - James Gormican, of this city, this morning received a letter from Charter Oak, Iowa, telling of the tragic death of his son, Michael Gormican, who left Brantford two years ago to seek his fortune in the west. Gormican, who had been working on the railway, fell


off the top of a fast-running freight train, beneath the cars. His body was horribly mangled, both arms and legs being cut off, the head and trunk rendered unrecognisable.

 

HALL (Georgetown, Ont.) July 21 - This morning about 8:30, the body of a young man was found on C. Barnes farm, near Georgetown, with a terrible gun wound in his head, the empty gun lying across his body. A small memorandum book found in his pocket contained his name, J.H. Hall, Palgrave, and also a number of messages to his mother and other members of the family. The case is evidently, one of deliberate suicide, as a small stick was found near him, with which he is supposed to have discharged the gun. Advises from Palgrave state that the young man was a

prosperous farmer, and no reason can be given for his rash act. The coroner has decided that an

inquest is unnecessary.

 

Monday, July 24, 1899

 

WHITE (Merriton) July 24 - Grand Trunk Brakeman Charles White, of Fort Erie, met with a fatal accident here about 11 o’clock this morning. He was braking on Conductor Connelly’s special, east bound, when approaching the station he fell between the cars, and eight cars passed over his body. He died almost instantly.

 

STEWART - Additional confirmation of ex-mayor A.D. Stewart has been received in the city. This morning Mrs. Harry Atwell, whose husband was one of the Birely party that started for the Yukon nearly a year and a half ago, received a letter from her husband by way of Seattle. It was mailed at Fort Yukon, which point Mr. Atwell reached on June 6th. Mr. Atwell writes his letter’s in diary form and he states that while on the way across the divide to Fort Yukon his party met with some Indian guides, who told them of the death of A.D.Stewart on March 13. Scurvy was the cause of death, and the Indians said that other members of the Stewart party were very sick with the same disease, but would recover. They were at that time on the Beaver river, and were intending to go on by it to the divide. The Indians say it would be impossible for them to make the crossing in that way and that they would have to turn back as soon as the river opens. These same Indians met two Edmonton men, one of whom was frozen to death, and the other dying of cold. The Stewart party was 70 miles from Fort McPherson.

Mr. Atwell seems to have put in the winter very well. He says he did some trading and made some money. He met a young man well-known in Hamilton, named Frank Venattor, of St. George. Venattor was also bound for the Yukon. On May 1 Atwell received work from Birely and decided to go on to Fort Yukon to meet him. The divide was reached on May 5, and Fort Yukon on June 6th. There he fell in with a Hamilton man named Anthony-a painter by trade-who was also on the hunt for gold. In the letter he says he expects to catch up with Brock, Duncan, and Irvine, and he also intimates that he will not go to Dawson City, as he thinks that place is overrun with officialdom.

He is now in Alaska and will prospect there. He says that he is now and will be in future within a month’s time of Hamilton, in the matter of communication and expects to write regularly. In the letter he mentions that he does not know just where French and Gardiner are. They were members of the same party.

Another letter was received today confirming the news of Mr. Stewart’s death, and also stating that Messrs. Tallman, Brock, and Skynner, were seriously ill. The agent of the Hudson Bay

Company at Fort McPherson has sent a dog train after the body, and it will be taken to Fort McPherson and buried there.

No word has been received by the relatives of Mr. Tallman


PYPER - On Friday, July 21st, 1899, at 180 Caroline street south, John Scott Storms, infant son of John Horace and Elizabeth Pyper, aged 4 months, and 14 days. Funeral on Saturday, July 22nd, at 3 o’clock p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

JOHNSTON - At Duneig, Woodstock, on 20th July, Margaret Johnston, relict of the late Robert Johnston, of Annadale, Grafton, Ont., in her 99th year. Interment at Grafton.

 

HOZACK (Toronto) July 24 - Robert Hozack, the fourteen-year-old son of David Hozack, blacksmith, of 139 Lansdowne avenue, met a horrible death on Saturday evening at the railway crossing at Dufferin street.

His body was completely cut in two by a passing Canadian Pacific passenger train and mangled beyond recognition.

Robert had been witnessing one of the cricket games which were being played on the commons in the vicinity of the exhibition grounds, and was accompanied by several of his chums.             He had crossed the railway tracks two or three times in safety.

About half-past 5 o’clock he was on Dufferin street at the crossing, watching a Grand Trunk freight train pass on its way to the city from the west on the most northerly track.

Just as soon as the last coach of the freight had passed Hozack started to walk across without looking to see if the way was clear.

No sooner had he stepped on to the most southerly track then the rapidly approaching C.P.R. train No. 307, bound for Hamilton, ran him down. The wheels of the locomotive passed over his body then threw him to north side of the track.

Pedestrians went to the aid of the boy, but he was dead having being instantly killed.

 

SULSTAN (London) July 22 - A sad drowning fatality occurred in London township, near the city, last evening, William Sulstan, a farm labourer, being the victim. With a party of four or five others he went for a bathe in the river, not far from the residence of R. Shawwood, for whom he worked. Sulstan was a good swimmer, but when his companions arrived they saw him struggling for life. He sank from sight before assistance could reach him, and, although the body was recovered ten minutes later, life was extinct. Sulstan had been working in the hay fields all day, and it is supposed he took cramps. Deceased was aged about twenty years and his home was near Kilworth.

 

HEAVY (London) July 22 - The Thames claimed another victim this evening about 6:30. This time it was the twelve-year-old son of C. Heavy, of the post office department. Young Heavy, with a number of other boys, had been swimming around Black Friars bridge, a greater part of the afternoon, and becoming tired, he climbed on the dam to rest himself. In some unaccountable manner he slipped from his position and fell into a very deep spot, being in such an exhausted condition at the time that he was unable to help himself. His companions were powerless to help the unfortunate lad, as it all happened so quickly and the boy disappearing the first time, made it impossible.

 

SILLS, PHILLIPS (Bracebridge) July 23 - The bodies of the two unfortunate young ladies, Miss Sills, of Belleville, and Miss Phillips, of Newmarket, who were drowned near Bala on Tuesday last, were recovered at the foot of Moon Chute, Muskosh river, on Saturday afternoon, and were conveyed to Bracebridge by special steamer during the night, arriving Sunday morning at 5 o’clock. The bodies were taken in charge of Undertaker Kinsey, of Bracebridge, and were transferred to the


depot and sent south to Belleville and Newmarket, respectively, by the imperial limited train, which passes through Bracebridge at 11 a.m.

 

ROSS (Windsor, Ont.) July 23 - The inquest on the death of James Ross, the coloured man, who died on Thursday night, from the effects of blows on his head, was held yesterday in Denis St. Louis

Grove, in Sandwich South. After hearing the evidence the coroner’s jury brought in the following verdict: “that Levi Stewart, did wilfully, feloniously, and with malice aforethought killed and murdered James Ross”.

Stewart was brought back to Sandwich jail last night by Detectives Capau, and Mahony. He will be brought Magistrate Bartlett Friday of this week for a preliminary hearing.

 

BORROWMAN - Mrs. Borrowman, of Toronto, died suddenly on Saturday at Winnipeg while coming home from Vancouver.

 

McMILLAN - James B. McMillan, a prominent hotel keeper of Niagara-on-the-Lake, died Sunday morning after a short illness.

 

MAGILL - On Saturday, after a lingering illness, William Magill, late principal of the English

classical school for boys on Bloor street, Toronto, passed away. He was born in Dublin, Ireland in 1823.

 

Tuesday, July 25, 1899

 

HEINTZMAN - T.A. Heintzman, the head of the firm of Heintzman company, died today at Toronto.

 

EDY - Mrs. Edy, of London, died on Sunday at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Haight, Picton street east. The remains were sent to London today by Green Bros.

 

WHALEY (Port Dalhousie) July 25 - Fred Whaley, from Toronto, one of the boys camping here, was drowned this forenoon, below lock 1, new canal, on the harbour side. The lad was in bathing with other companions, when he suddenly disappeared. The body is now being grappled for. Whaley was about twelve years old. He belonged to No. 2 company of the Boy’s brigade and was in charge of Capt. Geddes.

 

NEWLANDS - Andrew M. Newlands, rake manufacturer, Galt, passed away unexpectedly yesterday.

 

BRODIE -James Brodie, J.P., of Markham, died on Sunday. He was well and favourably known.

 

GORDON - Henry Gordon, a well-known resident of the east end of Toronto died Saturday after a long lingering illness.

 

DUFF - Alexander R. Duff, clerk in the surrogate office at Osgoode Hall, Toronto, died suddenly last evening of heart failure.


Wednesday, July 26, 1899

 

READ - In this city on Wednesday, 26th July, 1899, George Read, aged 63 years. Funeral from his late residence, Maple avenue, Friday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

George Read, who was a hackman until a couple of years ago, died at the city hospital today.

 

JAMES - In this city, at 82 Magill street, on Wednesday July 26th, Carrie Muriel, infant daughter of David and Louisa James, aged 4 months. Funeral at 4 o’clock Thursday afternoon. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BLONG (Toronto) July 26 - The inevitable came to ex-Ald. Edward Blong early this morning with a shocking suddenness. Yesterday he was in good health, complaining in nowise, and after supper took his accustomed walk out. He returned to his home, at 881 East Queen street at 9, and said to the members of his family that as he felt slightly weary, he would sit up with them and rest.

He chatted merrily with them all till shortly after midnight, when he was attacked with acute pains in the region of the heart. The family was alarmed and at once sent for Dr. G.S. Cleland, before the doctor could arrived Mr. Blong expired, sitting in his chair with his family all about him, unable to ward off the grim foe.


The deceased was one of the best known residents of the east end, where he had lived for over half a century. He helped to a great extent to build up that part of the city. He was born in the County of Armagh, Ireland, 60 years ago, and came to Toronto when six years of age with his parents.

Mr. Blong, at a early age, engaged in the cattle export trade and was a large shipper.

 

GOODWIN (Bowmanville, Ont.) July 25 - A sad affair took place here this morning when Doctor Haruden’s dental rooms. Mrs. A.B. Goodwin, accompanied by her husband and her physician, went to have some teeth extracted and while under chloroform, died during the operation.

Dr. N. Hall, who was operating, had nearly completed his work, when the doctor noticed that the patient was not breathing right, and immediately made every effort for her resuscitation, but without avail. Dr. Beith was also summoned, but Mrs. Goodwin never recovered consciousness, and died in a very few moments.

Dr. Mitchell, the local coroner was called in, but after hearing the circumstances did not deem an inquest necessary, and exonerates the doctors from any blame whatever in the matter. The deceased, was highly respected, leaves a husband and a five months old child.

 

WOOD (Windsor) July 25 - William Wood, aged 25, unmarried, son of Abraham Wood, farmer, third concession, Sandwich West, committed suicide early this morning by cutting his throat with a razor. About 2 a.m., the mother of the young man heard groans coming from her son’s room, and calling her husband the two went into the room together where a horrible sight met their gaze. The young man was lying across the bed, a blood-stained razor in his right hand, and his throat cut from ear to ear, the jugular being severed.

Yesterday the father of young wood called on Dr. Cruickshank, of this city regarding his son’s health. He said he had been suffering from melancholia, but never talked of suicide.

 

Thursday, July 27, 1899

 

McDOUGALL - In this city, on Wednesday 26th July 1899, Duncan McDougall, aged 69 years. Funeral Friday at 4 p.m, from the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Thomas E. McDougall, 92 Locomotive street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ANDERSON - At his parent’s residence, No. 15 O’Reilly street, on Wednesday, 26th July, 1899, James E. Anderson. Funeral private Saturday at 2 p.m.

James Anderson, a well-known and popular traveller died last night at the residence of his parents, O’Reilly street. He had been ill a long time, and his friends had been expecting the worst for months.

The deceased was a son of William Anderson, and was about 38 years of age. He was born and brought up in Hamilton and had a large circle of warm friends. He was traveller for McPherson & Co., for a number of years, and afterwards he was on the road for Lennox & Co

 

READ - In this city, on Wednesday 26th July, 1899, George Read, aged 63 years. Funeral from his late residence, Maple avenue, Friday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 


CHRISTIE (Caledonia, Ont.) July 26 - Henry Christie, a farmer, was instantly killed in a runaway accident here this evening. His horse became frightened and a G.T.R. train and threw him against a post. Mr. Christie’s son was in Hamilton preparing to go to Chicago and was notified.

 

Friday, July 28, 1899

 

ANDERSON - At his parent’s residence No. 15 O’Reilly street, on Wednesday, 26th July, 1899, James E. Anderson. Funeral private Saturday at 2 p.m.

 

FRASER - James H. Fraser, barrister, of London, died suddenly at Port Carling today.

 

WASSON (Newmarket, Ont.) July 28 - Detective John C. Wasson, of the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons, Toronto, died suddenly last night at Col. Lloyd’s camp, Orchard Beach, Lake Simcoe. The body goes to Toronto this morning via Newmarket.

It appears that Mr. Wasson, while on his wheel and riding at a rapid rate fell off in some way, alighting on the tent peg which penetrated his bowels, causing death in a short time.

 

BROWN (Chatham, Ont.) July 27 - This afternoon Mrs. Isaac Brown, of the eleventh concession of Dover, and a neighbour drove into the orchard to get some apples. The horse was tied to a tree, and the seven-months-old baby of Mrs. Brown was left in the rig. The horse, standing uneasily from the flies, threw the baby over the dashboard and it fell beneath the horses feet. Before the horror-stricken mother could reach her baby she saw the horse clamp one of its feet on the infant’s head, crushing its brains out and life out. The mother was completely overcome by the awful occurrence.

 

STUART (Norwood, Ont.) July 27 - A sad accident occurred at Salmon Island, Stony Lake, about 9 a.m. today, when Hattie, the nine-year-old daughter of R.J. Stuart, grand organizer of the Canadian Order of Foresters, lost her life by drowning. While playing on the docks she fell in, and her little six-year-old brother jumped in after her. The father and Herbie, an elder brother, hearing the screams, ran to the rescue and jumped in after the other two. The father, through excitement, became helpless, and all four would have been drowned had it not been for Percy Clark, who came to their assistance, but too late to save the life of the little girl.

 

McKEOUTH - J. McKeouth, an old resident of Chatham, died suddenly yesterday.

 

LONEY - Edward Loney, a young farmer, was killed at a barn-raising near Milverton, by the fall of a beam.

 

BROWN - Nathan Brown of Toronto, died Wednesday night, at the general hospital from cerebral meningitis. For the past five years he went about the streets collecting cigar stubs, and cigarette butts. He was reticent, but once confided to a friend that he was worth $7,000.

 

STEWART - A Winnipeg dispatch says; D.W. McDonald, Edmonton, is in receipt of a letter from John Wilson, dated Dawson City, June 24. He says Dr. Laneg was in receipt of a letter from Fort McPherson advising him of the death of A.D. Stewart, late mayor and chief of police, Hamilton, who died up Peel River.

John Knox, to whom the Duncan letter from the Yukon was addressed has returned to the city, and the letter has been opened. Mr. Knox says it contains nothing more than has already been printed about the Hamilton travellers to the Yukon from other letters received. When the letter was written Mr. Duncan was at Fort Yukon.


Saturday, July 29, 1899

 

WHITTON (Chatham, Ont.) July 29- About four o’clock this morning the body of Arthur Whitton was found in the river here. It is supposed that Whitton committed suicide. Whitton ran a bakeshop. He came here from England two years ago, and is said to have been well connected.

 

COSBIE (Windemere, Ont.) July 29 - A sad drowning fatality occurred last evening at Rossdrover, three miles from here. Maurice Cosbie, aged 13, son of Robert Cosbie, of Rose avenue, Toronto, and a companion named Emerson, were playing in the water with a floating log when by the force of the swells from the steamer Nipissing the former was carried out into water beyond his depth. His companion attempted to rescue him, but was forced to turn back. The father also bravely tried to save his son, but having on his clothing became exhausted and required help himself. In the meantime young Cosbie had sunk for the last time. The body is not yet been found. A peculiarly sad feature of the fatality is that some years ago Mr. and Mrs. Cosbie lost a son about the same age under somewhat similar circumstances at Kincardine.

 

McCOY (Belleville, Ont.) July 29 - It is reported that traces of strychnine have been found in the stomach of the girl McCoy, who died suddenly under suspicious circumstances at Marmora about two weeks ago, and that an arrest will be made in connection with the case.

 

DARLING (Simcoe, Ont.) July 29 - G.L. Darling, for 50 years a jeweller here, died very suddenly this morning of heart failure. Mr. Darling came to Simcoe when a young man and had resided here ever since. He was the oldest merchant in Simcoe.

 

BILLINGS - Two weeks ago Mary Ann Billings, of Toronto, broke her thigh. She died on Wednesday. An autopsy by Drs. Mayburry, and Harrington proved that death resulted from shock brought on by a fall.

 

ANDERSON - The funeral of the late James Anderson, took place this afternoon from his father’s residence, O’Reilly street. The pall-bearers were R.B. Harris, T.M. Bruce, R.L. Haskins, R.E. Chilman, Samuel Merrick, and R.T. Anderson.

 

Monday, July 31, 1899

 

McILLROY - In this city, at 131 Picton street east, of pneumonia, William McIllroy, aged 44 years and 7 months, a native of Fermanaugh, Ireland. Funeral will take place from above address on King street, August 1st, to St. Luke’s church, thence to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

McCONNELL - In this city, July 30th, Frances Emily, widow of the late James McConnell, aged 27 years and 5 months. Funeral on Tuesday 2 p.m. from her father’s residence John Dixon, 74 Bay street north. (Private) Interment at Hamilton cemetery.

 

ZOCK - Leopold Zock jumped from the steamer Chippewa and was drowned today. He was on his way to visit his son at Toronto.


 

McFARLANE - W. McFarlane, of the post office, today received the following, which confirms the report of the drowning accident in which his brother, Victor, lost his life. “Headwaters of McMillan river, June 8, 1899.”

“Dear Sir; we, the undersigned members of this party, are very sorry to have to write such a painful letter, but it is necessary. Vic was drowned on Jun 6th, 1899. We crossed the divide on April with hand sleighs, came down a little river about seven miles, and then went into camp, whipsawed lumber, and built a boat. On May 28 we started down the river about eight miles, when we came to another rapids, which we decided to portage, they being too swift and too rocky to try to run. We portaged about four and a half miles, in four days; then we decided to let our boat down with ropes. We let her down for about three miles all right, when the river seemed to get a good bit better. A couple of the parties ahead of us ran them from this point, so we decided to run them. Vic, took the sweep, Bill Brown road stroke, or, and Jim Beare next, Jack O’Hara next, and the fourth man was a chap named Louis; he was just giving us a hand to make up the crew as I had to get into the bow with a pole to help Vic in bad places. Well, they ran for about three quarters of a mile at a flying clip, when she struck. The first thing I knew I was out in the water, but had a good hold of the side of the boat, and was soon hauled in safe. As she struck the rock the current must have struck the sweep, and poor Vic, was thrown backwards eight or ten feet clear of the boat and out of reach of help. The water here was running like a mill-race the fellows did all they could in the short space of time they had before he disappeared for good; it was not long. He was carried about twenty feet from the boat in less than half a minute. The current just seemed to drag him down, because he only sank once, and never came up again. Jim Beare and I found the body in less than half an hour afterwards. Dr. Dillabaugh, with the assistance of the rest of the fellows, worked for three hours, but it was no good. Vic had gone. There were some nasty mark on his head where he had struck on the rocks. You have lost a brother, and we have lost a kind- hearted good-natured chum. We buried him on a point half a mile above where he was found. It was just good fortune alone that we ever found him, as the rapids are about seven miles long. He was in the best of health and must have weighted 170 or 175 pounds. We found a belt on him containing $196.00, which will be returned as soon as possible, along with his watch, and some other little things of his. There were 58 white men at the funeral. The rest of the boys are all well, and expect to find something farther down this river; but, of course, we are not sure. Now I must close, as this letter is to go out by a couple of fellows they are just about out of grub and have to skip”.

If you know of any person from Hamilton going to the Klondike, tell them to go by the coast, or stay at home.

Signed

LOGIE DONALDSON, JOHN O’HARA, W.J. BROWN, JAMES E. BEARE.”

 

McNEVIN (Ottawa, Ont.) July 31 - Alex McNevin, baggage master at Arnprior station, on the Canadian Pacific fell under the wheels of the moving cars last evening and both of his legs were severely crushed. McNevin was taken to the hospital here and died shortly afterwards. The remains will be returned to Arnprior. McNevin was 32 years of age.

 

SCOTT (Toronto) July 30 - William Scott, for many years caretaker at 42 Church street, was accidentally drowned in the bay on Saturday afternoon about half past two.


Shortly after that time William White 228 Teraulay street was walking along the cribwork at the foot of John street, when he noticed the body in the water. He at once set to work to get it ashore, them summoned Dr. Badgerow. The doctor found that there was still a spark of life in the man, and every means was adopted to try to bring back consciousness. All efforts were unavailing however, as Scott had taken two much water internally, and his heart stopped beating while the doctor was labouring with him. The patrol wagon was then called and the remains were sent to the morgue, for Coroner Johnson may hold an inquest this afternoon. The body remained unidentified until Sunday afternoon.

 

Tuesday, August 1, 1899

 

LONG - At the residence of her son, J.R. Long, 72 Hunter street west, on Monday, 21st July, 1899, Hannah Long, relict of the late Dr. G.M. Long, aged 87 years. Funeral private.

 

McGREGOR - Mrs. McGregor, Market street, called on the police yesterday to inquire about an old man named McGregor, who was found dead in a barn at Tavistock. She was satisfied that the deceased was not a relative of hers.

 

SCHIFF (St. Catharines, Ont.) August 1, 1899 - Leopold Schiff, traveller to the wholesale grocery firm of Lang & Co., of Montreal died last night at the Russell house, from an attack of acute peritonitis. Mr. Schiff’s home was in Toronto, and about a week ago he was taken ill at the Russell house, and Dr. Greenway had been in attendance on him ever since. His wife came over on Saturday, and his son and daughter on Monday, and all three were with him when he died. The body was taken to Toronto this morning.

 

ZOCK (Toronto) August 1 - Mathias Zock, of Newark, N.J., father of Jeweller of Zock, of West Adelaide street, jumped from the deck of the Chippewa yesterday to death. Many passengers witnessed the rash deed. The boat was twelve miles out from Niagara, when a woman noticed a man step up to the deck railing and begin to climb over. She warned him of the danger. He paid no heed to her. He jumped and struck the water. A boat was lowered and the drowned man brought on board. Dr. Guinane, of Toronto, and Dr. Campbell, of Ontario, N.Y., pronounced him dead before he struck water. The shock of the falling had stilled his heart. The body was taken to the morgue on the steamers arrival in this city.

 

McMARTIN - The body of Duncan McMartin, for 25 years turnkey of the jail at Cornwall, was found in the Black river.

 

Wednesday, August 2, 1899

 

LONG - At the residence of her son J.H. Long, 72 Hunter street west, on Monday, 31st July, 1899, Hannah Long, relict of the late Dr. G.M. Long, aged 87 years. Funeral private.

 

DIXON - On Tuesday, August 1st, Margaret Dixon, in her 77th year. The funeral will leave the residence of her son, James Dixon, 65 East avenue south, on Thursday August 3rd, at 2:30 p.m.

Mrs. Margaret Dixon died last evening at the Beach residence, of her son, ex-Ald., James Dixon. She had been ailing for a couple of years and had been confined to her bed for the past two months.


The deceased was 76 years old, and was the relict of William Dixon who died twenty years ago. She came to Hamilton with her husband about 50 years ago. She was a kind and loving mother, and a devoted Christian woman, and her death will be deeply regretted. She leaves five sons - T.L.,

James, and William, of this city; John, of Baltimore, and Robert, of New York - and two daughters - Mrs. Caven, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. and Mrs. Book, of Grimsby.

The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon from the residence of her son, James Dixon, 65 East avenue south.

 

PENNELL - This morning the body of William Pennell, 38 Simcoe street west, was found floating in the bay just off the Bayview wharf. It was first seen about ten o’clock and was towed into the wharf where it was made fast, and word was telephoned to the city. Coroner Philp was at once notified and drove to the scene. Constable Bainbridge also went out and took charge of the remains.

In the unfortunate man’s hat, which was found near the body, was his name and address, and the remains were also identified by two young men from the city who knew the deceased. After a couple of hours delay this information was telephoned back to the city and the patrol was sent after the body, which was removed to the morgue. From the appearance of the body it was evident that it had been in the water for at least a day. The doctor gathered all the evidence he could and will consult with the crown attorney this afternoon regarding the advisability of holding an inquest.

Whether Pennell met his death by accident or committed suicide cannot be determined as nothing can be learned concerning his whereabouts since he left home last Wednesday.

Mrs. Pennell had not been informed of the sad occurrence when the Spectator reporter called about two o’clock this afternoon and almost became frantic with grief when he told her what had happened. From her it was learned that the unfortunate man left home last Wednesday and had not been working for some time and continual sickness had made him despondent, but his friends and relatives do not think that he committed suicide. Pennell was a labourer and was about 40 years of age. He, however, had been unable to work for some time on account of been troubled with

rheumatism, which at times was so bad that he could not walk. It was no unusual thing for him to be away from home looking for employment for days at a time, and his wife was not worrying about his absence. The deceased left no family but a number of boarders live in the house.

The body was first noticed by Mr. Ryan, proprietor of the Bayview hotel.

 

KEITH (Toronto) August 2 - Mrs. Keith, 60 years of age, came in from the country on Monday night to visit her son. She went to his place and remained there for the night. About eight o’clock yesterday morning she said she would take a walk down to the East end where another of her sons reside. That was the last seen of her until she was found lying on the sidewalk, and went for assistance. Physicians were summoned and the use of a stomach pump showed trace of carbolic acid. The woman will die. When she left her son’s house she had a sum of money with her. This was not found on her person.

 

TODD - Joe Todd was drowned while swimming in Toronto bay this morning. He struck his head against a stone while diving.

 

SENSABAUGH (Attercliffe) - At her residence, Attercliffe, on July 25, Deborah Sensabaugh, beloved wife of Hiram Sensabaugh, passed away. The community mourn her loss. She will be missed and remembered as a kind and affectionate mother, a willing and ready attendant on the sick and a friend to those in distress. The funeral took place Thursday, July 27th, and was largely attended. The services were conducted by the Canboro minister, who spoke words of comfort.

Her husband three sons, and five daughters survive her.


WHITTON - The coroner’s jury returned a verdict of accidental death in the inquest over the body of Arthur Whitton, the baker, found floating in the Thames at Chatham.

 

CATION - Walter Cation, Jr., of Brampton, aged 28, a well-known thresher, dropped dead about five o’clock yesterday afternoon. Mr. Cation was cleaning out the carriers when he was observed to spring up and then fall. He was dead when the nearest man reached him.

 

Thursday, August 3, 1899

 

FORBES - At the City Hospital, on Wednesday, 2nd of August, after a long illness, Anthony F. Forbes. Funeral from Masonic Hall, tomorrow at 2:30 p.m. Friends and members of the Board of Fire Underwriters will please accept this intimation.

After six years illness, Anthony F. Forbes, an old and highly respected citizen died last night. About 1893, Mr. Forbes was stricken down with paralysis and was removed to the hospital. At the time he was not expected to live very long, but although 70 years of age, he showed wonderful vitality and the end did not come until last night. During his six years confinement the deceased has been in a helpless condition. He was unable to move his legs or arms and had to be fed by an attendant. His brain and tongue were also paralysed and he could not recognize or speak to any of his numerous friends, many of whom continued to visit him until the last. The deceased does not leave any family. His wife died some years ago. His sister, Mrs. Keating, lives in Bermuda, and Mr. Keating, of Toronto, superintendent of the street railway, is a nephew.

Before coming to Hamilton he was in the government services in Halifax and drew a pension from the British government. He was for many years an insurance agent, representing the British American company of Toronto in this city. He also conducted a stockbrokers business. The deceased was a member of the Masonic Order, and the funeral will be held from the Masonic Hall tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o’clock. The members of the Board of Fire Underwriters will attend in a body.

 

SHANNON - Postmaster Thomas Shannon, of Picton, died suddenly this morning of heart failure. Mr. Shannon who was 66 years old, had held the position for about 27 years.

 

EDGAR (Toronto, Ont.) July 3 - The funeral of the late Speaker Sir James Edgar this morning was of the simplest and most private character. It was attended only by relatives and a few personal friends. A short service was read by Rev. Mr. Plummer, of St. Thomas church, at eleven o’clock and then the hearse following by a few carriages, was taken to St. James cemetery, where the internment took place. Among those present were Sir Henri Joly, and Mr. Fisher, representing the Dominion government; Capt. Mowat, A.D.C., on behalf of the Lieutenant Governor; Justice Moss, on behalf of the bench; Messrs. J.W. Langmuir, and E.T. Malone, for the speakers business associates, and J.S. Willison, editor of the Globe.

 

McMORRAN, BLANCHET (Belle River, Ont.) August 3 - Two farmers, each about 65 years of age, who lived about two miles south of Belle River, were struck by a train while crossing the C.R.R. train at 4:30 p.m. yesterday, instantly killing one named Joseph McMorran, and so badly injuring the other, Benjamin Blanchet, that he died today. Both were well-to-do farmers and are supposed to have been under the influence of liquor when the accident occurred.


RICHARDSON - Jimmy Richardson, a bright thirteen-year-old-lad went bathing yesterday in Toronto bay and was drowned. It is thought that in diving he struck his head against a stone, as there is a gash visible above and along side the left eye. The little fellow undoubtedly became entangled in the weeds, because after entering the water he never appeared above the surface.

 

BOWMAN - James Bowman, sr., a respected resident of Clearvale, near Woodbridge, dropped dead on Tuesday night just as the family were sitting down at the table for the evening meal.

 

TAYLOR - A very sad accident has just been reported, which occurred at Blackstock, Cartwright township, on Friday last. The youngest child of Anson Taylor, reeve of the township, was playing around and fell head first into a pail of water, and was drowned. Mrs. Taylor had only left her sitting on the veranda, a few minutes before, and when discovered the child was quite dead.

 

DIXON - The funeral of the late Mrs. Margaret Dixon took place this afternoon from the residence of her son, James, 65 East avenue south. The pall-bearers were, Thomas, William, James, Robert and John Dixon, sons of the deceased and George L. Book, son-in-law. Dr. Fletcher conducted the service

 

Friday, August 4, 1899

 

READY - At Buffalo, on August 3, 1899, George H. Ready, son of William and Rebecca Ready. Funeral from the residence of his brother-in-law, Hamilton Marsh, Vinemount, Saturday afternoon at 1 o’clock.

 

TURNBULL - In this city, on Friday, August 4, 1899, Eda May Turnbull, beloved daughter of Adam and Minnie Turnbull. Funeral from her father’s residence, 94 Pearl street north, on Sunday at 4 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

ALLAN - Death came with awful suddenness to James Allan, 51 Caroline street north, yesterday.

The deceased was around attending to his horses as usual in the morning, but shortly after six o’clock in the evening he was found dead in his bedroom. For the past couple of years Mr. Allan had not been in the best of health and about a year ago he was confined in the hospital for some time suffering from a severe attack of rheumatism. Since his discharge from the hospital, he had not been well, but his sickness was not serious enough to prevent him from following his vocation as a teamster. He accompanied the Dundas company of the Seventy-seventh battalion to Niagara camp, and since he returned home, he complained of pains in his back and chest. He was not working yesterday, but went out about 9 o’clock in the morning to water his horse. His wife was not home at the time, but his daughter-in-law, Mrs. F. Robins, who lives in the same house, remembers that he returned about 10:30 o’clock and went upstairs to take a rest.


He had been in the habit of laying down at home, and had instructed the members of the household not to disturb while he slept. When Mrs. Allan got home about noon she went to the foot of the stairs and called her husband but he did not respond. Thinking that he was asleep she did not give the matter further though, but put his dinner aside, and returned to her work, leaving her daughter-in-law in the house. Once during the afternoon Mrs. Robins called him, but there was no answer. Toward evening, when did not come down, she became alarmed and when Mr. Robins came got home she asked him to go upstairs and see what was the matter. A neighbour, Mrs. Boyling, was called in, and she and Mr. Robins went upstairs. They found Mr. Allan’s body lying on the bed in his room, cold in death.

Mrs. Allan and Dr. Lafferty were at once sent for, but could do nothing for the unfortunate man, who had evidently been dead several hours. In view of the circumstances surround the death Coroner Philp was notified, but hearing the facts he decided that death was due to natural causes and that an inquest was unnecessary. The cause of death was neuralgia of the heart. The deceased leaves a widow and one grown up son, John, who resides in Buffalo. He was forty-four years of age, and a member of the Victoria flute band.

 

FORBES - The funeral of the late Anthony Forbes took place from the Masonic Hall this afternoon and was largely attended. The pall-bearers were members of Temple lodge, A.F. and A.M. of which deceased was an old member. Rev. W.H. Wade conducted the funeral.

 

PENNELL - The funeral of the late William Pennell took place from the family residence, 38 Simcoe street west, this afternoon. The pall-bearers were members of the Osborne lodge, S.O.E.,

The deceased’s brother, A.E. Pennell, editor of the Markham Sun, attended the funeral.

 

HARRIS (Millgrove) - The funeral of Harry Harris took place here last Sunday afternoon.

 

NEBBERGAL (Windsor, Ont.) August 3 - While undergoing an operation for the removal of a tumour at the Hotel Dieu hospital in this city last evening, Mrs. Caroline Nebbergal, residing at Victoria avenue, gave up her life. The surgeons had almost completed their work when symptoms of collapse became apparent and in a few moments the patient ceased to breathe. She leaves a husband and several children.

 

Saturday, August 5, 1899

 

TURNBULL - In this city, on Friday, August 4, 1899, Eda May Turnbull, beloved daughter of Adam and Minnie Turnbull. Funeral from her father’s residence 91 Pearl street north, on Sunday at 2 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

KENT - At her late residence, No. 182 Markland street, on Friday 4th August, 1899, Jane H. Kent, wife of Joseph Kent, aged 52 years and 6 months. Funeral (Private) Sunday at 2 p.m.

 

MALONEY - At her late residence, 401 MacNab street north, on Saturday, August 5th, Catharine Maloney, in her 83rd year. Funeral Monday morning to St. Mary’s Cathedral, thence to Holy

Sepulchre cemetery.

 

ASCOTT - In this city, on Friday, August 4th, 1899, William Ascott, a native of Devonshire, England in his 82nd year. Funeral from the residence of his son-in-law, 35 Wood street west, Sunday at 3 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

MacFADDEN - James MacFadden, late clerk of the surrogate court at Stratford is dead.

 


CROWE (Toronto) August 5 - J.G. Scott, of Fort Francis, who has been acting as forest ranger for the Ontario government has resigned his position on account of a nervous shock received in a recent trip through the wild lands of New Toronto. He was accompanied by his brother-in-law John Crowe, also forest ranger, who went mad, and developed a suicidal mania. Mr. Scott had to maintain a constant watch over him for days. Finally Crowe escaped, and dashed away through the woods. Later his body was discovered in a creek by some Indians. Mr. Scott’s experience so upset him that he feels unable to endure the loneliness of travelling through the woods.

 

Monday, August 7, 1899

 

THOMPSON - At his late residence, No. 582 Hughson street north, on Sunday, 6th August, 1899, John H. Thompson, aged 84 years. Funeral Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery.

Friends will please accept this intimation.

John Thompson, one of the oldest Conservatives in Hamilton, died at his residence, Hughson street, yesterday morning.

 

MARKS - At the residence of her parents, 287 John st. north, on Sunday afternoon Aug. 6th, 1899, May Marks, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Marks, aged 20 years, and 8 months. Funeral Wednesday at 8:30 a.m. to St. Mary’s Cathedral. Internment at Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

Friends will please accept this intimation.

After an illness which extended over some weeks, Miss May Marks died at the residence of her parents, 287 John street north, about five o’clock yesterday afternoon. The deceased was a well-known and popular young lady and the sad news of her untimely end will be learned with regret by her many friends.

 

PLAIER - At his father’s residence, 279 Mary street, John W. (Buddy) Plaier, only and beloved son of John and Annie Plaier aged 12 years, 3 months, and 24 days. Funeral on Monday at 4 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. “He will walk and talk with angels over there.”

 

ALLAN - The funeral of the late James Allan, who died suddenly at his residence, 51 Caroline street north, took place yesterday afternoon. The members of the Victoria flute band, of which deceased was a member, attended in a body.

 

NEWHALL - John Newhall, ex-inspector of the Toronto detective force, died on Saturday. He retired from the department in 1887.

 

Tuesday, August 8, 1899

 

MARKS - At the residence of her parents, 265 John street north, on Sunday afternoon, August 7th, 1899, May Marks, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Edward Marks, aged 20 years and 8 months. Funeral Wednesday at 8:30 a.m. to St. Mary’s Cathedral. Interment at Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

STACY - On August 7th, at his parents’ residence, 169 Robinson street, James B.P. Stacy, eldest son of John C. and Esther Stacy, aged 23 years. Funeral Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.


SHAIDLE - In this city, on Monday, Aug. 7th, Marion Shaidle, aged 25 years. Funeral from his parents’ residence 50 Margaret street on Wednesday, at 1:30 p.m. Interment at Waterdown cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

PLAICE - At his father’s residence, 279 Mary street, John W. (Buddy) Plaice, only and beloved son of John and Annie Plaice, aged 12 years, 2 months, and 24 days. Funeral took place Monday at 4 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. “He will walk and talk with angels over there.”

