Hamilton Spectator

                                                         Deaths, January-June, 1898

 

STEVENSON - Of bronchitis, on Friday afternoon, Dec. 31, at the family residence, 129 John st. south, the infant son of Thomas Stevenson, aged 4 months. Funeral private.

 

KING - On January 2nd, at his parent’s residence, corner of York and Dundurn streets, Jesse Samuel, eldest son of S.S. and Hannah King, aged 80. Funeral Tuesday at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Jesse S. King, eldest son of S.S. King, Dundurn street, died at his father’s residence early Sunday morning after a long illness. Deceased was a member of Erskine church, and one of the best known and popular young men of West Hamilton, and his early demise will be deeply regretted. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 3 o’clock.

 

ARMSTRONG - At his late residence, 283 John st. north, on Saturday, January 1, 1898, Edward Armstrong, aged 78 years. Funeral Tuesday Jan. 4, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

McLEOD - At 196 Peter st., Hamilton, Ont., on Sunday, Jan. 2, 1898, Harold, son of John and Christina McLeod, aged four years, and 6 months. Funeral Tuesday at 2 p.m.

 

CAMPBELL - In this city, on January 3, 1898, Robert Campbell, native of County Tyrone, Ireland, in the 73rd year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 258 Jackson st. west, on Wednesday 5th inst., at 2:30 p.m. to Zion Tabernacle thence to Burlington cemetery.

Robert Campbell, one of Hamilton’s oldest and most esteemed citizens, died at his residence 258 Jackson st. west, this morning. For nearly 40 years the late Mr. Campbell had been a resident of this city, and during that period he had endeared himself to many Hamiltonians. Robert Campbell was born in the county of Tyrone, Ireland, 73 years ago, in the parish of Pullaniskin. He was married on Feb. 22, 1845, and he and Mrs. Campbell celebrated their golden wedding in 1895. One year after his marriage Mr. Campbell left his native home, and moved to the United States, settling in New Jersey. He was a good, loyal subject, however, and was not satisfied to live under any other rule than that of her Majesty the Queen, and after six years residence in New Jersey moved to Wellington Square, now known as Burlington. Here Mr. Campbell lived with his wife and family until 1859, when he took his residence in Hamilton, where he had since resided. After moving to this city, Mr. Campbell engaged in the pottery business, and he was well known, and highly respected, and had a large business connection all over the country. He was a staunch Methodist, and early in his life connected himself with the old Main street Methodist church, now Zion Tabernacle, and since then had held many offices in connection with the church. In politics he was a Reformer.

Mr. Campbell is survived by a widow and eight sons and daughters - William Campbell, Chicago; John D., R.W., and Colin C. Campbell, Mrs. H.G. McMahon, Miss Minnie Campbell of this city; Mrs. J.J. Thomas, of Guelph, and Mrs. F.W. Galloway, of Burlington. The funeral will take place from 258 Jackson street west, on Wednesday afternoon at 2:30. The cortege will proceed to Zion Tabernacle, where a funeral service will be conducted by Rev. Dr. Brethour.

 

SCOTT - Miss Georgina Scott, a coloured woman, who was so badly burned in Albert Williams’ house a few weeks ago, died in the city hospital about 10 o’clock this morning.


BURNS (Toronto) Jan 3 - Rev. William Burns, secretary of the aged and infirm ministers’ fund of the Presbyterian, and the moderator of the Toronto Presbytery, died suddenly at Galt yesterday afternoon.

The Reverend gentleman dined with his family in this city on New Year’s day, but left by the four o’clock train for Galt, where he was to conduct services on the following day in aid of the fund of which he was secretary. Before quitting home the Reverend gentleman made the observation that he never felt better in his life. Yesterday morning he preached in Knox church in Galt, and subsequently partook of a hearty meal. At 3 o’clock, he proceeded to a dwelling in the town for the purpose of conducting a funeral service over the body of an old member of the congregation named William Lunn. He had just taken the bible in his hand for the purpose of reading a portion of Scripture when he was seen to totter. Willing hands caught the stricken clergyman as he fell, and medical aid was speedily forthcoming, but in a few minutes he quietly breathed his last. Local doctors ascribed heart failure as the cause of death. He was 58 years of age, and leaves a widow, three sons, and two daughters.

 

LEGGATT (Brantford, Ont.) Jan 6 - A terrible fatality occurred here on New Years day. William Leggatt, who was at one time coachman for Lord Lovelace in England, was driving one of Hunt & Colter’s carriages when the horses bolted and threw him against a telegraph pole. He was picked up in an unconscious condition, and shortly afterwards expired. He leaves a widow and three children. Leggatt was a splendid horseman, and much respected by his employers and the general public.

 

CURLY (Toronto) Dec. 3 - Inspector Rogers of the Ontario criminal investigation bureau has spent the last two days at Toronto Junction investigating the mysterious death of Joseph Curly, the Weston farm labourer, whose lifeless body was found in the Keele street subway, on Thursday morning. As a result of his investigations the officer is satisfied that Curly’s death may have been the result of an accident, and accident alone.

 

Tuesday, January 4, 1898

 

CAMPBELL - In this city, on January 3, 1898, Robert Campbell, a native of County Tyrone, Ireland, in the 73rd year of his age. Funeral from his late residence 258 Jackson st. west, on Wednesday, 5th inst, at 2:30 p.m. to Zion Tabernacle, thence to Burlington cemetery.

 

JEFFREY - In this city on Tuesday, Jan 4th, 1898, Bella, youngest daughter of John Jeffrey, 104 Ferguson ave. south. Funeral notice later.

 

McLAREN - At Oak Bank, Jan. 3, Jane, widow of the late W.P. McLaren, aged 75 years. Funeral on Thursday, Jan. 6th, at 3 o’clock.

The many friends of Mrs. W.P. McLaren will deeply mourn to hear of her death, which occurred last night at the residence of her son, Col. McLaren, Oak Bank, James street south. Mrs. McLaren was an old resident of Hamilton, and during her life here was intimately associated with charitable works of all description, for many years being president of the Orphan asylum, and Aged Women’s home board. The deceased lady was born in Coteau du Lac, on the St. Lawrence, and was a daughter of the late Capt. Evatt. Her age at the time of her death was 76 years. Four children are left. - Col. McLaren, two daughters at home, and one married living in England. The funeral will take place on Thursday from the family residence James st. south.


NASH, TURNER, BURRIDGE, ROBINSON, BECKETT, LUXTON, DELL, LEIGH, PHILLIPS, JACQUES, WILLIAMS, SMITH, BURKE, FELLOWS, HARRIS, CARROTHERS, BOYLAND, HEAMAN, TALBOT, BRUCE, TOWE, BURGESS, HILBERT, McLEAN

(London, Ont.) Jan. 3 - Twenty six people were killed and more than one hundred injured by a portion of the city hall floor giving way during an after-election meeting tonight.

The municipal elections had been fought on strictly party lines and when the returns showed that the Conservatives had elected their candidate for mayor, Dr. John D. Wilson, and had secured a majority in the council, the victors with some 2000 supporters, adjourned to the city hall to listen to the promises of the newly elected. The hall was jammed to the doors, people were standing in the window seats on the stairs and the floor of the hall was packed.

Speeches had gone along for an hour, and about 9 o’clock the small platform on which the mayor and his cabinet were seated was the centre of attraction. The crowd called for various speakers, and while waiting for an acceptable man to come forward, there was a temporary lull. Barrister Richard Toothe, was loudly called for and despite many withdrawals was pushed forward toward the platform. Ald. Carruthers and Mayor Wilson stepped to the front of the platform to secure quite, the good-humoured crowd, flushed with victory, was jostling and shouting in jovial mood. Suddenly there was a crackling sound on the platform on which the speakers of the evening were seated.

The platform seemed to pitch forward, the floor around it gave way, and down through the floor 200 people were hurled. Crashing down upon the heads of the doomed ones came a huge safe and an iron steam coil, which were standing in the north-eastern corner of the hall. Jagged beams and timbers from the broken floor were hurled down upon the seething mass of humanity. Seeing from above, all seemed struggling for life like the crew of a sinking ship. Some of those least injured dragged themselves painfully to the walls and endeavoured to reach the floor from which they had fallen. Down in the pit lay scores of motionless figures. Many lads, who had climbed behind the mayor’s chair as a sign of vantage were among the victims, and screams for help in their childish treble added new horror to the scene.

With the first swaying of the floor there was a rush of excited men towards the doors. Fortunately there were many exits and although many of the weaker ones were crushed down and trampled by those fighting for freedom and safety, no one was seriously injured.

A couple of small boys rushed to safety by deliberately clambering upon the heads of the thickly-massed crowd, and running over it to the doors.

Within twenty seconds the hall was cleared and as a few white-faced spectators who had not rushed to the street straggled back into the hall and gazed down into the abyss the sight was a terrible one. Men cursed and prayed, wept and laughed, in a delirium of terror, all the while struggling to free themselves from the network of beams and girders which surrounded them, and crushed them to their doom. Cries for help were mingled with frantic appeals to those above for aid.

The committee rooms of the defeated candidate for the mayoralty just opposite the city hall and deserted as usual on the evening of defeat were quickly brought into use and from all parts of the city doctors were hurried. The city hospitals were crowded with the wounded, while the list of the killed grew larger every few minutes. It was after midnight before any authoritative list of the dead could be secured. The unfortunates comprised the best-known men in the city, and were of all classes.


The cause of the disaster was the giving way of a beam which ran from north to south of the hall, about 20 feet from the northern end and directly under the raised stage used as a speaker’s platform. The beam had rotted from its fastenings, and when it fell, there was no support for some 400 square feet of space. This gave way, the flooring parting at a space about ten feet in front of the platform.

 

ARMSTRONG - With the death of Edward Armstrong which occurred on Saturday, passed away another landmark of Wentworth county. Born in Enniskillen, Ireland, in 1819, he came to Canada, in 1836, coming almost directly to this city and for a time resided on John st. almost directly opposite the house in which he died. In the rebellion of 1837 he was among the first to offer his services to his country, joining the Niagara and Fencibles and did guard duty on the Niagara frontier during the trouble. He afterwards joined the First Incorporated Dragoons (Queen’s Lancers), under Major McGraw. In those days, dispatches were carried from Kingston to the frontier by mounted relays composed of men from this regiment and the deceased often served in this capacity. He was married in 1843 and shortly afterward settled near Ancaster, where he followed farming until 1881, since which time he has resided in Hamilton. At the time of his death he was one of the oldest and most highly respected of the early settlers in this district. He is survived by a widow, three sons, - Thom. Armstrong, Dominion hotel; Wm.and Geo. superintendents of the Hamilton Cotton mills - and four daughters - Mrs. Urquhart, Mrs. Rook, Mrs. T.K. Foster, and Mrs. W.W. Lumsden. The funeral, which took place this afternoon, was largely attended, the pall-bearers being the three sons, mentioned above, and three grandsons - Harry, and William Rook, and Kenneth Urquhart. Rev. W. Bevan conducted the religious services.

 

McLAREN -The many friends of Mrs. W.P. McLaren will deeply mourn to hear of her death which occurred last night, at the residence of her son, Col. McLaren, Oak Bank, James street south. Mrs. McLaren was an old resident of Hamilton, and during her long life here was intimately associated with charitable works of all descriptions, for many years being president of the Orphan asylum and Aged Women’s home board. The deceased lady was born in Coteau du Lac, on the St. Lawrence, and was a daughter of the late Capt. Evatt. Her age at the time of her death was 76 years. Four children are left - Col. McLaren, two daughters at home and one married living in England. The funeral will take place on Thursday, from the family residence, James street south.

 

HEARTWELL (Hannon) - A number from here attended George R. Heartwell’s funeral at the Stone church, Ryckman’s corners, on Sunday last.

 

FELKER (Abingdon) - Mrs. Felker, an old and most highly respected resident of Caistor, passed away very unexpectedly this morning.

 

ROOT - John Root, proprietor of the Queen’s hotel at Dunnville, Ont., died suddenly Sunday night.

 

STEVENS (Galt) Jan. 3 - John G. Stevens, a partner of the late firm Stevens & Hamilton, Iron Tool manufacturers, died here yesterday in his 63rd year. Deceased had lived in Galt nearly 30 years and was much respected.

 

Wednesday, January 5, 1898

 

MEYERS - At 633 King st. east, Wednesday, Jan. 5th, Joseph Meyers, formerly of Macklenburg, Schwerin, in his 78th year. Funeral at 3:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 7th.Friends will please take notice.


JEFFREY - In this city on Tuesday, Jan. 4th, 1898, Bella, youngest of John Jeffrey, 101 Ferguson ave, south. Funeral Friday at 2:30 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

CHITTENDEN - In this city on Jan. 5th, at 186 Queen st. north, Elizabeth, wife of Henry James Chittenden, aged 36 years. Funeral Saturday afternoon Jan. 8th, at 2:30, from above address. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

DEATH LIST AT LONDON Jan. 5 - The fearful calamity which visited London on Monday evening is only coming to be realized in the full extent of its awfulness. The list of killed was happily decreased from the total first published in place of an increase. The death roll numbers twenty now. It may be augmented but hopes are entertained that all the injured will recover.

 

DEPEW (Basingstoke) - Mr. and Mrs. Hannon attended the funeral of their uncle, C. Depew, at Stony Creek, on Saturday.

 

FELKER (Fulton) - A number of the residents here attended the funeral of the late Mrs. Felker, of Ker, on Thursday last.

 

Thursday, January 6, 1898

 

JEFFREY - In this city, on Tuesday, Jan. 4th, 1898, Bella, youngest daughter of John Jeffrey, 101 Ferguson ave. south. Funeral Friday at 2:30 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

CHITTENDEN - In this city on Jan. 5th, at 186 Queen st. north, Elizabeth, wife of Henry James Chittenden, aged 36 years. Funeral Saturday afternoon, Jan. 8th, at 2:30, from above address. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MEYERS - At 683 King st. east, Wednesday, January 5th, Joseph Meyers, formerly of Macklenburg, Schwerin, in his 76th year. Funeral at 3:30 p.m. Friday, Jan 7th. Friends will please take notice.

 

PASCOE - In this city, on Thursday, January 6th, 1898, Annie Maud Pascoe, aged 38 years, daughter of William and Elizabeth Pascoe, 302 Victoria avenue north. Funeral notice later.

 

CART - Two more children of John Cart were taken ill with diphtheria last night and sent to the hospital. One child died today. This leaves five diphtheria patients in the hospital.

 

MASTER (Berlin, Ont.) Jan 6 - Isaac Master, registrar for the county of Waterloo, died this morning at 11 o’clock, of dropsy and heart affection. Mr. Master had been ill for the last four months. He was about 64 years of age. He succeeded the late D. McDougall and was formerly for many years MLA for South Waterloo. He was greatly respected and widely known.

 

CORBETT (Belleville, Ont.) Jan 6 - James Corbett, night agent of the Bell Telephone company, was killed some time after midnight on the G.T.R. track two miles west of the city by falling from a freight train. His body was cut into pieces. Corbett was 32 years of age and unmarried. His relatives live in Atlanta, Ohio. Mr. Corbett was one of the most popular in the city.


McKINNON (Toronto) Jan. 6 - About twenty minutes to four yesterday afternoon, an old man named Hugh McKinnon, was coming up the lane in the rear of George street, to enter the back yard of his house at 121, when he suddenly lurched forward and fell heavily.

P.C. Reeves happened to be passing the end of the lane at the time and noticed the old man fall. He ran up the lane and picked him up. One glance at his face showed that it was something more serious than drunkenness, the first thought that had come to the constable. Lifting the man bodily, he carried him into the house and upstairs, and just as he laid him on the bed the old man expired.

 

MITCHELL (Kingston, Ont.) Jan 5 - Isaac Mitchell, wholesale jeweller, went home during the forenoon to arrange for his dinner. On the way he paid his life insurance premium, which fell due today. He fixed the fire, went upstairs, reeled over and expired. His wife found him prostrated, but doctors could do nothing, as he was dead from heart failure. He was a Jew, and 43 years of age.

 

ABBOTT (London) Jan 5 - Alexander S. Abbott, for 34 years ex-city clerk, died at his residence here this morning, in his eighty-sixth year.

Mr. Abbott was a Royal Arch Mason, and was one of the first charter members of the Grand Lodge of Canada. He leaves a grown up family of three sons, and two daughters.

 

SIMS (St. George) - Mrs. Thomas Sims, (Maria Oliver) was buried in the Methodist cemetery on Tuesday. She was a victim of consumption.

 

McLAREN - The funeral of the late Mrs. W.P. McLaren took place this afternoon from the family residence, Oak Bank, James street south. Rev. W.H. Wade, and Rev. George Forneret were the clergymen, conducting a private service at the house at 2 o’clock, and a public service at the Church of the Ascension at 3 o’clock. There were many beautiful floral tokens, sent by mourning relatives and friends. The attendance at the funeral was very large. The pall-bearers were all grandsons of deceased, as follows; Wm. S. H. Evatt, A. Kerr. G. Haggarty, R. Juson, and F. Gates McLaren.

 

SCOTT - The funeral of Mrs. Georgina Scott, who died at the city hospital on Monday, took place yesterday afternoon, from Dodsworth undertaking rooms, King st. west. The deceased was very badly burned by the explosion of a lamp two weeks ago at her home on Walnut street.

 

Friday, January 7, 1898

 

CHITTENDEN - In this city on Jan. 5th, at 184 Queen street north, Elizabeth wife of Henry James Chittenden, aged 36 years. Funeral Saturday afternoon Jan. 8th, at 2:30, from above address. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

PASCOE - In this city, on Thursday, January 6th, 1898, Annie Maude Pascoe, aged 38 years, daughter of Wm. and Elizabeth Pascoe, 309 Victoria avenue north. Funeral Saturday at 1:30 p.m.Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CUSACK - At the residence of her daughter, Mrs. William Webster, 256 McNab st. north, Mary Jane Cusack, relict of the late Wm. Cusack, aged 76. Funeral on Monday, Jan. 10, at 2:30 p.m. to Christ Church Cathedral. Friends kindly accept this intimation.


The death is announced of Mrs. M.J. Cusack, in her seventy sixth year. The deceased had been a resident of Hamilton for seventy years, and had seen the city grow from a small village to its present size. She remembered when there was only one brick house in the place, and when the present business portion in the city was farming land, and all the place was a mere fringe of population along the docks. Her husband was the late William Cusack. The deceased leaves these sons and daughters, Mrs. William Webster, Mrs. William White, of this city; Mrs. Davidson of Zimmerman, Minn.; Mrs. R.S. Hamlin, Oshawa; Mrs. Edgar Percy, Johnston, PA, and Robert Cusack of Johnstown, PA. The funeral will take place on Monday afternoon.

 

MARA (Toronto) Jan. 7 - Thomas Mara died at his residence 207 Beverly street, on Thursday morning at the ripe age of 90 years. Mr. Mara was one of the oldest residents in the city, coming to Canada from Ireland in 1832, and taking up his residence in what was then known as muddy York.In the Rebellion of 1837 he served under the late Capt. Ross and for many years was Capt. of a volunteer fire company. In religion he was an ardent Methodist, and in politics a staunch Conservative.