 

LAVIN - At San Francisco, Sunday evening, Aug. 6th, of appendicitis, M.G. Lavin, formerly superintendent of the Dominion Telegraph company, Hamilton, aged 56 years.

John Lavin, of this city, received telegraphic information this morning that his brother, Michael C. Lavin, had died in San Francisco yesterday of appendicitis. Mr. Lavin had not heard of his brother’s illness, and the news was a startling as it was sad. Michael C. Lavin was a resident of this city, and superintendent of the Dominion Telegraph company, up to 1878, when he went to Chicago, as manager of the Western Union telegraph office in that city. Thence, a year after, he was sent to San Francisco to look after the business of the company there. In a short time he became superintendent of the Pacific Coast Postal telegraph company, and occupied that position until 1892, when he was appointed auditor for the company, an office which he held until his death.

Mr. Lavin was a bright, genial gentleman, full of life and energy a favourite wherever he was known, and a warm friend to those who had the honour and pleasure of intimate companionship with him. His death, at a comparatively early age of 56, will be sincerely regretted by a large circle of Hamilton acquaintances. May he rest in peace.

 

FOWLER - J.B. Fowler, jeweller, of St. Catharines, had a most melancholy experience yesterday. He came to the city to pay a visit to his wife, who was an inmate of the asylum. She had been in poor health for some time, but it was not thought she was in any danger. While Mr. Fowler conversed with his wife in the afternoon however, she became much worse and died in a short time. Deceased was about 50 years old.

The remains were placed in charge of Blachford & Son, who forwarded them to St. Catharines last evening.

 

Wednesday, August 9, 1899

 

FISHER - In this city, on Tuesday, August 8th, 1899, Louisa Babcock, beloved wife of Frank Fisher, aged 20 years. Funeral from the residence of her uncle, J.H. Hanes, 70 Inchbury street, on Thursday at 3 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

PHILLIPS - On August 8th, 1899, at her late residence, 27 West avenue north, Harriet Tindall, beloved wife of James Phillips, aged 58 years. Funeral Friday afternoon. (Private).

Mrs. Phillips, wife of ex-Ald. Phillips, died last evening at her residence, 27 West avenue north. She had been ill for sometime and her death was not unexpected. The deceased was a estimable lady, and, having lived in the city for a number of years, she had a large circle who will deeply regret her death.

 

MILLS - Frank Mills, of Newmarket, Ontario, was drowned near Arrowhead, B.C. on August 3.


BUTLER - Mrs. Butler, whose husband was burned to death at Ottawa, says the firemen were negligent, and they might have saved him.

 

LEE - William Lee went to sleep on the railway track at Simcoe and was killed by a freight train.

 

WILSON - William Wilson, of lot 10, third concession of the township of Albion, met with a terrible accident yesterday morning. He was operating an apparatus used by farmers for elevating racks. The machine in some manner was thrown out of gear, and the unfortunate gentleman was entangled in the operating ropes, and the upper part of his body badly crushed. Not withstanding the best medical attendance, he succumbed to his injuries during the afternoon.

 

DIXON - Mrs. George Dixon of 214 Richmond street west, Toronto, committed suicide yesterday morning by drowning herself in Grenadier pond. The woman was insane.

 

WOODS - The residents of Toronto Junction were very much shocked last night when they heard of the sad drowning fatality at the first bend on the Humber where Fred W. Woods, junior clerk in the Bank of Commerce was the victim. He was bathing and took a cramp.

 

BASKERVILLE - Mrs. J. Baskerville, a widow lady, who resided near Mount Pleasant, was found dead last evening by her son, at her home. Mrs. Baskerville had been out in the bush during the day picking berries, and had lost her way, and wandered about aimlessly for a long distance, finally reaching home. Later in the evening her son returned to the house to find his mother dead on the bed.

 

VANDERBURGH - A sad fatality occurred at the railway crossing at Uxbridge yesterday morning, whereby James Vanderburgh, Sr., of the sixth concession of Scott township, lost his life. Mr. Vandreburgh was driving out of town when his horse became frightened at a tractor engine and ran into the incoming train. The horse was fearfully mangled and cut completely open, and had to be killed at once. Mr. Vanderburgh was knocked unconscious and only lived a few minutes.

 

Thursday, August 10, 1899

 

PHILLIPS - On August 8th, 1899, at her late residence, 27 West avenue north, Harriet Tindell, beloved wife of James Phillips, aged 53 years. Funeral Friday afternoon. (Private)

 

RITCHIE - At her residence, Ancaster, Ontario, Sara, third daughter of the late Wm. Ritchie, in her 70th year. Funeral Friday, August 11, 3 p.m.

 

MARRIS - At Sarnia, Ontario, on Wednesday, 9th August, 1899, Edward Marris, eldest son of Henry Marris, of this city, aged 20 years. Funeral from his father’s residence, No 200 James st. north, Hamilton, on Friday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Eddie Marris, son of Sergt. Marris, caretaker of the armoury, died last night at Sarnia from typhoid fever. Young Marris who was for sometime employed by the Imperial Oil company went as purser on the Miles last spring. Being taken ill, with typhoid fever he was put off at Sarnia. His father went there a few days ago to look after him. Death came last night.

Blachford & Son were telegraphed to meet the 5:30 train this afternoon and remove the remains to Sergt. Marris’s home.


KILLEY - At his late residence No. 19 Hess street south, on Thursday, 10th August, 1899, Joseph H. Killey, aged 72 years. Funeral Saturday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

J.H. Killey, the well-known engineer past away rather suddenly this morning at his late residence, 19 Hess street south. He had been suffering from a cold, but did not regard it as serious. About 2 o’clock he got up and going into his wife’s bedroom told her he had great difficulty in getting his breath. Mrs. Killey went downstairs got some blackcurrant cordial, and gave it to her husband who continued to gasp for breath. A few minutes later he sank exhausted and said to his wife, “goodbye”.

Dr. Gilrie had been sent for but Mr. Killey about the time he reached the house.

There were few men in the world of mechanics better known than Joseph H. Killey, and his sudden taking off will be greatly regretted by many persons in all walks of live. During his long life -he was seventy two years of age - he was a busy man, constantly occupied with engineer schemes of more or less magnitude, and in them all he showed great skill, being much in demand when intricate problems were required to be solved. Of later years he devoted considerable time to temperance and religious work.

Deceased was born in Castletown, Isle of Man, April 24, 1827. He studied in the grammar school there and had from his earliest years a great love for machinery. The large pumping engines at the mines near his home was studied by him, and before he left school he had acquired the knowledge of the theory of their action. He mastered Lardner The Steam Engine before he was 12 years old. At 14 he constructed a crude model engine and boiler. He was sent to Liverpool to serve his apprenticeship and after two years at cabinet-making he was for some years in various foundries in Liverpool.

He came to Canada in 1864, and obtained employment with F.G. Beckett & Co., here. Sometime after he went to Toronto and was foreman of the St. Lawrence Foundry. For three years he was engineer on the steamer Rothsay Castle, and during the Fenian Raids was engineer of the gunboat Prince Albert which was employed guarding the river and lake coasts.

In 1870, Mr. Killey returned to Hamilton, and under the firm name J.H. Killey & Co., built up a large and profitable business. The deceased’s ability as an engineer was fully recognized and he carried out successfully several important orders. In 1884 the business became merged into the Osborne-Killey Company. Later the deceased entered the Killey-Beckett firm; but of late years he had been unconnected with any firm, acting as consulting engineer. In that capacity he carried out some important works. Among the matters that occupied his attention latterly was the horseless carriage.

The deceased had a varied experience in regard to his religious convictions. He was brought up a Methodist, but, while in Liverpool, he became the companion of sceptics and drifted among the infidels, among whom he was regarded as a fluent debater. He held to these views for years after coming to Canada; but some years later he became a temperance man, and, owing to sermons preached by Rev. Dr. James a believer in Christianity. Since then, Mr. Killey did much work for both temperance and religion. He was at the time of his death a member of Wesley church.

The deceased was a member of the Royal Templars and was connected with other orders.

He leaves a widow, and niece. The funeral will take place on Saturday afternoon.

 


MURPHY - After lingering between life and death for a few hours Mathew Murphy, H.G.& B., trackman who was injured by being struck by a H.G. & B. Trolley car near Grimsby yesterday morning, succumbed to his injuries in St. Joseph’s hospital early last evening. Dr. O’Reilly who was in attendance did all in his power for the unfortunate man, but his efforts were of no avail. The immediate cause of death was concussion of the brain, due to a severe scalp wound. There were also several minor wounds about the head and body.

Coroner Griffin was notified immediately and it was decided to hold an inquest, and Constable Knox, was instructed to summon a jury. The inquest was opened in the city hall at noon today, Coroner Griffin presiding. The men summoned to act on the jury were: Andrew Herron, John Jackson, James Robb, George Mullin, John Elliott, Duncan Fraser, Rubin Mullin, William Horspoole, John Littlehails, James O’Heir, James Fox, James Tracy, William Robinson, and William Ingles. James O’Heir, was elected foreman. The jury adjourned to Dwyer’s undertaking establishment and viewed the remains, after which it adjourned to meet again tomorrow night at No. 3 police station.

 

BABY - George W. Baby died at midnight last night at Windsor. He has been ill for two or three months. He was a member of the firm of Baby & Hanrahan, commission merchants.

 

KELLY (Windsor) August 9 - In a disorderly house in Detroit, Edna Kelly, aged 25, a handsome brunette who, her companions say, came there from Parkdale, Ontario, died at 3 o’clock this afternoon from the effects of a dose of laudanum, administered with suicidal intent. The woman had spent a hilarious night, and retired at 2 o’clock this morning. Six hours later she was discovered breathing heavily, with a laudanum bottle beside on the floor. Doctors were called, and did all in their power to save her life, but without avail. It is not believed the woman’s right name is Kelly, but other occupants of the house say she came there two months ago, and told them she had come from Parkdale, where she had left the two-months old fatherless babe.

 

SHEA - Murphy Shea, a Toronto newsboy, was drowned in Toronto bay yesterday afternoon while jumping from a boat to the wharf.

 

Friday, August 11, 1899

 

KILLEY - At his late residence, No. 19 Hess street south, on Thursday, 10th August, 1899, Joseph H. Kelly, aged 72 years. Funeral Saturday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

FARR - At his parent’s residence on August 11th, Albert John, only child of Mr. and Mrs. James A. Farr, aged 2 months. Funeral from 57 Garth street on Monday, at 3 o’clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DOHERTY - On August 10th, George Albert Pattison Doherty. Funeral (Private), from his late residence 143 Herkimer street, tomorrow (Saturday) at 3:30 p.m.

Word was received yesterday on the death of George Albert Pattison Doherty, of Hamilton, at Bennett’s Corners. The deceased had been ill for some time and went to Bennett’s Corners for his health. His death was not unexpected. The body was brought to the city last night, and the funeral, which will be private, will take place from his mother’s residence, 143 Herkimer street, tomorrow afternoon.

 


GRAHAM (Port Hope) August 10 - Coroner Dr. Corbett has just held an inquest into the cause of the death of Mrs. Robert Graham, the seventeen-year-old wife of Robert Graham, Lakeshore road. After hearing the evidence the jury returned the following verdict. “That the said Mrs. Robert Graham came to her death from a dose of the oil of cedar, taken with her own hand, but not with suicidal intent”.

“We also recommend that druggists be more careful and comply with the pharmacy act in regard to the sale of poisons”.

Mrs. Graham had been married a year.

 

WALTERS (Cayuga, Ont.) August 10 - A very distressing fatal accident occurred this morning at the farmhouse of William Walters about two miles from this village. Russell Walters, a boy between twelve and fifteen years of age, was alone in the house preparing some breakfast on the stove. The fire not burning very well, the boy obtained the coal oil can and poured the contents on the coals. The can exploded, enveloping the boy in flames. He immediately ran outside screaming.

His brother, who was plowing nearby, ran to his assistance and threw a coat around him, but by this time the entire clothing was burnt from his body, and the skin was hanging in shreds. Dr. Kerr of Cayuga, was called and did what he could to relieve the sufferer.

The child lived about five hours after the accident. Both his parents were away from home, his father being in Hamilton and his mother on a visit to friends at Severn Bridge.

 

MARRIS - The funeral of the late Eddie Marris, who died in the Sarnia hospital of typhoid fever, took place from his father’s residence, 200 James street north, this afternoon and was largely attended. The deceased being a very popular young man. The pall-bearers were six of his former companions: T. Anderson, W. McDougall, J. Pryke, W. Moore, W. Smith, J. Kemp. The religious services at the house and grave were conducted by Rev. E.N.R. Burns, pastor of St. Luke’s church.

Among the floral tributes was a wreath from the Dominion Philatelic association.

 

Saturday, August 12, 1899

 

FARR - At his parent’s residence on August 11th, Albert John, only child of Mr. and Mrs. James A. Farr, aged 2 months. Funeral from 52 Garth street on Sunday at 3 o’clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

PASSMORE - At the residence of her son, F.W. Passmore, Montreal, P.Q., on Friday 11th August, 1899, Jane Elizabeth, relict of the late C.W. Passmore, of this city, in her 77th year. Funeral from C.P.R. station, Hamilton on arrival of 5:30 a.m. train Monday. Interment at Hamilton cemetery.

 

REEVES - The closing of the Government bridge at the beach for repairs was responsible for a drowning accident last night, in which Miss Mary Reeves, an estimable young woman whose parents live on Grant avenue, met her death, and three other persons had a narrow escape. Since the bridge has been closed no means of crossing the canal has been provided, and small boys have reaped a harvest in carrying passengers across in rowboats at 5 cents a head. It was while getting out of one of these small boats that Miss Reeves met with the accident which resulted in her death.

The young woman was employed as a domestic at the summer residence of Thomas Irwin, on the north side of the canal.


Last evening her sister Flossie went down to pay her a visit, and about 9 o’clock started to catch the 9:10 car from the south side of the canal. She was accompanied by her sister Mary, and when they got to the north pier they asked Earl Carroll, a small boy who was in a skiff nearby, to take them across to the other side. Both young women got into the boat and they reached the south pier in safety. Ernest Carroll, a brother of the boy who was in charge of the boat, was standing on the pier and went to assist Miss Flossie out of the boat. She stepped on the gunwale and then slipped backwards pulling Carroll with her. The force of the two falling into the boat upset it, and the four were soon struggling in the water. Carroll held onto Miss Flossie and kept her afloat, but the other young woman came to the surface on the opposite side of the boat. She held on for a short time and then, losing her grip sank and did not come to the surface again.

The cries of the party soon brought a crowd to the scene of the accident, but it was so dark that the people could not render much assistance. A man named McDonald put out in a dingy and saved Miss Flossie Reeves, and Ernie and Earl Carroll. A soon as it was discovered that one of the young women was still in the water St. Clair Balfour and Charles Bull threw off their shoes and outer garments and dove to the bottom in an effort to save her. The current, however, must have carried her body away from the spot where the accident happened, as no trace of it could be found. The work of dragging the canal was commenced at once, but so far the body has not been recovered.

At the time of the accident there was a dance at the clubhouse of the R.H.Y.C. but hearing the sad news the music ceased. The sad end of the young woman is much regretted as she was very popular with all her new her.

The body has not been recovered, and it is thought it has drifted into the lake.

 

WERDEN (Picton, Ont.) August 12 - While engaged in drawing in peas at Bethel, about eight miles from here, this morning, during a thunder storm, John Crawford and his two grandsons Werden by name were struck by lightning. One of the grandsons, Harry Werden, aged 20 years, was killed instantly. Crawford and the other boy are likely to recover.

 

KILLEY - The funeral of the late Joseph H. Killey, who died suddenly Wednesday night, took place this afternoon from the family residence 19 Hess street south, and was largely attended. The large number of beautiful floral tributes showed the high esteem in which the deceased was held. Rev. W.F. Wilson had charge of the religious services at the house and grave.

 

DOHERTY - The funeral of the late G.A.P. Doherty took place this afternoon, but, being of a private nature, only the relatives and immediate friends followed the remains to the grave. Rev. John Morton officiated at the house and grave. The pall-bearers were: Walter Campbell, R.Raw, John Adam, and E. Wright.

 

McCADDEN (Cornwall) August 11 - News has reached Cornwall friends of the sad circumstances attending the death of John McCadden of Connaught, in Finch township. The family was milking in the morning when they heard the report of a gun, and on their return to the house found Mr. McCadden lying on the floor dead, with a charge of bird shot in his head, while the discharged shot gun lay beside him. It is supposed that following his usual custom he was going out to shoot sparrows when the gun was accidentally discharged with fatal results. The deceased was about 45 years of age, and was favorably known throughout Dundas, and Stormont counties.

 

McMULLEN (Port Hope, Ont.) August 11 -W.H. McMullen, son of Ald. John McMullen of Port Hope, who for the past two years has been engaged as a reporter on the staff of the Toronto World, was drowned here this afternoon, and the accident has occasioned a great commotion in the town.


Young McMullen accompanied the Durham Old Boys to Port Hope on Monday last, and remained here to spend his vacation with his parents. This afternoon he went down to the lake for a swim. He jumped off the end of the pier into deep water, and swam towards the shallow beach in the direction of the bathing pavilion. He had a hundred yards or so to swim, and before he had gone very far he was seized with cramps in his legs and sank.

A lad named Pilling swam out to his rescue but McMullen clutched him and both sank twice. McMullan then released his hold, and Pilling brought hin up and was not strong enough to sustain.

Pilling swam to shore for assistance. The McMahon brothers responded with their fishing boat, and succeeded in recovering the body after it had been in the water for fifteen minutes. The young man’s life was extinct. Deep sympathy for the bereaved family.

 

MURPHY - The adjourned inquest into the case of Mathew Murphy, the Beamsville man who died on Wednesday last from injuries received by being struck by an H.G. & B. car, was held at No. 3 police station last night. Coroner Griffin conducted the inquest. The deceased’s family was represented by J.B. Long and James Dixon looked after the interests of the company. It did not take long to get at all the facts of the case, but considerable time was wasted by jurors and counsel

asking witnesses apparently useless questions. It was after eleven o’clock before the witnesses had all been examined, and nearly midnight before the verdict was arrived at. The first witnesses examined were Benjamin Pyitt, and Elgin Hannigan, two men who were employed on a traction engine which was working just opposite where the accident occurred. They saw the car strike the deceased but were not sure whether there was any fender on the car or not. Had the bell of the car been ringing the speed of the cars in the country.

This concluded the evidence and it took the jurors nearly an hour to arrive at the following verdict: “That Mathew Murphy came to his death by being accidentally struck by a trolley car on the H.G. & B. railway and that this jury recommend that improved and fixed fenders be provided for all cars on such railway in order that such accidents maybe prevented as far as possible.

 

Monday, August 14, 1899

 

WELLS - In this city on Sunday, August 13th, at St. Joseph’s hospital, John street south, James Edward Wells, a native of England, aged 54 years, and 6 months. Funeral Tuesday 3 p.m. from the residence of John McKellar, No. 11 Barton street east, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will pleas accept this intimation.

 

MAGILL - In this city, on Monday, August 14, 1899, George Magill, aged 55 years. Funeral from the private residence of Thomas Crooke 548 York street, Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ANDERSON - In this city, at her late residence, on August 12th, Annie L. beloved wife of Alexander Anderson, aged 58 years. Funeral from 234 Hannah street west, on Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation. Aberdeen Scotland please copy.

 

BRYCE (Toronto) August 14 - On Sunday evening at 7 o’clock, J.W. Bryce, aged 35, son of ex-.Ald. Thomas Bryce and manager of the Bryce lumber company, left his home at 43 Cowan avenue south, Parkdale, with the intention of going for a walk. He did not return, although his wife despairingly waited up for him all night. At seven o’clock this morning, Henry Wright and John A.


Pearson, of 18 and 20 Tyndall avenue, respectively, went down to the exhibition wharf at the foot of Dufferin street for a dip. They found a cap lying on the wharf and soon afterwards saw a body floating in the water. Just as they got the corpse ashore, two of Mr. Bryce’s young sons, who had been making a search, came up and exclaimed; “Oh, that’s father”. The body proved to be that of Mr. Bryce, and it was accordingly taken home. Mr. Bryce had been in ill health of late and was subject to spells of dizziness. It is thought that he went down to the wharf last night, and, being overtaken with dizziness at the waters edge, fell in and was drowned. He leaves a widow and three children.

 

NEEDLES - Thomas Needles, of 10 Terauley street, Toronto, died yesterday while a doctor was hurrying to attend him.

 

McMULLEN - The remains of William Harper McMullen, of the Toronto World staff, who was drowned last Friday while on a visit to his parents in Port Hope were laid away in their last resting place Sunday afternoon. The funeral was the largest since that of Lieut. Col. Williams, fourteen years ago.

 

DAVIS (Deseronto, Ont.) August 13 - Last night about 7 o’clock a young immigrant named William Davis undressed on Cedar Mill dock here and jumped into the bay, and did not again appear on the surface. Some young lads who were in the vicinity at once gave the alarm, and a rescuing party recovered the party in about ten minutes. Doctors Armstrong and Passmore were summoned but life was extinct. The young man had only been in town a few days and it is said he was not mentally sound. The coroner was summoned, but did not deem an inquest necessary.

 

BROWN (Windsor, Ont.) August 13 - There was an exceptionally sad double drowning accident here last evening, the victim being Julius Brown and his ten-year-old-son Walter. Brown, who was employed at the Malleable Iron works at Delray, a suburb of Detroit, proposed to swim and, accompanied by his son, set out for the river soon after supper, despite the remonstrances of his wife, who declared she had a presentiment that something would happen if they went. Both undressed and Brown, who was a strong and expert swimmer took his son on his back and struck out for deep water. When he got about twenty feet from the bank he apparently was seized with cramps, for he immediately sank beneath the surface without a cry, the boy still holding tightly to his neck.

Several youths swimming in the vicinity seemed paralysed with fright, and scrambled to the shore, where they stood speechless. Nearly an hour elapsed before the alarm was given, and it took another hour before the bodies were located. When found the son was still clasping his father’s neck in a death embrace. Brown came to Detroit from Toronto about a year ago and was known as a steady, hard-working man. He is survived by a widow and three children.

 

KNOXEL (Welland, Ont.) August 13 - The body of Louis Knoxel was found in the canal here this morning. Deceased was seen late last night, but how he came to be drowned is unknown.

 

SPRINGER (Welland, Ont.) August 13 - The four-year-old-son of C. Springer, of this town, was drowned by falling into a well this morning.

 


MAIRS (Brougham, Ont.) August 12 - During the heavy thunder storm which passed over here early this morning John A. Mairs, one of our best known and highly respected citizens, was struck by lightning and instantly killed. Mr. Mairs was on his way to work, and took shelter under a tree during the storm. He was dead for some hours before being found. His wife and infant child, who have been visiting friends in Muskoka, returned today, only to find their terrible loss.

 

GIBBON (Pickering, Ont.) August 12 - Mrs. Gibbon, aged 74 years, one of the oldest residents of Pickering, died suddenly this afternoon from a paralytic stroke.

 

JAMES (Toronto) August 14 - The attorney-general has been asked by County Crown Attorney Haight, of Perry Sound, to investigate the cause of the death of Albert James, a resident of Bethune township, whose body was brought home from a fishing excursion on Friday, August 4, by two neighbours who said he had been drowned. A brother-in-law of the deceased Thos. Collis went to Parry Sound when notified of the accident, also on Saturday made requisition at the attorney general’s department for an inquiry by a provincial officer.

Mr. Collis stated that on the afternoon of Thursday, August 3rd, his brother-in-law went with a neighbour named Alderdice, and the latter’s son, John, a lad of seventeen or eighteen, on a fishing excursion that was to last for several days, to a small lake some miles away. On the day following the father and son returned with the dead body of James on a stoneboat.

The story told by Alderdice was that the three had camped out overnight on the shore of the lake, and early in the morning made a raft on which to go out and fish. They were just pushing off, he being at another corner of the raft, busy with something, when John cried out; “Albert is in”. He looked round and saw James standing in the water up to his chest. Neither said anything and Alderdice went on with his work. He looked again, and saw that James was in the water to his neck, and seemed to be going down on his knees. Then, Alderdice said, he went over to the other side of the raft and held out a paddle for James to catch hold of. He made no effort to do so, but went further down, and when the water reached his chin Alderdice called to him: “Albert, for God’s sake, grab the paddle”. He paid no attention, but continued to go down, and began beating the water with his hands. He went right down and did not come up, although he was in only four feet of water, and quite close to the shore.

Alderdice said that when James sank he and his son put back to the beach and went and got a bushranger named Logan to help him to recover the body. Logan got the body but four hours after the accident.

After the body was brought home a doctor was called and he made a cursory examination of the body. He said the deceased had a magnificent constitution. Mr. Collis from the first doubted that his brother-in-law had been drowned; but the body bore no outward evidence of violence save at the neck was somewhat swollen and blood flowed freely from the nostrils if the head were slightly raised. The whole neighbourhood, Mr. Collis said, shared his suspicions that the real cause of his brother-in-law’s death was a mystery. He thought the story of Alderdice scarcely credible, and he does not believe that James who was in splendid health and the sole support of his mother and sister would willingly throw away his life.

The deceased lived with his mother and sister on a 70 acre lot, of which about sixteen acres are cleared and works on the Ottawa and Parry Sound railway as a section man. Alderdice lives on the next lot. One of his sons has been paying attention to Miss James, a girl of 18, and the deceased was opposed to it.

The bushranger, Logan, did not come to the James house, and was not seen by Mr. Collis. Neither Alderdice or his son attended the funeral, and the boy did not come about the place after the body was brought home. Prior to five years ago the deceased lived for ten years, and was employed by the Ontario Brewing company. He was in his twenty third year.


After the funeral Mr. Collis asked Alderdice where the deceased’s watch and knife were. Alderdice said he had taken them that they might not be lost: the knife was at the house and he would send it over, and his son was wearing the watch, but he would tell him to return it. Both articles were returned.

 

Tuesday, August 15, 1899

 

MAGILL - In this city, on Monday, August 14, 1899, George Magill, aged 55 years. Funeral from the private residence of Thomas Crooks, 518 York street, Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

The late ex-Ald. Magill was a life member of Acacia lodge, A.F. & A. M. having been connected with it for nearly thirty five years, and was for a long time an officer of the lodge. The lodge will have charge of the funeral, and emergent meeting has been called for 2:45 p.m. tomorrow at the lodge room whence the brother will proceed to the residence of Thomas Crooks, 518 York street, and take charge of the remains.

 

CAMP - Robert Charles Camp, an old residence of the village of Copetown, met with an awful death yesterday afternoon. He was walking between Dundas and Copetown on the T.H.& B. track, when he was struck by the afternoon express from the west and instantly killed.

Camp was employed as a labourer. He did not go to work as usual yesterday, but walked to Dundas to attend to some business. It was while on the way back to his home that he met with the accident, which caused his death. Engineer Henderson, who was in charge of the engine, saw the man walking on the track, and blew the whistle, but the man apparently did not hear it, for he made no effort to get off the track. The next instant the engine had struck him, and he was hurled to one side. The train was stopped as quickly as possible, and went back to the spot where the accident happened and the body which was found about 100 feet away, was picked up and brought to the city and placed in the morgue. Coroner Griffin was notified and after hearing the circumstances deemed it advisable to hold an inquest. Constable Hay was entrusted with the duty of summoning a jury.

The body lay in the morgue for several hours before it was identified. When Mr. Camp did not return home as usual in the evening, his family becoming somewhat anxious, and having been informed by Rev. Mr. Howe, of Copetown, that a man had been killed on the track, Mrs. Alfred Brennan, one of his daughters, decided to come to the city and see if the remains in the morgue were those of her father. Although the body was badly disfigured, she had no difficulty in identifying it.

The inquest was opened at the city hospital at noon today. Coroner Griffin presiding. The juryman summoned were; Robert Gordon, Wellington St. John, Edmund Townsend, John Tilley, James Holbrook, Charles Holt, Simon Lawry, John Hogan, James Fox, Hiram Barker, Hiram Broadbent, James McIlroy, James Phillips, and Robert J. Wallington.

Hiram Broadbent was elected foreman, the jury then adjourned to the morgue to view the body. On returning to the hospital long enough to hear the evidence of Mrs. Brennan, who wished to return to her home. She said her father was slightly deaf but she never experienced much trouble making him hear what they were saying. She could not throw any light on the cause or nature of the accident. After hearing this evidence the jury adjourned to meet tomorrow night at eight o’clock at No. 3 police station.

The deceased who was 63 years of age, leaves a family of four grownup children. Mrs. John Perry, Pearl street north, is a daughter.


ROWLAND - At his late residence, No. 203 Wellington street north, on Monday, August 14, 1899, William Rowland, a native of Sandwick, Orkney, aged 48. Funeral Wednesday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

At his late residence, Wellington street north, after an illness of some months, which he bore with Christian fortitude, William Rowland, a native of Sandwick, Orkney, passed quietly away yesterday. For many years he had been a resident of this city, and a good citizen, and for nearly twenty years a faithful employee of the M. Brennan & Sons & Manufacturing company. The firm has decided to close down its works on Wednesday afternoon to allow its employees to attend the funeral in a body.

 

GRAY - Bertie, the-four-year-old-son of H. Gray, of Peterboro, was drowned while playing with several other small children back of the Dickson company’s saw mill.

 

Wednesday, August 16, 1899

 

BROWN - In this city, on August 15, Wilfred, infant son of Herbert M. and Florence A. Brown, aged 1 year and 9 months. Funeral from the parent’s residence, 357 East avenue north, Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock.

 

CAMP - On Monday, August the 14th, Robert Charles Camp, a resident of Copetown. Funeral from the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Perry, 101 Pearl street north, Thursday at 2 p.m. (Private).Interment at Hamilton cemetery.

The funeral of Robert C. Camp who was killed on the T.H. & B. will take place tomorrow afternoon.

 

REEVES - The funeral of Miss Reeves, who was drowned at the Beach, took place this morning from Blachford’s undertaking establishment. The remains were interred in St. George’s Societies lot. The religious services were conducted by Rev. J.A. Jackson.

 

MAGILL - The funeral of the late ex-Ald. Magill took place this afternoon from the residence of Thomas Crooks, 518 York street, and was largely attended. The large number of floral offerings showed the high esteem in which the deceased was held. The religious service was conducted by Rev. H.S. Beavis, and the pall-bearers were chosen from the members of Acacia lodge, A.F. and A.M., of which the late Mr. Magill was an old member. The Masons attended the funeral in a body.

 

STEVENS (Chatham, Ont.) August 15 - The quiet little summer resort two miles south of Cedar Springs where a number of Chatham’s prominent citizens spend the summer, was thrown into a state of excitement last night when it became known that Lyle, the only child of George and Mrs. Stevens, had been shot, perhaps fatally. When it became known here, excitement reigned supreme. Details were at first meagre and contradictory, but it was soon learned that the affair was accidental. The accident happened about 10 o’clock last night, about 200 yards east of the cottages. The injured lad and a number of girls and boys, with whom he was very popular, were sitting around a bon-fire on the beach, talking and laughing, when from the cornfield on the bank above a rifle spoke out a couple of times. This was not heeded, but when a stray shot struck the sand near where they were sitting, Lyle and one of the party jumped up and ran up the bank to see who was doing the firing.


But on nearing the top of the bank, a bullet struck young Stevens in the abdomen, passing downward as was learned afterward. When he was seen to fall, willing hands bore him tenderly to his father’s residence.

This morning the injured lad’s condition was not improved, and at noon it was no better. He is lying in a very critical condition, without an even chance for his life.

The injured lad is the only child of George and Mrs. Stevens. He is a particularly bright boy of fifteen summers, and was a prime favourite with all his school mates. The accidental shooting was done by Willie Houston, a son of P.M. Houston, who, with a number of other boys, was in the cornfield. Major Coogan, high constable, went out and investigated the matter and is of the opinion that the shooting was accidental. Mr. and Mrs. Stevens are prostrated with anxiety as to the boy’s condition. At the Houston cottage the household was equally grieved.

 

STEWART (Woodstock) August 15 - While the C.P.R. passenger engine on the train, which arrives in St. Thomas at noon, was backing down the main line at the Woodstock station today as usual, Alexander Stewart, aged ninety-one years, very deaf and almost blind, stepped in front of the engine and was knocked down across the rails and both legs cut off. He was killed instantly.

The family to which Stewart belonged seems to have been pursed by a strange fate. There were four brothers, and all, as well as their father, have met violent deaths. Donald, the oldest, was a private in the Forty- second Highlanders and at the age of sixteen fell on the field at Waterloo. Peter and the father were out fishing at Inverness, Scotland, some time later, and were drowned. Duncan, the third brother, was a resident of Woodstock. On December 7, 1867, he met death in a terrible manner. He had a long butcher knife in his pocket, and stumbling fell upon it. The wound soon proved fatal. Alexander, the youngest, had reached the age of ninety-one, and it was thought to him at least it would be granted to die in his bed. But it was not to be.

 

Thursday, August 17, 1899

 

VINCENT - On Thursday morning, August 17th, 1899, at his mother’s residence, 45 Young street, James Moneur Vincent, only son of the late Rev. Edward Vincent. Funeral on Saturday, 19th August at 4 p.m.

 

WERNHAM (Holland Landing, Ont.) August 16 - Alfred Wernham, of this place, was drowned this afternoon in the Holland river near the Bradford bridge. Mr. Wernham, and Mr. Evans, were bringing hay up the river on a scow, when Mr. Wernham fell overboard and the body went underneath the scow and before it could be recovered, life was extinct. Deceased leaves a wife and three children. The body was recovered.

 

HURDMAN - Mrs. Hurdman, wife of Major Hurdman, commander officer of the Ottawa field battery, died yesterday of typhoid fever.

 

O’KEEFE - Mrs. Eugene O’Keefe, wife of the well-known Toronto brewer, died very suddenly early yesterday morning. The deceased was sixty-four years of age. Death was caused by heart failure.

 

POLLARD - Lewis Pollard, whose daughter died at St. Michael’s hospital Toronto, some weeks ago, as a result of dose of poison administered by mistake, has issued a writ against the sisters of St. Joseph, claiming unstated damages.


STEVENS (Chatham, Ont.) August 16 - Lyle Stevens, who was accidentally shot Monday night, died at Erie Beach this afternoon at 3 o’clock.

 

HURST (Barrie) August 16 - Yesterday a boy named Hurst was driving a team and roller in a field in Innisfil township. He was riding on the implement at that time, and when going down a slope, fell forward. He was found dead beneath the roller, which was resting on the hollow of his neck.

 

CAMP - The presence of County Attorney Crerar at the inquest held last night to inquire into the death of Robert Camp, who was killed while walking on the T.H. & B. railway track Monday afternoon, lightened the labourers of the jurymen and coroner considerably. Unlike most inquests held recently, the evidence was all in and the verdict arrived at within an hour after Coroner Griffin called the jury to order.

Rev. Richard Rowe, a Methodist clergyman from Copetown, gave the clearest account of the accident, and from his evidence it was shown that no responsibility for the deceased’s death could be placed on the either the railway company or any of its employees.

Mr. Rowe, being sworn, said he had known the deceased for about two years. He was driving home from Lancaster, Monday afternoon, and as he neared the Governors road, he saw a man walking on the trestle. He then noticed a train coming in the opposite direction, and the man, apparently bewildered, started to run towards it. Had he turned back he might have escaped. When the man got near the centre of the bridge he saw that he could not escape and crouched down as if to escape being struck. The train struck him and he was thrown to the bottom of the cutting, a depth of about 25 feet. The witness got out of his buggy and went down to where the man lay. He was still breathing but died a few minutes later. On account of the blood on the man’s face he did not recognize him as Mr. Camp, until a boy named Kitchen said it was Mr. Camp. Mr. Rowe then drove to Copetown and informed the deceased’s daughter, Mrs. Brennan, of the accident, and in company with her he drove back to the city and she identified the body. The witness had prepared an elaborate plan of the bridge and surrounding country, which aided the jurymen to understand the situation. Mr. Rowe thought the crossing of the track and Governors road a very dangerous one, but was sure that the engineer blew the whistle and rang the bell on approaching the scene of the accident.

A. Henderson was the engineer on the train. He saw him on the bridge as the train approached, but thought he was too near the centre to go back to the south end. He, however, might have saved his life by crawling onto the end of the beams of the bridge. He apparently was about to do this when the train struck him. When the witness first saw the man on the track he blew the whistle, rang the bell and applied the brakes. The cow catcher on the engine struck the deceased’s head.

E. Kennedy corroborated the testimony of his engineer with the exception that he thought the man might have avoided the accident by retracing his steps.

J.G. Burns, baggage man, saw the man on the bridge but did not see the accident. He helped put the body on the train. Doctor Rennie held a post-mortem on the body and said that death was due to external violence. The wound on the head caused death.

N.J. McIlhorgey, train master on the T.H. & B. said that the accident would have been avoided had the deceased laid down flat on the end of the ties or step down onto the end of the beams.

The trestle is the private property of the company, and nobody had a right to walk on it.

The jurymen were not long in arriving at a verdict of accidental death, for which nobody but the deceased could be blamed.

 


Friday, August 18, 1899

 

VINCENT - On Thursday morning, August 17th, 1899, at his mother’s residence 45 Young street, James Monceur Vincent, B.A., Princeton University, only son of the late Edward Vincent. Funeral on Saturday, 19th August at 4 p.m.

 

FREETH - In this city, on August 18th, 1899, John Freeth, sr., a native of Wiltshire, England, aged 86 years. Funeral Saturday at 4 p.m., from his son’s residence, 175 Catharine street north. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

John Freeth, sr., died this morning at his late residence, having been ill for only two weeks. Previous to that he had enjoyed good health for a man of his age. The deceased was born in England 85 years ago, and lived in this country for 45 years. He was a butcher on the market for many years, and retired some years ago. He leaves two sons - John and George - and four daughters.

 

WATSON (Berlin, Ont.) August 18 - A shocking death occurred at Freeport, a village four miles south of here last night. A Mrs. Watson was in the act of starting a fire with coal oil when the flames from the fire reached and exploded the can. The unfortunate’s clothes caught fire, and she rushed out into the yard and rolled over in the grass in a vain attempt to smother the fire. So fierce were the flames that the grass and fence around her caught fire. Neighbours soon arrived, and the poor woman was made as comfortable as possible, lingering in dreadful agony till this morning when she died. She was about 40 years of age, and leaves seven children, one a babe two months old. Two years ago, two men were killed by lightning on this farm.

 

STEWART - The Toronto World says; Moore Kelly, a Montreal broker who has just returned from Dawson City, in speaking to the World, corroborated the intelligence that ex-Mayor Stewart of Hamilton had succumbed to the hardships of the Edmonton trail.

He was in W.F. Herring’s store in Dawson City, when a man just in from the Edmonton trail came into buy supplies. Herring who came from London, Ontario asked him if he had heard anything of Stewart. The trader’s reply that he was present at his funeral, and saw the poor fellow buried.

 

DUNN (Ottawa) August 17 - The soldier of the Royal Canadian regiment of infantry encamped at Rockcliffe, Private Robt. S. Dunn, of No. 2 company, Frederickton, N.B., was drowned this afternoon while bathing in the Ottawa river at that point. He dived under a raft of logs, and failed to come to the surface on the other side. Several companions were with him at the time, but were unable to render assistance. The body has not yet been recovered. Private Dunn was 21 years of age, and unmarried. He formerly worked in Brantford, enjoying the R.C.R.I., at Niagara recently. He has two brothers in the Imperial army serving at present in Ireland, but has no relatives in this country.

 

COLEMAN (Ingersoll, Ont.) August 17 - Howard, the nine-year-old-son of Wm. Coleman, butcher, of this town, while in bathing with his older brother and others about the same age, was drowned this afternoon in Carroll’s Dam, on the outskirts of the town.

 

Saturday, August 19, 1899

 


JARVIS - At his late residence, Woodburn, township of Binbrook, on Friday, 18th August, 1899, Archibald Jarvis, aged 77 years. Funeral Monday 21st inst., at 2:30 p.m. Interment at Knox church, Binbrook. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

FLEWETT - In this city, on August 18th, Elizabeth Flewett, aged 43 years, daughter of the late James Lucas. Funeral from her sister’s residence, 194 Mary street, on Sunday, August 20th, at 2 p.m. to Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

VINCENT - J.M. Vincent, son of the late Rev. Edward Vincent, died on Thursday at the residence of his mother on Young street. The deceased was an exceedingly bright young man. After receiving his early education at the Collegiate Institute, he went to Princeton University where he graduated with honours. The funeral took place this afternoon. The pall-bearers were; John Riach, Calvin McQueston, John Walker, M.D. McKichan, John Miller, L.E. Eager. The religious services were conducted by Rev. Dr. Fletcher.

 

O’NEILL - Patrick O’Neill, an old and respected resident, died last night at his residence, 216 Market street. The deceased was ninety years old, and had lived in Hamilton for a number of years.

 

JAMES (St. Thomas, Ont.) August 18 - The death of Mrs. Belle James, which occurred last night at her residence, is a very sad affair. Four or five years ago she married a man named James. One day a letter came to James and she opened it, and was surprised to find that signed “your loving wife and children”. Mrs. James asked her husband when he came home if he already had a wife. He acknowledged that he had a wife and several children in Virginia. A couple of days later he disappeared leaving wife number two, to look out for herself.

Last night the woman was taken sick and died, the physician in attends giving haemorrhage

as the cause of her death. Deceased was about 39 years of age.

 

KERR (Bracebridge) Aug. 18 - The sad news reaches here from Port Sydney that a son and daughter of Andrew Kerr, aged about twelve, and eighteen years, respectively were drowned in the river below the rapids on Tuesday afternoon. They were in bathing but no particulars of the fatality have reached here yet.

 

SELAK (Orillia) August 18 - Mary Selak, a girl of about thirteen years of age, was drowned at Bass lake yesterday afternoon. While playing with other children upon a raft, she fell into the water and was drowned before help arrived. The body has been recovered.

 

VILLENEAUVE (Clarence, Ont.) August 18 - The sad drowning accident occurred here yesterday evening by which Napoleon Villeneauve, aged seventeen, lost his life. He and two other boys were swimming in the Ottawa river here off the boom when he undertook to dive off a crib of timber fastened outside the boom, at that place being not more than six or seven feet in depth. It is supposed he most have struck his head on a rock, for he never came up to the surface. The body was recovered this morning.

 


BIRNIE (Goderich) August 18 - Alexander Birnie, aged fifty years, died at his home, at the corner of the Huron road and Oxford street and the circumstances of his death were such that the matter has been the subject of investigation by a coroner’s jury. The deceased had lived alone since the death of his mother six weeks ago, and it is said that since then he had been somewhat downhearted. A neighbour found him dying. An inquest was opened by Coroner Holmes, and after a number of witnesses had been examined without throwing much light on the matter, an adjournment was made until Wednesday. Doctors Taylor, and Shannon held a post-mortem and found a large quantity of Paris green in the stomach and intestines.

 

Monday, August 21, 1899

 

BEWICKE - In this city, August 20th, 1899, Clara Bewicke, aged 68, beloved wife of David Bewicke, Esq., late of London, England.

 

WOODWARD - In Spokane, Wash., on Thursday, 18th inst., W.J. Woodward, second son of the late H.W. Woodward, in the 41st year of his age. Funeral took place Sunday the 20th, to Spokane cemetery.

The body of W.J. Woodward, the Hamilton man who died in Spokane, Wash., will be interred in that city at the expense of his brother, who resides in Chicago.

 

BOND - In this city, August 19th, Mary, beloved wife of John Bond, aged 52 years and ten months. Funeral took place this afternoon at 3 o’clock.

Mrs. Mary Bond wife of John Bond, of East Flamboro, died at the city hospital on Saturday. The funeral took place today from Blachford’s undertaking establishment.

 

TURNEY (Kingston) August 20 - John Turney, of Adolphustown, who left over a year ago for the Klondike, died last March on his way home. His party endured great hardships, going by the Edmonton route. Mr. Turney was first taken down with pneumonia, and on his recovery scurvy set in which caused his death. He was over 60 years of age, and a highly respected farmer of Adolphustown.

 

WESESTENHAFER (Neustadt, Ont.) August 19 - While John Wesestenhafer, a labourer, who lived two miles from here, was returning home on Friday evening, he was run over and killed by a north bound express on the G.T.R. He was a quiet, hard working man.

 

McDONAGH - Rev. Father McDonagh, of Picton is dead.

 

SECORD - James B. Secord, of Niagara-on-the-Lake, grandson of Laura Secord, is dead.

 

SMALL - A.J. Small, boot and shoe merchant, formerly of Bowmanville, Ont., is dead in Winnipeg.

 

FERGUSON - The wife of Hon. Justice Ferguson died at an early hour this morning at her residence in Toronto.

 

GODFREY (Midland, Ont.) August 20 - At 8 o’clock this morning, George Godfrey, night-watchman at elevator No. 1, was drowned here. He was walking along the edge of the dock in front of the elevator, trolling and it is thought that he accidentally lost his footing and fell in. The body was found shortly afterwards, but life was extinct. He leaves a widow.


BLAIR (Ottawa) August 20 - A lad named Blair, of Hull, was drowned today while bathing in the Ottawa at the Chaudiere. He dived and remained on the bottom for fully ten minutes, until pulled out by his companions. Their crude efforts at resuscitation were unavailing to restore consciousness, and life was extinct when the nearest doctor arrived.

 

DUNN - The body of private Dunn, of the R.C.R.I., who was drowned at Rockcliffe while bathing last Thursday, was recovered on Saturday afternoon.

 

BOSWELL - The body of Willie Boswell, who was drowned at Bowmanville some weeks ago, was found on the beach about five miles west of the town. Since the accident occurred, Mr. Boswell has kept up a continual search along the shore. The remains will be taken to Toronto for interment.

 

Tuesday, August 22, 1899

 

GOODALE - At 21 Nightengale street on Monday, August 21st, 1899, Charles Stewart, infant son of James and Maggie Goodale, aged 3 weeks and 4 days. Funeral from above address on Wednesday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

ROBERTSON - In this city on August 21st, 1899, James Robertson, in his 52nd year. Funeral from his late residence, 231 Barton street east, on Wednesday at 3 o’clock. Friends will please accept this intimation. (Caledonia papers please copy).

 

WILCOX - At his late residence in Binbrook, on Monday, August 21st., John Wilcox Sr., aged 69 years. Funeral Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

 

CORLETT (Thamesville) August 22 - An accident occurred on the C.P.R. track north of Thamesville last night, whereby John Corlett, 21 years of age, lost his life. Corlett was one of the many hands bound for Manitoba on the harvesters excursion, which left here last night, and it is supposed he was walking down the track to the station when the twelve o’clock west bound express struck and instantly killed him. His body was further mangled by a following freight train.

 

LAKE - William T. Lake, aged 69, died in Belleville yesterday from apoplexy.

 

INNES - Mrs. James Innes, wife of James Innes, ex-MP., died in Guelph yesterday.

 

GLENN - Samuel Glenn, of the firm of Glenn & Sons, seed and grain merchants, Chatham, died last night in his 74th year.

 

CLINE - Mayor Teetzel this morning received a telegram from the warden of Kingston Penitentiary, stating that W.G. Cline, of Winona, who was serving a term there for shooting his son and wife, died this morning. Mr. Cline was suffering from rheumatism, and it is expected that this resulted fatally. Mayor Teetzel is Mrs. Cline’s legal advisor.

 

Wednesday, August 23, 1899

 

CLINE - In Kingston, on Tuesday, August 22nd, George W. Cline, of Winona, in the 54th year of his age. Funeral private.


TREBLE - Suddenly on Tuesday, August 22, 1899, Samuel G. Treble. Funeral from his late residence, No. 61 Hunter street west, Thursday at 2:30 p.m.

The hand of death was laid suddenly on S.G. Treble, the well-known merchant, yesterday afternoon. Without warning he was stricken down, and died within a few minutes. He was at the store, corner of James and King streets, and about 5 o’clock determined to go to his home on Hunter street west. He went upstairs and after getting a drink of water in Doctor Green’s office, he was returning when he fell unconscious in the landing. The sound of the fall was heard in the store below, and the clerks ran upstairs, to find Mr. Treble apparently dead.

He was carried into Dr. Green’s office, and Dr. Rennie, who was passing, was called in.

He, however, could do nothing to save Mr. Treble who died within a few minutes of falling unconscious. Heart disease was the cause of death.

The deceased was born in St. Thomas in 1853, being 46 years of age. He first conducted a men’s furnishing business in Windsor. In 1873, he came to Hamilton and established a similar business, which he carried on with the greatest success. For the last year or two he had dropped out of direct management, and at the time of his death had about completed arrangements for the transfer of the business, so that he could travel in the old country.

The deceased was unmarried. He leaves five brothers and two sisters - J.M., Toronto;

Marwood, Victor and Charles, Buffalo; William, Pennsylvania; Mrs. Sherk, Fort Erie, and Mrs. Fanson, Vannville, N.Y. About fifteen years ago deceased was a Lieutenant in the Hamilton field battery. He was a past master of Doric lodge, A.F. and A.M., and until a few years ago was an active worker.

Several of deceased brothers arrive in the city this morning and took charge of the funeral arrangements. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 2:30.

 

BRAIDWOOD - In this city, on Wednesday, August 23rd, at her parent’s residence, 342 Victoria avenue north, Myrtle M. Braidwood, infant child of Mr. and Mrs. A. Braidwood, aged 4 months and 2 weeks. Funeral tomorrow at 4 o’clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

RIOBEL - The body found on the C.P.R. tracks at Mile End, a few days ago has been identified as that of Stanislas Riobel, of Cornwall, Ontario. He was 45 years of age, and leaves a wife and family.

 

RUDGE (Toronto) August 23 - H.E. Rudge, a clerk in the crown land’s department was found dead sitting in his chair yesterday morning. He roomed over Burgess’ drugstore, corner of Yonge and Alice streets, and the discovery of his death was made by a friend who called in to see him. Dr. Nattress pronounced it a case of heart failure, and no inquest will be held.

Deceased had the rank of Lieutenant in the Royal navy and had seen considerable active service, having been under Lord Wolseley. While at Ashantee he contracted a fever, which was never completely eradicated from his system.

 

BENSON - Mrs. Benson, wife of the late Lieut. Col. Benson, of Peterboro, Ontario, died in Winnipeg yesterday, at the residence of her son, Dr. Benson, aged 83 years.

 

HARDING - T.J.D. Harding, one of Brockville’s most respected business men, less than a week ago was taken ill with heart trouble, and suddenly expired yesterday.

 


KINNEY - Thomas Kinney, 404 Catharine street north, met with an untimely death while following his regular vocation as a wheel- tapper on the G.T.R., last evening. Kinney was caught between two cars, and so badly crushed that he died within an hour. The deceased was an old employee of the G.T.R., and for some time has been on night duty. Last evening he went to work as usual at six o’clock.

 

McNIVEN - It has been decided by the crown attorney to hold an inquest on the death of Ruth McNiven, the two year old daughter of William McNiven, killed on the H.G. & B. track yesterday morning a few miles west of Grimsby village. Coroner Comfort, of Beamsville will preside, and the inquiry will commence tomorrow, as the crown attorney cannot attend sooner.

 

SPRATT - Robert Spratt, father of W.A. Spratt, and Mrs. Henry Fuller, died about 11 o’clock this morning, at Mrs. Fuller’s residence, 85 Charles street. Deceased, who was over 80 years of age, was for years a resident of Toronto, where he was president of the Board of Trade, and President of St. George’s society.

 

Thursday, August 24, 1899

 

BALLENTINE - On Thursday, August 24th, 1899, Mrs. Elizabeth Ballentine, relict of the late Alex Ballentine, aged 78 years. Funeral from her late residence No. 58 Wellington street north, on Saturday at 3 o’clock.

Mrs. Alexander Ballentine, mother of Adam Ballentine, the well-known John street grocer, died at her home on Wellington street this morning after a protracted illness. Mrs. Ballentine was born in County Armagh, North Ireland, and was in her 77th year. She came to this city with her husband and family in 1856, and has been a resident of Hamilton ever since, excepting a short time she lived in Toronto.

Her husband died in 1871. She leaves six children, ( four sons, and two daughters) - Adam, Robert Bailey, Alexander Lewis, and William G.; and two daughters, Misses. Annie and Maggie.

The funeral will take place from her late home Wellington street, on Saturday.

 

BACK - In Ancaster, on Tuesday, the 22nd, Amelia Back, wife of Leonard Back, a native of Norfolk, England, aged 58 years. Funeral Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

 

STEANGER - At No. 60 Murray street west, Hamilton, on Thursday morning, Aug. 24th, 1899, James Steanger, a native of Birsay, Orkney, Scotland, in the 76th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, on Saturday at 3 p.m.

James Steanger, an old resident of this city, died at his residence, 60 Murray street west this morning. The deceased was in his 76th year.

 

KILPATRICK (Dundas Star) - Mrs. Kilpatrick, wife of the late George Kilpatrick, of Dundas, died yesterday at Hamilton. The funeral takes place on Friday from the residence of Alex McKenzie, Park street, to the Grove cemetery. George Kilpatrick Jr., of Hamilton, and Mrs. Alex McKenzie, of Dundas are the only surviving children of deceased.

 

BRETT - James Brett, father of Mrs. W.W. Buchanan, formerly of this city, and now of Winnipeg, died in Chicago, at the residence of his son-in-law, Dr. McDiarmid, 6325 Greenwood avenue. Mr. Brett was in his eightieth year, but so well and active that he came to London on the “Old Boys” excursion, to that city. While there he was taken ill, but desiring to reach Chicago, he undertook the


journey on Aug. 17th. Arriving at home he sank very rapidly dying Saturday morning at 3 o’clock.

Mr. Brett spent several years in Hamilton and has many friends who will learn with regret of his death. He was a life long Conservative. His son, Dr. Brett, of Banff, has been a member of the North West legislature for the past twelve years, and leader of the opposition for the greater part of that time. The funeral took place in Chicago on Sunday.

 

RITCHIE - John Ritchie, a Keewatin journalist was drowned at Keewatin. He was about 35 years of age, and came from Mount Forest, Ont.

 

GURNEY - Word was received last night of the death of Rev. G.H. Gurney, Baptist minister at Freelton. On Sunday Aug. 13, Rev. Mr. Gurney occupied the pulpit of the Baptist church in Dundas. On his return to Freelton he was taken ill and grew rapidly worse until Tuesday, when an operation was performed. From this the deceased sank rapidly, death ending his sufferings yesterday morning. Appendicitis was the cause of death.

Mr. Gurney was well-known in Hamilton. He came to this city about five years ago from London as pastor of the Christian Workers church here. Resigning this pastorate, he became a member of Victoria avenue Baptist church, and about two years ago took charge of the Freelton church. He leaves a widow and two children. He carried a life insurance policy of $1000.

 

SMITH (Windsor, Ont.) August 23 - Thos. Smith, of St. Thomas, met death here today in a horrible form. Yesterday the young man, who was only 19 years of age, came to the city to look for work. His quest was unsuccessful, and sick and disheartened, he decided to return to his home, St. Thomas. He was penniless, and intended to make use of a freight train to reach his destination. At 7 o’clock this evening he attempted to board an east bound freight in the Grand Trunk yards opposite the waterworks, but missed his footing and fell between the cars. The accident was seen by the brakeman and the train stopped.

Smith’s body was found as it had fallen. His head and left arm were cut off, as cleanly as though done by a saw, and lay on one side of the rail while the body lay on the other. Coroner Bell was notified and the body removed to the morgue.

Chief Constable Smith of St. Thomas is an uncle of the deceased.

 

REYNOLDS - James Reynolds fell down the stairs in Stewart’s mill, Tilbury, and sustained fatal injuries.

 

BOOKER (London) August 23 - Miss Mary E. Booker did not want to accompany her mother on the trip to Buffalo, so she took a small dose of Paris green to make her sick enough to keep her home. The poison was stronger than she thought and she died this morning after hours of suffering. Miss Booker is 22 years of age, and lives with her parents at 697 Princess avenue. Yesterday morning she was taken ill, and admitted to her mother that she had taken a small dose of Paris green, but said that she would soon recover and persuaded her parents not to call a doctor. Last night she grew worse, and at 10 o’clock the physician was called. He could do nothing to help the young woman, who died at 10 o’clock today.

No cause can be assigned for the deed other than the fact that Miss Booker had arranged to visit Buffalo with her mother and afterwards desired not to take the trip. It is supposed she intended to take only enough of the poison to make her ill for a short time so that she might plead sickness as an excuse to remain at home.


JOHNSON (Toronto) August 24 - Thomas L. Johnson, a coloured messenger at the Parliament buildings, committed suicide at Windsor yesterday. The motive for his act, one singularly rare among men of his race, is wholly a mystery. Johnson left the buildings last week to take his holidays, and was accompanied as far as Hamilton by his wife and two children. Here the wife stayed to visit relatives, and he went on to Detroit to attend the convention of the Grand lodge of Coloured Freemasons, of which organization he was a prominent member.

Yesterday afternoon, according to a dispatch from Windsor he walked down to the riverside in his full Masonic regalia, and jumped head foremost into the water. The negro came to the surface only once, and made no outcry or effort to save himself. The police were at once notified and began dragging for the body, which was still unrecovered at sundown. When the news of his act reached Detroit, where the Grand lodge was meeting, it caused great surprise as Mr. Johnson was one of the most popular members of the Grand lodge. Only on Tuesday he was elected Grand Registrar of the order.

At the Parliament buildings the news was greeted with equal astonishment. Tom had been connected with the house keepers staff ever since the new buildings were opened,. five years ago. He was brought from Hamilton by Hon. J.M. Gibson, whose staunch supporter he had been in many elections. He was in receipt of a comfortable income and his wife, also coloured, comes of a well-to-do family in Hamilton.

 

DAVIDSON - In this city on Wednesday afternoon, at the home of his sister, Mrs. McMillen, 69 Catharine street north, Matthew Davidson, aged 75 years, answered the last roll call and reported to the Grand Commander. The deceased was a native of Ireland, but Hamilton has been his home for the past fifty years. He served in the United States Army during the Mexican war, and again in the war of 1861 - 65 for three years. He was drawing a pension of $12.00 a month.

The funeral will take place from his sister’s home, at 2 o’clock on Friday afternoon. Comrades of the Grand Army of the Republic and all other American soldiers are requested to meet at the post room, Corner of King and Catharine streets, at 1:30 o’clock to escort the remains of their comrade to the cemetery.

 

TREBLE - There was a large gathering of mourners at the funeral of the late S.G. Treble, which took place from 61 Hunter street west, at 2:30 this afternoon. Many representative citizens followed the remains to their last resting place, and deep regret was expressed on all sides. The funeral services, which were conducted at the house and grave by Rev. Mr. Lloyd, of Toronto, were of a most impressive nature. The pall-bearers were; George Forsythe, Mr. Tasker, two former employees, and four brothers of the deceased - J.M., Toronto, and Marwood, Victor, and Charles, Buffalo.

 

Friday, August 25, 1899

 

BALLENTINE - On Thursday, August 24th, 1899, Mrs. Elizabeth Ballentine, relict of the late Alex Ballentine, aged 78 years. Funeral from her late residence, No. 58 Wellington street north, on Saturday at 3 o’clock.

 

STEANGER - At No. 60 Murray street west, Hamilton, on Thursday morning, August 24th, 1899, James Steanger, a native of Birsay, Orkney, Scotland, in his 76th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence on Saturday at 3 p.m.


SPRATT - Suddenly on Wednesday morning, August 23rd, at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. B.H. Fuller, 83 Catharine street, Robt. Spratt, second son of the late Lieut. Spratt, 22nd Gordon Highlanders, in the 79th year of his age. Funeral at 11:45 a.m., Saturday, August 25th, to Toronto, via C.P.R.

 

GURNEY - Rev. E. Gurney, the Baptist minister of Freelton, who died on Wednesday was buried at Peterboro at 1 o’clock today.

 

NELSON (TEVETHICK) (Vancouver) August 24 - Two weeks ago, Annie Nelson retired to rest with a bottle of carbolic acid beside her. This morning the door was forced opened and the police found the remains of the woman in an advanced state of decomposition. Her real name was Tevethick. She came from near Exeter, Ontario.

 

FRANKLIN (Erie View) August 24 - Mrs. Celinda Franklin, an aged and respected resident, died here a day or two ago under very distressing circumstances. Mrs. Franklin, who was 75 years old, lived with her daughter, Mr. Louis Oakes, on Gaywood Dairy farm, in South Walsingham. A four year old bull, a thoroughbred Jersey, was running with a herd of cows, in a field adjoining the lane and yards to which they had access in order to get water. Mrs. Franklin saw the bull in the yard just as some people were leaving the house and went to drive it away. This enraged the bull, and the animal rushed at her and caught her on his head, carrying her ten yards and tossed her in the air, and as soon as she reached the ground did the same thing again. Rev. T.A. Presswood Frost, who lives on the homestead and saw the affair, rushed to the rescue with a club, and began to belabour the animal. The bull showed fight, but by this time Mr. Frost had secured a pitchfork and succeeded in burying the prongs in him again and again until the furious animal was driven off. Meanwhile Mrs. Franklin had been removed to the house and a messenger sent for Dr. Meek of Port Rowan, who found upon his arrival that she was suffering from concussion of the brain from numerous bruises and various internal injuries. In a few minutes she passed away.

 

WALLS (Ottawa) August 24 - A sad accident happened on Saturday night, at five o’clock at the government bridge over the Amable Dufonde river, about three miles south of Eauclaire station, on the C.P.R., in the township of Calvin. Three girls, aged respectively 17, 12, and 3 years, slipped off a boom and were drowned. They were the daughters of Thomas Walls, a farmer, who lived at the bridge. The youngest child was playing on a boom and she fell into the current, and her sister, aged 12 years, jumped into save her, but the current swept them away to the bridge, on which the eldest, aged 17, saw them. She jumped in too, and all were drowned.

 

WILCOX (Binbrook) - John Wilcox, an old resident of this township, passed away on Monday last, and his remains were interred in the Sinclairville burying ground on Wednesday afternoon.

 

McNIVEN - An inquest into the death of Ruth McNiven, the two-year-old-daughter of William McNiven, Winona, was held last evening by Coroner Comfort, of Beamsville, in Grimsby

village. After hearing the evidence the jury brought in a verdict of accidental death.

 

MACLAINE - George Maclaine, of St. Louis, Mo., brother of John Maclaine, of this city, arrived last evening to attend the funeral of his mother. Mr. Maclaine will return to his home on

Tuesday next.


Saturday, August 26, 1899

 

CRAWFORD - In this city, on the 25th inst., Mrs. Elizabeth Crawford, widow of the late

Samuel Crawford, in her 86th year. Funeral from the residence of Mr. Alfred Powis, Aberdeen ave., on Monday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock.

 

O’NEILL - In this city, on the 26th Aug., Annie Byrnes, beloved wife of Robert O’Neill. Funeral from her late residence, 57 Macaulay street west, on Monday morning at 9 o’clock, to St. Mary’s Cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BALLENTINE - The funeral of the late Mrs. Margaret Ballentine took place from her late residence, 58 Wellington street north, this afternoon, and was largely attended. The pallbearers were sons and relatives of deceased. Rev. Dr. Fletcher conducted the service.

 

WILKINSON - Joseph Wilkinson, an old man who was well-known to the police having been before the magistrate on numerous occasions on charges of drunkenness and vagrancy, died rather suddenly in the city jail last night. Wilkinson was sentenced last May to serve six months on a charge of vagrancy. Since his confinement he has frequently been seized with epileptic fits.

Last evening when the turnkey visited him at 10 o’clock he appeared to be in good health, but an hour later, he was found in a dying condition. Dr. Balfe, jail surgeon, was called in but could do nothing for the poor fellow, and he died shortly afterwards.

An inquest was held at the jail at noon today, Coroner Wolverton presiding. The jury was only a few minutes in arriving at a verdict of death from natural causes.

 

SPRATT - The funeral of the late Robert Spratt took place today from the residence of his daughter, Mrs. H.H. Fuller, 85 Charles street. Private service was conducted at the house by Rev. Father Daw, at eleven o’clock. The remains were taken to Toronto, via the Canadian Pacific Railway on the 12:25 train, the pall-bearers to the station, being the deceased’s five sons-in-law- Stuart Howard of Montreal; S.B. Fuller, of Woodstock; W.B. Nivin, of New York; Douglas Armour, of Toronto, and Alexander Moffatt, of New York, and Drs. Macdonald, and Edward B. O’Reilly, of Hamilton.

The remains were met at Toronto by T.C. Patterson, Geo. W. Torrance, J.G. Haggerty, Frank Cayley, Wm. Boyd, Geo. S. Crawford, Barlow Cumberland, and Percival Ridout, who acted as pall-bearers at Toronto. The funeral service was conducted at St. George’s church by Rev. Canon Cayley, rector, assisted by Rev. Father Daw. The remains were taken to St. James cemetery for interment in the family plot.

 


STEVENS (Chatham, Ont.) August 25 - For five evenings, twelve leading business men of Chatham have listened to the testimony offered at the inquest on the body of Lyle Stevens, shot at Erie beach on Monday, August 14. Deceased was the only son of Ald. George Stevens, and the lad who fired the shots, according to his own admissions and the evidence, was Willie Houston, police magistrate Houston’s only son. The intention was to scare the party about the bonfire at the beach. The reason given for the desire to frighten the people was that some of those who were about the fire had usurped the drift wood gathered by the Houston party. When this became known Miss Jessie Houston suggested to her brother that he frighten them by firing off the rifle. Four shots were fired at 10 o’clock at night, and Lyle Stevens now lies in Maple Leaf cemetery, the victim of a bullet in his abdomen. Keen interest has been taken in the proceedings before Coroner J.L. Bray. The jury was composed of the best business men in the city.

 

CUNNINGHAM (Ottawa) August 25 - Robert Cunningham, eight years old, fell into the Rideau canal this afternoon, and was drowned. The scene of the accident was in full view of many, yet the boy’s body was not taken out for eighteen minutes after the accident. Efforts at resuscitation proved unavailing. The boy’s mother is in the Protestant hospital dangerously ill, and his father George Cunningham, a painter, is in Montreal. The boy was drowned while his brother and sister looked on.

 

BOLTON - Dennis Bolton, a coloured man, on the western excursion from Owen Sound, fell from the train and was killed near Winnipeg.

 

ANDRUS - Gordon Andrus, son of G. Andrus, of London, Ont., was drowned while bathing in Lake Huron at Southhampton. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

GOSSAGE - Col. Brooks Wright Gossage, of St. Thomas, passed away yesterday morning. Deceased was the youngest son of the late Thomas Gossage, of Great Creaton, North Hamptonshire, England, and was born in that place 67 years ago.

 

GIRLING (South Hampton, Ont.) August 25 - At the time when raspberries were first getting ripe a few weeks ago a son of Peter Girling who lives on the reserve, was apparently in somewhat poor health for a few days. One day he went berry picking. A large snake entwined itself around his ankle, which caused him to shake and kick his foot furiously in his strenuous effort to free himself from the reptile. The result of the incident was a terribly severe shock to his nervous system, which apparently precipitated a sort of low fever, which had been threatening him for a few days previously. A physician was summoned, but no trace could be found of the snake having bitten him. A few days ago the boy, who was eleven years of age, died, but the cause of his death was attributable to the fever than anything else.

 

PORTESS (Brockville) August 25 - While going through the bush, W.J. Post came upon the body of an old man named John Portess. He had lived alone for some time, depending largely upon the charity of his neighbours, and at times was rather eccentric in his ways. When found, the body was decomposed and quite naked. It is supposed he left his house in a demented condition and ran through the bush until he was exhausted.

 

KENNY - The adjourned inquest into the death of Thomas Kenny who was killed at the Stuart depot the other afternoon, was concluded at No. 2 police station last night. Nothing new was brought out in the evidence, and the jury returned a verdict accidental death, and a recommendation that in cases where a train has been divided in sections a warning signal be given before coupling.

W.J. Roberts, the first witness called, was carrying baskets of fruit between the cars. He and Kenny started to cross between the two cars of the train. He had just passed through the openings when he heard the cars crash and saw that Kenny was pinned. He helped carry Kenny to the platform. He did not hear any signal or warning.

Donald McKenzie, express man, warned the men not to carry the baskets between the cars. He did not see the accident.


John Hamill, yardmaster, said he did not see the accident. He said Kenny knew the danger he incurred. He had known deceased to get in dangerous places before.

Robert Gray, assistant station-master, did not see the accident, but helped carry Kenny to the ambulance. At Kenny’s request he went in the ambulance with him, and Kenny repeated several times how foolish he had been in crossing between the cars.

Martin Phillips car-repairer, road to the hospital in the ambulance with Kenny, and heard him repeat statements made to Gray.

Thomas Rodgers, foreman of the car department; Thomas White, Thomas Murphy, and Dr. Mackelcan, gave evidence corroborative of the other witnesses.

Coroner Griffin in summing up the evidence said that he thought it was a clear case of accidental death.

 

Monday, August 28, 1899

 

SMITH - At “Avon Cottage” Main street east, Jessie Ross, beloved wife of Donald Smith. Funeral at 8:30 Wednesday morning, to St. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. No flowers.

Mrs. Donald Smith, an old resident of the city and wife of Donald Smith, died this morning at her residence after a long and painful illness.

 

POLLY - On Wednesday last John Polly, a Harrow labourer, aged about sixty years, received injuries in a run-a-way which resulted in his death on Saturday night.

 

EMERY - James Emery, aged seventy years, a pioneer of Essex county, fell dead while driving cows from pasture last evening. The body was found this morning by the side of a fence. Mr. Emery had been afflicted with heart trouble for a long time.

 

KELLY (Brockville, Ont.) August 28 - Len Kelly, aged nineteen years, walked along the C.P.R. dock here last night about 10 o’clock. Suddenly he was seen to leap into the river. An attempt was made to rescue him by throwing a plank and a rope to him but he made no effort to save himself and sank. It was evidently a case of determined suicide. The body was recovered.

 

BEATTIE (Markham, Ont.) August 28 - William Miller, son of John Miller, of the tenth concession of Markham, and two children of the late William Beattie, of Stouffville, a boy and girl, aged respectively ten and twelve years, were crossing the railway track here in a buggy when they were struck by the Sutton Flyer. The two children were hurled into the air some twenty feet. The boy sustained a bad scalp wound and internal injuries from which there is little hope of his recovery.

The girl is badly bruised about the head and body but is expected to recover. Miller was drawn over the dashboard by the lines, sustaining a number of bruises. He was able to drive home after resting a few hours.

 

FARR (Paisley, Ont.) August 27 - After a fierce battle with the flames, Mrs. W.R. Farr, a widow, 92 years old, was burned to death in her bedroom. About 10 o’clock last night the old lady who insisted on living alone, called on her son, Frank Carter, who resides two doors from her home. She only remained a short time and left in good sound mind. At 12 o’clock the town night watchman noticed smoke as he passed Mrs. Farr’s house, and after a hurried investigation he roused her son and some neighbours, and broke into the house to find her room full of smoke.


They quickly broke open the windows and secured what proved to be the old ladies lifeless body from off the bed. She was robed in her night attire. The lamp glass was in one corner, the lamp in another, and smoldering clothes in another, proving that she had been awake when the lamp exploded, and fought the fire by throwing her bedclothes to smother it. She had succeeded in extinguishing the flames, but it is thought was completely overcome, lay on the bed and was smothered. On her feet were cuts supposed to be from stepping on the pieces of broken lamp, and her nightdress was burned in some places and also small burns on her back and her hair scorched.

The Coroner Dr. McLaren, did not consider an inquest necessary.

 

OWENS (Toronto) August 28 - Hugh Owens, a full private of the Royal Canadian Dragoons, was found dead in the water just off the pier at Stanley barracks by some of his comrades-in-arms early on Saturday morning.

Deceased was a strapping young Englishman, some 30 thirty years of age, and since he had enlisted about three years ago, his time with the regulars at the fort was nearly up. He would have completed on September 15.

The deceased was out on pass till midnight and when he was not in his room at the expiration of his time it was wondered where he was. He had been sitting out smoking on the pier on Friday evening, but it was thought that he had gone down town.

About 6:45 on Saturday morning Pte. Cummings, R.C.D., happened to be at the pier, and noticed the soldier’s body about ten feet from shore in about four feet of water. He at once notified Sergt - Major Redding, R.C.D., and the latter went out in a boat and brought the dead dragoon in.

When the doctor’s arrived the body was in the fort hospital, and though post-mortem was made, a careful examination showed that no marks of violence were on the body. The doctor’s came to the conclusion that the deceased while sitting smoking must have been seized with some kind of fit or stroke and tumbled into the lake where he was drowned.

The deceased came from Tadcaster, Yorkshire, England, and had no friends or relatives in this country, and the men at the barracks knew nothing regarding his people in the motherland nor of his affairs generally other than what has been stated.

 

COOK - Doctor George H. Cook, the well-known dentist who practised at the corner of Spadina avenue and College street, was drowned in Lake Ontario, near Mimico, about 5:30 on Saturday afternoon. Although several friends were in bathing with Doctor Cook at the time, they were unable to rescue him, and he perished almost before their eyes.

Deceased, with his family, had been camping on the lake shore some distance west of the Humber river all summer since the end of June, and several friends had tents erected nearby, so that a pleasant little colony was formed. It was the daily custom for all to go in swimming together, and on Saturday afternoon most of the campers were enjoying themselves in the water as usual. Doctor Cook had come into the city on business, and so was not with the bathers at first. He returned on his wheel while they were still in the water, and made haste to undress and join his friends, who were thinking about coming out. Doctor Cook, hot and dusty after his brisk ride, ran into the water till he reached a depth of about five and a half feet, and then made a few strokes. He had not gone a dozen yards when he suddenly gave a loud cry for help and sank almost immediately.


Those of his companions who were swimmers hurried to the spot and made vain endeavours to reach Doctor Cook, who had not risen to the surface. Oscar Hassard, a student in Doctor Cook’s office made several attempts to dive and seize the body, but he was unsuccessful, and was finally forced to relinquish his search and return to shore. As soon as possible efforts were made to launch a boat, but on account of the surf caused by a southeast wind, the craft could not be gotten afloat. While the men were still struggling with it, an usually large wave came shore wards, and rolled the dead body of Doctor Cook at the feet of his friends.

Doctor Godfrey, of Mimico was soon on the spot, and tried hard to restore the unfortunate man, but as he had been under water for twenty five minutes life was extinct.

Eye witnesses to the sad accident give it as their opinion that Doctor Cook was undoubtedly seized with a cramp, and being a poor swimmer at the best of times, could not make a strong fight for his life. The fact that the drowning man could not be reached by those who swam to his assistance is explained by those familiar with the lake at this spot, whose state that there is always strong undercurrent when the wind come from the south east. When the body was recovered, the lungs and the stomach were filled with sand and water. Doctor Cook leaves a widow and two small children. W.R. Cook of the inland revenue department was a brother of deceased, and Doctor Capon was a brother-in-law. Deceased was 35 years old and lived at 17 Howland avenue. He was prominent in Presbyterian church circles.