 

GLASBY (Cayuga, Ont.) Jan 6 - James Glasby, a young farmer living in the township of North Cayuga, committed suicide today by cutting his throat from ear to ear with a razor. Deceased had been melancholy for a few days, but no idea was entertained of his committed such a rash act.Doctor Thompson, coroner, drove out this evening to view the body and hold an inquest if necessary. Up to a late hour tonight he had not returned, and nothing further at present can be said why he committed the awful act. Deceased was unmarried and lived with his parents. He was highly respected and well known in this vicinity.

 

BOYS (Guelph) Jan 6 - While walking on Queen street at 4:30 this afternoon, Miss Boys, sister of Mrs. Arthur Hogge, dropped dead. She was carried into Mrs. Cutten’s residence and a physician summoned, but he gave it as his opinion that life was extinct, as soon as she had fallen. Heart disease was the cause. Deceased was 76 years of age, and a sister of Judge Boys, of Barrie. She was a highly respected resident of the city for many years, and her very sudden death, has cast a gloom on a wide circle of friends who knew her.

 

MYERS - The funeral of the late Joseph Myers, of 633 King st. east, took place yesterday afternoon.Mr. Myers was born in Neu Strelitz, Mecklenburg, in 1820, and had already attained his 78th year.He had been a resident of this city for nearly half a century and was esteemed and respected by all who knew him. He was a charter member of the German Benevolent society, with which he was connected for over thirty years. He leaves a widow, five sons, - Henry, William, Joseph, Frederick and John - and two daughters - Mrs. Walter Elliott, and Mrs. H.P. Bonny. The funeral service was conducted by Rev. G.A. Adams, the sons of the deceased and his son-in-law, H.P. Bonny being pallbearers.

 

Saturday, January 8, 1898

 

PASCOE - In this city, on Thursday, January 6th, 1898, Annie Maud Pascoe, aged 38, daughter of William and Elizabeth Pascoe, 302 Victoria avenue north.Funeral Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 


CUSACK - At the residence of her daughter Mrs. W. Webster, 256 MacNab st. north, Mary J. Cusack, relict of the late Wm. Cusack, age 76. Funeral on Monday, Jan 10th, at 2:30 p.m. to Christ Church Cathedral. Friends kindly accept this intimation.

 

ORR (Berlin, Ont.) Jan 7 - This afternoon the following was given to the press, being a copy of a full confession made by James Allison, the condemned murderer of Mrs. Anthony Orr, on Aug. 9 last. The original is in the hands of Crown Attorney W.H. Bowlby; “I want this to be at once made public, I told it to the authorities come time ago. I never at any time made improper proposals to Mrs. Orr. I had made up my mind to get even with the Orr’s for things they said and did to me. That morning I got mad because they would not let me go to Niagara Falls. After breakfast I left my loaded gun in the woodshed. I did some chores. Mrs. Orr was milking about twenty feet from the woodshed. I went into it and fired at her through the door. She fell off her seat and never moved again. An axe lay near her. I took it and struck her on the head with it. I had the grave to the swamp ready some days before, but it was too far off, so, in a hurry, I made the grave in the corn patch and dragged her to it by the hands, and buried her. I hid the gun and raked up the tracks with the fork, after I got back from Barie’s.

This is the truth so help me God, signed James Allison, Berlin Jail, Jan 7, 1898.”

Witnesses J. Cook, jailer; Thomas Tracy, turnkey.

The above confession was made by Allison voluntarily, not the slightest pressure was brought to bear upon him.

Then Mr. Cook spoke on the present demeanor of the doomed young man.

“He has not the slightest fear of the gallows”, said he.“All he is afraid of is the next world.He is a changed man since he made the confession a month ago.”

The confession has caused a great sensation in town.

 

WERDEN (St. Catharines) Jan 7 - Robert Werden, aged 84, was found dead in his bed at his home, on Church street, this morning. He was a man of eccentric habits and a short time ago went away from home. He was found at Queenston and brought back, but had not been well since. He came here from Picton. His remains will be taken to that town for interment.

 

PALMER (Galt) Jan 7 - Fred Palmer, watchmaker of this town, fell from the CPR bridge crossing Beverly street this afternoon, and died a few minutes afterwards from the injuries which he sustained. Palmer, was about 60 years of age, was subject to dizzy spells, and it is supposed while walking across the bridge he was taken with one of these and fell over the edge. Deceased leaves a widow and two sons, and four daughters, all of whom reside in Galt. Coroner Radford, after inquiring into the circumstances, decided not to hold an inquest.

 

BECKETT, McPHILLIPS (London, Ont.) Jan 7 - This forenoon, the last of the funerals of the victims of the city hall catastrophe were held. An immense crowd attended at St. Peter’s Roman Catholic cathedral, where Rev. Father Tiernan and Rev. Father L.Heureux conducted the usual burial service over the body of Crawford Beckett, contractor, and Patrick McPhillips, who died from shock of the calamity in which his son was injured.

City clerk C.A. Kingston said that no complaints had been made to him regarding the city hall during his term of office, nor to his knowledge ever had been made to the City council or to any city official concerning the condition of the hall.

The inquest was then adjourned until Monday next at 2 p.m.


Monday, January 10, 1898

 

PAPPS - On Sunday night, Fanny Beatrice, second daughter of George A. and Caroline A. Papps, in her 18th year. Funeral private.

 

MESTON - At Hamilton, Canada, on the 10th of January 1898, Thomas Meston, aged 44 years.

 

Funeral Wednesday. Relatives of the family only are invited to attend the funeral. No flowers.

 

HASTINGS - In Toronto on Saturday, Jan 8th, Jane Mulholland, beloved wife of John Hastings, formerly of this city. The funeral takes place this afternoon from the G.T.R. station, at 3:30 to Hamilton cemetery.

 

OSBORNE - At the residence of her parents, 62 Catharine st. south, on Sunday, Jan 9th, Lillie (Mead)Marigold, daughter of James and Elizabeth Osborne, aged 36 years. Funeral Tuesday Jan. 11th. Service at 8 p.m. at the Church of the Ascension. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LENFESTEY - On the 10th inst., Mary Scott, beloved wife of Hilary Lenfestey, aged 77 years.Funeral on Wednesday, Jan.12th, at 2 o’clock from her late residence 248 Main east. Friends will please accept this notice. Montreal and Quebec papers please copy.

 

EWING (Kingsville, Ont.) Jan 8 - The ten-month-old baby of Samuel and Mrs. Ewing, whilst in a baby carriage this morning, awakened and fell out on the floor alighting on its head, causing concussion of the brain. The child remained in spasms all the forenoon, and died this afternoon.

 

COLE (Brantford, Ont.) Jan 9 - Seth Cole, license inspector for the city of Brantford, after but a short illness, died at an early hour this morning. Deceased had held the position of license inspector for a number of years, and was highly respected.

 

Tuesday, January 11, 1898

 

MESTON - At Hamilton, Canada, on the 10th of January, 1898, Thomas Meston, aged 44 years.Funeral Wednesday. Relatives of the family only are invited to attend the funeral. No flowers.

 

LENFESTEY - On the 10th inst., Mary Scott, beloved wife of Hilary Lenfestey, aged 71 years.Funeral on Wednesday, the 12th, at 2 o’clock from her late residence 248 Main east. Friends will please accept this notice. Montreal and Quebec papers please copy.

 

HEWSON - On Jan 11th., at his mother’s residence, 12 Murray street east, John Hewson, only son of Mrs. Grogell, aged 32 years, and 10 months. Funeral Thursday at 2 p.m. to the Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BRUNKE - At his parent’s residence, No. 112 King st. west, on Tuesday, Jan. 11th, 1898, Hans W. Brunke, son of Albert and Fransiska Brunke, aged 19 years, and 6 months. Funeral Thursday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


Hans Brunke, the nineteen year old son of A. Brunke, 112 King st. west, died this morning of consumption at his father’s residence. Up to three months ago he resided in Montreal. The funeral will take place on Thursday afternoon.

 

MULLIN - In this city, on the 10th inst., Mary Farley, relict of the late ex.-Ald. James Mullin, in her 82nd year. Funeral will take place from her late residence, 198 Main st. east, on Thursday at 3:30 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend without further notice.

 

DRUMMOND - In East Flamboro, on Tuesday, Jan 11, 1898, Nancy Isabella Drummond, beloved wife of Mr. Hugh Drummond sr. aged 71 years, and 19 days. The funeral will leave her late residence at 1 o’clock on Thursday afternoon for Millgrove cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

LEPARIE (Cornwall) Jan 10 - Joseph Leparie, with his wife and three children left here this evening to cross the river to Hogansburg, N.Y. When about half way between the St. Lawrence park and Cornwall island, the ice suddenly gave way and they were all left in the water. Leparie threw an eight-year-old boy on the solid ice, and after about ten minute life-and-death struggle, managed to get out himself. An Indian who was some distance ahead came back and pulled out Mrs. Leparie. She was nearly exhausted, and the two-year-old child she was holding slipped from her nerveless grasp and was lost. The third child was left in another rig coming behind. The horse and rig were lost.

 

HOLMES (Wellandport, Ont.) Jan 10 - Oliver, the five-year-old son of Charles Holmes, merchant, and a companion named Neil Heaslip, ventured out on the ice, on the Welland river just in rear of the wheat store houses this afternoon. Coming to a weak spot in the ice, Oliver fell through and was drowned. His companion also fell in but, clinging to the ice and shouting for help, was rescued.

 

PRISQUE (Penetanguishene) Jan 10 - On New Years eve, Paul Prisque, who had been living in a shanty on Beausoleil island for some time, went across the ice with a couple of friends to Midland. After doing some shopping and some drinking, they started for home again over the ice.

Prisque became weary when within a mile of home, sat down to rest. His companions went on and gave him no thought til next morning. Then, missing him, they started out to search and soon found his body where he had stopped to rest frozen stiff. Coroner Spohn decided to hold an inquest. The town constables went into Beausoleil Saturday for the body.