 

McDONALD - Hector Macdonald, the man in charge of the boy’s bathing place at the eastern gap, found a suit of clothes lying on the shore about 6:30 on Saturday evening. A card in one of the pockets indicated that the garments were the property of Arthur McDonald, 35 Ontario Place.

The clothes were brought over to the city and placed in charge of the police, who had them positively identified as McDonald’s property. The young man’s relatives state that he was a very good swimmer, and that he had often gone into the water near where his clothes were picked up.

It is supposed that McDonald must have taken a cramp while swimming. As it was about tea time when the drowning occurred, no one was near the place, the man in charge being away at his home on Fisherman’s island.

For several hours yesterday parties in boats grappled for the body but without result.

McDonald was 18 years old, and worked for the Cobban Manufacturing company.

 

GRAVES (Kingston, Ont.) August 27 - On Saturday morning, a sad accident occurred at Clayton, N.Y., when Charlie Graves, 14 years of age, son of William D. Graves, customs officer, of this city, was drowned. He had charge of the news stand on the steamer Islander, and while the boat was at Clayton, N.Y., he stood on the gang-plank and talked to Mrs. Nash. This was the last seen of him alive, and it is supposed that after the lady went away he slipped off the gang plank. This occurred without an eye witness. When the boat got to Alexandria Bay, the men on board missed Charlie and concluded he had stopped off at Clayton to visit his uncle. On the return trip it was learned the boy had not been scene at Clayton during the day, and the conclusion was arrived at that he had been drowned. Men and boys searched for the body, and Saturday night two boys found it.

 

JOHNSON (Windsor) August 27 - The body of Thomas L. Johnson, delegate to the Coloured Free Masons convention who committed suicide by drowning here last week, was recovered yesterday about 100 yards below where Johnson went down. Although only in the water three days, the body was terribly swollen. In the pockets of the dead man’s clothes was found his gold watch, some Masonic documents, and $2.80 in currency. The remains were shipped to Toronto last evening for burial, and will be buried in Hamilton today.

The deceased left $6000 insurance. He had $2100 in A.O.F., $3000 in the Sun Life, and the rest in the government endowment.


SPRATT (Toronto Sunday World) - Poor old Mr. Spratt has died in Hamilton at the age of 80. Feeble since he broke his leg and not often seen in this city, his old friends here, where he lived so many years, had lost sight of him. He was a good specimen that type of sterling Englishman of whom he represented. Upright, unyielding, rather unreceptive, hearty, liberal, and high principled was Robert Spratt. He was a terror at public meetings, and, being no mere respecter of persons, never hesitated to interrupt the speaker if anything was said which conflicted with his views. He was for many years engaged in the milling business here, but was unfortunate and was in fact a man very unlikely to change with the times. Two of his daughters were married to sons of Bishop Fuller. One of his sons was in the bank of Montreal here for years. With Mr. Spratt almost the last specimen in Canada of the stout and sturdy Englishman who might have lived in the reign of George III.

 

LIDDLE - Mrs. Christopher Liddle, of Leamington, committed suicide by drowning, while insane.

 

McMILLAN - John McMillan, a farmer near Parry Sound, was found dead on the road, having being thrown out of his buggy.

 

FEATHERSTON - R.C. Featherston, a photographer, recently arrived from Ireland, expired in the Ottawa police station Saturday morning. He had been drinking heavily.

 

MACDONNELL - Alan S. Macdonnell, barrister of Welland, died suddenly of heart disease on Friday at Gravenhurst, where he had been staying for the benefit of his health.

 

CAMPBELL - Rev. James Campbell, one of the oldest Presbyterian ministers in Canada, passed away yesterday at his son’s residence, in Toronto. He was 83 years old.

 

ROSS - Mrs. James Ross, an aged lady living with her son in Malden road, township of Sandwich, West, dropped dead yesterday afternoon while on her way to visit a sick neighbour.

 

TORRANCE - Henry George Francis Torrance, for many years a citizen of Galt, died in that town on Saturday morning. His wife and a family of three survive - Talbot, a journalist, well-known in Toronto; Harry, who lives in Philadelphia, and Miss Addie, who lives at home.

 

RITCHIE (Rat Portage) August 27 - John Ritchie, publisher of a small weekly paper, called the Minstrel, at Keewatin, was drowned at Port Francis. He was a member of the Keewatin band, and he and his wife accompanied the excursion to the fort. After tea Ritchie left his wife to take a walk, and as he did not return a search was instituted. His body was not found until next morning. It appears he had walked out on some drift wood above the falls, and fell off the timber on which he was standing. His body was found lying out of the water, but his head was submerged and held down by a limb.

Ritchie was about 35 years of age, and came from Mount Forest, Ont. He leaves besides his widow one child. The dead man was down on the program to sing Just Break the News to Mother, at the Minstrel show the evening he was drowned.

 


LANE - Mrs. Philip Lane, of the Hamilton Cotton company, received word on Saturday that her husband, who left here for England on the Parisian on August 3, had died at sea. Mr. Lane had been a sufferer from diabetes for many years, and on the advice of his physician decided to visit relatives in England, hoping the trip would benefit his health. Four days after leaving Montreal, he died and was buried at sea.

Mr. Lane’s relatives were at the wharf to meet him, but instead received the sad intelligence of his death. They at once cabled to William Lane, deceased’s father, who lives at 314 Hess street south. Mr. Lane was about 26 years of age, and leaves besides a widow four small children.

 

Tuesday, August 29, 1899

 

SMITH - At “Avon Cottage” Main street east, Jessie Rose, beloved wife of Donald Smith. Funeral at 8:30, Wednesday morning, to St. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. No flowers.

 

ALDERSON - In this city, on Monday August 28, 1899, George W. Alderson, aged 52 years. Funeral from his late residence, 79 Queen street south, on Wednesday, at 3 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

HORNING - On August 28, Catharine M. (Kitty) Freeman, beloved wife of William Ira Horning, in her 30th year. Funeral from her late residence, in Saltfleet township, on Wednesday at 12:30 o’clock to Trinity church, thence to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this notice.

 

COLLIER - Arthur Collier, about 21 years old, son of Martin Collier, of Windsor, was killed in the M.C.R. yards, this morning by being run over by a locomotive. He was employed as car checker and began work only yesterday.

 

BREEN - A body found this morning on the Grand Trunk tracks near Whitby, proved to be that of P. Breen, a cattleman, fifty years of age, who left Toronto last night in charge of a consignment of horses for export.

 

HUBBARD (Paris, Ont.) August 28 - An old and highly-respected resident passed away yesterday in the person of Sergt. Hubbard. Mr. Hubbard was born in the county of Kent, England, in the latter part of 1815, being almost 85 years of age. In 1832, he enlisted in a rifle brigade and was selected on the guard of honour at the Coronation of her Majesty Queen Victoria. For the following three years Private Hubbard was stationed at Windsor Castle, where he gained many reminiscences of the Queen which he delighted to relate. On more than one occasion he was singled out by her Majesty to receive some special favour. After his service at Windsor, Private Hubbard joined the old Hundredth Regiment at Halifax, where he completed his 25 years service, and retired on a pension in 1857. It was while in Halifax that he advanced to the rank of Sergeant. Soon after his retirement from the army he came to Paris. He served as staff-sergeant under the late Lieut. Col. William Patton in the Fenian raid. Deceased is survived by his wife, to whom he was married in 1840. None of the family are living. Sergt. Hubbard was a member of the Church of England.

 

WATT (Toronto) August 29 - After having recovered from the effects of having a finger amputated, Richard Watt, of 25 Draper street, died in Grace hospital on Saturday last from an acute attack of lockjaw. Mr. Watt received the injury to his finger about a week ago in Gurney’s foundry, where he was employed. The doctor’s advised amputation of the member and Mr. Watt was thought to be doing nicely.


Early on Saturday morning, the members of his family were awakened and Mr. Watt complained of severe pains in the head. Physicians ordered his removal, and Mr. Watt died shortly after being admitted to the institution.

Mr. Watt was 51 years of age. He leaves a widow and two daughters.

 

SYMINGTON - James Symington, a former resident of Weston, died in the Royal Victoria hospital at Montreal, yesterday.

 

GOWANLOCK (London, Ont.) August 28 - Andrew Gowanlock was killed this evening in the stable yard of the O’Neil house, and George Harding and William Dyer, two hostlers, are in the police station suspected of having caused his death. Gowanlock, who lived near Thorndale, had been employed for some time with his team in the construction of cement sidewalks in the city. Today he did not work, and proceeded to celebrate his holiday by gathering up a load of liquor. In this he was quite successful and toward nightfall he arrived at the O’Neil house where he had boarded while at work, with a larger cargo of wet goods than he could carry with safety. In the stable yard, an argument ensued. There was a scuffle, and Gowlanlock dropped to the ground and did not move. There was no sign of life, and a doctor was called, who said the man was dead. The body was carried to the stable, where it was examined and the neck found broken. There was no mark of violence to be seen.

George Harding, a hostler, was arrested in the yard. Harding had been drinking, and was still under the influence when captured. Wm. Dyer, another hostler, was afterwards arrested on the street by Detectives Ryder and Nickle.

 

MOFFAT (Fergus, Ont.) August 28 - While raising one of the trusses for the roof of the new Methodist church building at Fergus, John Moffat, joint contractor for the woodwork, was almost instantly killed. The truss, which is a heavy one, was being hoisted with block and tackle, and was almost at the required height when one of the guy-ropes broke. Mr. Moffat saw what had happened, and was running to avoid the falling timber when he was struck between the shoulders and expired almost immediately. Medical aid was summoned, but nothing could be done.

Mr. Moffat had been for many years intimately connected with St. Andrew’s Presbyterian church, in which he was an elder, as well as a very active Sunday school worker.

 

NIGHTINGALE (Toronto) August 29 - Alfred Nightingale, aged seventeen years, was instantly killed yesterday afternoon by the breaking of the breaking of the cylinder of a pickling machine in P. & P. Griffins hair factory, corner Bloor street and St. Helen’s avenue.

Nightingale, who resided with his parents at 322 Brock avenue, had been employed in the factory for nearly three years. He was feeding hair into the picker, when, without the slightest warning, the steel cylinder, which revolved at a terrific speed flew into fragments. At a little distance from one end of the machine is a light partition of boards for the purpose of stopping the hair as it flies from the cylinder. When the cylinder broke, Nightingale was behind the partition about eight feet from the picker, gathering some of the hair. A bar about six feet long crashed through the partition and struck him on the head, crushing his skull. Death was immediate.

Much sympathy is felt in the district for the family. Alfred contributed to their support, and the father is ill with pneumonia and not expected to live.


WHITE (Toronto) August 29 - Wilbert White fell into the water at the eastern gap and drowned.

White was employed by W.E. Fins, dredge, which was at work on the eastern gap. When it was time to quit work he started to climb up a short ladder from the deck above. The rungs of the ladder were greasy and in his haste the man slipped and fell back to the deck. His head struck the planks with sufficient force to stun him and he rolled into the water and sank.

Engineer Buckner on the tug operating the dredge saw the accident and gave the alarm. Efforts were made to render White assistance but he did not come to the surface again, and his companions finally relinquished the task and placed it in the hands of Constable Williams, who grappled for the body, and secured about 8 o’clock. He was 24 years old and unmarried.

 

Wednesday, August 30, 1899

 

JACKSON - In this city, at her parents’ residence, 28 Clark avenue on Tuesday, August 29th, Iris H., only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Jackson, aged 1 year and 3 months. Funeral Thursday at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WHITMORE - In this city, at her parents’ residence, Sherman ave. on Wednesday, August 30th, Myrtle Isabell, infant daughter of Curtis and Alice Whitmore, aged 1 year and 6 days. Funeral Thursday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DOYLE - At Waterdown, on Tuesday morning August 29th, 1899, Annie Hunter, beloved wife of Michael Doyle, in her 56th year. Funeral on Thursday morning at 10 o’clock. Interment at Roman Catholic cemetery, Waterdown. Friends please accept this intimation.

 

CANTY - At St. Joseph’s hospital on the 29th inst., Anne Canty, (Quinlan), aged 60. Funeral from Dwyer’s undertaking establishment, to St. Mary’s Cathedral at 8:30 Thursday. Interment at Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

 

CARROLL - At the residence of her son-in-law, William Ballantine, 192 Bold street, on Wednesday, 30th August, 1899, Sarah E. Carroll, relict of the late James Carroll, in her 78th year. Funeral Thursday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

Sarah E. Carroll, for over 60 years a resident of Hamilton, died at her residence, 192 Bold street, this morning. The deceased was 78 years of age.

 

GORDON - At the residence of her parent’s, No. 56 Murray street west, on August 30th, 1899, Mary Christiana, infant daughter of James S. and Maggie Gordon, and granddaughter of the late Frank Sturdy, aged 10 months, and six days. Funeral tomorrow (Thursday) at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SMITH, MILNE - Margaret Smith died at the hospital this morning from the effects of typhoid pneumonia. On Saturday Margaret Milne, a daughter of Mrs. Smith’s, died from the same cause, and two sons are very low.

 

CHAPMAN - James Chapman, aged seventy-five, employed in the cooperage department of John Campbell’s flour mill, St. Thomas, dropped dead while at work, shortly before noon today.


DRYSDALE (Kingston) August 29 - This evening Miss Lizzie Drysdale, 14 years of age, met with an accident which may cause her death. While riding a bicycle she ran into a van on Ontario street carrying a boat, refrigerator, and lamp supplies. She rolled under the wheels, and one of them passed over her breast. When pulled up her collar bone was broken, her arm cut, and body bruised in many places. Attending physician’s hold out very little hope of her recovery.

 

JOHNSTON (Guelph, Ont.) August 29 - Frederick Johnston, who murdered his wife and three children near Dauphin, was a son of Robert Johnston, of Speedside, and Mrs. Johnston was a daughter of Thomas Ruddell, of Eramosa. Mr. and Mrs. Johnston were married six years ago, and left almost immediately for Manitoba. He managed a farm near the Portage for an English gentleman for some time and later went to the Dauphin country. He sent for others of the family to join him, and a brother and sister both unmarried went out last spring. There are other Eramosa people also in the settlement. The friends here have no idea of any cause for the deed

 

PARR-TRAILL (Lakefield, Ont.) August 29 - Mrs. Catharine Parr-Traill, the authoress, died today at 10:40 in her 98th year, at her home Westove, Lakefield. The funeral will take place on Thursday August 31.

Born in England in 1802, the daughter of Thomas Strickland, she wrote her first work in 1817, at the age of fifteen. She came to Canada in 1832, and wrote her last book in 1895 at the age of 93. So this remarkable lady has maintained literary activity for nearly 80 years.

Among Mrs. Traill’s many works are the following: The Young Immigrant, Sketches from Nature, The Backwood of Canada, A Pepp into Canadian Forests, A Guide for Female Immigrants, Studies of Plant Life in Canada. Her works, Pearls and Pebbles, or Notes of an Old Naturalist, and Cot and Cradle Stories, were published by Briggs of Toronto in 1894, and 1895. It is said that he book, The Backwoods of Canada, had a wide circulation and induced many to turn their eyes to Canada.

Mrs. Traill has lived latterly with her daughter, Miss Traill, and her granddaughter, Miss Katie Traill, at Westove, Lakefield, upon an income barely sufficient to keep them in simple comfort. Unfortunately the death a few years ago of a trusted agent revealed a disastrous state of affairs with regard to Mrs. Traills investments, so that the income was greatly reduced.

The story of her arrival in Canada, where she was struck done by cholera the moment she landed, her battles with poverty, in which she enlisted her pen, writing sketches and stories for magazines, and amid all her domestic and literary cares, finding time to study the botany of the country, is intensely interesting and instructive. In 1832 Mrs. Traill married a retired army officer. He died 27 years later, leaving four sons, and five daughters.

 

DONOGHUE - Frank Donoghue, 37 years of age, married, was drowned in the Ottawa river yesterday. He went down to the river to wash, and while leaning over the water fell in. The body was recovered. Donoghue’s home was in Ottawa East.

 

POWER - William Power, a veteran ship builder of Kingston, died Tuesday morning after a prolonged illness. Some fifteen years ago he had a fall, but recovered. A few months ago he began to suffer pain in the side and cancer soon developed, due to injuries received by the accident of some many years previously. Deceased was 78 years of age.

 


MENAGH, GALLIPEAU (Smith’s Falls, Ont.) August 29 - This afternoon Annie Menagh, daughter of Robert Menagh, and Sofia Gallipeau, daughter of Charles Gallipeau, two girls of about ten years of age, were drowned. They had gone in bathing together with two other girls in the Rideau river, and got beyond their depth.

The bodies were recovered in from fifteen to twenty minutes, and medical aid was soon at hand, but all efforts to revive them proved unavailing.

 

EDWARDS (Toronto) August 29 - Mrs. Charles Edwards, 18 Brookfield street, dropped in a fainting fit, at half-past-six-o’clock last evening on the exhibition and expired five minutes afterwards.

Mrs. Edwards, who is the wife of Charles Edwards, a guard at the central prison, had just entered the grounds, and was going to the gate at the grandstand to meet her husband. She was accompanied by her sister, Mrs. McDougall, of Bayfield, Ontario, and by the latter’s little sister, who came to the city yesterday morning to attend the exhibition.

Mrs. Edwards and Mrs. McDougall were walking down the avenue, hand-in-hand, and talking, when the former fell. A messenger was at once sent for the police ambulance, but before it arrived at the tent Mrs. Edwards had died, notwithstanding the efforts of the medical men to restore to consciousness.

 

PHAIR (Exeter, Ont.) August 29 - When the G.T.R. freight train was shunting a car off on a short spur of the track that runs into the yards of the Southern-Innis company’s stave and heading mills this morning Mrs. William Phair, a lady between 50 and 60 years of age tried to cross the track. She fell in front of the train, which passed over her body, frightfully mangling it, severing the head from the body, and crushing the arms, in a most frightful manner. The accident was witnessed by several persons. Her son called to her not to cross the track, but she did not seem to hear him.

 

ATKINSON, KITCH (Woodstock) - August 29 - Mrs. Walter Atkinson, Main street, died on Sunday night very suddenly, and her brother, Leonard Kitsch, died of gangrene at the hospital today. Mrs. Atkinson had been ailing for some time, but was not seriously ill. On Sunday night a neighbour called and told her of the serious illness of her brother. At the announcement, she suddenly fell over and expired.

The brother entered the hospital a week ago suffering from typhoid fever which was successfully combatted. Gangrene set in, and he followed his sister this morning. Both parties were well and favourably in Woodstock.

 

DOYLE - Michael Doyle, the well-known Waterdown hotel keeper, is having his share of troubles. Two years he lost a son, three months ago his young daughter Kate died, and now he is called upon to mourn the death of his beloved wife, who died yesterday morning. Mr. Doyle has the deep sympathy of his many friends of his sad bereavement.

 

SMITH - A large number of mourning followed the remains of the late Mrs. Donald Smith to the grave this morning. The body was taken to St. Patrick’s church where High Mass was said by Bishop Dowling, Rev. Fathers Coty, Doyle, and Dr. Walters assisted in the services at the church and grave. Rev. Father Craven was also present. The pall-bearers were: T. Lewis, John Cauley, John Ronan, Alexander Turner, C.J. Bird, and Robert Clohecy.

 

ALDERSON - The funeral of the late George Alderson took place from the family residence this afternoon and was largely attended. Rev. Canon Forneret conducted the religious services at the house and grave. The members of Gore lodge, A.O.U.W., of which deceased was a member attended in a body and had charge of the funeral.


Thursday, August 31, 1899

 

HOLMAN - On Thursday, 31st August, 1899, Amelia Holman, wife of Charles Holman, aged 53 years. Funeral from her late residence, No. 258 King street west, Sunday at 4:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Charles Holman, 238 King street west, is mourning the death of his wife, which occurred this morning. A couple of years ago Mr. Holman lost a son by death.

 

VANDUREN - At Logie’s Farm, Mount Albion, on Wednesday August 30th, 1899, Hugh Vanduren, aged 56 years. Funeral from his late residence on Friday, at 10:00 a.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

CALDWELL - Mrs. Caldwell, of Windsor, is dead, at the age of eighty years. She was the wife of the late Major Caldwell, and had lived in Windsor for the past twenty five years.

 

McGREIVES - William McGreives, one of the gardeners in charge of Parliament Hill grounds, died today in an Ottawa hospital of tetanus, which developed as the result of a slight accident.

 

STEVENSON (Uxbridge, Ont.) August 31 - Roy Stevenson, the four-year-old-son of George Stevenson, of Udora, was bitten on the calf of the leg by a “kissing bug” on Thursday last. Doctor McDermot was called, but despite his best efforts blood poisoning set in and the child died last night.

 

MULCAHY (Toronto) August 31 - Mrs. Annie Mulcahy, 117 Jarvis street, while alone in the house with her two young children about 10 o’clock this morning, poured coal oil on the fire to make it burn up quickly. An explosion followed, in which the woman’s clothing caught fire, and she ran out to the street covered with flames, falling unconscious on the roadway. She was removed to St. Michael’s hospital and is not expected to recovered.

 

McCOLL - Nelson McColl, proprietor of the Fulton House, Fingal, died yesterday.

 

ORR - A son of Rev. Mr. Orr, of Mono Mills, was drowned at Alliston while bathing.

 

ROBINSON - Mrs. Edward Robinson, a Christian Scientist, died at her home in Galt yesterday morning after an illness of two or three weeks duration. No regular medical practitioner

was called, the family being all believers in Christian Science.

 

ATKINSON (St. Thomas, Ont.) August 30 - The death occurred yesterday of George Atkinson, a respected resident of this city. A year ago last April Mr. Atkinson left St. Thomas for the Klondike. Six weeks ago he returned to the city, after having undergone many hardships. While away he was attacked by scurvy, and his health was greatly undermined. A week ago he was taken ill with peritonitis, which resulted in death.

 


HORNING (Hannon) - After an illness of two weeks, Mrs. William Ira Horning, (nee) Kitty Freeman, aged 30 years, died on Monday, the result of blood poisoning from child birth. The funeral took place on Wednesday, the services, which were conducted by Rev. Mr. Mooney, of Bartonville, taking place at Trinity church here, thence to Hamilton cemetery for interment. Mrs. Horning had only been married about one year, and had a large circle of relatives and friends in this section. A husband and infant son are left. The pall-bearers were: M. Davis, John Wilson, Robert Grassie, J.O. Fletcher, Robert Potruff, and Geo. Soulle.

 

Friday, September 1, 1899

 

MacLOGHLIN - Died at Hamilton Beach, on August 31st, 1899, Robert Hazelwood, youngest son of Edward and Elizabeth MacLoghlin, aged 20 years. Funeral private. No flowers.

Hazel MacLoghlin, son of ex-Street Commissioner MacLoghlin, is dead. He was a young man of brilliant attainments and his parents have the sympathy of many friends in their bereavement.

 

HOLMAN - On Thursday, 21st August, 1899, Amelia Holman, wife of Charles Holman, aged 53 years. Funeral from her late residence, No. 238 King street west, Sunday at 4:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LAFORCE - Richard Laforce, of Burlington, died in the city hospital yesterday from the effects of injuries received a couple of weeks ago while diving in the lake.

 

LAVELLE - While visiting at the residence of Patrick Barrett, Catharine street yesterday morning, Patrick Lavelle, 135 Maria street, died very suddenly. He was seized with a hemorrhage, and died before medical assistance arrived. Mr. Lavelle was a baker and well known in the city. He was 47 years of age.

 

STOKES - William Stokes, customs officer at the ferry dock Windsor, died suddenly yesterday.

 

WILCOX - A prominent resident of Binbrook has passed away in the person of John Wilcox, who died at his residence on Monday, Aug. 21. Although deceased had been in poor health for the past three years his death was quite unlooked for. It was due to paralysis.

Mr. Wilcox was born in the County of Peel, and his ancestors were United Empire Loyalists. In politics Mr. Wilcox was a Reformer. He was 69 years of age, and leaves a family of five sons, and one daughter, Mrs. Wilcox having died two years ago.

 

BOWMAN (Fruitland) - Mrs. Alexander Stewart Jr., attended the funeral of her father, Mr. Bowman, in Flamboro, on Wednesday last.

 

Saturday, September 2, 1899

 

GARTSHORE - At her late residence, 280 Bay street south, Hamilton, on September 2nd, Margaret, relict of the late John Gartshore, of Dundas, aged 90 years, and 2 months. Funeral private.

 

HAMILTON - In this city, September 2nd, Mrs. Hamilton, widow of the late Andrew Hamilton, in her 84th year. Funeral Monday at 2 p.m., from Miss Gregg’s residence, 37 East avenue north, to Mud Meeting House burying ground, Glanford.


MacLOUGHLIN - The funeral of the late R.H. MacLoughlin took place this morning from his father’s residence at the Beach. Rev. W.H. Wade was the clergyman, and the pall-bearers were Iforde MacLoughlin, R. Hill, S.G. Wade, J. Riach, V. Olmsted, and J. Sweet.

 

LAZARUS - Rev. Abraham Lazarus, formerly of Toronto died at Houston, Texas on Thursday evening. He leaves a widow and three children. Death came as the result of an attack of

malarial fever.

 

PATTERSON - Yesterday the two-year-old-son of George Patterson, concession 10, Dummer, found and ate his grandmother’s rolled oats that had considerable rough on rats mixed with it. In spite of medical aid the child died about eight o’clock in the evening.

 

DUFF - Rev. D. Duff died at Cedarville yesterday. Some weeks ago he went on a visit to his sister, who resides in that village, and while there occupied the pulpit in the Presbyterian church, and was taken sick during the service. Mr. Duff was a graduate of Knox College, Toronto, and had had charge of West Bentinck and Brant Presbyterian congregations for over thirty years.

 

Monday, September 4, 1899

 

VEALE - In this city, Sept. 3rd, of typhoid fever Frederick W., second son of Thomas O. and Harriett Veale, aged 13 years, and 11 months. Funeral from his parents’ residence 724 Barton street east, on Tuesday at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Frederick W. Veale, second son of Thomas O. Veale, Barton street east, died at his father’s residence yesterday morning of typhoid fever. He was a fine young man, and a popular employee of the Archdale Wilson company. The funeral will take place on Tuesday afternoon.

 

GLASS - At her late residence, No. 213 Rebecca street, on Sunday, Sept. 3rd., 1899, Sarah Glass, in her 84th year. Funeral from the above address on Tuesday at 3:30 to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WEBBER (Durham, Ontario) September 2 - A sad drowning accident occurred near here yesterday. While two sons of Robert Webber, of Bentinck, were returning from school, the younger of them entered the river where the current was pretty strong and was taken off his feet. The older went promptly to the rescue and managed to help his brother to the abutment of a bridge, upon which the little fellow climbed, but the elder brother’s strength must have become exhausted, as he sank and was drowned.

 

Tuesday, September 5, 1899

 

GLASS - At her late residence, No. 213 Rebecca street, on Sunday, September 3rd, 1899, Sarah, wife of the late George Glass, in her 84th year. Funeral took place from above address this afternoon at 3:30 to Hamilton cemetery.

The funeral of the late Mrs. Glass took place this afternoon. The pall-bearers were: James, John, George, Thomas, Wallace, and William Glass. Rev. W.H. Wade conducted the religious services.

 

CAMPBELL - In this city, on Monday September 4th,1899, Mrs. Mary Campbell, in her 81st year. Funeral from her late residence, 44 Queen street north, on Wednesday at 3 p.m. Interment at


 Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Mary Campbell, Queen street south, died this morning after a lingering illness. She was in the 81st year of her age.

 

CLARK (Frankford, Ont.) September 5 - Harry Clark, son of George W. Clark hotel keeper, of this place, started out in his boat this morning about 5:30 o’clock to do some trolling. He took his dog with him. About fifteen minutes after leaving, the dog returned all wet and on a search being made the boat was found below the bridge partly full of water. The unfortunate young man’s body has not yet been recovered. The river is being dragged for it.

 

REID (Detroit, Michigan) September 5 - As the Grand Trunk car ferry Great Western was backing out of the slip near the foot of Beaubine street, yesterday afternoon, Miss Susanna Reid, 45 years of age, a well-to-do-lady, whose home had been with her mother and two sisters in Exeter, Ontario, either fell accidentally or jumped from the gangway of the boat and was drowned. Fireman Molt Brown saw Miss Reid floating in the river and an effort was made to rescue her, but she soon sank from view. About six hours later the body was found floating in the current opposite the south end of the city, between five and six miles from the place where she left the dock. Miss Reid was a clever business woman and the owner of four paying gas wells at Marthaville in the Petrolia oil regions.

 

STEWART - R.V. Mathews, of the city hall, has received word of the death of his uncle, James H.F. Stewart, of Ardross, Alness, Scotland. The deceased was well-known to may Hamilton people, having married in this city Mrs. Robert Kilgour some years ago. Mr. Stewart had intended in coming to Canada this fall, but was stricken down with pneumonia.

 

GOLDING - William Golding, a British army pensioner, was found dead at the Brunswick hotel, Colborne, this morning.

 

WILLIAMS (Toronto) September 5 - Jimmy Williams, a news boy living on Berryman street, was instantly killed while attempting to board a car on Dufferin street, opposite the exhibition grounds about 10:40 last night.

There was an immense crowd waiting on Dufferin street for the cars, which were almost filled before they stopped after rounding the curve just north of the car tracks. As motor car 442 swung round the bend on the street, there was as usual a rush made for seats. Many managed to get a foothold on the steps and platform while the trolley was still in motion, and among them was little Jimmy Williams.

He got safely on the rear platform of the motor car, and then as the crowd pressed forward he was pushed off and fell under the wheels of the trailer. Before the car could be stopped the wheels of the two trailers attached to motor car 443 had passed over his body. He was instantly killed. One arm was amputated and a large portion of the scalp torn off.

The unfortunate lad was dragged out as soon as possible, and the patrol wagon conveyed the remains to the morgue. Deceased was 15 years old.

 

REYNOLDS (Brockville, Ont.) September 3 - A fatality occurred early in this morning in the G.T.R. yards, the victim being Robert Reynolds, a young brakeman, of Brockville. In the darkness he was struck by a light engine and instantly killed. The body was mangled beyond recognition, but from papers in his pockets the yardmen had no difficulty in fixing his identity.


GOSSELIN (Ottawa) September 4 - Miss Annie Gosselin, of Center street, Hintonburg, was struck and instantly killed by the C.P.R. local train from Pembroke. The accident (occurred) at the new crossing put in over Center street by the railway company last fall. The woman, it is supposed, not noticing the incoming train, stepped on the tracks. She was struck by the engine and hurled into the adjoining ditch. Her skull was fractured and her body badly mangled.

 

HUGHES (Toronto) September 5 - While on his way to take part in the labour demonstration yesterday, Shadrach W. Hughes, a cigar maker, met with a serious accident, from which he afterwards died. The deceased, who was a cripple, slipped while crossing the corner of Albert and Elizabeth streets and fell heavily to the ground. The shock ruptured a blood vessel in the back of his head, from which he died at his home, 77 University avenue, about an hour later.

The deceased had been ill for three weeks past, but the members of his union, hearing that he was convalescent and might be able to leave the house yesterday, provided a cab for his accommodation. As stated, it was while on his way to the rig that the accident occurred.

The deceased, who was about 50 years of age, leaves a widow and four daughters.

 

GEISINGER (Toronto) September 5 - A man named A.O. Geisinger was found dead at 142 Victoria street about 5 o’clock yesterday morning. W. Quinn, who occupied a room with Geisinger, heard the latter get out of bed about the time mentioned, and then fall heavily to the floor. Quinn sprang up and raised Geisinger to the bed, and at once summoned Doctor E.H. Adams, who pronounced life extinct.

Geisinger came to Toronto with Quinn and another from Cleveland on Thursday last. They intended to hold an anti-gambling crusade in this city. The party was well-known in the big American and Canadian cities, where they have done much missionary work.

 

McMAHON (Toronto) September 5 - The police yesterday examined the effects of the young woman who committed suicide on Adelaide street on Friday night. Some of her clothing was marked “Blanche McMahon” and from this it would appear that the name “Stella Williamson” was simply a stage cognomen. Some advertising matter of the Picton to Coe Hill railway was also found as well as a business card of the Avery hotel, Mount Clemens, Mich.

 

COLE - John Cole fell off the dock at Owen Sound and was drowned.

 

WELLAR - Mrs. James Wellar, of Brantford, who was deserted by her husband a few weeks ago, died of consumption on Sunday.

 

ISBESTER - James Isbester, a prominent railway contractor of Ottawa, died at the hotel Leland, Winnipeg, after an illness of two weeks.

 

McDONALD - The body of Arthur McDonald, of Toronto, the young man who was drowned near the eastern gap on Saturday Aug. 26th, was found floating in the lake near the Long Branch rifle ranges yesterday.

 

Wednesday, September 6, 1899

 

OKERLUND - At Hamilton Beach, on Sept. 6, from accidental burning. Mrs. C. Okerlund, mother of Mrs. C.G. Carlson, aged 82 years. Funeral notice later.


The north side of the beach this morning was visited by a fire that not only destroyed five cottages but brought grief to the family of C.G. Carlson, the well-known tailor through the cremation of Mrs. Carlson’s mother, Mrs. Okerlund, who was over 80 years of age. Location of the fire was what is known as Station 22, on the Radial road a few hundred feet north of the canal where a string of framed cottages stretched towards Burlington. Here the cottages are placed side by side to the east of the road, and had there been a heavy wind from the south the long row of houses would have been destroyed. As it was, the wind fortunately blew from the east and carried the flames across the road and towards an open space by the bay side.

The fire broke out about 8 o’clock in the back kitchen of the Carlson cottage, right in the centre of the destroyed buildings. When the flames began to show themselves on the outside, they were noticed by William Smith, an ice man. The flames were seen about the same time by W.J. Kingdon, and he raised an alarm and Robert Curtis, whose residence is to the south of the cottages joined him.

Soon a general alarm was sent out, and in about a minute the score of people were on the scene, as it was early for the residents to come up to the city. Among the earliest arrivals were Norman Wood, of the R.H.Y. club house, A. Munro, Magistrate Jelfs, R.T. Lancefield, Peter Balfour, Thomas Irwin, Constable Hazel, Herbert Yates, Lucien Hills, and George Ott.

In very little time the flames had spread from the Carlson’s cottage to J.H. Hornings, on the south, and a little later they jumped the other way and fastened on to T.M. William’s cottage, passing later to Charles Judd’s cottage, still further north. At the other end of the fire line the cottage occupied by D. McRae. was attacked, and within the half hour five residence were wrapped in flames and doomed to destruction.

Meanwhile, more serious things had been happening in the Carlson and Horning cottages. With the Carlson’s lived Mrs. Carlson’s mother, Mrs. Okerlund, aged 83. She was downstairs when the kitchen was discovered on fire, and started upstairs for some money she had laid away in her room. Mrs. Carlson tried to follow her mother when she found where she had gone, but the flames increased so rapidly that she could not do so.

Mr. Kingdon and another man were appealed to, and they got on the veranda by means of a ladder and broke in the window of Mrs. Okerlund, but the smoke drove them back and they were reluctantly obliged to leave the old lady to her fate.

Mrs. Okerlund was a native of Sweden, and came to her daughter’s home in 1892. Later in the morning when the rooms had cooled a little, the unfortunate woman’s remains were found. There was little more than the body left, and it was burned black. The remains were placed in a box until they could be brought to the city.

 

TANSLEY - David Tansley, a old and highly respected farmer of Sheffield, died yesterday at his home. He had lived continuously in that district for more than 45 years. He leaves to mourn his loss, a widow, four daughters and a son, besides some step-children of which Wilder Babcock, of the Bell Piano company, is one.

 

MORGAN (Montreal) September 5 - William B. Morgan, a Montrealer, who was employed as coppersmith at the C.P.R. roundhouse at Schreiber, Ontario, was burned to death on Sunday morning. The roundhouse caught fire during the night and was burning fiercely when Morgan reached the scene. He sprang into the building to endeavour to save his tools, and was overcome by flames and smoke. Before he could be rescued the walls fell in on him, crushing and burning him almost to a crisp. Morgan charred trunk was subsequently taken from the rooms and will arrive here this evening.


NEWBY - The lad who was killed near the Toronto Exhibition grounds on Monday night, and who was thought to have been Jimmy Williams, has been identified as Charles Newby, another newsboy.

 

REID - Mrs. J.D. Reid, wife of the editor of the Arrow, Burk’s Falls, who had been in poor health for some time, spending her summer holiday’s with her father Rev. J. Sieveright, B.A., of Lion’s Head, is dead.

 

Thursday, September 7, 1899

 

OKERLUND - At Hamilton Beach, on Sept. 6, from accidental burning, Mrs. C. Okerlund, mother of Mrs. C.G. Carlson. Funeral (private) on Friday.

 

CARROLL - In this city, on Wednesday, September 6th, Mrs. Ellen Newell Carroll, a native of County Mayo, Ireland, in her 70th year. Funeral from her late residence, 48 Ferguson ave. south, on Friday morning 8th inst., at 8:30 o’clock to St. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Ellen Carroll, widow of the late Patrick Carroll, and a resident of this city for the past thirty five years, died at her home, 48 Ferguson avenue south, last evening. Mrs. Carroll was seventy years of age, and had been an invalid for five or six years. The funeral will take place at 8:30 tomorrow.

 

BALL - Last evening’s celebration at Dundas, unfortunately, did not pass without an accident that resulted fatally today. In one of the rigs, owned by Richard Williamson, and driven by George Lees Jr., were seated George Ball, tax collector, and Robert Fennix. As the rig passed over the stone crossing at the intersection of Main and King streets, the seat became loose, and the two men were thrown out backwards, and fell upon their heads on the stones. They were picked up unconscious and medical assistance was obtained as quickly as possible. Dr. Flint attended them, and found Mr. Ball was in the most dangerous condition, concussion of the brain having set in. Mr. Fennix was not so seriously hurt but he is confined to his bed today.

Ball remained unconscious all night, and this morning he began to sink fast. Shortly before noon he died. His death is keenly felt throughout Dundas coming so quickly after last evening’s

happy celebration.

The deceased was 62 years of age, and leaves to mourn his sudden taking away a widow and thirteen children, most of them grown up. He was a resident of Dundas for many years. He first drove the stage between Hamilton and Dundas, and when the Hamilton and Dundas railway was started he became one of the conductors, and is well remembered by Hamiltonians, as a capable and courteous official. Several years ago he was appointed tax collector in Dundas, and held that position at the time of his death. He was very greatly respected.

The deceased was a member of the Baptist church, and treasurer of Home circle 41.

 

REED (Exeter) - September 6 The body brought down here is that of Miss Susannah Reed, who on Monday last either accidentally fell or jumped from a ferry boat at Detroit, has been fully identified by Miss Reed’s brother-in-law, James Parkinson, of this place, also by her sister Mrs. Hubbard, of Detroit. The body was buried at Walkenport today.

 


LIVINGSTONE (Listowel, Ontario) September 6 - John Livingstone Sr., died at his home here tonight, aged 89. Mr. Livingstone was the last surviving member of the family of Dr. Livingstone the African explorer and was two years older than his famous brother. There was a strong family resemblance between the two brothers and they maintained an intimate correspondence until the doctor’s death. Mr. Livingstone here treasured many letters and personal mementos sent him by his brother from Africa.

The deceased, John Livingstone, was the eldest son of Neil Livingstone, of Blantyre, Scotland, where he was born on May 15, 1811. He was married in Scotland in 1834, to Sara MacKenzie, who predeceased him in Listowel nearly nineteen years ago. He moved to Canada in 1840 and living in Lanark for twenty years, engaged in mercantile business. He came to Perth county in 1860, starting a general store. He built up a large and prosperous trade.

The surviving members of his family are Neil Livingstone, Rockwood, Ontario; Dr. Henry Livingstone, California; Mrs. J.W. Scott, Listowel; John Livingstone, Jr., Listowel, and Charles Livingstone, Seattle. For the past eight years he had made his home with his son in Listowel. He was entirely free from pain and disease of any kind, quietly sleeping away and conscious to the last. He had been a man of vigorous constitution, and in spite of his great age, was of active habits.

 

KIMBEL (St. Thomas, Ontario) September 6 - Death came with terrible suddenness about noon today to Wm. Kimbel, son of William Kimbel, auctioneer, who resides on Hiawatha street. This morning the young man started out with a companion to drive to Port Stanley to bring a piano to the city. He was driving the horses when the animals ran away. The young man succeeded in getting the horses under control. At the top of the hill approaching Union, young Kimbel appeared to be very much excited, and he told his companion that he would get in the back of the democrat and lie down. When the bridge was reached, the man along with Kimbel noticed that the latter was dying and called for help. When the neighbours arrived on the scene he was dead, the excitement had proven too much. Doctor Jackson, of Union, was hastily summoned but could do nothing.

 

SECORD (Port Colborne, Ont.) September 6 - T.R. Secord, until two years ago, deputy superintendent of the Welland Canal, died at noon today. Deceased was well- known throughout the counties of Welland and Lincoln, and other parts of the province. A widow, three sons and one daughter survive.

 

McDONAGH (Stratford, Ontario) September 6 - After an illness of nearly three years duration, of which the closing year was marked by extreme suffering, endured with exemplary patience, Mrs. McDonagh, wife of Rev. Wm. McDonagh, passed away this morning at their residence on Gore street, Stratford. Two years ago Rev. Mr. and Mrs. McDonagh removed to Stratford, his last charge at Kingsville.

 

WATSON - Charles Watson, of Guelph, aged 70, dropped dead on the roadway yesterday.

 

WAUGH - Rubin Waugh, a first-year student at Trinity College, Toronto, is reported to have been drowned in Grass Lake Simcoe county, on Monday afternoon.

 

Friday, September 8, 1899

 

BALL - The funeral of the late George Ball will take place at Dundas at three o’clock tomorrow afternoon.


ALLEN (Bowmanville, Ont.) September 7 - This morning, W. Allen, a farmer who lives just east of the town, went out to milk while his wife was preparing breakfast. Not coming in, Mrs. Allen went out to call him, and found him lying on his face smothered to death. He had been subject to fits, and must have taken one and fallen just outside the stable door and died in that position. He leaves several small children.

 

McALPINE - Peter J. McAlpine, proprietor of the McAlpine house, Glencoe, died last night, after three weeks illness.

 

ALEXANDER - A little child of William Alexander’s, toll keeper on the London and Port Stanley road, just on St. Thomas limits, wandered away from home yesterday afternoon, fell into Kettle creek, and was drowned before assistance could reach her.

 

NICHOLS (St. Catharines, Ont.) September 7 - A peculiarly sudden death occurred about 1 o’clock this morning at the home of John Nichols, his only daughter Jennie, falling a victim to acute toxaemia. The girl who was seven years of age, had been playing in the park yesterday afternoon, and went home complaining of feeling chilly. She put on a jacket and stood near the stove, and presently lay down. She fell into a sleep about 7 o’clock, from which she did not awake, and since she did not struggle in the least, or appear very ill, no fears were aroused. Two doctors were called in, but the little girl passed peacefully away shortly after midnight.

 

WAHL (Toronto) Sept. 8 - While out gathering water lillies in Grass lake, North Orillia, on Sunday afternoon, Frederick Wahl, a Wycliffe college student was drowned. Deceased had been spending his vacation with friends near Grass lake. On Sunday he went out in a row boat, accompanied by Gordon Fostick, who lives at 397 Sackville street, Toronto. When out some distance from shore, one of the oar became detached and dropped into the water. Wahl then attempted to paddle the boat along, when his oar became tangled in some weeds. In trying to free it he lost his balance and fell overboard. Fostick and the boat were carried away by the wind, and it was some time before he could get assistance. About three hours afterwards the body was recovered. It was standing upright in the water, the head being only a few inches from the surface. There was no indication of a struggle, and death apparently took place immediately after he had fallen in.

 

POWERS (Lindsay, Ont.) September 7 - A terrible threshing machine accident happened last night on the farm of Edward Costello, a few miles east of the town, by which Michael Powers, a lad of nineteen years, lost his life. The young man was employed on the thresher and at the close of the day’s work was cleaning up the machinery, when a part of the woodwork he was standing on gave way. He fell into the machine and went through it, passing out to his fellow-labourers on the top of the stack, in a horribly mangled and torn condition. He lived but a few hours, although medical aid was hastily summoned.

 

MORRIS (Whitby) September 7 - An old and respected citizen of this town, William Morris, died this afternoon, the result of an accident which took place at Gilmore’s brick yard yesterday. The deceased was severely crushed by a heavy wagon being suddenly backed up against him. At the time nothing serious was anticipated and Mr. Morris walked home after the accident. The bowels were severely ruptured, however, and in a few hours death resulted.

 


NEUMAN (Emerson) September 7 - A fatal accident happened yesterday on the flats east of here, when the twelve-year-old son of Michael Neuman lost his life. The young fellow had taken a horse out to water, and in order to get a secure hold had twisted the tie rope around his wrist. The horse made a sudden start for the stable, and the boy, being unable to extricate himself was dragged and struck against the side of the stable door being killed instantly.

 

REID (Smith’s Falls) September 7 - The saw mills of the Gillies Bros. Co., at Brayside were the scene of a frightful accident yesterday afternoon, in which Frank Reid lost his life. The unfortunate man had been engaged during the last three years or more in running an edger in front of the mill. While a piece of three-inch deal, sent to Mr. Reid by the culler, was being edged, it got stuck in the saw, when nearly sawn through. Mr. Reid tried to overcome the difficulty by moving the adjustable saw. Just as this was done, a piece of edging, three inches thick, and about three feet long, flew back and struck him in the right groin, cutting the main artery. He pulled it out and walked a few steps, asked for a cup of water, and then dropped to the floor. He bled to death in a few minutes.

 

OKERLUND - A large number of mourning friends followed the remains of the late Mrs. Okerlund, who was cremated at the Beach, to their last resting place this afternoon. The funeral took place from the residence of her son-in-law, C.G. Carlson, 138 Market street. The religious services at the house and grave were conducted by Rev. J.L. Gilmore. The pall-bearers were; Messr. Kraft, Catchpole, Bell, Robertson, Pilman, Stetger, and Fletcher.

 

Saturday, September 9, 1899

 

DEVANY - At Detroit, on Friday, September 8th, Joseph P. eldest son of the late M.J. Devany, of this city, in the 27th year of his age. Funeral will leave his aunt’s residence, Mrs. Costis, 13 Liberty street, on Monday morning, at 8:30, to St. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

John Devaney, a former resident of this city, died in Detroit yesterday. His aunt, Mrs. Costis, Liberty street, went to Detroit this morning to have the body shipped here for interment.

John Devaney died in Detroit last night, having been ill for about four weeks.

 

BLOODSWORTH - Robert Bloodsworth, the youngest son of John Bloodsworth, Hannah street east, died on Thursday at Olean, N.Y., where he carried on business. The deceased leaves a widow and three children.

 

RODGER - Thomas A. Rodger, general secretary of the Y.M.C.A., has been called to Toronto to attend the funeral of his mother. Mr. Rodger has the sympathy of a large circle of friends in his present bereavement.

 

DAVIDSON (Toronto) September 8 - Willie Struthers Davidson, son of Robert Garden Davidson met with a sad and sudden death yesterday evening. In company with several young children, he was playing during the afternoon in front of his home at 36 Madison avenue. The party of children had gathered around the corner of Bloor street, and Madison avenue, about 6 o’clock. Davidson was standing behind a tricycle with his foot resting on the rear bar. With the other foot he was shoving it along and had his hands on the handle bars. The tricycle ran to the side of the road and toppled over the curb stone. Davidson was thrown over the tricycle and fell on the road, his head striking the curbing. Pedestrians carried him to his home in an unconscious condition. Medical aid was called, but, despite all, he passed away fifteen minutes afterwards, never regaining his senses.


BALL - The funeral of the late George Ball, tax collector of Dundas who received fatal injuries at the Bertram reception on Wednesday evening, took place this afternoon to The Grove cemetery. A very large concourse of mourner followed the remains to the grave. They included the Mayor the town council, and members of Circle 41, Canadian Order of Home Circles, of which deceased was treasurer.

Rev. A.P. McDonald, of the Baptist church, conducted the services, and the pallbearers were the six sons of the deceased; Edward. Herbert, William, Robert, Ernest, and Richard.

 

Monday, September 11, 1899

 

BROADBENT - Accidentally killed at Myrtle Station, Charles Broadbent, of 157 York street, fireman on Canadian Pacific railway. Funeral notice later.

Charles Broadbent, a Canadian Pacific fireman, left on his train at 6 o’clock last night for the east. Three hours later he was a corpse in the little village of Myrtle, having been killed almost instantly.

He was on the run from Toronto Junction with a passenger train. As the train was passing through the station at Myrtle, Broadbent looked out of the caboose window. Directly north of the tracks is the large water tank from which locomotives get their supply. No sooner had Broadbent looked out and his head went with a thud against the side of the tank. The engineer who was an eye witness stopped his train as quickly as possible and picked the unfortunate man who was leaning out of the window. He was carried to the ground, but expired almost at once. A physician was called but on his arrival the man was dead. Broadbent skull had been crushed in a dreadful manner and his neck was broken. The remains were removed to an undertaking establishment pending an investigation.

Deceased was 30 years of age and unmarried. He boarded on Vine street in Toronto Junction and had been employed on the C.P.R. for a number of years. His parents reside in Hamilton.

The unfortunate man was well-known here. His parent’s live at 557 York street, and his father, George Broadbent, is employed in the G.T.R. shops. His two brothers are engineers. One of them just arrived home from British Colombia on Sunday morning. His mother only returned home a few days ago after spending a week in Toronto with the deceased. Mr. Broadbent and another son left this morning for Toronto to take charge of the remains.

 

COON - At her parent’s residence, 165 East avenue north, on Sunday, September 10, 1899, Laura Gertrude, only daughter of J.H. and Alice M. Coon, aged 13 months. Funeral from the above address on Tuesday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

FREEMAN - At No. 38 Park street south, on Sunday September 10th, 1899, Helen Maude, infant daughter of Harry and Louisa Freeman, aged 10 months. Funeral Tuesday at 2 p.m. (Private)

 

ANSTEY - Mrs. William Anstey, of Cleveland, had the body of her late husband removed from Prospect cemetery Toronto, and interred in the Hamilton cemetery on Saturday last.

 

DEVANY - The funeral of the late M.J. Devany, the Hamilton man who died in Detroit on Friday took place from the residence of his aunt, Mrs. Costis, 15 Liberty street this morning. The body was taken to St. Patrick’s church, where High Mass was said by Rev. Father Doyle. At the grave Rev. Father Coty officiated.


PELINEAU (Ottawa) September 10 - William Pelineau, an employee of the McLaren estate at Buckingham, was instantly killed yesterday while working at a splitter in a saw mill. It appears that while feeding a board to the splitter, it flew off and struck him on the neck and death immediately followed. Pelineau was a young man about twenty-four years of age, and had been married about 2 months.

 

Tuesday, September 12, 1899

 

BAKER - Suddenly, in this city, on September 11th, Sarah L. Baker, beloved wife of John I. Baker and daughter of John Stock Sr., in her 30th year. Funeral Wednesday at 2 p.m. from her husband’s residence, Dundas street, East Flamboro to Waterdown cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

STEWART - At Ancaster, on Monday, September 11th, Robert Stewart, aged 78, a native Perthshire, Scotland. Funeral on Thursday at 1:30 p.m. at Carluke cemetery.

 

BROADBENT - Accidentally killed at Myrtle Station, Charles C. Broadbent, fireman on Canadian Pacific Railway. Funeral from his parent’s residence, 557 York street, Wednesday at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

The body of Charles Broadbent, who was killed on Sunday night, arrived from Toronto this morning, and was taken to his father’s residence, 557 York street. The funeral, which will take place tomorrow will be conducted by Crescent lodge, I.O.O.F.

 

JUSON - At Monklands, Shrewsbury, on August 31st, aged 84, Harriet, widow of the late Richard Juson, formerly of this city.

Mrs. Juson, widow of the late Richard Juson, died at Monklands, Shrewsbury, on August 31. Mr. Juson was in the wholesale hardware business here many years ago.

 

FREETH - In this city, at St. Joseph’s hospital, on Tuesday September 12, 1899, Mary, beloved daughter of John and Carrie Freeth, aged 21 years, 2 months, 9 days. Funeral at her parents’ residence, 179 Catharine st. north, at 8:30 Thursday morning to St. Mary’s cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

Miss May Freeth, daughter of John Freeth, died this morning, having been ill with typhoid fever for three weeks. The deceased was 21 years of age, a great favourite with all, and her death will be greatly regretted by a large circle of friends.

 

MOORE (Aylmer, Ont.) September 12 - Word has reached here of a very sad accident which occurred yesterday morning about 11:30 o’clock at the home of Wilson Pounds, near Fairview. Robert Moore, of Cornish, was taking out the brick frame of a well when suddenly it caved in on him. It was about half-an-hour after the accident took place before the unfortunate man could be reached, when life was found to be extinct. Moore leaves a wife, but no family.

 

RODMAN (Toronto) September 12 - Miss Annie Rodman, of Brantford, was seized with heart failure at the Union Station yesterday afternoon. She was removed to the Emergency hospital, where she died in half-an-hour. The doctors in the hospital state that Miss Rodman’s death was due to rheumatism of the heart.


Deceased came to Toronto for the purpose of visiting the Exhibition, and while in town she stayed with her sister, who lives at 937 Queen street west. Shortly before 3 o’clock yesterday afternoon she went down to the Union Station to take a train for Brantford. She had just got inside the main corridor when she fell suddenly to the ground. Her friends lifted her up, but her ghastly appearance so alarmed them that they conveyed to the Emergency hospital with all speed.

She was conscious but almost no pulse; nothing that the physician’s could do seemed to able to stimulate the heart’s action, and in half-an-hour after her arrival in the hospital she expired.

Miss Rodman’s home was in Bruce county, but she had been living with her uncle, D.W. Moore, in Brantford. She was 25 years old.

 

CLARKE (Kingston, Ont) September 11 - On Labour day, Miss Martha Jane Clarke, aged 28, attended the labour demonstration at Lake Ontario park, at which a number of horses ran away, and dashed into the crowds. Miss Clarke received a severe shock, which resulted in her death Sunday morning.

 

TANSLEY (Sheffield) - David Tansley, an old and respected resident of this place, passed away on Tuesday evening, Sept. 5. The deceased was 75 years of age and was a well-known farmer in this section of the country. By his straightforward course through life, he made for himself a host of friends, who deeply regret his demise. The funeral was held on Thursday. After the usual service at the house, the funeral cortege made its way to the Sheffield burying ground, where Rev. J. Showers presided. Mr. Tansley leaves to mourn his loss, his son and four daughters.

 

BAKER - Mrs. Baker, wife of John Baker, who lives near Waterdown, died very suddenly in the office of Dr. Thompson, dentist, King street east, yesterday afternoon. She had had eleven teeth extracted, and when she was leaving the chair she collapsed. Doctors Griffin, and Aikens were summoned, but they were too late to do anything, Mrs. Baker having expired. The physicians attribute death to collapse induced by a weak heart as no anaesthetic was used, although she desired gas. The dentist applied cocaine to the gums to deaden the paid.

Mrs. Baker was about 40 years of age, and was accompanied by her husband, who was in the office with her.

The deceased was a estimable lady and her sudden death is deeply regretted by her many friends.

 

Wednesday, September 13, 1899

 

BURRELL - At her parent’s residence, 106 Dundurn street, on Wednesday September 13, Mary

Jane, third daughter of Thomas and Ann Burrell, aged 12. Funeral from above address on Friday at 3 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

North of England papers please copy.

 

FREETH - In this city, at St. Joseph’s hospital, on Tuesday, Sept. 12th, 1899, Mary, beloved daughter of John and Carrie Freeth, aged 21 years, 2 months, 9 days. Funeral from her parents’ residence, 179 Catharine street north, at 8:30 Thursday morning, to St. Mary’s cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 


TAIT (Gravenhurst) September 13 - The way freight from the north, due to arrive here about 8 o’clock last evening, parted about a mile-an-a-half north of the Hoc Roc bridge, which is about two miles north of this town. The engine and a few cars attached slowed up to recover the hind section, when, it being down grade, the hind part of the train crashed into the forward part just across the Hoc Roc bridge. Brakeman William Tait, of Allendale, was killed, and four passengers who were in the caboose were badly shaken up but escaped injury. Four cars loaded with lumber and wood were wrecked.

 

WALLACE (Winnipeg, Man.) September 12 - John Wallace, a young labourer from Bracebridge, Ont., was accidentally killed at Alexander Station last night, being fatally by the wheels of a heavily laden wheat wagon.

 

WELLS - Mrs. John Wells, wife of the well-known Galt florist, died very suddenly Monday night. Heart disease, super-induced by acute indigestion, is given as the cause of death.

 

NORTHROP - Mrs. Mary Northrop, mother of Mrs. George Gooderham, died in Toronto yesterday. Mrs. Northrop was 74 years of age, and was a native of New York. Her husband was Henry S. Northrop who instituted the wholesale druggist business of Northrop,& Lyman.

 

LAUDER - Robert Hervey Lauder, one of the best known commercial men in Canada, died yesterday in Toronto. Deceased was regarded as one of the best authorities on grain matters not alone in this country, but also in the United States. He was also a writer on commercial subjects of recognized merit.

 

BROADBENT (Myrtle, Ont.) September 12 - Coroner Carson, of Whitby, has for the past two days been conducting an inquest on the body of the late Charles Broadbent, the fireman who met with such a shocking death at the water crane here last Sunday night. A more searching inquiry was made to discover the cause of death, and the jury’s verdict was “that the deceased met his death by being impaled on the rod of the water crane, and the jurors unanimously agreed that there was no negligence on the part of either the officials or employees of the Canadian Pacific company”.

Over two hours this morning were occupied in making most careful tests into the working of the water crane, under the direction of C.P.R. Engineer Little, who afterwards gave expert testimony in a most lucid manner to the jury, who had most of them seen the tests made.

County Crown Attorney Fairwell, of Whitby, was present on behalf of the crown, and Mr. Dunlop, of Toronto, appeared for the railway. The jury was unanimous in expressing its belief of the evidence of Brakeman Steele, who gave his testimony in a most straitforward manner. The railway company gave the jury every facility for making inquiry, and the evidence of all its employees was given in a satisfactory manner.

The body was brought to the city yesterday morning and removed to the deceased home on York street. The funeral took place this afternoon, and a large number of mourning friends followed the remains to the grave, including about fifty railway men from Toronto, who came up in a special car. The pall-bearers were members of Crescent lodge, I.O.O.F, of which the deceased was a member. The members of the lodge attended the funeral in a body. Rev. J.G. Shearer conducted the religious services, at the house and grave.

 

Thursday, September 14, 1899

 


BURRELL - At her parents’ residence, 106 Dundurn street, on Wednesday, Sept. 13, Mary Jane, third daughter of Thomas and Ann Burrell aged 12. Funeral from above address on Friday at 3:30 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

North of England papers please copy.

 

BRIDGMAN - At Burlington on Sept. 13, John Wesley Bridgman, in his 56th year. Funeral from his late residence, Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock, to Greenwood cemetery. Friends and acquaintances

please accept this intimation.

 

TAYLOR (Waterloo, Ont.) September 14 - C.W. Taylor, familiarly known as the “father of insurance” died about 5 o’clock this morning. For the last few months he had been constantly hovering between life and death, and his demise was unexpected. Mr. Taylor was the founder of the Waterloo Mutual Fire Insurance company, of this town, and took a very active part in organizing the Ontario Mutual Life. He was manager of the former from its organization in 1863 until last September, when failing health compelled to retire and to accept the position of consulting manager. He held the position of Vice President of the Ontario Mutual from the formation of the company until his death. He leaves a wife and six children.

 

DOOLEY (Ottawa, Ontario) September 14 - Henry Dooley, 25 years of age, a millhand at J.R. Booth’s, met with a horrible death this forenoon. He was drawn on two rollers up to a large circular saw, which mangled him in such a manner as to cause his death a few minutes afterwards. Dooley was unmarried.

 

BANNON - Mrs. Agnes Bannon, of Toronto, who was found lying unconscious in her house last evening, having evidently fallen down stairs, died at the general hospital this morning. Deceased was subject to epileptic fits.

 

McGUIRE - John McGuire, of Toronto, was knocked down by a streetcar and terribly injured. Physicians say he will not recover, as he is hurt internally. He was pushed along the road for several yards, and then his body went under the fender. He was drawn in as far as the front wheels before the car was stopped.

 

BARWICK (Drumbo, Ont) September 13 - John Barwick, postmaster of this village for a number of years, died suddenly this afternoon at the C.P.R. station. The deceased, who was upwards of 80 years of age, was in the act of speaking to the C.P.R. agent, when he fell to the floor expiring in a few minutes. He was a member of the Anglican church, a life-long Conservative, and an ardent admirer of the late Sir John A. Macdonald. He was very active during his early years in municipal affairs being reeve of Blandford township for 21 years.

 

ROBERTSON - J.W. Robertson, postmaster of Stony Creek, died last evening rather unexpectedly. He was taken ill with typhoid fever some weeks ago, and had been convalescent. During the day he was apparently progressing satisfactorily. In the evening, however, he took a relapse, and sank rapidly until death claimed him.

The deceased was thirty-seven years of age. He went to Stony Creek a number of years ago and began business there. About ten years ago he was appointed postmaster. He leaves a widow and one child.


Friday, September 15, 1899

 

GIBSON - At Carluke, Ancaster, of injuries sustained in a fall, James Gibson, of Barton-on-the-Hill, and formerly of Ancaster, in his 81st year. Funeral Monday at 1:30, from the residence of his son, Carluke. Friends and acquaintances attend without further notice.

 

WALLACE - In this city, on the 14th inst., Nora, E, wife of James Wallace, in the 74th year of her age, a native of the County of Waterford, Ireland. Funeral will leave her late residence, 82 Cannon street east, Saturday morning at 8:30, for St. Mary’s cathedral thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Funeral private.

 

GOODALE - In this city, on Friday Sept, 15th, Clara Fern, third daughter of George and Ida Goodale, aged 1 year and 17 days. Funeral Sunday at 2 p.m. from her parent’s residence, Ida street, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

APPLEGARTH - On the 14th September, 1899, Elizabeth, daughter of the late John Applegarth, of East Flamboro, in her 77th year. Funeral from her late residence, No. 3 Hunter street west, on Saturday September 16th, at 2 p.m.

 

GIBSON - Death came suddenly and in most unexpected guise to James Gibson, Sr., of Ancaster township, this morning.

Mr. Gibson had been for years one of the best known and most generally respected man in the county of Wentworth, and the news of his sudden taking off will be a sad surprise to his many friends in all parts of the country. Yesterday morning he left the home of his step-son, Adam Inch, on the mountain back of the city, to drive to Carluke. It was his intention to attend the funeral there of an old friend - Robert Stewart - in the afternoon. Reaching the farm of John Butter - another old friend - about noon, he stopped for dinner and put his horse in the barn. While walking the barn steps, he must have slipped and fallen to the basement. Being missed a short time afterward, he was found lying in the basement with his head terribly bruised and in an unconscious condition. He was taken to the house and medical quickly summoned, but it was of no use. He lingered in an unconscious condition all night and passed away at an early hour this morning. Concussion of the brain was the direct cause of death.

Mr. Gibson was in his 81st year. He was a Scotchman, having been born in Lanarkshire, and coming to Canada when quite a young man, he settled first in Scarborough, but soon afterward came to Ancaster, where he spent the balance of his long and useful life. One of the pioneers of the township, he cleared a large farm and made for himself one of the finest homesteads in the district. He leaves a widow - a second wife, who was formerly a Mrs. Inch - two sons, and one daughter, James Jr. resides in the homestead in Carluke. William F. is located in Atlin, B.C., and the daughter is Mrs. David Butter, of Carluke.

In politics, Mr. Gibson was always known as a staunch Conservative, and the fact that he spent all his life in Ancaster township made this all the more prominent. He took a great interest in political affairs and was an earnest admirer of the late Sir John A. Macdonald. The man who knew Mr. Gibson perhaps better than any other in this part of the country is Dr. Russell, of the Hamilton Asylum. Dr. Russell went to school with the deceased in Scotland and had been his intimate friend from that time.

The funeral will take place on Monday next, at 1:30 from the old homestead in Carluke, and it promises to be the largest that the township has ever seen.


Saturday, September 16, 1899

 

GIBSON - September 15, at Carluke, Ancaster, of injuries sustained in a fall, James Gibson, of Barton-on-the-Hill and formerly of Ancaster, in his 81st year. Funeral Monday at 1:30 from the residence of his son, Carluke. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

GOODALE - In this city on Friday September 15th, Clara Fern, third daughter of George and Ida Goodale, aged 1 year, and 17 days. Funeral Sunday at 2 p.m. from her parent’s residence Ida Street, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

MOORE - On Friday September 15, at her husband’s residence near Stony Creek, Sarah Dagleish, beloved wife of James Moore, aged 80 years. Funeral Monday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances please accept this notice.

 

HOBDEN - In this city, on Saturday September 16th, 1899, William R. Hobden, aged 58 years. Funeral from his late residence, 273 King street east, on Sunday at 3 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

CLARK - On Saturday, September 16th, 1899, Phyllis Gwendoline, only child of Fannie and William J. Clark, aged 9 months. Funeral from 174 Market street, on Sunday, September 17th, at 2:30 p.m. to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

DYNES - At Hamilton Beach on Saturday. Sept. 16th, John Dynes, in his 53rd year. Funeral Tuesday Sept. 19th, at 2 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation. American and Toronto papers please copy.

 

McGINNIS - Lock McGinnis is believed to be the Hamilton man drowned in the wreck of the Schooner Lisgar.

 

ROBBINS, HUNT (St. Mary’s, Ont.) September 16 - The two boys who were killed last evening in the railway smashup one mile west of St. Mary’s have been identified as Richard Robbins, aged 12, and Charles Hunt, aged 15, both of Brantford. An inquest is now being held.

 

ARMSTRONG (Toronto, Ont.) September 16 - J.C. Armstrong, a builder of Lindsay who carries on operations at Ste. Sault Marie, during the summer, arrived in the city last night, accompanied by Mrs. Armstrong, aged 40 and Miss Lottie Armstrong, aged 20, of Peterboro, his sister, who had been summering with him at the Soo. The three were on their way home. They stayed for the night at the home of H.J. Fidler, 175 Logan avenue, brother of Mrs. Armstrong, and went to bed as usual, the two ladies sleeping together. When Mr. Armstrong went to their room at 7 o’clock this morning to awaken them he found them both dead, having been asphyxiated by gas. They had evidently turned off the gas and turned it on again by mistake. Four doctors were summoned but they had been dead for some time and nothing could be done to save them.

 

LOWE - Stephen Lowe, of Uxbridge, fell out of his buggy and was caught in the gear and killed.

 

McGRAW - Nathan McGraw, an old employee of the Grand Trunk Railway, fell dead on the street at Stratford.


SILVERTHORN - “Found drowned” was the verdict returned by the jury at the inquest of the body of William T. Silverthorn, the man whose body was found in Toronto bay last Sunday.

 

FRY - Ernest Fry, of Bellville, a lad of thirteen years of age, yesterday fell out of a pear tree to the ground, a distance of 25 feet, sustaining concussion of the brain and injury his spine. He is still unconscious and will in all probability die.

 

COOPER (Elmsdale) September 15 - A sad and fatal accident happened at the home of H. and Mrs. Cooper, when their only daughter, about five years of age, was shot by the discharge of a rifle in the hands of her brother, about two years her senior. On the morning of the fearful fatality, the father, when looking for the cows, took his rifle with him, and on returning to the house, unfortunately, and contrary to his usual practice on such occasions did not withdraw the cartridge when he placed it in his accustomed place in the room. Towards evening the deceased noticed her brother handling the rifle, and at once ran to tell her mother, who was at the pump, a short distance away, and on returning to the house, stopped opposite a window when the discharge took place, the ball entering a little above the right eye, and literally tore off and carried away a large part of the scalp.

 

Monday, September 18, 1899

 

DYNES - At Hamilton Beach, on Saturday Sept. 16th, 1899, John Dynes, in his 53rd year. Funeral Tuesday September 19th, at 2 o’clock, by carriages. (not by rail as announced ), to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation. American and Toronto papers please copy.

 

JONES - At the residence of her son-in-law, Charles Vesper, Hess Corners, Barton, on Sunday 17th September 1899, Sarah Jane Jones, beloved wife of James Jones, aged 76 years. Funeral on Tuesday 19th inst., at 2 p.m. Interment at L.A. Church, Barton. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Jones, one of the pioneers of Saltfleet, died yesterday morning at the residence of her son-in-law Reeve Charles Vesper, Hess Corners. The deceased was 78 years of age, and death was due to a second stroke of apoplexy. She leaves a husband, Thomas, and six children - Adolphus, Leamington; William, Manitou, Man; Weaver, Detroit; Mrs. Allie Harris, Leamington; Mrs. Adelaide Truax, Leamington, and Mrs. Vesper, Barton.

The deceased had resided with Reeve Vesper for the past ten years, and the funeral will take place from his residence at Hess Corners tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clock.

 

INGLIS - Suddenly on Sunday 18th, at her parent’s residence, 23 Mulberry street, Brand, eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Inglis, aged 4 years and 7 months. Funeral notice later.

 

WATT - At the residence of H. Watson, 104 Tindale street, on Sunday 17th September Mr. Watt, merchant tailor of this city, aged 72 years. Funeral from the residence of his son Alex, 83 Erie avenue, Hamilton, on Tuesday 19th inst., at 4 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery.


John Watt, the well-known merchant tailor of MacNab street north, died at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Thomas Watson, Toronto, at an early hour yesterday morning. Mr. Watt was 72 years of age, and had been a resident of Hamilton for a great number of years, coming here as a young man from Scotland. Since the death of his wife some time ago, deceased had been failing rapidly, and for the past four months he had retired from active business, living with his daughter in Toronto. Death was due to a general breakup of the system. Three sons and two daughters are left to mourn the loss of a kind and loving father.

The remains were brought from Toronto today and taken to the residence of Alexander Watt, eldest son of deceased, 83 Erie avenue. Mr. Watt was a member of several fraternal societies, and these will likely take some part in the funeral service.

 

WALDON - Suddenly at Winnipeg, Man., on Saturday, 16th September, 1899, Alfred E. Waldon, son-in-law, of Charles Hardy of this city, aged 32 years. Funeral from the residence of Charles

Hardy, 59 Young street, Hamilton, Wednesday at 3 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

A Winnipeg dispatch says; A.E. Waldon of the wholesale commission firm of McGlashan & Waldon, died last night in a cab, while being driven to his home from the station here. He was taken ill at Regina on Friday with tonsilitis; an abscess broke while he was on the train, and death from suffocation resulted while in the cab. The wife of family of deceased are visiting at Hamilton, where the remains will be taken for interment. He was a former resident of Palmerston, Ontario.

The deceased was a son-in-law of Charles Hardy, 59 Young street, and was employed by Archdale Wilson & company, some years ago. Mrs. Walden and her two daughters are visiting Mr. Hardy. The body is expected from Winnipeg tomorrow.

 

McGUIRE - John McGuire, of Toronto, who was struck by a trolley on Wednesday last, died from his injuries at his home on Saturday morning.

 

LEADLAY - Edward Leadlay, Sr., of 25 Esther street, Toronto, died yesterday. Mr. Leadlay carried on business as a hide and wool merchant in Toronto for many years.

 

NASH (Toronto) September 18 - The very sad fatality was discovered at Toronto Junction early yesterday, when Albert Nash, of Chatham, was found dead in the C.P.R. coal car, his death being undoubtedly a consequence of a collision, which took place at Galt a few hours before. Nash, who appears to have been stealing a ride from Chatham to Toronto, was crushed to death through the shifting of a pile of lumber which filled one end of the car in which his body was found.

The accident occurred in this way; two freight trains came into Galt station from the west shortly after midnight on Saturday. The one had been following a few minutes behind the other. The first to arrive came to a standstill in the station, and the signals were either not properly placed or the engineer of the second train did not heed them. At any rate the first train was run down by the second, which fortunately was running at a slow rate of speed. The caboose was flung from the track, and a flat car jumped on top the cars in front. Several of the loaded cars broke and spilled their contents on the ground.

Nash was riding in a coal car which as had been said, was loaded at one end with lumber. When the crash came the pile shifted and crushed his life out against the wall of the car.

The accident to Nash was quite unnoticed at the time, and word was dispatched to Toronto Junction asking for a wrecking train to clear up the debris of the collision. The auxiliary was immediately dispatched to the scene of the disaster, and the wrecked train was brought to the junction. As one of the yard men was examining the wrecked cars about six o’clock he noticed blood tripping from one of the cars, and one closer examination, found the body of deceased as stated.

 


HINCHCLIFFE (Cornwall, Ont.) September 17 - George Hinchcliffe, clerk, Ressmore hotel, was accidentally shot and it is thought fatally wounded near here today. Along with two other young men they had gone boating in the vicinity of Grey’s creek. They took their guns along with the expectation of a shot at wild duck. Hinchcliffe was getting into the boat pushing his gun ahead of him, when it went off and he received the entire charge of shot in his side. Two ribs were broken and the liver lacerated.

 

Tuesday, September 19, 1899

 

WALDON - Suddenly at Winnipeg, Man., on Saturday, 16th September, 1899, Alfred E. Waldon, son-in-law of Charles Hardy of this city, aged 32 years. Funeral from the residence of his Charles Hardy, 59 Young street, Hamilton, Wednesday at 3 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

The body of W.E. Waldon will not arrive from England until this evening.

 

BILLING - At his late residence, No. 102 Pearl street south, on Tuesday, 19th, September 1899, John L. Billing, agent for the London Life Insurance and Company, aged 57 years. Funeral Thursday at 2 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. London papers please copy.

J.L. Billing, 102 Pearl street south, died this morning from typhoid fever. The deceased was a collector for the London Life Assurance company.

 

GIBSON - The funeral of the late James Gibson took place yesterday afternoon to the new Presbyterian burying ground at Carluke, and was very largely attended. The cortege was fully a mile long showing the great esteem in which the deceased was held. A remarkable feature of the gathering of mourners was the large number of elderly men in it. Every friend, who, though old, was able to be present, joined those who followed the remains.

The funeral took place from the residence of the deceased’s son, near Carluke, Rev. E.B. Chestnut, of Carluke and Rev. James Black, of this city, conducted the services.