 

ORR (Berlin, Ont.) Jan 10 - The jail people have furnished further particulars as given by Allison relating to his crime. It had been his intention he says to kill Mr. and Mrs. Orr several weeks before the murder. He wanted to get even with them for what he terms their-ill- treatment of him. Once Mrs. Orr slapped Allison’s face, and that roused the devil in him. It made him her deadly enemy. He dug the grave in a swamp on a Sunday two weeks before the day of the murder, and it was his intention to kill Anthony Orr and bury him there, he says. He never got an opportunity though. On Saturday Aug. 7, he asked the Orr’s if he could go on an excursion to Niagara Falls the following Monday morning. and they refused his request. This awakened afresh his animosity to Mrs. Orr and he brooded over the matter all that day, finally as he says himself, made up his mind that the very first chance he got, he would kill both his employer and his wife.

 


MULLIN - Mrs. Mary Mullin, relict of the late James Mullin, for many years an alderman for the city previous to twenty years ago, died at the residence of her son-in-law, Miles Hunting, 195 Main st. east, last evening. Deceased was born in Armagh, Ireland, in 1816, and came to Hamilton when three years old. She lived in the city up to the time of her death. She leaves two sons and two daughters - David F. James, Mrs. Miles Hunting, and Mrs. Morris Macklin. The funeral will take place on Thursday afternoon at 3:30.

 

Wednesday, January 12, 1898

 

MULLIN - In this city, on the 10th inst., Mary Farley, relict of the late ex-alderman James Mullin, in her 82nd year. Funeral will take place from her late residence, 195 Main street east, on Thursday at 3:30 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend without further notice.

 

SIMPSON - On Wednesday morning Jan. 12, at the residence of her brother-in-law, Aaron Bawden, 214 Canada street, Mrs. Jessie Simpson, widow of the late William Simpson, aged 78 years.

Funeral from above address on Friday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock.

 

BAIRD - James Baird, for many years editor of the North Ontario Observer, died suddenly in Port Perry.

 

QUINN - Michael Quinn died in Kingston yesterday, aged 83. For 20 years he had been a night watchman.

 

Thursday, January 13, 1898

 

SIMPSON - On Wednesday morning, Jan. 12, at the residence of her brother-in-law, Aaron Bawden, 294 Canada street, Mrs. Jessie Simpson, widow of the late William Simpson, aged 78 years.Funeral from above address on Friday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock.

 

ECCLESTONE - In this city, at his late residence, 50 Erie ave., on Jan. 13, William T. Ecclestone, aged 72 years. Funeral will take place from above address, on Saturday at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

DEPEW - The many friends of Charles Depew will regret very much to learn of his sad and sudden death. He took a cold and pneumonia set in, terminating fatally. He leaves a widow and nine children to mourn his loss - five sons and four daughters, the youngest only five years. He was held in the highest esteem by all who knew him.

 

BADEN (Kingston, Ont.) Jan 12 - This morning Eli Baden, market gardener, Portsmouth, died suddenly. He had been looking after some work in the greenhouse, when he became ill. He went into the house and lay down, telling his wife that he had pains about the chest. Mrs. Baden went to get him some medicine and upon her return her husband fell off the sofa to the floor. When Mrs. Baden attempted to help him to arise, she found that he was dead. Heart disease was the cause of death. He was 73 years of age, and an Englishman.

 

 


Friday, January 14, 1898

 

ECCLESTONE - In this city, at his late residence, 50 Erie ave. on Jan. 13th., William T. Ecclestone, aged 72 years. Funeral will take place from above address on Saturday at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please this intimation.

 

LEE (St. Thomas, Ont.) Jan 14 - George Arthur Lee, M.C.R., brakeman, a married man, 26 years of age, fell off a freight train at Tillsonburg early this morning, and was ground to pieces, seven trains passing over his body. His parents reside at Kingsmill.

 

HAMILTON - James Hamilton, of Fitzroy, was killed while felling trees.

 

MCNIVEN (Kilbride) - The infant son of James McNiven died on Saturday morning and was buried on Monday.

 

NESS - (Smithville) - Mrs. H.N. Ness, died last Sunday morning after an illness of only a few days.She leaves a husband and a grown-up family, who have the heartfelt sympathy of the community.

 

CURLY (Toronto Junction) Jan 13 - The adjourned inquest into the death of Joseph Curley, of Weston, whose body was found in the Keel street subway on the morning of Dec. 30, was resumed this evening. John Marr, contractor, the first witness called, testified that he had examined the spot where Curley was found about 12 o’clock noon on the day the body was found. He saw a large pool of blood about eight feet south of the subway, about three feet in diameter; it was dripping into the gutter. He also saw a stone lying near the blood, and it was covered with blood. There was also another pool of blood about one foot in diameter, about ten feet north of the subway. There were two more spots of blood about eighteen inches from the curb stone.

Chief of police Royce was then recalled, and he stated that he had endeavoured to find an important witness named George Andrews, but had not been able to do so.

This concluded the evidence, and at 9 p.m. after 45 minutes consideration, the jury returned the following verdict; “that the said Joseph Curly came to his death from the effects of injuries to his skull, caused by a murderous blow or blows from some blunt instrument from the hands of some person or persons, not known to the jury.”

Thirteen jurors were in favour of the verdict and two opposed.

 

Saturday, January 15, 1898

 

GARRY - On January 14th, at St. Catharines, Mr. John Garry, manager of Wilson’s carbide works, formerly of Hamilton. Funeral from G.T.R. Stuart st., tomorrow at 3:30.

John Garry, for many years a resident of Hamilton, died yesterday, after a short illness at St. Catharines. Deceased, who was about fifty years old, went to St. Catharines two years ago to be manager of the Wilson carbide works. He leaves a wife and family. Dr. Lafferty, this city, is a nephew of deceased. The funeral will take place to Hamilton cemetery tomorrow afternoon on the arrival of the train from the east.

 


SIMPSON - The funeral of the late Mrs. Jeannette Simpson, Canada street, took place yesterday afternoon and was largely attended. The pall-bearers were Ald. Findlay, James Findlay, Aaron Bawden, A. Hay, Alexander McCoy, and James Noble. Rev. Dr. Breathour conducted the religious services.

 

Monday, January 17, 1898

 

EARLEY - At the residence of her father, Edward Harriott, 120 Inchbury street, on Sunday 16th inst., Emma, beloved wife of Hugh Earley, aged 27. Funeral Wednesday 19th inst., at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

McKILLOP - On January 17, at 21 East ave. north, Catharine McKillop, aged 75 years, beloved

wife of Angus McKillop. Funeral on Wednesday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Catharine McKillop, wife of Angus McKillop, died this morning at her home, 21 East ave. north. She was 75 years of age.

 

SHAW - At his late residence, 170 James st. north, on Sunday, 16th January, George McNair Shaw, M.D., in the 48th year of his age. Funeral Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. Service at the Church of the Ascension at 3 o’clock.

After a short illness Dr. George McNairn Shaw, one of the most prominent physicians in the city died yesterday morning at his residence, 170 James st. north. While his unexpected death was a great shock to his many friends, the members of his family and his attending physicians Drs. Mullin, Malloch, and Wolverton, were not very hopeful of his recovery. The deceased was taken ill on Tuesday evening, when he had a chill. Pneumonia set in, and as he had been working hard and had not a strong constitution, he gradually became worse, until the doctors concluded that the end was near at hand. He peacefully passed away at 9:45 yesterday morning.

Dr. Shaw was born in the township of Glanford, Wentworth county, 48 years ago, being a brother of Prof. Shaw, formerly of the Guelph Agricultural college. He took up the study of medicine at the Toronto Medical school under the late Dr. W.T. Aikins, and won the silver medal when he graduated. Subsequently he took his degrees at the Toronto University. He practiced at Queenston for several years, but preferring a larger field of labour, he moved to Hamilton twenty years ago, and succeeded in building up a large and lucrative practice.

The deceased represented the Hamilton district in the Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons, and for many years was a member of the hospital medical staff. Ever since he came to Hamilton he had been physician of the Boys’ Home. Last Monday he was reappointed a college institute trustee by the City council. He was also a member of several fraternal societies.

Dr. Shaw leaves a widow and four children. Mrs. Shaw is a daughter of John Symons. of Toronto. The funeral will take place on Wednesday afternoon.

 

TEMPLETON (Belleville, Ont.) Jan. 17 - William Templeton, mayor of Vancouver, whose sudden death is reported, was a son of the late William Templeton, grocer of this place, and was born in Belleville. He carried on a business here for several years, and removed to Vancouver about fifteen years ago. His brother and sister reside here.

 


RICHARDSON - David Richardson, the patriarch of Ancaster township, passed over to the silent majority last Saturday at the great age of nearly 100 years. Few men on this continent have had a more varied experience of life and the countries of the world that had the deceased. He was born in the parish of Ruthwell, Dumfries, Scotland. When a young man, he was engaged for about three years on a sailing vessel. During that time he sailed in nearly all the seas about Europe, Asia, and Africa, and touched nearly every country in the eastern hemisphere with the exception of Australia, and China. From 1822 to 1832, he was employed as a nursery man and wood forester on the estates of the Earl of Mansfield.

In April, 1832, he embarked for Canada, but the vessel was wrecked before she got clear of the coast of Scotland. He was taken back to Scotland and started again for Canada. He arrived at Little York in July and was employed by Hon. John Elmsley for four years. After that he went to live in Ancaster township as foreman over 750 acres of land belonging to Col. Macdonald of Kingston, and 300 of which he owned at his death.