 

JENNINGS - Yesterday afternoon Coroner Griffin decided to open an inquest to inquire into the death of Mrs. Walter Jennings, who died in a dentist’s chair yesterday morning. Constable Barron summoned the jury which met yesterday afternoon, viewed the remains, ordered a post-mortem, and then adjourned to met tonight at No. 3 police station. Dr. Rennie will conduct the post-mortem. Alexander J. Myers was elected foreman of the jury. The other jurors are; James Kelly, William Kerner, Alexander B. Davidson, George Ross, O.B. Hammill, Philip Roy, A.Brunke, George Pearson, Thomas Haines, E. Condon, J. Martin, Charles Austin, E.W. Johnston, W.B. Ellis, P.N. Kenny.

 

BLAKE (Smith’s Falls) September 18 - Mrs. Anne Blake, wife of Thomas Blake, of this town, was found dead in an upper room of their house this morning, under circumstances that require an investigation.

The body was nearly in a nude state, and was covered with bruises and abrasions from head to foot, some old, some recent. It appears that Blake and his wife, together with a man named Henry

McGrath were drinking together on Saturday evening and Blake becoming jealous of McGrath, beat his wife with a stick. McGrath has not been arrested yet, but search is being made for him.Blake, on being asked to go to work on Monday morning, said he could not as his wife was dead. He also said she died at 9 o’clock Saturday night; that she was misbehaving, and that he had thrashed her with a stick. He was placed under arrest.


His first wife died under similar circumstances 25 years ago. He has said to be subject to epilepsy, and has a violent temper.

 

BUHRMAN - Capt. E. Buhrman, and his brother Arthur, of Ironprior, Ontario, died of scurvy in the Yukon.

 

RYAN - One of the oldest residents of Carlton county, probably the oldest, died yesterday in the person of Mrs. Bridget Ryan, aged 102 years.

 

BROWN - Henry Brown, a young man employed by Uriah Wilson, of Russell, fell off a wagon. The wheels past over his body and he died in a few hours.

 

GAGNON - S. Gagnon, a young apprentice in Gilmour & Hughson’s mill at Ottawa was killed while doing a horizontal bar act on a fast revolving shaft which turns beneath the mill.

 

WILKES - Heart disease caused the suddenly death of Miss Eliza Wilkes, at Toronto yesterday morning. Miss Wilkes was dressing at the time of the stroke and fell to the floor without a word.

 

POWERS (GILLESPIE) - Mrs. Jane Powers, wife of James Gillespie, Toronto, was found dead in bed yesterday. When she did not come down stairs yesterday morning her daughter went to her room and was shocked to fine her lying cold in death.

 

THOMPSON - Lieut. Col. W.A. Thompson, one of the early settlers of this country, died in Toronto yesterday. Deceased was in his eighty-ninth year. He was born at Niagara-on-the-Lake, his father being a well-known United Empire Loyalist, and at one time a member of Parliament for York. Both held rank in the Canadian Militia, and figured in the rebellion of 1837.

 

BEYER (Brantford Expositor) - Another of the well-known people of Brantford passed away last night in the person of Mrs. Margaret Beyer, wife of the late John D. Beyer of West Flamboro. The deceased was very widely known in this city and much regret will be expressed at her death. She was 65 years of age, and death was caused by dropsy. Mrs. Beyer resided for many years with her only daughter, Mrs. C. F. Lewis, 139 Chestnut avenue, and the funeral will be held tomorrow. The remains will be taken to Dundas and will be interred at Bullock’s Corners.

 

Wednesday, September 20, 1899

 

BILLING - At his late residence No. 102 Pearl street south on Tuesday, 18th September, 1899, John L. Billing, agent for the London Life Insurance company aged 57 years. Funeral Thursday at 4 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation. London papers please copy.

 

FULSUM (Attercliffe) - James Fulsum, an old and respected resident, died Sunday.

 

WALDON - The funeral of the late A.E. Waldon, whose death occurred in Winnipeg the other day, took place this afternoon from the residence of his father-in-law, C. Hardy, Young street. Rev. George F. Salton, and Rev. W.E. Pescott, of Galt, conducted the burial service, and the pall-bearers


were, H.J. Waldon, of Toronto; T.G. Waldon, of Winnipeg, C.D. and G.F. Waldon of Palmerston all brothers of the deceased, and F.J. Burd of Winnipeg, and H. Hyndman of Palmerston.

 

ROBINSON (St. Catharines, Ont.) September 19 - Mrs. Robinson, a nurse, who lived in a room on St. Paul street, was found dead on the floor of her room about noon today. She had not been seen since Sunday morning. Today an offensive was noticed coming from the rooms, and a policeman was called, who forced the door open and found the badly decomposed body of Mrs. Robinson on the floor. The Coroner was notified but on investigating decided the death was the result of natural causes. Deceased, who was about sixty years of age, had a son living, but his whereabouts is unknown, the last time he was heard of being from Missouri. Her husband died some years ago. He was a lake captain and the couple lived in Kingston for some time.

 

FITZGERALD (Moose Jaw - N.W.T.) September 19 - Tobias Fitzgerald, a well-known merchant of Peterboro was fatally shot while out duck shooting on Buffalo lake Saturday afternoon. He was accompanied by Dixon Jewett, a clerk in the Snowdon house, Peterboro, and another man, and while one of the trio was aiming at some ducks which suddenly rose in front, the canoe gave a lurch and Fitzgerald received a portion of the discharge in the side of the head. Deceased is said to have suffered from weak action of the heart and the shot proved too much, resulting in his death on Monday evening. Deceased, who was able to walk from the canoe, was taken to the “shooting box” and every care and attention given to him, but he became unconscious and gradually sank, only recovering consciousness towards the last.

Tobias Fitzgerald had been a resident of Peterboro for many years. He conducted an extensive livery, coal and wood business in Peterboro. He was an elder in St. Andrew’s Presbyterian church. As a sportsman there was no better known man in the district, and he had lead many expeditions, deer hunting and fishing, into the wilds of North Ontario. He leaves a widow but no family.

 

BATES (Brockville, Ont.) September 19 - Minor Bates, a young man of the township of Yonge, while operating a corn cutter yesterday, was caught in a belt and became tangled up in the machinery, receiving injuries from which it is thought he cannot recover. His skull is fractured.

 

BELL - Lieut. Robert J. Bell, son of the Grand Trunk solicitor, died at Belleville.

 

FISHER - The death of George G. Fisher at Cookstown on Friday removed one of the best known and wealthiest men in South Simcoe. He was 79 years of age.

 

GOWANLOCK - George Harding, charged with killing Andrew Gowanlock in the yard of the O’Neil house, London, Ont., has been committed for trial on a charge of murder.

 

PINNARD (Toronto) September 20 - The mangled remains of the man found under the C.P.R. bridge which spans Reservoir park, yesterday, were those of James A. Pinnard, Ottawa.


It appears that Pinnard, who was 65 years of age, had been an inmate of Dr. Meyers’ private sanatorium, Deer Park, for some two months, and left, apparently in the best of health, to visit the priest. About ten minutes past twelve o’clock Joseph Falvey, of St. Clair avenue, while crossing the bridge at North Toronto, was horrified to see Pinnard walk out to the middle of the bridge, take off his coat, overcoat and hat, laying them along with his umbrella on the bridge, and then fall backwards into the ravine below. In falling, he was seen to strike lines of wires just below the bridge.

An unknown lady also witnessed the suicide’s act. Mr. Falvey at once notified P.C. Hutchinson, who was then patrolling the beat on Yonge street north.

When Hutchinson arrived the man was quite dead, his neck having been broken by the fall, and the patrol wagon was sent for. Doctors Crawford and Meyers were also notified, and arrived on the scene accompanied by Inspector Johnson and B.D. Humphrey, undertaker. The body was then removed to the establishment of the latter on Yonge street, pending an inquest.

The body was badly mangled, the left arm being broken near the shoulder and the right leg near the thigh, as well as the ankle. Across the forehead lines were quite apparent no doubt caused in striking the wires while falling.

Deceased came to Toronto to be treated for a nervous complaint, and it was thought by the physicians at the sanatorium that a cure had been affected. He has a son in the inland revenue department at Ottawa.

 

JENNINGS - The inquest into the case of Mrs. Walter Jennings was concluded at No. 3 police station last evening. The jury returned a verdict of death by shock. It did not take the coroner long to get in all the evidence, but the jury was nearly two hours in arriving at a verdict. The jurors could not agree among themselves and had to call in the coroner on three occasions to explain points in the evidence. Finally, when a verdict was arrived at, only half of the jurors would vote for it. After arguing for another half hour a unanimous was brought in as follows.

“That Mrs. Jennings death was due to shock while under the influence of chloroform and that no blame could be attached either Dr. Thompson or Dr. Gaviller”.

Dr. Rennie conducted the post-mortem examination. He found no evidence that the heart or lungs were weak, and all the other organs were equally strong. He was of the opinion that death was due to shock.

 

Thursday, September 21, 1899

 

HOUGHTON - In this city, on Wednesday, Sept. 20th, 1899, James H. Houghton, only son of the late John Houghton, aged 31 years. Funeral from his late residence, 115 Locke street north, on Saturday at 3 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

TENNANT - At Toronto on Wednesday Sept. 20th, James Tennant, (of James Tennant & Co.) In his 56th year. Funeral service from the residence of his brother-in-law, Frank Giles, 28 Hazelton avenue, Toronto, on Thursday evening at 8 o’clock. Interment at Paris, Ontario on arrival of the G.T.R. train leaving Toronto at 7:30 a.m., Friday, the 22nd.

James Tennant, of the firm of James Tennant & Co., lumber merchants, Toronto, died yesterday of typhoid fever. He was born near Paris Ontario, in 1843, and after being brought up on the farm, at the age of 27 went into the lumber business, in which he was most successful. He leaves three daughters - Mrs. J.E. Elliott, of Port Huron; Mrs. James Gardiner, and Mrs. Thos. Lee, of Hamilton - and one son, James, in Chicago.

 

BETTLES - At No. 128 Robinson street on Wednesday, 20th Sept., 1899, Stewart Duff, youngest son of Thomas R.A. and Barbara Bettles, aged 4 years and 3 months. Funeral Friday at 3:30 p.m.


DEAN (Prescott, Ont.) September 20 - One of the attractions at South Grenville fair today was a balloon ascension. A fourteen-year-old-lad named Dean was standing with others watching the work of raising it when one of the poles supporting the balloon fell on his head. His skull was split and although medical assistance was at once obtained, he died about two hours later.

 

ELLIS - William Ellis, an old man who attempted to commit suicide at Belleville is dead.

 

O’CONNOR - The oldest resident of the County of Lincoln, Mrs. William O’Connor, died at St. Catharines, aged 104 years.

 

ARCHAMBAULT (Cornwall, Ont.) Sept. 20 - James Archambault, of Cornwall, was drowned at the head of St. Regis island last night while crossing the river in a row boat with two friends.

A strong gale was blowing, and Archambault attempted to stand up in the boat, when a wave struck it, and Archambault was thrown out. He leaves a widow and five small children.

 

Friday, September 22, 1899

 

HOUGHTON - In this city, on Wednesday September 20th, 1899, James H. Houghton, only son of the late John Houghton aged 31 years. Funeral from his late residence, 115 Locke street north on Saturday at 3 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

McWHIRRELL (Kingston, Ont.) September 22 - W.W. McWhirrell, in the penitentiary for life for the murder of the old Williams couple near Brantford some years ago, died in the hospital today. He had suffered for six months from consumption. McWhirrell was sentenced to be hanged, but later the sentence was commuted.

About a year ago, Mrs. Gertrude M. Truman who lived here, claimed that she was McWhirrell’s wife and that he was not guilty of the crime. She also claimed that McWhirrell was not the convict’s right name, but that he was the son of an earl.

 

Saturday, September 23, 1899

 

SPOONER - In this city, on Sept. 22nd, John Spooner, in his 55th year. Funeral from the residence of his cousin, Mr. Thos. Parkham, 57 Garth street, on Sunday at 4 o’clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

McWHIRRELL - At Kingston, Ont., William Walter McWhirrell, aged 53 years, 5 months and 19 days. Funeral Sunday at 3:30 p.m. from No. 183 Queen street north, Hamilton. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Kind friends and sympathizers invited to attend.

The mystery attached to the identity of McWhirrell, the convicted murderer who died in the

penitentiary, is likely to remain unsolved, for some time at least. The only person in Canada who can solve the mystery is Mrs. Gertrude Truman, of this city, but she persists in refusing to say who McWhirrell was, if he really was any other than William Walter McWhirrell. She holds to her former statement that the dead man was a high birth in Scotland, but of the family and its place of residence she declines to be communicative. She intimates, however, that some day, if the deceased’s relatives give their consent, she will tell all about the “poor boy”.


The Spectator reporter called on Mrs. Truman at her Queen street north residence this morning and had a long talk with her on the subject that is near to her heart than anything else. She became much agitated when interrogated about the disposal of the remains of McWhirrell.

I can only tell you, “that the body of the dear boy will be interred in the cemetery here. Yes, I asked the governor of the penitentiary at Kingston to be permitted to intern McWhirrell’s remains, and I heard later in the day from Ottawa that my request would be acceded to. Mind you, I wish to say that the burial here will be a temporary one only. It is my purpose, when the opportunity comes, to take the remains to Scotland and inter them where they should rightly be buried. When that will be I cannot yet tell; but it shall be done”.

“Did you know of his sickness” was asked.

“I did not” answered Mrs. Truman. “Walter used to correspond with me regularly, but I was not aware he was dangerously ill. It was a terrible shock when I was informed yesterday of his death.

Consumption? The poor fellow was hounded to his death. When I knew him he was a strong and healthy man, and I can’t believe he died from consumption. Oh, if an innocent man was wrongly convicted that poor boy was!” Here Mrs. Truman with great difficulty kept from bursting into tears. “Now, what more can I tell?” queried Mrs. Truman.

“As you are now the only person who can tell the name and family of the dead man, will you say who he was?”

Mrs. Truman started from her chair and retorted with flashing eyes and quivering mouth; “No, No; a thousand times no! Ask me anything but that I will gladly tell you; but who the dear boy was I cannot, will not tell. I must consider his people in the old land”.

Mrs. Truman vouchsafed one tiny bit of information about the deceased; it was that he was 33 years, 5 months, and 19 days old.

The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon from Mrs. Truman’s home to the cemetery.

 

CURRAN (Toronto) September 23 - Little Willie Curran, a child about two and a half years old, was struck and almost instantly killed by a trolley car on Parliament street, shortly before seven o’clock last evening. Norman, his brother, who made a brave attempt to save the little one, was also knocked down by the car, but fortunately his injuries were not serious.

Norman and Willie were sent by their mother to buy some groceries at the corner of Parliament and Sydenham streets. They had made the purchases and were crossing Parliament street, on their way home, when the smaller boy’s attention was attracted by some lads on the other side of the road, who were trying to get horse-chestnuts from the trees. The little fellow wriggled free from his brother’s detaining hands, and sprang forward. In his eagerness he did not see trolley car No. 335, which was coming down the street.

Norman, however, saw Willie’s peril and dropping his parcels, he ran to save him. He was too late. The little fellow was struck and thrown to the ground with great force, his skull being crushed in. The other boy, who is a few years older, was also struck by the fender and thrown aside, but escaped with a few bruises. The car was stopped as soon as possible, and Willie was carried to Dr. Noble’s surgery but life was extinct, before he reached the doctor’s door.

 

ROBERTSON (Lindsay, Ont.) September 22 - A fatal accident happened last evening on the farm of Richard Moore, a farmer living a few miles west of this town, by which John Robertson, brother of Andrew Robertson, implement agent, of Lindsay, lost his life.


Robertson, employed by Mr. Moore on the farm, was hitching a spirited team of horses to a wagon, when one of the animals suddenly kicked him in the side, killing him instantly. The horses then ran away, and it was some little time before the body was discovered, bleeding profusely from the mouth.

Mr. Robertson was well-known and respected. He was unmarried.

 

BOOK (St. Catharines) September 22 - Mrs. Ezra Book, aged 40, the mother of seven children, who resides with her husband in Gainsboro township, near Silverdale, yesterday morning carried her infant child to a well on the farm and deliberately drowned it. She then walked to the home of her mother, four miles away, whither she was followed by other members of the family, who missed her and the child.

Asked as to what had become of the babe, she calmly replied that she had drowned it in the well, adding that she had intended to kill herself, but the water in the well was not deep enough for the purpose.

Mrs. Book had previously shown signs of slight attacks of insanity.

Three years ago Mrs. Book wandered away from home while in insane, leaving an infant uncared for, and was found hiding in a grain chest in a pig pen on her mother’s place in Pelham. Her mental condition was thought to be due to trouble with her eyes. A few years ago she underwent an operation for the eyes, a piece having to be taken out of the lid to allow her to open it. This cause intense suffering which affected her greatly. County Crown Attorney Brennan has gone to Silverdale to investigate the case.

 

HOUGHTON - The funeral of the late James H. Houghton took place from his late residence, 115 Locke street north, this afternoon, and was largely attended. Rev. T. Albert Moore conducted the religious services at the house and grave. The members of Minerva lodge I.O.O.F., attended the funeral in a body. The pall-bearers were three members of Minerva lodge, and three of the deceased’s fellow-employees on the G.T.R.

 

Monday, September 25, 1899

 

FORBES - At the residence of her brother, John Forbes, Brandon, Manitoba on Saturday morning Sept. 23rd, 1899, Isabella Forbes eldest daughter of the late James Forbes, of Waterdown. Funeral from the residence of her brother-in-law, W.O. Sealay, 25 Victoria avenue south, from Hamilton on Wednesday, 27th inst., at 3 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Miss Isabella Forbes, sister of Mrs. W.O. Sealay, Victoria avenue south, died at Brandon last Saturday evening. The remains are expected to arrive in the city tomorrow evening at the internment will take place Wednesday afternoon from Mr. Sealay’s residence.

 

BIRDSALL - In this city, on Sunday, Sept. 24, Minnie, beloved daughter of J.W. Birdsall. Funeral from her parents’ residence 211 Main street east, on Tuesday Sept. 26th, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BEWS - Suddenly, on Saturday evening, at his residence, 190 James street south, William Bews, late of Kirkwall, Orkney Islands, aged 78 years. Funeral Tuesday 3:30.

Wm. Bews, 190 James street south, died very suddenly on Saturday evening. He was engaged in lighting the fire when he fell over and expired before medical aid could be summoned.

The deceased was seventy-eight years of age and had lived in Hamilton for a number of years. He leaves three daughters.


BROWN (Belleville, Ont.) September 25 - Mrs. Jas. Brown, of Hamilton, who was here on a visit to her son, Cameron Brown, manager of the Sun, died this morning.

Mrs. Brown, who was over 62 years of age, is survived by her husband, two sons and two daughters, and her brothers, John Cameron of the London Advertiser, and L.R. Cameron, of Toronto, Queen’s printer for Ontario.

 

MODDRILL - Charles Moddrill, the well-known clerk at the Waldorf hotel, died rather suddenly on Saturday afternoon. He had been ailing for some years, but was able to attend to his duties until 3 o’clock Friday afternoon, when he became so ill that he was forced to retire to his rooms. Dr. O’Reilly was called in and did all in his power for the suffering man, but he was beyond medical aid and passed away about 3 o’clock the following afternoon. The cause of death was dropsy.

The deceased had been employed as clerk at the Waldorf since last June. He was about 60 years of age, and had a wide experience as an hotel clerk before becoming to Hamilton. He had at different times been employed in the leading hotels in Brantford, St. Catharines, St. Thomas, and Windsor, and was well-known and generally liked by the travelling public. His home was in Philadelphia, where his wife and family reside. The remains were removed from the hotel to Blachford’s private morgue and prepared for burial.

The deceased’s son, James A. Moddrill, came to the city this morning and had the remains shipped to Philadelphia for interment.

 

KAY (Toronto) September 25 - Mabel Kay, the-ten-year-old-daughter of George Kay, 55 Grant street, while playing around a bonfire near her home on Saturday afternoon, received burns which resulted in her death about twelve hours later.

A vacant lot near Mr. Kay’s house was the favourite resort of the small children of the neighbourhood, and on Saturday afternoon at 3 o’clock some dozen youngsters were romping around the fire which they had kindled for the purpose of roasting potatoes. Mabel was standing too near the burning wood, and a sudden gust of wind blew the flames against her dress. It was ablaze in an instant. The child screamed for help, but her companions were seized with a panic and fled from the spot.

Her younger brother Walter, however, stayed to help his sister, and this lad who is just six years old, had the presence of mind to throw the screaming girl on the grass and roll her over and over in an attempt to smother the flames. In so doing, the brave little fellow had his own hands severely burned, but, notwithstanding the pain he dragged his sister to their home and called his mother. Both the mother and another lady, who lent her aid, received burns from Mabel’s clothing, but finally the fire was extinguished, and Doctors Fraser, Cleland, and Norman Allen, arrived on the scene to render what assistance they could.

The child was placed under the influence of morphine and her terrible injuries were dressed. Her throat,. waist, and back were severely burned and she had inhaled the flames to such an extent that her lungs and throat were scorched. She died at 4 o’clock on Sunday morning.

 

LaPLANTE - Vital LaPlante, aged 73 years, dropped dead at Tillbury.

 

KENNEDY - Homer Kennedy, the seven-year-old-son of Robert Kennedy of Lindsay, was drowned in the river while playing with a number of other boys on a scowload of lumber.

 


McWHIRRELL - The remains of the murderer, Wm. Walter McWhirrell, repose in a corner of Hamilton cemetery, in the Church of Ascension portion. The interment took place about 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon in the midst of a downpour of rain, which did not prevent a large concourse of people from attending. Faithful to the last, Mrs. Gertrude Truman stood by the grave-side and saw

the earth cover the coffin in which was the form of one to whom she had shown great devotion.

The remains were removed to Mrs. Truman’s home, 183 Queen street north, on Saturday afternoon, and that evening and yesterday up to the time the casket-lid was fastened down forever, a great number of persons look on the face of the dead man. Mrs. Truman said that not less than 6,000 persons passed through her cottage for that purpose. At 2:30 yesterday afternoon, the time set for the funeral, an immense crowd gathered on Queen street and witnessed the departure of the cortege. Rev. W.F. Wilson conducted the service at the house and referred to his visits to deceased when he occupied the cell in Brampton jail.

On the casket lay a bouquet of flowers, placed there by Mrs. Truman. Written on the card attached to the flowers were these words; “Victor, till we meet again. Thy May”. She explained afterwards that the deceased always liked to call her May.

The pall-bearers were Charles Alderman, W. Caskell, George F. Vedder, and J. Jarvis.

As the cortege moved to the cemetery rain began to fall heavily, and few of the crowd on the street followed the remains to the city of the dead. There Rev. Mr. Wilson conducted the brief service and his closing words were; “the end of the chapter”.

On Saturday morning Mrs. Truman stated it was her intention to as soon as possible remove the remains to Scotland, and she asked that a shallow grave be dug to make their removable easy. Later in the day, however, she changed her mind and ordered that the grave be dug so that when she departed this life she could be placed in it, to be near her love one. “And I don’t care how soon that day comes now” she added.

A dispatch from Kingston says during his illness, McWhirrell said he was not guilty of having murdered old Mr. and Mrs. Williams near Toronto, but he supposed it was ordained that he should suffer incarceration for sins which he had committed. Four weeks ago he went to the prison hospital to have an abscess removed from his hand and a few days later he took a fever, which resulted in his death.

 

Tuesday, September 26, 1899

 

CONKLIN - At Erie Pa., on Sept. 24, 1899, Charles E. Conklin, aged 26 years. Funeral Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. from Green Bros. Emporium Parlour, corner King and Catharine streets. Friends and acquaintances please accept this notice.

 

BROWN - At the residence of her son, Cameron Brown, Belleville, Ont., on Sept. 25th, Anna Jane Cameron, beloved wife of James Brown of this city. Funeral from the family residence, 653 York street, on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.


The death occurred yesterday morning of Mrs. James Brown, of Hamilton, at the residence of her son, Cameron Brown, Belleville. The deceased had been ailing for several months and had spent part of the summer at Erie, Pa., and later went on a visit to Belleville, her illness taking an acute form about one week ago. She was the eldest daughter of the late Wm. Cameron, of London, Ont., and was married there thirty-six years ago to James Brown of this city. Besides her husband, there are two daughters and two sons - Mrs.( Rev. Dr.) Booth, and Mrs. J.E. Reid of Erie Pa., and Cameron and Redfern Brown, of Belleville. Surviving her also are two brothers and two sisters - John Cameron, publisher of the London Advertising; L.K. Cameron, Queen’s Printer, Toronto; Mrs. C.E. Robinson, Toronto, and Mrs. Blount, London. The funeral will take place at 3 o’clock tomorrow afternoon from the family residence 633 York street. Rev. J.G. Shearer, Erskine church, will conduct the funeral services.

 

McMURRAY - At her late residence, No. 64 Charles street, on Monday 25th Sept., 1899, Elizabeth, wife of John McMurray, aged 35 years. Funeral service this evening. Funeral to T.H.& B. Station, Wednesday at 8 a.m. Interment at Niagara Falls, Ont.

 

STOCK - On Tuesday, Sept. 26th, at his late home, Dundas street, Clappison’s Corners, John Stock, Sr., aged 85 years. Funeral on Thursday at 2 p.m. Waterdown cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

John Stock died this morning at his home at Clappison’s Corners. He was 85 years of age and was well and favourably known in this part of the country.

The deceased was born in Oxfordshire, England, and came to this country with his parents about 60 years ago, and had lived in the vicinity of Waterdown ever since. His family was composed of a widow, and four children - three daughters, and one son. His widow and two daughters, Mrs. Hill, and Mrs. Baker (who died in a dentist’s chair a few weeks ago), have all passed away since Christmas, and the shock was too much for Mr. Stock, who had been ailing for several years. He leaves one daughter, Mrs. Lyons, and a son, Edward, who lives near Waterdown. He had always been a staunch Liberal in politics, and was assessor of East Flamboro township for over fifteen years.

 

GAGE - On Monday, Sept. 25th, William Gage, infant son of William J. and Sarah E. Gage. aged 5

months. Funeral from his parents’ residence, Beach Road, Wednesday at 3 o’clock.

 

STANTON (Chatham, Ont.) September 25 - About six o’clock this evening, a five-year-old-son of Henry Stanton, who lives about five miles from here, was run over by a roller and crushed so there is very little chance of recovery. The little boy was riding home from the fields on the roller and slipped off, the roller passing completely over him before the horses could be stopped. The young victim is badly crushed about the abdomen and breast. The boy suffers great pain and is not expected that he will live till morning.

 

Wednesday, September 27, 1899

 

PARK - At 63 Markland street, on the 27th inst., John H. Park, aged 57 years. Funeral private on Friday 29th inst., at 3 o’clock p.m.

John Henry Park, formerly a member of the wholesale grocery firm of Lucas, Park & Co., died this morning at his residence, 65 Markland street. He had been ill for some time and his death had been expected.


The deceased was born in the County of Donegal, near Londonderry, on Oct. 9, 1842. He was very young when his parents came to this country and settled in Toronto, subsequently removing to Hamilton. Mr. Park attended the Central school and afterwards studied with Mr. Cuthbertson, of Toronto. He first entered business as a clerk in the wholesale grocery house of the late G.J. Foster & company. His advancement was steady and he soon became a traveller. After the death of Mr. Foster, he entered into partnership with R.A. Lucas, establishing the firm of Lucas, Park, & Co. on April 12th, 1870. The warehouse at that time was at the corner of King and Charles streets, but in February 1881, the firm moved to the present premises on MacNab street north. In December, 1892, the firm was dissolved, Mr. Park retiring and R.T. Steele and George E. Bristol being admitted as partners. Since then Mr. Park had lived a retired life.

Mr. Park always took a deep interest in all legitimate field sports, and at cricket, football, and racquets, he was an expert. For years he was a member of the Hamilton Cricket club, and Hamilton Football club.

He was also a member of the Thirteenth Battalion being with the regiment at Ridgeway in 1866.

In politics Mr. Park was a Conservative. Socially he was exceedingly popular, his genial and affable manner making him many warm friends.

Mr. Park is survived by a brother, Robert Park, and three sisters.

 

BRADD - In this city on Tuesday, Sept. 26th, 1899, Elizabeth Bradd, beloved wife of John Bradd, aged 59 years. Funeral from her late residence, 41 Ferguson avenue, south, on Thursday at 2:30 p.m.

Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BELL - At Fort Saskatchewan, N.W.T., on Sept. 25th, Minnie, beloved wife of Robert A. Bell, an only daughter of John Lutz of this city, aged 19 years and 10 months.

 

REYNOLDS - The late Judge Reynolds, of Brockville, was a brother-in-law of W.E. Brown, of this city. Mr. Brown has gone to attend the funeral.

 

FORBES - The funeral of Miss Isabella Forbes, who died in Brandon Man., took place this afternoon from the residence of her brother-in-law, W.O. Sealey, 95 Victoria avenue south.

 

BROWN - Thomas Brown, of Ingersoll, died on Sunday, aged 90.

 

BRYSON - Mrs. Anna M. Bryson, for more than 20 years matron of the Toronto jail died yesterday. Deceased was born in County Monaghan, Ireland, but came to this country when quite young.

 

WATSON - Ex-mayor E.P. Watson, of Sarnia, died suddenly yesterday from heart disease, aged 68 years. Deceased was one of the oldest and most respected citizen of Sarnia, having lived there about 50 years.

 

REYNOLDS - James Reynolds, junior judge of the united counties of Leeds and Grenville, died in the Brockville hospital last evening. He had not been in good health since June, but was not actually laid about till about six weeks ago when dysentery set in.

 

HART (Newboro, Ont.) September 26 - John Hart, who had been keeping hotel here for several years, was kicked in the breast by a horse on Thursday last, and died about 12 o’clock p.m. yesterday. Deceased was about 65 years old, and leaves quite a large family.

 

CONKLIN - The funeral of the late Charles E. Conklin, who died at Erie, Pa., after a week’s illness took place this afternoon from Green’s Undertaking establishment. A large number of sorrowing friends followed the remains to the cemetery. The funeral service was conducted by Rev. A. MacWilliams. The pall-bearers were: George Turner, William Chapman, William Hagell, Charles Pratt, Charles Byers, and James Teeple.


A peculiar thing in connection with Mr. Conklin’s death was that at the time he was stricken down with typhoid fever, he was just preparing to come home to visit his mother and also to get married to a Hamilton young lady.

 

Thursday, September 28, 1899

 

WEST - At Chedoke on Thursday Sept. 28th, 1899, Guy West, aged 11 months. Funeral from his parents’ residence, Chedoke, on Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BUSH - On Sept. 28th, at the residence of his parent’s 150 Grant avenue, this city, Charles Bush, Jr. In his 24th year. Funeral on Saturday morning at 8:30 to St. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Buffalo and Ste. Sault Marie papers please copy.

Charles Bush Jr., died this morning at the residence of his parents, 150 Grant avenue. He had been ill for several weeks. The deceased was 24 years of age, and was a popular young man. He was employed by the Sanford Manufacturing company.

 

PARK - At 65 Markland street, on the 27th inst., John B. Park, aged 57 years. Funeral private on Friday 29th, inst., at 3 o’clock p.m.

 

ROWAN - Martin Rowan, an old residence of this city, died on Tuesday night. He was 83 years of age, and had lived here for 70 years.

 

DUFFIELD - Dr. Cummings was one of the pall-bearers at the funeral of William Duffield in London yesterday. Mrs. J. Duffield, of Glanford, was also present.

 

WESLEY ( Mount Albion) - Miss Hannah Wesley died on Saturday last after a brief illness. The interment took place to Hamilton cemetery Monday afternoon.

 

MARTIN - Robert Martin, of Guelph, aged 91, father of David Martin, hotel keeper, died yesterday.

 

BRACKINRIDGE - David Brackinridge, manager of the Cornwall Manufacturing company, died last night. He was formerly of Streetsville.

 

SAWSON - An Indian labourer named Carl Sawson was drowned at Iroquois yesterday by falling off a dump car which was thrown off the trestle by the collapse of the same.

 

DOWNEY - The death occurred early Wednesday morning of John Downey, Toronto, father of Alex Downey, the official stenographer of the Admiralty court, after an illness of some months.

 

MARTINS - Thomas McKee Martins, one of the oldest Orange men in Hastings, died yesterday at his home in Thurlow. He was 83 years of age, and is survived by three daughters and five sons.

 

Friday, September 29, 1899

 


NELSON - In Caistor township, on September 28th, 1899, Gilbert H. Nelson, aged 81 years. Funeral Sunday at 1 p.m. from his late residence to the Backbee church. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

CARLILE - In this city on the 29th inst., George Carlile, a native of Nottingham, England, in his 76th year. Funeral from his late residence 60 Caroline street north, Saturday at 2:30. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Another of Hamilton’s old settlers was called away last evening in the person of George Carlile, who died at his residence, 60 Caroline street north. The deceased was 76 years of age, and was one of the best known residents of the West end, where he had lived for many years. Prior to his illness Mr. Carlile was a contracting carpenter, and in his time assisted to erect many of the largest and best buildings in Hamilton. His death is generally regretted by all who knew him.

The deceased was born in Nottingham, England and came to Hamilton about 50 years ago. In the old days he was a great cricketer.

 

WEST - At Chedoke, on Thursday, Sept. 28th, 1899, Guy West, aged 11 months. Funeral from his parents’ residence, Chedoke, on Saturday, at 2:30 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BUSH - On Sept. 28th, at the residence of his parent’s 150 Grant avenue this city, Charles Bush, Jr., in his 24th year. Funeral on Saturday morning at 8:30 to St. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy

Sepulchre cemetery. Buffalo and Ste. Sault Marie, Ontario, please copy.

 

BLAIN - In Galt, on Thursday morning, Sept. 28th, 1899, Margaret Gillespie, wife of Richard Blain, and at one time the resident of Hamilton, aged 76 years. The funeral will take place from the family residence, on West Main street, Galt, on Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock to the Trinity church cemetery.

Mrs. Blain, wife of Ex-mayor Richard Blain, died here rather unexpectedly this morning after an illness lasting only from the previous afternoon, aged 76 years. She was one of the best-known women in these parts. Born in Cumberland, England, the deceased came with her parents to Hamilton when a young girl, in which city she was married to Richard Blain, over fifty-two years ago, coming immediately thereafter to Galt. She was very highly esteemed by all who knew her.

Three sons, James Blain, in New York; Joseph, in Australia, and Thomas in Belt, Montana, and four daughters, Mrs. Thos. Gibbard, Montreal; Mrs. (Dr.) Henderson; St. Paul, Minn; Mrs. James E. Warnock; Galt, and Miss Sarah Blain, at home, survive. One sister, Mrs. Mary Smith, Hamilton, is also living.

 

HAINES - Edward Haines, who cut his throat with a razor on Sunday night, died in the hospital last night.

 

PARK - The funeral of John H. Park took place from his late residence, 65 Markland street, this afternoon, and, being of a private nature, only the intimate friends followed the remains to their resting-place. The service at the house was conducted by Rev. Neil McPherson, and at the grave Rev. John Young officiated. The pall-bearers were; R.A. Lucas, George E. Tucket, W.H. Gillard, Ed DeLahooke, Robert Evans, Alexander Murray, Geo. Roach, and J.J. Scott. Among the chief mourners were the deceased’s brother Robert H. Park, John Bell, a brother-in-law, Percival Bell, nephew, and J.Y. Osborne, J. Alexander, and A.I. McKenzie.


MOORE - Thomas Moore, who for over forty years was an employee of the Toronto waterworks department, died yesterday.

 

O’CONNOR - Stuart P. O’Connor, aged 16, son of H.P. O’Connor Q.C., of Walkerton, is dead, as a result of blood poisoning following a fall from a tree while out shooting.

 

RAY (Cornwall, Ont.) September 28 - A fatal landslide occurred on the new canal out at Cardinal yesterday afternoon, in which two employees were caught. One was fatally injured and died last night on his way to Montreal, where he was being taken to the hospital. His name was William Ray, a native of Scotland. He leaves a widow and infant child at Cardinal, friendless and without means.

 

SHUNTER (Gravenhurst, Ont.) September 28 - Fred Shunter, of Glen Orchard, while out hunting, shot a fox. Immediately after shooting he reloaded his rifle, but neglected to put down the hammer. He found the fox was not quite dead, and struck it a blow with the butt end of his gun, which discharged. The ball pierced his right hand and entered his right side, passing clean through his body just below the heart. Although in great agony, he managed to crawl to his house, a distance of about a quarter of a mile, but expired shortly afterwards. Deceased was about 27 years of age and leaves a widow and one child to mourn his loss.

 

BROWN (Chicago) September 28 - A romance that began in Toronto three weeks ago ended today in the suicide of one of the principles. E.J. Brown lies a corpse at Ralston’s morgue, while Mrs. Violet Holden, with whom he eloped, is being cared for, with her two children, at the Harrison street station annex. Brown shot himself in the right temple, while in a despondent state, in his room at the Queen’s hotel, Wabash avenue and Harrison street. In the pocket of his coat was found a letter, in which he declared that he took his life because he could not bear to see his companion suffer over their sin.

Brown and Mrs. Holden arrived in Chicago September 6th from Toronto. They took up their abode at the Continental hotel. They passed as man and wife under the name Mr. and Mrs. J. Hollard. They said they had just arrived from New York and intended to make their home in Chicago. They remained at the Continental only a short time, and then went to the Queen’s hotel.

They were not accompanied by children, but shortly after their arrival at the Queen’s they sent to Toronto for two children, afterwards proven to be those of Mrs. Holden.