Up to recently, deceased kept in remarkably good health, for his advanced years, but old age began to tell, and the grim reaper conquered on Saturday evening. He was married to a Miss Aitken in 1840, and she died in 1868. Of the six sons and three daughters born to them there are living John, residing in Gering, Nebraska; Mrs. W. Kennedy, Austin Texas; Elmsley, Ancaster township; Arthur, at home; and A.E., Saginaw, Mich. Deceased was a staunch Conservative and was personally acquainted with Sir Francis Bond Head, and Sir Alan MacNab.

The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon.

 

Tuesday, January 18, 1898

 

McKILLOP - On January 17, at 21 East avenue north, Catharine McKinnon, aged 75 years, beloved wife of Angus McKillop. Funeral on Wednesday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SHAW - At his late residence, 170 James st. north, on Sunday, 16th January, George McNairn Shaw, M.D., in the 48th year of his age. Funeral Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. Service at the Church of the Ascension at 3 o’clock.

 

HARBISON - At St. Joseph’s hospital, Hamilton, on Tuesday, 18th inst., Hanorah Callaghan, beloved wife of Joseph Harbison. Funeral on Thursday 20th inst., at 8:30 a.m. from 82 Colborne street, to St. Mary’s cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Chicago papers please copy.

 

ARCHER (Burlington, Ont.) Jan 18 - William Archer, a resident of Burlington, while walking on the railway track two miles east of here this morning, was struck by a C.P.R. passenger train bound for Hamilton, and instantly killed. Mr. Archer was very deaf, and, though going east, evidently did not see the train approaching, as he was caught fair on the track. A wife and five small children are left in almost destitute circumstances. An inquest is being held, but no blame can be attached to the railroad people, as the usual signals were given by the engineer, but to no purpose.

 

PARSONS (Guelph, Ont.) Jan 17 - Mrs. Parsons, maker of the celebrated Stilton cheese, died here today, at the age of 95.

 

BARBER (Mountsberg) - Gilbert Barber, of Tara, the man found dead on the C.P.R, Schaw station, was well-known in this part of the country. The verdict of the jury was that he came to his death by his own negligence in laying down to sleep on the track, where he was struck by a passing train. This is the fourth dead man Section Foreman Butcher had to take charge of.


Wednesday, January 19, 1898

 

HARBISON - At St. Joseph’s hospital Hamilton, on Tuesday, 18th inst., Hanorah Callaghan

beloved wife of Joseph Harbison. Funeral on Thursday 20th inst., at 8:30 a.m. from 82 Colborne street, to St. Mary’s cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Chicago papers please copy.

 

BROWN (Norwich, Ont.) Jan 18 - The lifeless body of Charles Brown, formerly of Norwich, was found under the railway bridge at Burgessville today. Deceased was on his way from Embro, to his home here, and it was thought he must have fallen off the train. His wife and family were expecting him home to look after moving their household goods to Embro, where the deceased had been carrying on a butcher shop for some time.

 

MARTIN(Athens, Ont.) Jan 19 - John Martin, of Lindhurst, was drowned last night. He attempted to cross the creek above that place and went through the ice.

 

PUNSHON - Morley Punshon, son of the late Rev. William Morley Punshon, and well-known in Hamilton is dead. His death occurred at Fairlawn, Bowes Park, London, England.

 

STORER - Word has been received of the death at his home in England of Henry Mitchell Storer. Mr. Storer was well-known among the older residents of Hamilton, having for a long time being connected with the Great Western railway here. He was 76 years old.

 

SHAW - The funeral of the late Dr. Shaw, took place this afternoon, and was attended by a large number of mourners, including members of the Board of Education, and medical men of the city, and of Toronto. The relatives who followed the remains to their last home were; Robert Shaw, Niagara Falls South, Prof. Thomas Shaw, St. Paul, Minn., and John C. Shaw, brother; John T. Symons, and David T. Symons, Toronto, and John Soule, Niagara Falls, brother-in-law, and Dr. Thorburn, Dr. J.D. Thorburn, Dr. B.L. Riordan, Toronto; Alex Shaw, Q.C. Walkerton; Robert F. Shaw, Woodburn; George Shaw, Niagara Falls, and J.R. Shaw, Toronto.

The floral tributes were beautiful and numerous.

A private service was held at the house at 1:45, and the remains were taken to the Church of the Ascension at three o’clock.Revs. W.H. Wade. and F.E. Howitt conducted the services.

“Resolved, that the board desire to convey to the widow and family an expression of sincere sympathy in their sorrow, and in their irreparable loss they have sustained, that as the mark of respect to the memory of the deceased, the board attend the funeral at 2:30 o’clock this afternoon”.

 

BOOTH (London, Ont.) Jan 19 - George Booth, a watchman at the G.T.R. crossing Waterloo street, was struck by an incoming train this morning, and injured to such an extent that he died at the hospital a few hours afterwards.

 


BROWN (Blyth, Ont.) Jan 18 - The residents of this section of Huron county and especially the farming community are aroused to a high pitch of interest over the death of James Brown, a young farmer of Hullett township, which took place on July 21, 1897. The event did not at the time excite more that a local interest, because, although the man’s death of itself a tragedy, it was not at the time thought that the cause was due to anything but suicide. Recent incidents, however, in connection with the affair have caused a wide spread feeling of unrest among the neighbours, and have led to the opening of an investigation, by the attorney-general’s department, with a view to ascertain what foundation, if any, exists for the rumours which have by this time become so common. Within the past week Chief Inspector Murray, of the criminal investigation department has visited Blyth, and has interviewed many of those who might be supposed to know something of the circumstances.What the results of his inquiries have been is of course not known, but it is unlikely that the case will be allowed to rest until all speculation regarding it has been quieted.

It is stated here that between Haggitt, the hired man and Mrs. Brown, a friendship sprung up which Brown himself regarded with anything but favour, and this or other causes led to Haggitt’s dismissal on the last day of July. of last year, Haggitt told the man on the morning of that date, that he must leave, and Haggitt left accordingly. Next morning the neighbourhood was shocked by the discovery that Brown had been found by his wife hanging to a beam in a stall of his barn quite dead.

Thus for the time the affair was closed. Shortly afterwards Haggitt came back to Mrs. Brown who still remained on the farm and resumed his position as hired man. His influence with the widow, it is alleged, grew daily, and as the matter was exciting a good deal of comment, Mrs. Brown was induced, it is said, by her mother to once more discharge him.

The present excitement in this neighbourhood is no doubt due to the fact that the post-mortem on Brown’s body was incomplete. Dr. Tait is quoted as having said that the blow on the head was sufficient to have produced insensibility and the people feel that considerations of expense should not be allowed to stand in the way of a complete investigation of this and other facts connected with the affair. It is hoped that the department will order an exhumation of the body at once, as by this means it would be possible to settle speedily the uncomfortable feeling which at present exists.

 

BOWERMAN - Daniel Bowerman was found dead in his mill near Picton with marks of cogs on the side of his head. He is supposed to have been struck while fixing the machinery.

 

MADDEN - E.J. Madden, of Newburgh, Ont., is dead, aged 50. He was a cheese dealer and owned a factory at Newburgh, also one at Camden East. Mr. Madden belonged to the Freemasons, A.O.U.W., I.O.O.F., and Chosen Friends. A widow, one son and two daughters survive him.

 

STERNAMAN (Ottawa) Jan 18 - The result of the appeal to the government in the case of Mrs. Sternaman became known tonight through the dispatch of instruction to the sheriff of Haldimand county not to carry out the death sentence on Thursday. It is been ordered that the condemned woman shall have another trial. The proceedings upon the appeal made yesterday on behalf of Mrs. Sternaman have been quite of the ordinary course.

 

Thursday, January 20, 1898

 

MILLER - At Peoria, Ill., on Sunday evening January 16, 1898, Duncan Miller, M.D., aged 70 years, seventh son of the late William Duff Miller, Esq., of Niagara-on-the Lake, Ontario.

 

ROSS - On Jan 19th., 1898, David Ross, a native of Cromarty, Scotland, aged 70 years. Funeral from his brother-in-law’s residence, Peter St. Clair, No. 76 Ferguson ave. south, on Friday Jan 21st, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. Caledonia paper please copy.

 

LUMSDEN - On January 20th, of pneumonia, William Douglas, youngest son of Frederick and Eliza Lumsden, aged 2 years, 9 months, and 10 days. Funeral Saturday, private.


SIPLE(St. Thomas, Ont.) Jan. 19 - A fatal runaway accident happened here this afternoon. While the Misses McDowell, of Norwich; Miss Siple and Claude Siple aged eight, were driving down Fingall hill the horse ran away. They were thrown against the embankment. Claude Siple landed on his head, and his skull was fractured. He died in an hour. Clara McDowell had one leg broken. Minnie McDowell was badly bruised about the head and back. Miss Siple had several teeth knocked out and chin hurt. The dead lad was a son of Charles Siple, milkman, Southwold. When the fatality occurred the occupants of the rig were on their way to invite guests to a party to be held at the house of Mr. Siple.

 

Friday, January 21, 1898

 

MULHOLLAND (Sheffield) - Mrs. J. Mulholland, who has been residing with her daughter, Mrs. J. Cornell, died on Saturday night last. The funeral took place from her residence to Troy cemetery on Monday.

 

MULHOLLAND (Troy) - Another old pioneer of Beverly is gone. Mrs. Mulholland, mother of James Mulholland, died on Saturday.

 

DOUGLAS (Woodstock, Ont.) Jan 20 - Mrs. Geo. Douglas, an old lady residing at 44 Bealey street, died suddenly and under somewhat peculiar circumstances. The cause of death was congestion of the lungs, produced, the doctor says, by a fright received on Tuesday. On that day Mrs. Douglas was in bed upstairs when she was startled by smoke coming into her room. Although in a weak condition she got out of bed, but before proceeding far fell to the floor where she was found in a helpless condition. Dr. McLay arrived in the meantime and discovered an insipient blaze in one of the rooms which the domestic had evidently not seen. Mrs. Douglas never rallied from the shock. Some years ago Mrs. Douglas erected a tombstone over he husband’s grave in the Presbyterian cemetery and had her own name carved under that of her spouse. A blank was left for the date of her death, which will now be chiselled in.

 

STERNAMAN (Ottawa, Ont.) Jan 20 - If the quiet talk of the innermost circles be true Mrs. Sternaman had a very narrow escape of the gallows. It is said that had the question been decided on a vote for commutation or execution of the sentence, the later would have carried. A very large portion of the council is said to have been in favour of the law being allowed to take its course, and that four or five votes were had recourse to during the days proceedings. Finally the new trial motion received a very narrow majority and it was decided to abide by that vote.

 

MANARY (Delhi, Ont.) Jan 20 - John Manary, about 60 years of age, and a farmer, living about six miles from here, committed suicide today at noon by cutting his throat with a razor. He lived only about an hour.

 

HENDERSON (Welland, Ont.) Jan 20 - One of the oldest residents of the Niagara district, in the person of Edward Henderson, died at his home at Marshville today.

 

Saturday, January 22, 1898

 


COUNSELL - On Saturday morning, the 22nd inst., George Springer Counsell, aged 54 years.Funeral (private). 3 o’clock Monday.

People around the court house this morning were terribly shocked at the news of the sudden death of George S. Counsell, for the past 37 years clerk of the county of Wentworth. No one had imagined Mr. Counsell had been at all ill, and in fact his sudden taking off was as much a surprise to his family as to his many friends.

Deceased leaves a widow and two estimable daughters to mourn the loss of a loving husband and kind father. C.M. Counsell is a brother of deceased and Mrs. Edward Martin and Mrs. McGiverin are sisters. The funeral will take place on Monday afternoon from deceased’s residence, will be of a private nature.

 

COOPER - At the residence of her mother 46 Main st. west,. on Saturday January 22, 1898, Sarah Frances Cooper, in the 29th year of her age, beloved daughter of Mary and the late W.F. Cooper. Funeral Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

DAVIS - In this city on Friday Jan 21, at his late residence, 150 East ave. north, after a lingering illness, ---- Davis, a native of Cordant, Windemere, England, in the 60th year of his age.Funeral from above address on Sunday afternoon, at 2 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectively invited to attend.

 

COOPER - Miss Frankie Cooper, 46 Main street west, died this morning after a long illness.

 

JAMIESON - At Seeley Bay, Ont., Samuel Jamieson, aged 68, died yesterday morning.

 

MORROW - The death of John Morrow, of the John Morrow Machine Screw company, Ingersoll, occurred Thursday. He was born near Milton in 1851.

 

FOLEY - T.F. Foley of the Standard Bridge and Son works, died Thursday, aged 29 years. On Monday last he became very ill, and on Wednesday malignant scarlet fever developed, terminating fatally a few hours later. He leaves a young widow.

 

Monday, January 24, 1898

 

COOPER - At the residence of her mother, 46 Main st. west, on Saturday, January 22, 1898, Sarah Frances Cooper, in the 20th year of her age. Beloved daughter of Mary and the late W.H. Cooper. Funeral Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

JOHNSTON - On Sunday Jan. 23, at 58 Spring street, Jane Thompson, beloved wife of Geo. L. Johnston, aged 35.Funeral on Tuesday at 2 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation. No flowers.

The many friends of Mrs. George L. Johnston will regret to learn of her sudden death, which occurred yesterday at her home 58 Spring. Two or three weeks ago Mrs. Johnston had an attack of rheumatism and pneumonia followed, resulting in her death.

 

DRYSDALE - On Monday morning Jan. 24th, at his parent’s residence, 23 Main st. east, Chariton, beloved son of Chariton and Sarah Drysdale, age 2 years. Funeral Wednesday at 3 p.m.

 


JUDGE - Robert Judge, an old man who died yesterday at the city hospital, will be buried tomorrow afternoon, from Dodsworth’s undertaking rooms. The Salvation army will assist in the burial and Rev. W.H. Wade will conduct the service.

 

USSHER - Hugh Ussher, a young man who had been crippled for years with rheumatism, died yesterday at his home on Catharine st. south. Since the opening of the T.H.& B, he had been keeper of the crossing at Hunter and Catharine streets.

 

COUNSELL - The funeral of the late George S. Counsell, took place this afternoon and was of a decidedly private nature, being unattended even by the members of the County council, at the request of deceased’s family. Rev. Canon Sutherland conducted the funeral service.

 

DAVIS - The funeral of the late Isaac Davis took place from the family residence, East avenue north, yesterday afternoon, and. considering the disagreeable weather. was largely attended. Rev. C.E. Whitcomb conducted the service at the house, and the I.O.O.F. performed a like ceremony at the grave. The pall-bearers were; W.J. Davis, Geo. Davis, James F. and Wm. Harper, Samuel Law,

 

and Steven Furminger.

 

KELLOCK (Perth, Ont.) Jan 23 - Dr. James D. Kellock, one of Perth’s oldest physicians, died in his cutter while on his way home from the country, where he had been attending a patient this afternoon.

 

CRESWICKE (Barrie, Ont.) Jan 23 - Henry Creswicke, P.L.S., one of Barrie’s best known citizens was instantly killed by a train at 5:30 p.m. yesterday, between Barrie and Allandale stations. A double track has lately been put in use, and Mr. Creswicke was walking on what was formerly the main track, when the mail train coming behind him, whistled for the semaphore. Probably thinking the signal was for him, he stepped over to the other track in front of the approaching train. He was struck at the feet and thrown back on the cowcatcher with such force that a big cut was made in his head. This was likely the immediate cause of his death. The train was immediately stopped, and he was found on the cow-catcher quite dead. Mr. Creswicke was about 55 years of age, and had spent most of his life here. He was unmarried.

 

McEWEN (Carlton Place) Jan 23 - James McEwen, who has just died in Beckwith township, aged 84, was a public benefactor in more ways than one. When friends died it was he who fashioned the coffins in which their remains were laid to rest. A score or more coffins were constructed by him. Some time ago his hands, which had fashioned many coffins for friends, turned tenderly in his own behalf, and he built with superior care. It lay in an out building until the other day, when it was brought into requestion for the object with which it was constructed.

 


DONOVAN - Death came suddenly to Jeremiah Donovan, an elderly molder, employed at Burrow, Stewart & Milne’s foundry, on Saturday afternoon. Donovan boarded at Daly’s Delmonico hotel, corner of John and King William streets. Between 1 and 2 o’clock Donovan was found in a semi-conscious state in the lavatory in the basement of the hotel. It was thought by the man who discovered that he was suffering from over-indulgence in strong liquor. He was carried upstairs but collapsed when the hallway was reached and the men laid him on the floor, expecting that he would recover in a short time. About half an hour later, there being no signs of life, Dr. McCabe, was hurriedly sent for. He pronounced life extinct.

Coroner Wolverton was advised, and on his laying the facts before the crown attorney, an inquest was ordered. It was opened at the Dwyer’s undertaking establishment on Saturday evening, Christopher Kerner, named foreman of the jury. After viewing the remains, the jurors adjourned to meet this evening at No. 3 police station.

Deceased was between 50 and 60 years of age, and had boarded at Daly’s hotel for several years.

 

Tuesday, January 25, 1898

 

DRYSDALE - On Monday morning Jan. 24th, at his parent’s residence, 286 Main st. east, Chariton, beloved son of Chariton and Sarah Drysdale, aged 2 years. Funeral Wednesday at 3 p.m.

 

DUNN - At Walters, California, on Jan. 24th, Alfred Williams, beloved son of Frederick and Amelia Dunn, of Mountain Top, Barton, aged. 28 years, and 10 months. Interred at Sansing, California.

 

PRENTICE - At Fairleigh Park, on Tuesday Jan. 25th, William Edward, youngest son of William and Mary Prentice, aged 3 years and 2 months. Funeral private Wednesday afternoon.

 

CAHILL (St. Catharines, Ont.) Jan. 24 - Thos. Cahill, a bricklayer, formerly of this place, was caught under a boiler in West Jefferson street, Syracuse, used in the construction of a sewer, at 10 o’clock today, and so badly scalded that he died on the way to St. Joseph’s hospital. The portable engine-house was being moved along the job when the boiler was jolted out of place and crashed through the floor into the trench. Cahill was scalded by the escaping steam. He was 30 years old, and unmarried.

 

JAMIESON (Milton, Ont.) Jan 24 - A farm labourer named James Jamieson, living at Zimmerman, was struck and killed by the G.T.R. passenger train about two miles south of here tonight while walking the track home. The body was brought here by the train. It was terribly mangled. Deceased left town about 5 o’clock badly under the influence of liquor.

 

OLIVER (Sault Ste. Marie, Ont.) Jan 24 - A man named W.J. Oliver, a pattern maker at the pulp mills on this side, was at the American Sault on Thursday night, attending a religious service. He left for home between 10 and 11 o’clock, and probably in trying a short cut fell over the old Michigan canal bank, a distance of 50 feet, into the locked chamber. His body was found crushed beyond recognition. He leaves a widow and family at Carleton Place.

 

JOHNSTON (Toronto) Jan 25 - Death came suddenly to John J. Johnston, who carried on a bakery business at the corner of Dundas street and Argyle avenue last evening. He was engaged in baking a batch of bread about 11:20 o’clock, when he complained of being ill. He went upstairs and asked his wife to prepare a mustard plaster for him. Within five minutes he was dead. Deceased was 56 years of age, and leaves six sons, and one daughter.

 


DUNSMORE (Barrie, Ont.) Jan 24 - Word was received here on Saturday that Thomas Dunsmore had been killed instantly in a grist mill in Duluth, where he was working. Deceased removed from this vicinity about fourteen years ago, and has many relatives in this part. His body will be brought home for burial. He leaves a widow and three children.