It developed after the suicide today that not only did Mrs. Holden desert her husband and four children, but Brown did likewise, leaving a wife and three children in want.

From inquiries last night it was learned that the act by which E.J. Brown ended his life was not his first attempt at self destruction. Three years ago he was arraigned in the Toronto police court and fined for attempting to commit suicide.

Mrs. Holden and Brown eloped to Chicago, where her romance lasted two weeks. The affair is greatly lamented in the section where all the parties have lived. Brown’s family, which has carried on business in St. Lawrence market for years is highly respected. His wife’s family is also one held in esteem in York township.

 

LAMBEY (Winnipeg) September 28 - A man named Lambey, of Brockville, was crushed to death by a log rolling on him at the Garland saw mills in the Dauphin district.


WOOD (Brantford, Ont.) September 28 - Word reached this city this morning of a melancholy tragedy which occurred yesterday near the Village of Kelvin, in Burford township.

A man named Samuel Wood, tired of life, first shot his faithful dog dead, and then blew out his own brains. Wood was 50 years of age, and unmarried. He had had a lot of trouble, and his mind was supposed have been unhinged. Yesterday he took his shotgun and, calling his dog, walked towards the woods not far from his home in search of small game. The man must have brooding over his troubles, for just before he reached the woods, he turned on the dog at his heels and shot him dead. He then walked into the bush, where he came upon some men at work. The men asked him what he had shot at, and he replied that he had killed his dog, but would give no reason except that it was better dead. Wood then strolled back to where the dog lay, and before anyone noticed what he was doing placed the muzzle of the gun to his head and pulled the trigger by means of a stick. The whole top of the man’s head was blown off, and he fell dead instantly, close beside the body of his four-footed companion. The coroner was notified but did not deem an inquest necessary.

 

STOCK (Waterdown) Funeral of the late John Stock took place from his residence to the Waterdown cemetery on Thursday afternoon and was largely attended.

 

FULSUM (Attercliffe) - The death of James Fulsum on Sunday, September 17th , was not unexpected, as he was old and feeble and had been failing for the last few months. He was one of the few remaining old residents of this neighbourhood and was well and favourably known and highly respected by all who knew him. He had for many years been a faithful member of the Methodist church and died in that faith. His funeral took place at Attercliffe village church last Wednesday. Rev. Mr. Snider preached the funeral sermon to a large congregation.

 

KELLOGG (Renforth) - Mrs. William Kellogg passed away on Wednesday after an illness of several months. The funeral took place on Thursday at the White Brick burying ground.

 

ROWAN - A number of sorrowing friends attended the funeral of the late Martin Rowan, which took place from the family residence, 88 Aurora street, at half-past-eight-this morning. The remains were taking to St. Patrick’s church, where mass was said by Rev. Father Coty, after which the funeral procession proceeded to Holy Sepulchre where interment took place. Rev. Father Doyle officiated at the grave. The pall-bearers were; John Wren, John Flynn, Chas. Bird, Michael Sullivan, James Wall, and Patrick Barrett.

 

Saturday, September 30, 1899

 

BROOKS (Hamiota, Man.) - On Saturday, September 23rd, 1899, Eliza J. Macartney, beloved wife of Wm. Brooks, formerly of this city. Interment took place at Hamiota.

 

MELLISH - At 436 Markham street, Toronto, Saturday morning, September 30th, Rev. Henry F. Mellish, rector of Caledonia. Funeral from Caledonia by train to Wilmott church, near New Hamburg, Monday morning October 2. Friends please accept this notice.


Rev. Henry F. Mellish, for over 25 years rector of St. Paul’s church, Caledonia, died suddenly at 430 Markham street, the residence of his daughter, Toronto, this morning. He was seized with a slight paralytic stroke at his home a few days ago and went to Toronto for treatment. His death was unexpected. The deceased leaves a family of one son, and three daughters - Albert, Mrs. Dymond, wife of Allan M. Dymond, legal secretary in the office of the Attorney General, and Misses Connie, and Mary Mellish.

The body will be taken to Caledonia tonight, and the funeral will take place from there on Monday morning to the family burying ground at Wilmot, near New Hamburg, where repose the remains of the late Mrs. Mellish.

 

THOMPSON - At St. John’s N.B., on Friday 29th Sept. 1899, Julia Elizabeth Thompson, eldest daughter of the late James Thompson. Funeral on Monday at 2:30 p.m. from her late residence, No. 291 Jackson street west. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Funeral private.

 

HEROD - In this city, on Saturday, Sept. 30th, 1899, Rebecca J. Herod, in her 27th year. Funeral from the residence of her brother-in-law, Alex Thompson, 42 Gore street, on Monday at 3 p.m.

Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BUSH - The funeral of the late Charles Bush took place this morning. Two members of the Germania club and four employees of the Sanford manufacturing company acted as pall-bearers. Rev. Father Doyle said high mass at St. Patrick’s church.

 

McKEE (Windsor, Ont.) September 29 - Thomas W. McKee, formerly owner of the British American hotel, died of heart failure shortly after midnight. Mr. McKee had been a prominent figure in Ontario for many years. He was born in Haldimand county 58 years ago. When a young man he moved to Woodstock and was made Chief of police. About fifteen years ago, he moved to Sandwich. He was appointed Provincial detective of Ontario by the government. Three years ago he resigned. About a year ago, he bought the British American hotel, and two weeks ago sold it.

He leaves a widow, a daughter, and four sons. While serving as Provincial detective, he ran down many celebrated criminals, among them the murderer, Truski; Ben McMahon, who murdered Wilson Heighton, and was sent up for life, the death sentence hadn’t been commuted; the three Freeman brothers, murderers of Policeman Rankin of Chatham, sentenced for life, and the incendiary Wilson, one of the worst firebugs the police ever had to tackle. Wilson fired eighteen buildings but McKee nailed him at last and sent him to the penitentiary for 20 years.

 

Monday, October 2, 1899

 

MACKENZIE - At Toronto, on October 1st, Wm. Mackenzie, aged 56 years, a native of Rosshire, Scotland.

 

REED - Accidentally killed in this city on Sunday October 1, 1899, Joseph P. Reed, aged 32 years. Funeral notice later.


Joseph B. Reed, 455 York street, a freight conductor on G.T.R., met with a sudden and awful death shortly after four o’clock yesterday afternoon. He left the Stuart street yard in charge of a freight train bound for Port Dover, and shortly after the train left the station, he had occasion to go along the top of the cars to the engine. It was on the way back to the caboose that he met with the accident which resulted in his death. The conductor had passed along the top of the cars until he had reached the one next to the caboose, which was loaded with lumber. He was about to climb down into the caboose when he tripped and fell between the cars. He landed between the rails, and the caboose passed over him crushing his life out. He was cut about the head, one leg was broken, and his body badly crushed and bruised.

The accident occurred just at the junction of the T.H.& B, and G.T.R.

Frederick Clarke, East avenue; F. Gladwell, Main street east, and Dr. Shaw, Ferguson avenue south were in the vicinity at the time and saw the unfortunate man fall. They signalled to the engineer to stop the train and then hastened to assist Reed. The unfortunate man was still breathing, but died almost immediately. The body was placed on the train and brought back to the station. The ambulance was called and it was removed to the morgue, and afterwards to Dodsworth’s Undertaking establishment to be prepared for burial.

Coroner White, on being notified of the circumstances, ordered that an inquest be held, and Constable Venard was entrusted with the duty of summoning a jury.

The deceased was one of the best known and most popular railway men in this part of the country, and had been in the employ of the G.T.R. for over twenty years. In politics he was a staunch Conservative. He was 51 years of age, and a widow and family of six grownup children are left to mourn his loss. The children are; Mrs. Edward Hazel, Miss Lillian Reed, Richard, Joseph, Robert, and Harry Reed, all of this city. The deceased’s mother and brothers live in Illinois, and Mrs. Reed and two members of the family were contemplating a visit to the States. The funeral will be held on Wednesday, and may be postponed if the brothers do not arrive in time.

 

WALSH - At the residence of his brother-in-law Fred H. Yapp, No. 139 Herkimer street, on Sunday 1st October, 1899, George Walsh, aged 25 years and four months. Funeral (private) Tuesday at 6:15 p.m. to G.T.R. Stuart street station. Interment at Valleyfield, P.Q.

 

LOTTRIDGE - At his late residence, Beach Road on Sunday, 1st October, 1899, (his birthday) George Lottridge, aged 81 years. Funeral Wednesday at 2 p.m. Interment at Gage’s cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

At the noon hour yesterday and on the anniversary of his eighty-first birthday, George Lottridge of Saltfleet passed away, his death being caused by congestion of the lungs. The deceased was one of the oldest living settlers of the township, and in his lifetime was a bosom friend of the late John Dynes. He was a farmer and settled in Saltfleet many years ago. His family includes one son - S.D.Lottridge - and four daughters - Mrs. McFarlane, Mrs. L. Bates, Mrs. James Gage, and Mrs. J.M. Hill.

The funeral will take place on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock from deceased’s late residence to the Lake Chapel burying ground.

 

LYES - At her son’s residence, No. 279 James street north, on Monday, October 2nd, 1899, Ellen Lyes, beloved wife of John Lyes and widow of the late Caleb Fonger. Funeral Tuesday October 3rd, at 2 p.m. Interment at English church, Aldershot. Friends and acquaintances kindly accept this intimation.

 

LANAWAY - At West Flamboro village on Saturday, Sept, 30th, David Edgar, only son of Robert T. and Agnes Lanaway, died of inflammatory croup, aged 4 years, 11 months, and 19 days. Funeral from his late home, Tuesday, October 3rd at 1 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

HEROD - The funeral of Miss R.J. Herod took place this afternoon from the residence of her brother-in-law, Alex Thompson. Miss Herod died of typhoid pneumonia, which she contracted while nursing Mrs. Matthews of Keenville and other members of the family.


McPHAIL (Rodney, Ont.) - Word reached here Saturday afternoon of a fatal shooting affray which was enacted Friday evening about 7 o’clock on the farm of John Doyle, living about 5 miles from this place. For some time past, considerable ill-feeling has existed between one Philip McPhail, a young farmer, residing with his mother, about a mile-and-a-half-from the Doyle farm and the Doyle family. It culminated on the evening mentioned in a tragedy, when McPhail called at the Doyle home and encountered his own sister and Miss Doyle who was carrying a small child in her arms.

McPhail, by threats, succeeded in driving his sister out of the house and then commanded Miss Doyle to put the child down. The young lady refused to do this, where upon McPhail pulled a revolver and sent a bullet into the girl’s head. The ball entered at the ear and took a downward course.

Leaving Miss Doyle for dead, McPhail proceeded to his home, and shot himself in the left breast, dying about 12 o’clock at night.

Miss Doyle was shot in the left ear. The doctors in attendance think she will recover.

 

JELLEY - Harry B. Jelley, formerly C.P.R. station agent at Alton, died somewhat suddenly at the home of his brother-in-law in Owen Sound on Saturday.

 

BUSBY - John Busby, of Coleman, who was run down by a train on Saturday morning near his home, received such terrible injuries that he died five hours afterwards in the Toronto general hospital.

 

Tuesday, October 3, 1899

 

REED - Accidentally killed in this city on Sunday, October 1, 1899, Joseph Reed, aged 52 years. Funeral from his late residence, 425 York street, on Tuesday at 3 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

PETTIT - On Monday, October 2nd, at his parent’s residence 89 Chestnut street, Kenneth Barr, youngest son of B.H. and Rene Pettit. Interment Wednesday 4th at Winona cemetery. Funeral private.

 

LOTTRIDGE - At his late residence, Beach Road, on Sunday 1st October, 1899, (his birthday) George Lottridge aged 83 years. Funeral Wednesday 3 p.m. Interment at Gage’s cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CAMPBELL (St. Thomas, Ont.) October 2 - N.M. Campbell, principal of the new Central school, dropped dead suddenly in his private room. Deceased was one of the oldest and most respected citizens of St. Thomas and had talked in the public schools here for many years. Death was caused by neuralgia of the heart.

 

OCHERMAN (Milton, Ont.) October 2 - A sad drowning accident occurred this morning at Boyne, a country village near Milton. The three-year-old-son of E.D. Ocherman was missed from the house only ten minutes and upon a search being instituted he was found drowned in a tank of water which was used for cooling milk.

 


DONNELLY (Kingston, Ont.) October 2 - John Donnelly J.P., ex-reeve of the township of Portland and ex-member of the county council, was found dead in bed this morning by a neighbour. He had not been feeling well for upwards of a week, and was being looked after by friends. He was a bachelor, aged 65, and was very wealthy.

 

NELSON (Abingdon) - About five o’clock Thursday morning Gilbert Nelson, one of Caistor’s oldest and most respected citizens passed away at his residence. The deceased was nearly 81 years old. The funeral took place on Sunday to the Stone Church cemetery.

 

HOWARD (Hagersville) - Muriel, the infant daughter of Wm. and Mrs. Howard was buried on Sunday last.

 

LAWRENCE - Mrs. Frances Lawrence, mother of James E. Lawrence, paymaster of the Welland canal, died at St. Catharines on Sunday.

 

McVICKER - Miss McVicker was buried at Port Arthur yesterday. During the first Red River rebellion she was living in Winnipeg and interceded with Riel for Scott’s life.

 

Wednesday, October 4, 1899

 

REED - Accidentally killed in this city on Sunday Oct. 1, 1899, Joseph B. Reed, aged 54 years. Funeral from his late residence, 455 York street, on Thursday at 2 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

Coroner White held an inquest at No. 3 police station last night in the case of Joseph B. Reed, the G.T.R. freight conductor who was killed near the corner of Ferguson avenue and O’Reilly street on Sunday afternoon. Evidence was given by Engineer Shaw, Fireman Farley, Brakeman Leigh, George Harrington, Fred Gladswell, Daniel Shaw, and Dr. Rosebrugh. A clear account of the accident was given by Fred Gladswell, who saw it from a window of a relative’s house. He said the deceased was going from the caboose to the engine. When he was near the end of the lumber car, he turned in the direction of the caboose and missed his footing, falling between the cars. The witness rushed out of the house and found that the deceased was still alive. He went for assistance and when he returned, Mr. Reed was dead.

The jury decided that the deceased was accidentally killed and that the officials of the G.T.R. were in no way to blame for the accident.

 

LOTTRIDGE - The funeral of George Lottridge took place from his late residence, Beach Road, to Gage’s cemetery this afternoon and was largely attended.

 

WALSH - The funeral of the late George Walsh took place last evening from the residence of deceased’s brother-in-law, F.H. Yapp, to the Stuart street station. Rev. W.H. Wade conducted the funeral service and the pall-bearers were; L. Walsh, A. Walsh, F.H. Yapp, and R.V. Mathews. The interment will take place at Valleyfield, Que.

 

Thursday, October 5, 1899

 

CHRISTIAN - In this city, on Wednesday, 4th October, 1899, Jane, relict of the late John Christian, printer, of this city. Deceased was a native of the county Kildare, Ireland. Funeral will leave her late residence to 289 Main street east, Saturday, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


BROOKE - John E. Brooke, of Chatham, is dead from injuries received on Tuesday evening by being thrown from his carriage.

 

KIRKLAND - Mrs. Thomas Kirkland, widow of the late principal of the normal school, Toronto, who died in the spring, passed away on Tuesday.

 

Friday, October 6, 1899

 

RANDALL - At the residence of his grandfather Edward Harriett, 129 Inchbury street, on Friday, October 6th, Ainie , beloved son of Aaron Randall, age 8 years and 3 months. Funeral Sunday at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

CHRISTIAN - In this city, on Wednesday 4th October, 1899, Jane, relict of the late John Christian, printer, of this city. Deceased was a native of the County Kildare, Ireland. Funeral will leave her late residence 289 Main street east, Saturday at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WILLISTON - In this city, on Thursday, October 5th, 1899, Maude Williston, aged 24 years. Funeral from the residence of her brother, Mr. Thos. Bradd, 138 Dundurn on Saturday at 3 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

STEPHENSON - Capt. Rubin Stephenson, between 70 and 75 years of age, who had been living retired at the Mansion House hotel, Grimsby, met his death unexpectedly yesterday. He was driving a spirited horse, belonging to Charles Weaver of the Mansion House, a little east of the village, about 4:30 yesterday afternoon, when it ran away. Capt. Stephenson was thrown out of the rig with considerable force on the roadway. Shortly afterwards his inanimate form was seen lying on the road by the motorman of a H.G.& D. car, and the unconscious man was brought to the village and attended by Dr. Morris.

No bones were broken, but the shock proved too much for him and he died about ten o’clock last evening. The horse ran down the park road , then turned and came back to the village, where it collided with Walter Palmer’s carriage, upsetting it and damaging it slightly.

The deceased was formerly a resident of Grimsby for some time, but went away and returned to the village a short time ago.

 

MACKENZIE - Alexander Mackenzie, registrar of Wellington, who died at Guelph yesterday, used to live here many years ago.

 

Saturday, October 7, 1899

 

BREMNER - At his residence, Waterdown, John Bremner, a native of Aberdeen, Scotland, Clerk and Treasurer of East Flamboro, in his 84th year. Funeral on Sunday at 2 p.m.

 

RANDALL - At the residence of his grandfather, Edward Harriett, 120 Inchbury street, on Friday, October 6th, Ainie, beloved son of Aaron Randall, age 8 years and 3 months. Funeral Sunday at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.


McNAIR - Samuel McNair, an old resident of Hamilton, died very suddenly this morning. Mr. McNair had been a well-known figure on the streets of this city, for the last forty years. He was of a kind and genial nature and had a host of friends who will learn with regret of his sudden death. He was uptown yesterday as usual and, while somewhat weak, did not complain of feeling ill. But this morning about 10 o’clock he was seized with a bad fainting spell and was dead within half-an-hour, passing away very peacefully.

Mr. McNair had been court crier for many years and was also well known around the city hall, having been connected with the water works and tax offices. He leaves two sons, Rev. T.R. McNair, of Tilbury, and Samuel, of this city; and five daughters - Elizabeth and Amy, Mrs. S. Johns, Victoria, B.C. and Mrs. C.J. and R.T. Lancefield, of this city. The funeral notice will appear onMonday.

 

RASPBERRY - Thomas Raspberry, a brother of John Raspberry, the well-known milk man, fell from an apple tree on his brother’s farm in West Flamboro yesterday afternoon and broke his back. He is an elderly man and no hopes of his recovery are entertained.

 

Monday, October 9, 1899

 

RASPBERRY - In West Flamboro, on Sunday, October 8th, 1899, Robert Raspberry, aged 89. Funeral from the residence of his brother, John Raspberry, West Flamboro on Tuesday at 2:30 p.m.Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends please accept this intimation.

 

McNAIR - On October 7th, 1899, Samuel McNair, a native of Killanduff, County of Sligo,

Ireland, in his 74th year. Funeral on Tuesday, October 10th, from his late residence, 29 West avenue north, at 2 p.m.

 

LISTER - At her late residence, No. 297 John street north, on Sunday, October 8th, 1899, Elizabeth, relict of the late James Lister, aged 79 years and 6 months. Funeral Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. to Christ Church Cathedral, interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Elizabeth Lister relict of the late James Lister, an old resident of Hamilton, died yesterday morning. She was 79 years of age.

 

RASPBERRY - Robert Raspberry, of West Flamboro, who fell from an apple tree on Friday and broke his back, died at ten o’clock yesterday morning. The deceased was about 58 years of age, and had lived in Flamboro for a number of years. He was a quite and industrious man being in partnership with his brother John, in the farming and dairy business. He was unmarried.

 


ROGERS (Brockville, Ontario) October 9 - Mrs. Rogers, a young widow, committed suicide by jumping into the river. The body was recovered at daybreak this morning. The circumstances leading up to the tragedy were as follows; Mrs. Rogers husband died about six years ago, leaving her with a baby boy, and in straitened circumstances. About four years ago she opened a boarding house, and among those who came to lodge with her was a man named Hamel, who came here from Toronto. Hamel soon commenced to pay Mrs. Rogers marked attention, and it was understood that they would marry. However, a short time ago, Hamel transferred his affections to another Brockville lady, and it was announced not long since that he was about to marry her. When the news reached Mrs. Rogers, she was heard to remark that she would shoot Hamel rather than see him marry another woman. Hamel called on Mrs. Rogers house yesterday afternoon. They had a heated discussion, and she finally drew a revolver and threatened to shoot him. He immediately raised a window near where he was standing and leaped out, and forthwith sent the police to the house. It is supposed that Mrs. Rogers, on seeing the police coming towards her, became frightened and fleeing out a back door to Mathen’s wharf, which is near the house, jumped into the river. An inquest will be held this afternoon.

 

DIXON (London, Ontario) October 8 - While coming down stairs with a lightened lamp Saturday evening, Mrs. Elizabeth Dixon, an elderly lady residing at 355 King street, tripped and fell, causing the lamp to explode. Her clothing was ablaze in a moment, and before assistance arrived, the unfortunate was frightfully burned. She was removed to the hospital, where her injuries proved fatal a few hours later.

The fire was extinguished before much damage to the house was done.

 

FROST (Sault Ste Marie) October 8 - Willie Frost, son of Rev. F. Frost, missionary at Garden River, was out hunting in the woods, when, in jumping off a log with the gun in his hand, it went off, and the charge entered his body just above the groin. He was brought home some twenty miles, and attended by two doctors from the Sault, who advised his removal to the hospital where he died.

 

VANDERFORT (Toronto) October 9 - Albert Vanderfort, a G.T.R. brakeman, living at 118 John street, received fatal injuries at Newtonville on Friday night. He was loading a car with apples, but in moving about in the car, he lost his balance and fell out through the open door, directly against another freight, which was passing. He was terribly crushed about the shoulders. Vanderfort was put on a train bound for Toronto, but died when near Little York.

 

SPARR (Stratford) October 8 - Kate Sparr, a domestic, was arrested yesterday charged with infanticide.

The prisoner’s family reside in New Hamburg, but she had been in the city for several years. She was 26 years of age, fair, and quite good looking. For some time past, she has been a domestic in residence of Judge Woods, and previous to that she occupied a similar position in the household of County Crown Attorney John Idington, Q.C.,

 

LARSON - Hans Larson, an old miner and prospector, committed suicide by shooting himself with a gun in a Rat Portage boarding house.

 

NETTLETON - William W. Nettleton, of Collingwood, was found in the street suffering from morphine poisoning. He as conveyed to a doctor’s surgery and restoratives applied but he only lived a few hours.

 

JOHNSTON - Mrs. Lawrence Johnston, an aged woman, was stricken with paralysis while coming downstairs at the home of William R. Hager, Toronto, on Saturday night, and fell to the landing, several feet. The ambulance was called to take her to her daughter’s home, but before it had gone any distance, the woman expired.

 

HYNDMAN - Dr. Hyndman, prominent in Exeter’s affairs for 40 years, is dead.

 

GREER - William Greer, well-known in the east end of Toronto, died yesterday.


PEARSON - Frank Pearson, a Toronto printer, died in Brooklyn on Saturday. He was 28 years of age.

 

REID - Jonathon Reid, of Bridge End, an old and deaf man, sat down on the L.E. and D.R.R. tracks near Chatham and was struck by a train.

 

MAGEE - Mrs. Magee, widow of the late Thos. Magee, a few miles east of Omemee, dropped dead early Sunday while in the performance of her domestic duties.

 

BOATE - John Boate, a young farmer of Emily township a few miles east of Omemee, was suddenly taken ill Sunday morning and expired before medical aid could be obtained.

 

MURDOCK - A two-and-a-half-year-old son of Joseph Murdock, who is in the employ of the Rathbun company at Lindsey, was struck by a run-away-team and so seriously injured that he died.

 

WILSON - While on her way to Sunday school yesterday afternoon, Miss Emily Jane Wilson, of 115 St. David street, Toronto, was stricken with haemorrhage of the lungs, and died ten minutes afterwards. Miss Wilson had been in ill health for the past four years, but about a month ago she began to improve. She was nineteen years of age.

 

QUINN - On Friday night, James J. Quinn, proprietor of the Clarendon house, Toronto, was talking to several friends in the bar, when, without any warning, he suffered a paralytic stroke and fell to the floor. The usual treatment was applied and he seemed to grow better for a few hours. A change took place, however, and he passed away yesterday morning about ten o’clock never regaining his senses.

 

BREMNER - The funeral of the late John Bremner, for 30 years clerk and treasurer of West Flamboro township, took place yesterday afternoon from his late residence in Waterdown to the village cemetery, and was the largest attended funeral in many years. Rev. P.M McEachern conducted the services and the pall-bearers consisted of the member of the township council.

Deceased was 84 years of age, and after coming to this country from Aberdeen, Scotland, taught school for 30 years. He leaves an only daughter, Mrs. Kelly, wife of Andrew, of Kelly, Alexander, & Co., Brandon, Man.

 

Tuesday, October 10, 1899

 

LISTER - The remains of the late Mrs. James Lister, 297 John street north, were laid at rest this afternoon in Hamilton cemetery. The deceased was a very old resident, having resided here since 1833. She leaves to mourn her loss one daughter, Miss J. Lister, school teacher, and two sons, Robert and Archibald, of California. Rev. Canon Bland conducted the funeral services, in which church deceased had been a member for 66 years. The pall-bearers were; Frank Edgar, George White, Samuel Arthur, Charles Bolton, George Moore, and George Johnston.

 

McNAIR - The funeral of the late Samuel McNair took place this afternoon from the family residence, and was largely attended, showing the high esteem in which the late court crier was held. The religious service was conducted by Rev. Canon Sutherland, and Rev. J. Austin Jackson. The pall-bearers were all relatives being the two sons, Rev. T.R. McNair of Tilbury, and Samuel McNair of the city, and R.T. Lancefield, C.J. Lancefield, W.T. Lancefield, and A.C. Lancefield.


 

 

McGUIRE (Brockville, Ontario) October 9 - Relatives in Brockville have just learned of the tragic death of Miss Fannie McGuire, who committed suicide by swallowing carbolic acid.

She went under the name of Irene Stone and had aspirations to the stage when she lived in Brockville six years ago. She went to New York to further her ambition, but met a man named Albert S. Goetz, with whom she took up housekeeping.

The woman was deserted by Goetz, and after a stormy interview took carbolic acid on the street, dying an hour later. The remains will be brought to Brockville for interment.

 

JOHNSTON - Mrs. Catharine Johnston, a lady 53 years of age, residing at Downer’s Corners, near Peterboro, while despondent from ill health, took a large quantity of carbolic acid and died after in great agony.

 

BENNINGTON (Brockville, Ontario) October 9 - On Saturday, a little girl named Bennington, daughter of a farmer living on the road between Prescott and Maitland, met with a terrible accident. Her father was engaged drawing potatoes from the field and she went out to meet him to ride back. In some manner she fell off the wagon, and one of the hind wheels passed over her chest almost cutting her in two. She lived but a short time.

 

McKENZIE (Little Current) October 9 - James McKenzie, who resides near Providence Bay, was assisting at a threshing near Brittainville, when his shirt caught in the tumbling shaft, and in an instant he was drawn into the gearing. The machine was stopped just in time to save his head from being severed. His ribs were broken from the breast bone, and his arms badly crushed and broken, he only lived a short time.

 

Wednesday, October 11, 1899

 

McKELLAR (London, Ontario) October 11 - This forenoon, William McKellar, a conductor on the street railway system, and residing on Litchfield street, was adjusting the trolley of his car to the power circuit on Richmond street north, when the guy rope broke, causing him to fall backward across the rails. He was unable to get clear of the moving car, and the rear wheels passed over his neck, killing him instantly. McKellar was formerly Major of the Twenty-Sixth Battalion and was 62 years of age.

 

MARQUIS (Brantford, Ont.) October 11 - Dr. J. Marquis passed away this morning. The deceased practised in Mount Pleasant, Brant County, for a time, but some years ago moved to Brantford, where he had a large practice, both in city and country. He was also doctor for the Institute for the Blind, and was very highly esteemed. He leaves a widow and two sons.

 

RASPBERRY - The funeral of the late Robert Raspberry, West Flamboro was held yesterday afternoon. The procession was the largest seen in these parts in many a day. The remains were buried in the city cemetery, Rev. Mr. Irving, of Dundas being the officiating clergyman.

 


ORTON (Brockville, Ont.) October 10 - This morning, Alva Orton, a well-known farmer residing near here, was found dead in bed. He retired last night in apparent good health, and was engaged yesterday attending a threshing machine. Heart disease was the cause. Mr. Orton was about 55 years of age, and leaves a widow and three children. He was born in this vicinity.

 

SMITH - George Smith, Sr., formerly section foreman on the Canadian Pacific Railway, dropped dead on the road a short distance from Nairn Centre.

 

BURGESS - Capt. James Burgess, one of London’s first citizen soldiers, and for years an active factor in the military life of Western Ontario, died yesterday, at the advanced age of 79.

 

THORNE (Ottawa) October 10 - “I am crazed for the want of sleep. I cannot not bear my sufferings any longer. Goodbye all. You will find my body in the Ottawa river near the railway tracks, where they turn on the bridge”.

This was the message that Mrs. Elizabeth Thorne found on the work bench on her son’s shop at the rear of their residence, 138 Elm street, this morning. The man who had left the message was Henry Thorne, 46 years old, her son, who had lived in the house with his father and mother. The story is told in a few words.

Henry Thorne, up to six weeks ago, worked at his trade as a bricklayer; at that time he was compelled to quit work and go to the hospital with an abscess in his leg, from which he had been infected for a some time. He had the abscess lanced and two weeks later returned to his home. Here he lingered for a week, and Dr. Small, his medical adviser, told him he should go back to the hospital again, as the wound was not improving. When he received this advice, Thorne became discouraged, and went to the hospital again, but in very poor spirits. The remains were found where the note indicated.

 

Friday, October 13, 1899

 

TAYLOR - On 12th instant, Ann Maria Taylor, relict of the late Thomas Taylor, builder of this city. Funeral from the residence of her son, Frederick Taylor, 55 Bay street south, on Saturday at 3:30 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation. Please omit flowers.

 

FAIRLEY - On Thursday, 12th October, 1899, William Fairley, in his 56th year. Funeral from his late residence, No. 167 King William street, Sunday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

William Fairley, of the firm of Fairley & Stewart, plumbers, died last night, having been ill for two or three months. The deceased was 56 years of age, and had been a resident of Hamilton for many years. He was well-known, and highly esteemed. He leaves a widow and four children.

 

JENKINS - At St. John’s Hospital, Toronto, on Thursday October 12th, 1899, Elizabeth Martin, beloved wife of Charles Jenkins, aged 48 years. Funeral at 2 p.m. Saturday, from the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Marion Miller, 215 John street north. Friends will please accept this intimation. Her end came in peace with God.

Mrs. Jenkins, mother of Mrs. Marion Miller, 215 John street north, died at St. John’s Hospital, Toronto, last night. The body will be brought to Hamilton for interment.


Saturday, October 14, 1899

 

FAIRLEY - On Thursday, 12th October, 1899, William Fairley, in his 56th year. Funeral from his late residence, No. 187 King William street, Sunday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ISRAEL - At her late residence, 309 King street east, on Saturday, October 14th, 1899, Mary Israel, beloved wife of Charles Israel, aged 66.Funeral Monday at 3 p.m. (Private).Interment at the Jewish cemetery, Barton.

 

McMAHON (Toronto) October 14 - A warrant been issued for an inquest on James McMahon, who died in Clancy’s saloon, shortly after midnight last night. The reported cause of death is heart disease, but the belief is that there was foul play. He was found at the foot of the stairway at 11:30 with a ugly wound at the back of his head, which may have caused death. He had not been drinking, and the theory of accident is thus weakened. McMahon was a nephew of Justice McMahon.

 

ORR - About 11:30 last night Dr. Baugh, King street east, was called to attend Mrs. Helen Orr, a woman living at 410 King street east, who was said to be dying. The physician responded to the call, but before he arrived at the house, Mrs. Orr was beyond medical aid and died in a few minutes. In the house were two small children and a grown up daughter of the dead woman, about 22 years of age. The young woman had been out in the early part of the evening, and when she returned home, found her mother apparently choking. Not knowing what was the matter, she hurriedly called Dr. Baugh. In view of the suddenness of the death, Coroner Philp and the police authorities were notified, but no inquest will be held. From information secured by the police at the house, it is not likely that there is anything suspicious about the death. Mrs. Orr’s husband is at present engaged as a nightwatchman at the Sanford Mausoleum, and he was greatly shocked at the news of his wife’s sudden taking off. The deceased was a woman of middle age and of heavy build.

 

CAMPBELL - Dr. James B. Campbell, of London, is dead.

 

DOHERTY - J.P. Doherty, eldest son of W. Doherty, organ manufacturer, Clinton, died yesterday morning. He had been ailing all summer but nothing serious was anticipated until Thursday afternoon when he became unconscious, in which condition he continued until he died. He was 28 years of age.

 

KANE (Belleville, Ontario) October 13 - The body of Ed Kane, a shoemaker, was found in the harbour this afternoon. The body had evidently been in the water for some time. The man had been missing for several days, and it was supposed that he had gone to Stirling.

Deceased was 58 years of age. He leaves a widow, three daughters, and one son. Suicide is supposed.

 

SCARROW - Salvation army bandsman John Scarrow, one of the best army bandsman in Canada, died at St. Catharines on Wednesday night after a short illness. Guelph was his home and he was one of the early bandsman there. With the Household troops band he visited nearly every town and city from Halifax to Vancouver.


Monday, October 16, 1899

 

McGINNIS - In this city, Sunday, the 15th inst., Hannah, relict of the late Hugh McGinnis. Funeral will leave the residence of her daughter Mrs. A.T. James, 950 Wellington street north, tomorrow (Tuesday) at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

POTTER (Picton, Ontario) October 16 - A young man named Potter, 21 years of age, living near Demorestville, about eight miles from this place while taking part in a jumping match on Saturday evening, burst a blood vessel, dying almost immediately.

 

SNELGROVE (Brighton, Ontario) October 15 - Two miles west of here last night, Herbert Snelgrove, son of George Snelgrove, was killed and his two companions badly injured in an accident. The three young men had been in town Saturday evening, and boarded a west-bound freight train about ten o’clock to return home, intending to jump off at a grade near home. They did so but with the above fatal result.

 

TILLEY - A young child of William Tilley, of Salem, was killed by falling into a well.

 

LAIDLAW - John Laidlaw, aged 81 years, died very suddenly Sunday afternoon. He was one of the best known and most public-spirited men of his time in Toronto.

 

FAIRLEY - The funeral of the late William Fairley took place yesterday afternoon and was largely attended. The pall-bearers were members of Unity lodge, I.O.O.F. and Hamilton lodge, A.O.U.W., three from each lodge. Rev. Dr. Fletcher conducted the religious services.

 

Tuesday, October 17, 1899

 

WHITEHEAD - On Monday October 16th, at her parent’s residence, 37 Chatham avenue, Helen Amelia, youngest child of Benjamin and Helen Amelia Whitehead, aged 2 years and 1 month. Funeral Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please take notice.

 

ATKINSON - Guthrie Atkinson, a lad, was today smothered in a wheat bin at the Tillson Mills, Tillsonburg.

 

McCULLOGH - Lance McCullogh, of Grand Valley, aged thirteen years, was killed by falling out of a tree.

 

SHALES - It is thought that the name of the unknown woman killed on the G.T.R. near Gananoque recently was Mrs. Shales, who was on the way to Kingston to visit her sister.

 

Wednesday, October 18, 1899

 

CUTTRISS - In this city, on Wednesday, October 18th, 1899, George Edward Cuttriss, aged 21 years and 6 months. Funeral from his mother’s residence, 20 Spring street, on Saturday at 3 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.


STONE - Thomas Stone, the oldest dry goods merchant in Chatham, is dead.

 

GRAND - A little boy named Grand was killed at Paisley by a hay-rack falling upon his neck.

 

McEVOY - Mrs. Sarah McEvoy, widow of the late Bernard McEvoy, of Belleville, Ontario, died Monday night, aged seventy three, leaving three daughters and two sons.

 

CLEMENTI - Yesterday the death occurred of one of Peterboro’s oldest residents, Rev. Vincent Clementi, B.A., at the age of eighty seven years. He was a retired Anglican clergyman.

 

COUTURE - Alfred Couture, a conductor on the Grand Trunk between Levis and Richmond, has just died from the effects of a fly-bite received three months ago on the Island of Orleans.

 

PERRARD (Ottawa) October 18 - Marcille Perrard, wife of Guillaume Perrard , a farmer, residing on the Cyrville road, beyond Blackburn station, and about nine miles from the city, has died under circumstances so suspicious as to warrant a holding of a coroner’s inquest. To inquire into conditions which attended her death. This inquest will be held today by Dr. Freeland. In the meantime, the woman’s husband is suspected of being responsible of her death.

 

Friday, October 20, 1899

 

CUTTRISS - In this city, on Wednesday, October 18th, 1899, George Edward Cuttriss, aged 21 years and 6 months. Funeral from his mother’s residence 23 Spring street, on Saturday at 3 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BOND - Mrs. John H. Bond, aged 82 years, was found dead in bed at Chatham this morning.

 

WILSON - Mrs. Lucy A. Wilson was found dead in the yard at her home in Belleville.

 

GOLDTHORPE - Nina Goldthorpe, a child, was burned to death at her parents’ home in Colborne

township.

 

DOWN - Mrs. Mary Down, widow of Richard Down, Norway, Ontario, was found dead in her bed yesterday morning.

 

LEPAN - Frederick Nicholas D’Orr Lepan, one of the oldest and most highly respected citizen of Owen Sound, is dead.