 

SCOTT (Brockville, Ont.) Jan 24 - James Scott, a well-known farmer, living four miles from Brockville, was found dead in bed yesterday. He was over 80 years of age.

 

CLARK (London, Ont.) Jan 24 - After seven weeks struggle with typhoid fever and its after affects, W.J. Clark, the well-known London barrister, died shortly after 2 o’clock yesterday morning at his home, on the Wortley road, London South. For a week past Mr. Clark had been lying at the point of death, and his decease was, therefore, not unexpected. A widow and two little girls survive him.

 

ELLIOTT (Chatham) Jan 24 - Mrs. Elliott, widow of the late Rev. Frances G. Elliott, of Windsor, and daughter of the late Sheriff Mercer, died last night, aged 58. Universally regretted.

 

GRIFFIN (Galt, Ont.) Jan 24 - Mrs. Griffin, wife of J.K. Griffin, of New York, and mother of Mrs. (Rev.) John Ridley, died at the rectory here this morning. She had been visiting her son, Rev. K.K. Griffin, Dresden, and while on her way to Toronto, stopped over at Galt to visit her daughter. She contracted a cold on the way, which, developing into pneumonia caused death. Deceased was in her seventy first year. The remains will be taken to Toronto, on Wednesday morning for interment.

 

JOBLIN (Brockville, Ont.) Jan 24 - One of Brockville’s pioneers, Edward Joblin, died yesterday aged 86 years. He was a carpenter and contractor, and lived here over half a century, during which time he amassed a large fortune. He bequeathed $5,000 to the general hospital, and $2,000 to the three Anglican churches.

 

McCLURE (Thorold, Ont.) Jan 24 - The sad intelligence of the death of Dr. William McClure of Thorold, was received here late Sunday evening. The doctor had been in Toronto under medical treatment for some weeks past, and had improved so much lately that he was expected home this week. The funeral will be held here on Wednesday. He leaves a widow and two daughters.

 

Wednesday, January 26, 1898

 

CADDY - On Tuesday evening, Jan. 25th, at her residence, 42 Main street west, Georgina, wife of the late Capt. John Herbert Caddy, B.A., and daughter of the late Col. Rich Hamilton, B.A., in her 94th year. Funeral Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Service at Christ Church cathedral.

 

DONOVAN - In this city, on Jan 23, Jeremiah Donovan, aged 65 years. Funeral from Dwyer’s undertaking establishment on Thursday morning at 8:30 o’clock to St. Mary’s cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

 

LAND - At St. Joseph’s hospital on Tuesday, Jan. 25th, Abel Land in his 78th year. Funeral will take place from his late residence 196 Rebecca street, on Thursday at 2:30 p.m. to the H.G.& B. station, Hamilton, thence to Stony Creek, for interment. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

FOSTER-REEVES - In this city on Jan. 26th., at her residence, 176 Locke st. north, Susan Foster-Reeves, widow of the late Joseph Foster-Reeves, engineer, aged 68 years. Funeral notice later.


HAMILTON - The unfortunate elevator accident in Wood, Vallance, & Co.s, warehouse yesterday afternoon resulted in the death of Robert D. Hamilton, about 8:10 last evening. Deceased was a large man weighing about 245 pounds, and from the first the doctors attending him had grave fears that he could not recover a shock to his system being most severe. It was a surprise to them the death was not instantaneous. During yesterday afternoon, deceased’s brother, Peter Hamilton, of Peterborough, was telegraphed for but he arrived at the city hospital about ten minutes after his brother’s death. Mr. Park of Toronto, a brother-in-law of deceased was by the bedside when death came. A large number of the Peterborough curlers also visited the hospital to inquire as to their fellow-citizen condition.

Deceased was the manager of the Peter Hamilton Manufacturing company of Peterborough, and was about 40 years old. He leaves a wife and family. The remains were forwarded to Peterborough this morning by Blachford & Son.

John Knapman who was with deceased, is doing well at the hospital. He is manager of the Bell Telephone company’s exchange at Peterborough, and formerly lived in Hamilton.

 

SMITH (Glanford)- The funeral of the late Gideon Smith took place on Sunday at the old White church. The deceased was 82 years of age, and one of the old landmarks of Glanford having lived here all his life, and was highly respected by all who knew him. He leaves a large family of grown-up sons and daughters, among whom are; Joel Smith, undertaker, of Mount Hope, Lincoln, and Dr. Lewis of Buffalo, Grant of Brantford, and Martin, Edward, and Dickson of this place.

 

ROUSE (Lynden) - Mrs. H. W. Rouse died of pneumonia last week. She left three small children.Mr. Rouse has the sympathy of the entire community. The funeral was largely attended.

 

McPHERSON (St. George) - Angus McPherson, farm labourer at P.S. Howell’s, died suddenly on Saturday night.

 

SMITH (Dundas) - Miss Rose Smith, King st., died suddenly on Sunday last after a brief illness. The funeral took place to the Roman Catholic cemetery on Tuesday forenoon.

 

COOPER - The funeral of Miss Frankie Cooper took place yesterday afternoon from her mother’s residence, 46 Main st. west. The deceased had been ill for about nine months, her death being due to a complication of diseases. She was only nineteen years of age, and a member of Centenary Sunday school. She was much beloved by all who knew her and the number of floral tributes placed on her bier indicated the high esteem in which she was held. The pall-bearers were; J.L. Coles, C. Bremner, C. Butterworth, C. Glascot, C. Zimmerman, F. Foster. Her mother has the heartfelt sympathy of her many friends.

 

Thursday, January 27, 1898

 

FORBES - At his residence, 140 West avenue north, David Henry Forbes, in the 53rd year of his age. Funeral Friday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 


CADDY - On Tuesday evening, Jan. 26th, at her residence, 42 Main st. west, Georgina, wife of the late Capt. John Herbert Caddy R.A., and daughter of the late Col. Rich Hamilton, B.A. in her 94th year. Funeral Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Service at Christ church cathedral.

 

FOSTER-REEVES - In this city on Jan. 26th, at her residence 170 Locke st. north, Susan Foster-Reeves, widow of the late Joseph Foster-Reeves, engineer, aged 48 years. Funeral notice later.

 

SMITH - At 14 Hannah st. west, Hamilton, on Thursday morning, Jan. 27th, 1898, Elizabeth Markle, beloved wife of J.H. Smith, P.S., Inspector, aged 57 years. Funeral Saturday Jan. 29th, at 3:30 p.m. to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BREWSTER - At her late residence, Derby, Conn., of chronic peritonitis, Monday evening, Jan. 24, Louise, relict of Jacob DeWitt Brewster and sister of Rev. Benjamin B. Keefer, of this city, aged 60 years, 4 months, and 4 days. She died in great peace.

 

Mrs. Louisa Brewster, widow of the late Jacob DeWitt Brewster, of Derby, Conn., and sister of Rev. B.B. Keefer, of this city, died on Jan. 24.

 

GURNETT - On Thursday, Jan. 27th, L.A. Gurnett, of Woodstock, third son of the late L.A. Gurnett of Ancaster. Funeral on Sunday, Jan. 30th, from Stuart st. station, Hamilton, on arrival of G.T.R. train due 12:15 to St. John’s church, Ancaster.

 

COTE (Mille Roches, Ont.) Jan 27 - An accident happened in the quarry of the Canadian Construction co. here this morning by which a man by the name of Eugene Cote, of Cornwall, was killed. He was acting as tag man under a derrick, when in some way a stone dropped or broke from the hooks and fell, crushing his head. He leaves a wife and family.

 

GRIFFIN - The remains of the late Mrs. Griffin, wife of James K. Griffin, late of Waterdown, andwell-known in the county, were brought here today from Galt for interment. Mrs. Griffin was visiting in Galt when she died. Deceased was a relative of Dr. Griffin, and Justus A. Griffin of this city.

 

McLEAN - Donald McLean, formerly a sheep rancher at Moose Jaw, was found dead in his room at Windsor.

Donald McLean was found dead in his room in the Dougall Block, Windsor, this morning by several neighbours who smelled natural gas and traced it to McLean’s room. A draught in the stove had evidently blown out the fire, and McLean had lain down for a nap and never wakened up.

 

DICKIESON (Guelph) Jan 26 - A young man named John Dickieson and his mother were driving in the village of Rockwood last night when their horse ran away. At a railway crossing the occupants of the cutter were thrown out and the young man was struck by a passing freight train.His right arm was run over and his skull was fractured. He died in the hospital here at midnight.An inquest will be held tomorrow.

 


SMITH - Early this morning Elizabeth Markle, wife of J.H. Smith, county school inspector, died at the family residence, Hannah street west, after a short illness. Pneumonia was the direct cause of death. Mrs. Smith was a well-known and highly-respected lady and her husband and family have the sincere sympathy of a large number of friends and acquaintances in their severe bereavement. The funeral will take place on Saturday afternoon.

 

Friday, January 28, 1898

 

FOSTER-REEVES - In this city, on Jan. 26th, at her residence, 170 Locke st. north, Susan Foster-Reeves, widow of the late Joseph Foster-Reeves, engineer, aged 48 years. Funeral notice later.

 

SMITH - At 14 Hannah street west, Hamilton, on Thursday morning, Jan. 27th, 1898, Elizabeth Markle, beloved wife of J.H. Smith, P.S. Inspector, aged 57 years. Funeral Saturday Jan. 29th, at 3:30 p.m. to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

GURNETT - On Thursday Jan. 27th., L.A. Gurnett, of Woodstock, third son of the late L.A. Gurnett, of Ancaster. Funeral on Sunday, Jan. 30th, from Stuart st. station, Hamilton, on arrival of G.T.R. train due 12:15 to St. John’s church, Ancaster.