 

HUTTON - Wm. Hutton, aged fifty, of Brantford, dropped dead while working in the moulding shop of the Waterous Engine company.

 

PARSONS - While shooting near Komoka, Frank Parsons received a fatal wound from a gun in the hands of Garfield McCormick, of London.

 

ATKINSON - John Atkinson, aged 22, a G.M.W. Telegraph company lineman, whose home is in Toronto, is believed to have been drowned in Little Wolf pond while hunting.


FOXTON - Elias Foxton, a man upward of 50 years of age, residing in the seventh concession of Thurlow, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor. He died soon afterwards.

 

Saturday, October 21, 1899

 

MILLER - On Saturday October 21st, at 118 Pearl street north, Sarah Mary Foreman, wife of H.J. Miller. Funeral notice later.

 

HUSTED - Silas Husted dropped dead this morning while cleaning a fire box in a C.P.R. engine at Toronto. He formerly lived in Guelph. Heart disease was the cause.

 

PEARSON - John Pearson, for many years, clerk of Ellice township, died at his home in Sebringville.

 

Monday, October 23, 1899

 

McDOWELL - In this city, on Oct. 23rd, Hiram McDowell, aged 51 years. Funeral service Tuesday morning at 8 o’clock., at his late residence 176 Mary street, thence to G.T.R. station. Interment at Norwich. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

KING - At his parent’s residence, No. 102 Dundurn street, on Saturday, 21st October 1899, Frederick W., son of Mr. and Mrs. S.S. King, aged 17 years and 9 months. Funeral Tuesday at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BERRY - On Sunday October 23, 1899, at 210 Victoria avenue north, Mrs. Martha Berry. Funeral from her son’s residence, at above address, on Tuesday at 1:30 p.m. to Waterdown cemetery. Friends please accept this intimation.

 

MILLER - On Saturday October 21, (Trafalgar Day) - at 116 Pearl street north, after a short illness, Sarah Mary Foreman, wife of R.I. Miller. Funeral on Tuesday at 2 p.m., from her husband’s residence to Zion Tabernacle, thence to cemetery. Comrades of H.M. Army and Navy Veterans, friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

“ I shall not in the grave remain.

 “Since Thou death’s bonds have severed;

 “But hope with Thee to rise again,

 “From fear of death delivered

 “I’ll come to Thee where’er Thou art,

 “Live with Thee, from Thee ne’er part;

 “The- - - - to die is rapture,

 “And so to Jesus Christ I’ll go,

 “My longing arms extending;

 “So fall asleep in slumber deep,

 “Slumber that knows no ending,

 “Till Jesus Christ, God’s only Son,

 “Opens the gates of bliss - leads on

 “ To Heaven, to life eternal”


O’NEIL - Saturday evening, while preparing supper, Mrs. O’Neil, aged 80, wife of Michael, an old respected resident of Uxbridge, dropped dead.

 

HUTCHINSON - The remains of Daniel C. Hutchinson, aged 71 years, once a well-known Toronto man, lie at Blake’s morgue, Detroit, unclaimed, and if no reply is received from any of the dead man’s relatives to whom telegrams have been sent, the body will be interred at the city’s expense.

 

HUSTED - Silas Husted, an employee in the C.P.R. shops at Toronto Junction, was found dead in the fire box of one of the engines on Saturday morning. He had gone into the fire box to clean the flues, and it is supposed death was due to heart failure, of which ailment he was known to be a sufferer.

 

Tuesday, October 24, 1899

 

McCREADY - In this city, on Monday, October 23, 1899, John McCready, aged 71 years. Funeral Wednesday at 2 p.m. from his late residence, 306 Main street east.

 

McINTYRE - In Montreal, on the 23rd inst., aged 67, Mr. Archibald McIntyre, of Montreal, and father of Mrs. M.A. Ptolemy of MacNab street south, Hamilton.

Archibald McIntyre died on Sunday morning at Montreal. He was the father of Mrs. R.A. Ptolemy of MacNab street south, Hamilton, who was hastily summoned to Montreal on Saturday evening, but she did not arrive in time to see him alive. He appeared in his usual health Saturday morning, but in the afternoon was stricken with paralysis of the brain, and was unconscious to the time of his death at 1:30 a.m. Sunday. The deceased was a native of Perthshire, Scotland, and went to Montreal nearly forty years ago and carried on a successful business as a contractor, some of the finest buildings there having been erected by him. One of these was the residence of Lord Mount Stephen. He retired a few years ago, having accumulated considerable means, and had since occupied the position of president of the Standard Shirt company, (Limited), in which he was a large stockholder. One son and seven daughters survive him, Mrs. McIntyre having died in March last.

 

BLACK - At her late residence, No. 171 Emerald street south, on Monday, 23rd, October, 1899, Sarah A. Dearden, beloved wife of John Black, aged 73 years, a native of Sheffield, England. Funeral Thursday at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

The many friends of John Black, Emerald street south, will mourn with him over the loss he has sustained in the death of his wife. Mrs. Black was a lady beloved by all who had the pleasure of her acquaintance. The funeral will take place on Thursday at 3 o’clock.

 

McROBERTS - (St. George) - Word was received here last night of the death of Alexander McRoberts, of Toronto. He was at one time a merchant in this village.

 

McKENZIE (St. George) - Eldred McKenzie, a machinist in Bell’s Agricultural works, died on Saturday morning after three days illness, of quinsy. The interment took place on Monday at the Methodist cemetery.

 

COPPIA - N.W. Coppia, flour and feed merchant, Toronto, died yesterday, aged 70, of appendicitis.

 

GUNN - W.A. Gunn, secretary of the McClary Manufacturing company, of London, Ont. is dead.


KINGSFORD - Miss Alice E.A. Kingsford, only daughter of the late William Kingsford, Canadian historian, died on Sunday at her mother’s home in Ottawa.

 

STONEY - Thomas Stoney, a resident of Stratford since 1848, died yesterday at the age of 79. He was the first reeve of the village of Stratford, and had also filled the positions of warden of the county and mayor of the town.

 

TOCQUE - Rev. Philip Tocque, a retired clergyman of the Church of England, died in Toronto on Sunday. He was a son of a merchant ship owner in Newfoundland. Born at Carboneau, Nfld., January, 1814, he was educated there.

 

HOWARD - Henry Taylor Howard died in Toronto from paralysis yesterday. He was well-known as a newspaper writer. His religious contributions to the World, which appeared over the pen-name of Ebor, where for years a feature of that paper. He was married in June last.

 

FREESE (Lynden) - Mrs. Freese, of Florida, U.S., died on Sunday evening at the residence of her sister, Mrs. F. Clement. The funeral took place on Tuesday at 2 p.m. to the Methodist burying ground. Rev. Dr. Cornish conducted the service.

 

Wednesday, October 25, 1899

 

McINTYRE - In Montreal on the 24th inst., aged 67 years, Mr. Archibald McIntyre, of Montreal, and father of Mrs. E.A. Ptolemy, of MacNab street south, Hamilton.

 

BLACK - At her late residence, No. 171 Emerald street south, on Monday, 23rd, October, 1899, Sarah A. Dearden, beloved wife of John Black, aged 79 years, a native of Sheffield, England. Funeral Thursday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ALLEN (London) October 25 - Grant Allen, the author, who has been in ill-health for some time past, is dead. He was born in Kingston, Ontario, in 1848.

 

MILLER - The funeral of the late Mrs. Miller took place yesterday afternoon and was largely attended. A service was held in Zion Tabernacle, being conducted by Rev. T. Albert Moore. The pallbearers were members of the Army and Navy Veterans, and members of Zion Tabernacle.

 

SWEETMAN (Kingsville, Ontario) October 25 - Fred Sweetman, fifteen years of age, was run over by a wagon loaded with gravel last evening on the second concession of Gosfield South, and instantly killed.

 

McDOWELL - (Amherstburg. Ontario) - October 24 - The body of Mrs. McDowell, who lived with Dick Dunn, and his wife, two noted characters in the township of Anderdon, was found last evening about 8 o’clock near the town hall, with the flesh torn from her back, arms and legs. The two women got into a buggy with an unknown man and a bottle of whisky. It is supposed Mrs. McDowell fell from the buggy and her foot got caught in the side-bar, dragging her for half a mile, as pieces of her clothing were found some distance from the body. The Dunn woman was arrested last evening and seems to know nothing, except that they were all drunk, and does not know when the McDowell woman fell out, or how.


WHITTAL (Windsor, Ontario) October 24 - The two-year-old-daughter of Alfred Whittal, of Leamington, while playing before the fire yesterday, was so terribly burned that she died an hour afterward in great agony. Her mother was absent at the time. It is thought that the child’s clothing caught fire from sparks. Screams were heard by the neighbours, who rushed in and extinguished the flames, but not before all the clothing had been burned off the little ones body.

 

FARREL - At Kincardine, Robert Farrel stepped on a defective blank and fell to the ground a distance of fourteen feet, sustaining injuries which resulted in his death.

 

Thursday, October 26, 1899

 

THOMPSON (Kingston) October 25 - A shocking accident occurred at the cement works, Napanee Mills, by which George Thompson, aged about eighteen, lost his life. He and Harry Sweet, a lad about his own age, were alone at the time. Sweet, for some reason, flung a cement sack over a shaft making over 200 revolutions per minute. According to Sweet’s testimony, Thompson asked him how they would get the bag. Sweet replied “It will have to stay there”.Starting to go about his work, he noticed where the sun was shining on the opposite wall a shadow flying around. Turning his head he saw Thompson on the shaft. As soon as possible the machinery was stopped and Thompson’s lifeless body dropped to the floor horribly mangled.

 

FULLJAMES - John P. Fulljames, the oldest man in Barrie, died yesterday afternoon in his 87th year. He was a native of Gloucestershire, England.

 

WEESE (Peterboro) October 26 - Intelligence has been received here of a terrible dynamite at Jack’s Lake, Burley township, in the northern part of Peterboro county. A party of prospectors for gold were encamped near the lake. While the rest were out prospecting two men, Peter Weese, of Chandos, and Mr. Galbraith, an American, were left in camp to prepare dynamite cartridges. An explosion took place and Weese was literally blown to atoms. Not enough of his body having been found to warrant a burial. Galbraith had both hands blown off and both eyes were destroyed.

 

Friday, October 27, 1899

 

LACKIE - At Bullock’s Corners on October 27th, Agnes McKee, widow of the late John Lackie, aged 77 years. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, James Clark, Bullock’s Corners, to the Grove cemetery, Dundas, on Sunday at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this notice.

 

HOOPER - On October 26th, Willie B. Hooper, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Hooper, No. 77, Victoria avenue north, aged 17 years and 3 months. Funeral Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

John Hooper, of the Sanford company, has the sympathy of a large circle of friends in the death of his son which occurred at the hospital last night. The deceased was about seventeen years of age, a student at the Hamilton Business college and was an exceedingly bright and popular boy. He was taken ill a week ago with appendicitis, and on Sunday an operation was performed on him, from the effects of which he never recovered. The deceased was a member of the Third Tigers.

 


PURCHASE (Toronto, Ontario) October 27 - James Purchase, 550 Givens street, a car cleaner in the G.T.R. yards, was crossing the tracks at the Union Station this morning, when he was run down by a train. Half a dozen cars passed over him, severing his left leg, and left arm. He was removed to the Emergency hospital. It is believed he is fatally injured.

 

FARR - Joseph Farr, of London, Ont., who was caught and crushed between two streetcars, will not survive his injuries.

 

O’DONNELL - Clarence O’Donnell, a young son of James O’Donnell, farmer near Niagara-on-the Lake, fell of a bridge into a creek, which crosses the farm yesterday, and was drowned.

 

CRAWFORD - William Spence Crawford, an old and respected resident of the township of Albion, died at his residence, Mono Road, Thursday evening aged 84. Deceased had been ailing for some twenty years, from a hurt he received in his leg. In the hope of saving his life, the member was amputated, but after the operation he gradually sank.

 

Saturday, October 28, 1899

 

HOOPER - On October 26th, William B. Hooper, son of Mr. and John Hooper, No. 77 Victoria avenue north, aged 16 years and 3 months. Funeral Sunday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

TURK - In this city, on the 27th inst., Mrs. Ann Turk, mother of J. Phillips, letter carrier aged 82 years. Funeral from 50 Macauley west, on Sunday at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

STEVEN - On Wednesday, October 24th, 1899, at her residence, Brooklyn, N.Y., Laura Steven, in the 56th year of her age, widow of Andrew Steven, formerly of this city.

 

BOHNER - Prof. Charles Bohner, a well-known Toronto musician, dropped dead of heart failure in the house of Gerald Dimwoodie, Bracondale about 6:30 last evening.

 

Monday, October 30, 1899

 

BROWN - At the residence of her son, James H. Brown, No. 50 Macauley street west, on Sunday, 29th October, 1899, Jessie Brown, relict of the late John Brown, aged 78 years, a native of Stromness, Orkney Islands. Funeral Wednesday at 2 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

Mrs. James Brown, an old resident of this city, died at her residence, 55 Macauley street west, yesterday. She was 78 years of age.

 

STEWART - On Sunday, October 29th, John Meeson Stewart, of Edinburgh, Scotland, in the 67th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence 150 Victoria avenue south, Tuesday, October 31st, at 2:30 p.m., to St. Thomas church, thence to Hamilton cemetery.

 

WILSON - At No. 27 Hess street south, on Sunday October 29th, 1899, Allan Stanley, youngest son of James D. and Louisa F. Wilson, age 11 years. Funeral took place this (Monday morning). Private.

Allan Stanley Wilson, the eleven-year-old - son of James Wilson, died at his parents’ residence, 27 Hess street south yesterday. The funeral, which was private, took place this morning.


BANKIER - On ths 29th October 1899, at his late residence “Ingleneuk” Hamilton, Patrick Macindoe Bankier, barrister at law, aged 39 years. Funeral on Tuesday, 31st October, at 3:30 p.m.

After a short illness, P.M. Bankier, of the firm of Crerar, Crerar, & Bankier, died at his residence Ingleneuk, early yesterday morning. For several days his condition had been serious, but his friends hoped he would pull through.

Patrick Macindoe Bankier, was born in Glasgow, Scotland, thirty-nine years ago. In 1880, he came to Canada, being the guest of P.D. Crerar. He returned to Scotland and completed his education at the Glasgow University, where he received the degree of M.A. In 1882, he returned to Hamilton and entered the office of Crerar, Muir & Crerar as a student. Four years later he was called to the bar. He became a member of the firm of Crerar, Crerar, & Bankier in 1888. In 1887, he married Miss Stuart, the only daughter of John Stewart, of the Bank of Hamilton. A widow and four children survive him. In social circles, Mr. Bankier was exceedingly popular, and all regret his death.

The deceased used to be a lieutenant in the Fourth Field battery, but he resigned his commission some time ago.

 

BENGOUGH (Toronto) October 29 - The death took place at his residence on Church street this morning of Capt. John Bengough, one of the pioneers of navigation of Lake Ontario. Capt. Bengough was in his 81st year. His sons are: J.W. Bengough, the cartoonist; William Bengough now in the Phillippines as an artist and correspondent for the New York Journal; Thomas Bengough, court reporter, Toronto; George Bengough and James Bengough of the Carter-Crume company Niagara Falls. Capt. Bengough was very prominent as a social reformer.

 

PURCHASE (Toronto) October 28 - James Purchase, 550 Gibbons street, was working in the G.T.R. yards at the foot of Simcoe street, yesterday morning, when he slipped and fell in front of a locomotive with five cars attached. The entire train passed over his left arm and leg, crushing them to pulp. He was removed at once to the Emergency hospital.

It was decided to amputate the injured limbs, but before the operation could be performed, the patient expired.

Deceased was 60 years old, and had been in the employ of the G.T.R. for 23 years.

 

HOOPER - The funeral of the late Willie H. Hooper, son of John Hooper, of the W.E. Sanford Manufacturing co., took place yesterday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock from his father’s residence, 77 Victoria avenue north. The deceased, though but a boy, was popular and well liked by all who knew him, and the large number of floral tributes testified to the deep sympathy of friends for the bereaved relatives. The funeral was very largely attended. The pall-bearers were: Hugh Fletcher, Kier Davis, William McAdams, Ernest Moore, Arthur Riddell, George Insole, Alex Stewart, and Garnet Sintzel.

Rev. John Young, of St. John’s Presbyterian church, conducted the religious services and the members of the bible class of St. John’s church Sunday school attended the funeral in a body.

 

Tuesday, October 31, 1899

 

STOKES - At his late residence, No. 27 Pearl street north, on Monday, 30th October, 1899, Harry Stokes, aged 78 years. Funeral Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


O’NEILL - In this city, on the 30th instant, Louise, beloved wife of J.B. O’Neill, aged 29 years. Funeral on Thursday at 8:30 from her late residence, 485 Hughson street north. Services at St. Lawrence church. Interment at Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

After a short illness Mrs. J.B. O’Neill, wife of James B. O’Neill, 485 Hughson street north, died in St. Joseph’s hospital last evening. Mrs. O’Neill was suffering from internal trouble, and an operation was performed on her yesterday afternoon, but she was too weak to stand the strain and died from shock.

Mrs. O’Neill was only married about two months ago. She was a Mrs. Hayes before her second wedding, which the whole north end celebrated.

 

BAIN - On October 30th 1899, Marjorie Bain, widow of the late Thomas Bain, aged 59 years. Funeral from her late residence No. 32 Wellington street north, on Wednesday, November 1st at 3 p.m. to St. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

Mrs. Marjorie Bain, widow of the late Thomas Bain, furniture manufacturer, died yesterday afternoon at her residence, 32 Wellington street north. The deceased lady had resided in Hamilton since 1839, and was very much respected. She leaves four children to mourn her loss, namely,

Mrs. Thomas Burrows, Mrs. James Gilgour, and T.J. Bain, all of this city, and Mrs. John W. Madigan, of Buffalo, N.Y.

 

BROWN - At the residence of her son, James H. Brown, No. 55 Macauley street west, on Sunday, 30th October, 1899, Jessie Brown, relict of the late John Brown, aged 78 years, a native of Stromness, Orkney Islands. Funeral Wednesday at 2 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

 

REED (Attercliffe) - John and Mrs. Damude, of the village, attended the funeral of Mrs. Damude’s father, Archibald Reed, of Moulton, Ontario last week.

 

RYAN - George Ryan, of Downeyville, dropped dead.

 

DUPLESEE (Rat Portage) October 30 - A French man named Fred Duplesee, employed by Graham & Horn, and working in one of their lumber camps near Barwick, Rainy River, was decking logs, and was in the act of placing a large log on the skid way when the block gave way. Duplesee tried to jump out of the way but was caught between two logs and got his back broken, death being instantaneous. The deceased came here recently from Gatineau Point, Ottawa.

 

KENNARD - On Monday, October 23, at her home, Miss Addie Kennard, daughter of the late Henry Kennard, of Lowbanks, committed suicide by hanging herself to a hook on the wall. The deceased and her one brother, Clarence, resided together and on Monday evening the latter went on an errand to one of the neighbours. He was only absent for a short time, and on returning he found that his sister had the tea table set, but he saw nothing of her. On entering the adjoining room he found her hanging to a hook on the wall. No cause can be assigned to the deed, as the deceased was in good spirits when he left. It is thought that her mind was unhinged.

 

LAPP (Lowbanks) - Peter Lapp, an old resident of this place, died on Monday morning. He had lived on the same farm for 70 years. He was 77 years old, and leaves a daughter, Mrs. Bradford Lane, and four sons, William, Fia, Samuel, and Gervin. The funeral took place on Wednesday afternoon.


REED (Lowbanks) - Archibald Reed, an old resident, who lives near Stromness died at his home on Tuesday morning, October 24th, in the 76th year of his age. The funeral took place on Thursday from his late residence.

 

BANKIER - The funeral of the late P.M. Bankier, which took place this afternoon from the family residence, was largely attended, the deceased being one of Hamilton’s best known and most popular citizens. While the members of the Law association, did not attend the funeral in a body, the profession was well represented, nearly every lawyer in the city turning out to pay a last tribute to his late Fellow-Practitioner. The floral offering were numerous and very beautiful.

At the house, Rev. Canon Bland conducted the Church of England service and at the grave he read the burial service. The pall-bearers were, Major J.S. Hendrie, P.D. Crerar, F.W. Gates Jr., E.H. Browne, A.D. Braithwaite, W.A. Spratt, Darcy Tate, and W.T. Ramsay. Among the chief mourners were the two cousins of the deceased, W.H., Bankier, of New York, W. Boyd, of Pittsburgh, and John and Alexander Stuart.

 

Wednesday, November 1, 1899

 

O’NEILL - In this city, on the 30th instant, Louisa, beloved wife of J.B. O’Neill, aged 36 years.

Funeral on Thursday morning at 8:30 from her late residence, 485 Hughson street north. Services at St. Lawrence church, interment at Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

 

BAKER - In this city, on October 31st, Josiah Baker, a native of Churchill, Somersetshire, England, aged 73 years. The funeral will leave the residence of his son, Albert H. Baker, 18 Blyth street, on Thursday afternoon at 3:30.Friends will accept this intimation.

Josiah Baker who had lived in Hamilton for many years died last night. The deceased was born in Churchill, Somersetshire, England, 73 years ago, and came to Hamilton in 1869. For many years he carried on business as a contractor and builder. Four years ago, he suffered from a paralytic stroke and was compelled to retire from business. The deceased was highly esteemed by a large circle of friends. He was a member of Unity lodge, I.O.O.F. He leaves three sons, R.B., A.H., and A.E. and one daughter Miss Agnes Baker.

 

RICE - At Buffalo, N.Y. October 31st, 1899, Mrs. Sarah A. Rice, relict of the late Mr. Wm. S. Rice, of Buffalo, and sister of Samuel, James G. and Helen E. Davis of this city.

 

RENAUD - Joseph Renaud, a labourer, residing at Rochesterville was run over by an engine on Canada Atlantic Railway at Ottawa East, and killed.

 

BROWN - The funeral of the late Mrs. Jessie Brown took place this afternoon from the home of her son, James H. Brown, 55 Macauley street west, and was largely attended. The pall-bearers were James H. and John Brown, sons of the deceased, James W. Brown, Andrew Johnson, Thomas Morrison, and John Fotheringham. Rev. Dr. Fraser conducted the services at the house and grave.

 

STOKES - The funeral of the late Harry Stokes took place this afternoon from his late residence, 91 Pearl street north, to Hamilton cemetery. It was attended by members of Loyal Commercial lodge, C.O.O.F. and many old friends of deceased. Rev. F. E. Howitt conducted the services. The pall-bearers were William Pitt, Frederick Dallyn, Samuel Heath, and three members of Loyal Commercial lodge whose names were not listed.


Thursday, November 2, 1899

 

ARCHIBALD - In this city, on Wednesday, 1st November 1899, Willoughby S. Archibald, late of Truro, N.S., aged 28 years. Funeral from his mother’s residence, 79 Bold street, on Friday at 2 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

PEIR - In this city on November 1, at his brother-in-laws residence, at Loosemore, corner of Gibson street, Michael Peir, a native of County Westmoreland in the 64th year of his age. Funeral from above address on Saturday morning at 8:30 o’clock, from St. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BAKER - The funeral of the late Josiah Baker took place this afternoon from the family residence, Blyth street, and was largely attended.

 

O’NEIL - The funeral of the late J.B. O’Neil took place this morning and was largely attended. There many beautiful offerings, including a pillow, anchor and crown, from Mr. O’Neil, and his son Harry; wreath; Mrs. Borland, and daughter; wreath, Walter and Mrs. Clark; Spray, Mrs. Hughson.

The services at St. Lawrence church were conducted by Rev. Father Brady. The choir was assisted by T. Murphy of Toronto. The chief mourners were Mr. O’Neil and his son Harry, D. Small, J. Johns, and T. Murphy of Toronto were present. The pallbearers were T. Parver, Chas. Gardner, A. Almas, M. O’Neill, J. Dowling, J. Johns, H. Harrison, and R.S. Fraser.

 

ROSS (Holland Landing, Ontario) November 1 - At eight o’clock tonight the stable of John Ross, who lives two miles and a half south of here, on Yonge street was destroyed by fire, and Mr. Ross perished in the flames.

Mr. Ross, went out with the lantern to attend to his horses, and cow for the night, and in some way he upset the lantern, and in trying to extinguish the fire he lost his life, together with his horse and cow, besides the buggy and wagon and other rigs.

Deceased was an elderly man and leaves a widow and daughter, Miss Ross, who teaches in the Newmarket model school.

 

YASTER (Eganville, Ontario) November 1 - A double tragedy was perpetrated early Wednesday morning or late Tuesday night, about eight miles from Eganville, in the township of Wilberforce.

Mrs. William Yaster and her seventeen-year-old-daughter were horribly mutilated about their heads by some heavy instrument while in bed, and their lifeless bodies now await the coroner’s inspection. The husband and father, William Yaster, aged about 50 years, who for some time had given evidences of insanity, is accused of doing the terrible deed. He had previously threatened to take their lives. Three children younger than the dead daughter were in the house and it was they who gave the alarm to the neighbours.

 

ADAMS (Ottawa) November 1 - Mrs. Adams, wife of E. Adams, chairman of the board of steamboat inspection, dropped dead on O’Connor street tonight on her way to church.

 

Friday, November 3, 1899

 


ECHLIN - In Hamilton at 147 Hannah street west, on Thursday November 2, at 8:30 p.m. Francis A. Echlin, son of the late Robert Echlin, in his 46th year. The funeral will take place from his late residence, on Sunday November 5th, at 12:30 p.m. to Mount Zion burying ground, Beverley township north of Copetown. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

PEIR - In this city, on November 1, at his brother-in-laws residence, Thomas Loosemore, corner of Gibson avenue and Barton streets, Michael Peir, a native of County Wexford, Ireland, in the 64th year of his age. Funeral from above address on Saturday morning at 8:30 o’clock to St. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

TANTON - John Tanton, of London, who was hurt in a run-a-way, succumbed after suffering about twenty four hours.

 

CRAWFORD - The-eighteen-month-old-son of Mrs. Crawford, Beachville, was drowned in a pail of water yesterday.

 

SMUCK - Peter Smuck, of Sarnia, a brakeman on the through freight, fell off the train about half-a-mile-west of Watford at 5:30 last evening, and was instantly killed, his head and both legs being cut

 off. He leaves a widow and family residing in Sarnia.

 

LUSK - At Eardley, near Ottawa, the eight-year-old-daughter of Kennedy Lusk lost her life. A brother of the victim was handling a revolver, when a shot went off and took effect in the little girl’s chest. The wounded girl died in terribly agony, two hours afterwards.

 

Saturday, November 4, 1899

 

MORRIS - At her late residence, foot of Wentworth street, Hannah M., wife of John Morris, aged 40 years. Funeral Monday at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

STIPE - This afternoon a lad named Stipe, grandson of S.P. Stipe, of Barton, was killed by a Radial railway car near the smelting works. He tried to get on the car before it stopped, and fell under the wheels. The body was brought to the hospital. An inquest will be held.

The deceased was twelve years of age.

 

Monday, November 6, 1899

 

PEER - On November 5th, at his late residence No. 180 Bay street north, Philip Peer, aged 71 years. Funeral Tuesday morning at 9 o’clock to St. Mary’s cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

 

ELLIOTT - On Sunday November 5th, at the residence of his son-in-law James Newman, West Flamboro, in his 78th year, Ralph Elliott, a native of Weardale, County Durham, England. Funeral from the above address on Tuesday, 7th, inst., at 2 p.m. to St. Mathews church burying ground, Plains Road. Friends and acquaintances please accept this notice.

 

STIPE - On Saturday, 4th November, 1899, Walter N. Stipe, grandson of S.P. Stipe, Barton, aged 12 years. Funeral from the residence of S.P. Stipe, Tuesday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. Internment in Hamilton cemetery.


CLIFF - In this city, at corner of Cannon and Hess streets, on Sunday, November 5th, William Cliff, a native of Birkenhead, England, in the 46th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence to the Salvation Army Citadel, thence to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

About five o’clock yesterday afternoon, William Cliff, who lived with his wife and family at the corner of Cannon and Hess streets, died under rather peculiar circumstances, and a coroner’s jury has been summoned to inquire into the cause of death. On Friday afternoon, Cliff was in his usual good health and supper with his family at five o’clock. Among other things he ate was some canned

herring and it is believed that this was responsible for his death.

Cliff was employed as nightwatchman in the Norton manufacturing company’s factory. As he was going his rounds about 3 o’clock Saturday morning he complained to some of the men about not feeling very well, but his illness was not thought at the time to be very serious. He did not go his round at 4 o’clock as usual, and one of the men went to look for him. He found him in a remote part of the factory in an unconscious condition, and securing the assistance of some of the other men carried him to his home. Dr. Anderson was summoned an did all in his power to save the poor fellows life, but his efforts were of no avail. Yesterday Dr. Coburn was also called in, but Cliff was beyond medical aid and died about five o’clock in the afternoon.

Coroner Balfe was notified and after hearing the circumstance decided to hold an inquest. Constable Canary summoned the following jury which met this morning, and after viewing the remains and ordering a post-mortem to be held adjourned to meet again Wednesday night at No. 3 police station; John Berryman (foreman) ; K. Scully, W. Diack, William Condon, T. Bratt, William Cannon, E.J. Townsend, John Dillon, F. Taafe, John Beer, Joseph Dillon, J.B. Webber, R.W. England, John Littlehales, and R.A. Reid. The post-mortem will be conducted by Drs. Anderson, and Coburn.

The deceased was 46 years of age, and was twice married. He was married to his second wife on Thanksgiving day 1898, and there were no children by the second marriage. Four children by his first wife survive him. They are Alfred, Lena, and Annie Cliff, and Mrs. Perry. Mrs. Cliff has been married three times and has a grown up family.

Canned herring which the deceased ate was taken from the stock in a grocery store kept by Mrs. Cliff. What was left in the can will be analysed and the result will be made known at the inquest.

Cliff was a member of Britannia tent, Nights of the Maccabees, and Rose lodge, S.O.E. For the past eighteen years or more he has been a member of the Salvation Army, having joined it at Birkenhead, England. He came to this country about twelve years ago, and during his residence here has been conducted to the local branch of the Army.

The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon. Service will be held at the Salvation Army Citadel at 2:30 p.m.

 

ST. DENIS (Cornwall, Ontario) November 6 - The barge Laura, in tow of the tug Nellie Reid, was run into by the barge A.D., in tow of the tug St. George, near Stanley island, at 5 o’clock this morning, and one man, the son of Capt. St. Denis, of the barge Laura, was instantly killed. He was coming up the forecastle hatchway and the force of the collision drove the hatch together, cutting the young man almost in two. The vessel is now lying aground near Stanley island.

 

WELLS - Mrs. William Wells, of Rothsay, dropped dead while talking to a neighbour.

 

SMITH - A farmer named Smith, of London township, was killed by a falling brick while working in a well.


HAWKENS - A man named Boucher was found guilty of murdering William Hawkens, of Port Hope, at St. Joseph, Mich.

 

SMITH - Edwin Smith, aged 77 years, for a number of years assistant post master and chairman of the Public school board at Port Colborne, died Saturday night.

 

CHAUVIN (Comber, Ontario) November 6 - F. Chauvin, of Tilbury North township, a young man of about twenty years of age, and a school teacher by profession, met with a shocking accident Saturday afternoon. He and two other young men were in the woods for a day’s sport. One of the young men was in the act of loading his gun, when the hammer slipped and the gun was discharged. The contents entered the leg of Chauvin above the knee. On Sunday the leg was amputated but the young man died while under the operation.

 

GREENMAN (Toronto) November 6 - Annie Greenman, a domestic, aged about 27 years, employed at the house of Frank Hilton, 115 Madison avenue, was found dead in bed on Sunday morning, asphyxiated by gas. She had only come to the house the day previously, and before she retired, the method of turning and off the gas had been carefully explained to her, but it is presumed that she must have misunderstood in some way. She slept with the door and window both closed. When she did not answer a call Sunday morning, the door was opened and the dead woman found lying on the bed.

 

LAMB (Chatham, Ontario) November 5 - Michael Lamb was found dead beneath the L.E. and D.

R.R. bridge over the river this morning. Lamb, who was about 60 years of age, was a farm hand. Some of the railway employees were talking to him just before he started to go across the bridge. This was the last seen of Lamb, till he was picked up this morning beneath the bridge with his neck broken. It is thought he missed his footing and fell to the ground below, some 30 feet.

 

PEIR - The funeral of the late Michael Peir took place on Saturday morning from the residence of his brother-in-law, Thomas Loosemore, corner of Gibson avenue and Barton street, the remains being laid at rest in Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Deceased was a resident of this city and vicinity for nearly 43 years, and was unmarried. He leaves two sisters, Mrs. John Byrne, and Mrs. Thomas Loosemore, of this city, and one brother John Peir, of Grimsby, to mourn his loss. By the special request of deceased, his six nephews acted as pallbearers, namely Jas. and John Byrne, James, John, and Frank Peir, and Charles Loosemore.

 

Tuesday, November 7, 1899

 

SMITH - On Tuesday November 7, at his residence, in Binbrook township, David A. Smith, aged 64.Funeral on Thursday, November 9, at 1 p.m. from above address to Case’s church burying ground, Glanford. Friends will please accept this intimation.

D.A. Smith, an old and respected resident of Binbrook township, died early this morning after a short illness.

 

ALLAN - On November 6th, at the residence of her son-in-law, Charles Reid, No. 50 Wilson street, Mrs. Louisa Allan, aged 89, a native of Edinburgh, Scotland. Funeral on Thursday, the 9th inst., at 3 p.m.


Mrs. Louisa Allan, widow of the late David Allan, an old and respected resident of Hamilton, passed away yesterday afternoon, at the residence of her son-in-law, Charles Reid, 30 Wilson street. The deceased was born in Edinburgh, Scotland 89 years ago, and came to this country with her husband man years ago. Mr. Allan was connected with the building of the Great Western Railway. After his death, Mrs. Allan moved to New York, where she resided until a few years ago, when she returned to Hamilton, and took up her residence with her son-in-law. Three children, David, and William Allan, and Mrs. Walter Sheldon, all of New York, are left to mourn her loss. The funeral will take place on Thursday afternoon.

 

PARK - Mrs. Park, wife of Hugh Park, 49 Macauley street west, died early this morning after a brief but painful illness.

 

HONEYSETT - A fatal accident occurred shortly before 6 o’clock last evening at the W.A. Freeman Fertilising Works, John Honeysett, Dundurn street, meeting death by falling down the elevator shaft. How the accident occurred will probably never be known, because nobody saw Honeysett fall, and it was not known that he had met with an accident until he was found in an unconscious condition in the basement, at the foot of the elevator shaft by one of the employees of the company.

Honeysett was a butcher who bought job lots of meat and, after trimming it up, sold the bones to the fertiliser people. He had been in the habit of going to the Freeman establishment with loads of bones and was seen driving into the yard with a load about 5:30 o’clock last evening. He went into the building and not seeing anybody around called for someone to come and wait on him. One of the workman on the second floor heard him and went down to attend to him, but he got to the ground floor there were no signs of anybody being in the building. He returned to where he had been working and secured the lantern it being quite dark at the time, but was still unable to find anybody.

A few minutes later Henry Turner, the floor man at the works had occasion to go into the basement, and he found Honeysett lying at the foot of the shaft in an unconscious condition. Blood was flowing from his nose and ears, and the left side of his face was cut and bruised. The ambulance was telephoned for and the injured man was removed to the city hospital, but died a couple of minutes after he was taken to the institution. It is believed he went to the shaft to call one of the workmen and losing his balance fell into the opening to the basement, striking the left side of his head. The skull is fractured and it is believed death was resulted from internal haemorrhage. The distance from the ground floor to the basement is only about eight feet.

The deceased was a married man and leaves a widow and six small children. He was a member of Concord lodge, A.O.U.W. and will be buried by that society tomorrow afternoon. The body was removed from the morgue to Dodsworth’s undertaking establishment to be prepared for burial.

Upon hearing the circumstances of the death, Coroner Griffin was consulted with Crown Attorney Crerar and it was decided to hold an inquest.

The inquest was opened at the city hospital at noon today and after viewing the body the jury adjourned to meet again at No. 3 police station on Thursday night.

 

TIGHE - The body of William Tighe, who has been missing since August 24, was found in the Thames river beneath the L.E. & D.R.R. bridge at Chatham.

 

SHEWAN - Magnus Shewan, one of the best known residents of Toronto, passed away yesterday afternoon. Mr. Shewan was born in the Shetland Islands 83 years ago.


HUNGERFORD (London, Ontario) November 6 - Benjamin Hungerford, a farmer, who lived near Thedford, died of blood poisoning at the city hospital on Saturday morning. His body was taken to Thedford this morning. A wife and a family of ten children survive him.

 

CROWTHER (Attercliffe) - James Harold, a bright little baby of Harry and Jessie Crowther, of the village, was taken suddenly ill, and not withstanding every effort possible put forward by Doctors

Shupe, and Zumpstein, the little sufferer passed quietly away last Tuesday night. The funeral took place last Thursday and was largely attended.

 

STIPE - The evidence given at the inquest held last night to inquire into the death of Walter Stipe, the lad who was killed at Stipe’s crossing on Saturday afternoon by being run over by a Radial car, did not throw any additional light on the accident. The jurymen spent over two hours listening of the evidence of seven witnesses and framing a verdict in accordance with the facts brought out......(edited as to length of article.)

After consulting for about half an hour, the jury returned