The death took place this morning under peculiar circumstances, of Lemuel Gurnett, member of the well-known firm of Gurnett & Co., liquor dealers. About a month ago, Mr. Gurnett sustained a slight injury to one of his fingers, which at first was though to be trivial. Two weeks ago blood-poisoning developed, followed by erysipelis, which caused his death this morning. The late Mr. Gurnett was 42 years of age, and was a son of the late Lemuel Gurnett, division court clerk, and merchant, of Ancaster. He came to Woodstock about eight years ago, and had since been in business here, the first four years as a grocer, and latterly as head of the liquor firm of Gurnett and Company. He leaves a widow and two children.

 

RITTENBERG - At St. Joseph’s Hospital, on Thursday, Jan. 27th, the beloved wife of G.B. Rittenberg, aged 30 years. Funeral 25 Park st. south, Saturday 9 a.m. to St. Mary’s cathedral 9:30 a.m., thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

COUTLEE - At No. 723 St. Antoine street, Westmount, Montreal, on Monday, Jan. 24th inst., Margaret Blanche, (Daisy) Pringle, wife of C.E. Coutlee, C.E., and only surviving daughter of the late James D. Pringle, of Hamilton, Barrister-at-law. Funeral took place at Montreal on Wednesday 25th inst.

 

HUTTON - A coloured man named William Hutton met with a fatal accident yesterday afternoon about 5:30 in the Ontario Rolling mills company’s yard. He was employed as cinder wheeler, and had to cross the tracks on which were shunted coal cars to get to the cinder heap. Hutton started with a barrel load of ashes, and, received no warning of danger wheeled his barrow over the track. Just at that moment a Grand Trunk engine came up and struck one of the cars, and the unfortunate man was crushed between two cars.

His cries brought several men to his assistance. It was seen that he was terribly injured and the ambulance was called to take him to the city hospital. It was found there that there was no hope for Hutton’s recovery. His left thigh was crushed to a pulp and the lower part of his body was also fearfully crushed. About 7 o’clock, an hour after his arrival, Hutton died.


The rule in the yard is that proper warning must be given to the mill men, who are frequently crossing the track, when any cars are going to be moved. It is alleged that this warning was not given yesterday afternoon, when Hutton went to his death. The unfortunate man had been working for the company for a few days only. During the summer he delivered ice for the Careys, and was well-known about town in various kinds of labouring work.

Deceased was about 40 years old and lived at 170 ½ McNab st. north. His proper name was Gaskin. His mother married a second time and deceased took his step-father’s name, Hutton. He lived a somewhat stormy life, but his end was a sad one.

Coroner White opened an inquest at noon at the city hospital. After viewing the remains the jury adjourned until Monday evening at No. 3 police station.

 

McCANN (Campbellford, Ont.) Jan. 27 - John McCann, a farmer of Belmont township, 50 years of age, committed suicide this afternoon by cutting his throat.

 

PERRY (Chatham) Jan 27 - While driving a spirited team of horses, attached to a wagon, near Florence village, yesterday, two young people of Edward Perry, had a frightful experience. The boy, aged eleven, and the girl eight, were thrown from the vehicle by the running away of the team, and the latter sustained wounds in the head, which resulted fatally a few hours later.

 

FORBES - David Henry Forbes died very suddenly Wednesday afternoon. He was out for a walk during the afternoon, and when he returned about 6 o’clock he was taken ill and died shortly afterwards. Rheumatism of the heart was the cause of death.

The deceased was about 53 years of age, and was born on a vessel on the Detroit river. He has lived in Hamilton all his life. He leaves three sons - W.T., George, and John D. Forbes - and four daughters.

 

Saturday, January 29, 1898

 

FOSTER-REEVES - In this city on Jan. 26th, at her residence, 170 Locke st. north, Susan Foster-Reeves, widow of the late Joseph Foster-Reeves, engineer, aged 48 years. Funeral from 170 Locke st. north, Sunday at 3:30.Friends will please accept this notice.

 

HUTTON - In this city, on Thursday, Jan 27, Wm. Hutton, aged 35 years. Funeral from his late residence, 170 ½ MacNab st. north, on Sunday at 2 p.m., to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

BELL - At 27 Lansdowne Crescent, Glasgow, Scotland, on the 15th inst., Dugald Bell, F.G.S., lately cashier with Messrs. J. & W. Campbell & Co., Glasgow.

 

COTE - Alexander Cote, at Ottawa, was killed by a train, at the Canada Atlantic depot.

 

Monday, January 30, 1898

 

BERRY - In this city on Jan. 31st, at 586 James st. north, Amelia, Berry, beloved wife of John Berry, aged 76 years. Funeral Wednesday at 8:30 a.m. to St. Lawrence church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

SMITH - The funeral of Mrs. J.H. Smith, 14 Hannah st. west, took place on Saturday, and was largely attended. Rev. Dr. Smith, and Rev. Dr. Clark conducted the services.


HENDERSON - Edward Henderson, one of the oldest and best known residents of the Niagara Peninsula, died on Jan. 20, in Wainfleet township, aged 95 years. He came to Canada nearly 70 years ago, and was one of the contractors during the building of the Welland canal. E. Henderson, the well-known hotel keeper of Ancaster, is a son of deceased

 

Tuesday, February 1, 1898

 

BICKELL - In this city, on Feb. 1st, at 41 Inchbury st. John beloved son of Jean and Ellen Bickell, aged 23 years. Funeral notice later.

 

FINCH - In this city on January 30th, at 49 Hughson st. north, Chaney C. Finch, aged 76 years.Funeral on Wednesday at 10:30 o’clock at North Glanford cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BERRY - In this city on Jan. 31st, at 566 James st. north, Amelia Berry, beloved wife of John Berry, aged 76 years. Funeral on Wednesday at 8:30 a.m. to St. Lawrence church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

STUART - On Tuesday, 1st February, after a long illness, born with patience, Annie Miller, beloved wife of Alexander Stuart, city treasurer, in the 69th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence 86 Victoria ave. south, at 2:30 on Thursday, 3rd inst. Please omit flowers.

 

TRILLER - At the residence of his daughter, Mrs. D.E. Smith, 148 Emerald st. north, Hamilton, on Monday, Jan. 31st., 1898, Philip Pettid Triller, in the 73rd year of his age. Funeral Thursday at 10 a.m. to the 11:15 train, G.T.R. station. Interment at St. Jude’s cemetery, Oakville. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

DEAN - In Saltfleet, on Jan 31st, John Dean, in his 56th year. Funeral on Wednesday, Feb. 2nd at 1 p.m. from his late residence, to Stewart’s church. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

COLE - Oh the pity of it. An old woman, destitute and along, found evidently starved to death in this good city in a land of plenty. The discovery was made this morning, in an old frame dwelling off Jackson east. On the east side is what is known as Cruickshank’s mill, are two of three small houses standing on the east side of an alley running north and south. The dwelling most northerly was occupied by an elderly woman, named Miss Cole. She lived alone in the two small rooms, that constituted the dwelling. Up until last Saturday she was seen in her home by the neighbours, but after that she kept herself indoors. On Sunday an only friend came with some food for Miss Cole, but failing to gain an entrance she went away. All day Sunday and yesterday the neighbours wondered what was wrong, and this morning Mrs. Mary Fanning, who lives next door, tried to get into the house by the door, and failing that she went round to the back and looked through the window into what was Miss Cole’s bedroom. To her horror she saw the apparently lifeless form of her neighbour lying on the floor.


Coroner Griffin was sent for, and the police were called. When P.C. Harris arrived in the patrol he broke open the window in the front of the house, and opened the door, whose protection was nothing more than a string twisted around a nail. The party, composed of Coroner Griffin, P.C. Harris, two newspaper men and a neighbour, then entered the abode of death. In the front room were a lot of odds and ends scattered about, the small stove, fireless, with a kettle and an oil lamp standing on it, but no sign of food anywhere. In the next room, an awful sight met the parties gaze.On the floor, stretched out full length laid the body of Miss Cole, almost unclothed, and terribly emaciated. The apology for a bed, which consisted of a mattress, a couple of pillows, and a coverlet was tossed around, as if deceased had struggled and then fallen on the floor.

Coroner Griffin decided to leave the body as it was until the jury men had seen it, and Constable Harris threw the coverlet over the remains.

Deceased was subject to epileptic fits, and it is supposed she was seized with one, and her enfeebled frame could not stand the shock.

An inquest was opened at 2 o’clock at No. 3 police station. The jurors then view the remains at the house, and adjourned to meet on Thursday evening. Michael Birrell is foreman of the jury.

 

HUTTON - The inquest on the death of William Hutton or Gaskin, who received fatal injuries in the rolling mills yard last Thursday afternoon, was concluded last evening at No. 3 police station before Coroner White. The evidence was heard by a large number of people, coloured and white.The Grand Trunk company was represented by Joseph Wallace, and Chief Detective Day, and J.J. Scott, watched the case for the Ontario Rolling Mills co.

William Irvine, a coal shoveller for the mill company stated that he was standing a few feet away when the shunting began. Sullivan did not come back to see if the way was clear when he made the coupling. When Sullivan was starting to back up, witness’ mate, John Galtrie shouted to Sullivan “go back” but Sullivan didn’t go back. The engine struck the second car and Sullivan, on hearing the outcries came to where Hutton was between the cars. He then opened them out and Hutton reeled from between and fell.

The jurors concluded they could get along without Giles’ evidence and proceeded to discuss the verdict. They brought in the following; “that the said William Hutton came to his death through negligence on the part of the Grand Trunk employees”.

An action for damages against the Grand Trunk company will doubtless follow. Stuart Livingstone attended the inquiry on behalf of decease’s widow now living in St. Catharines.

 

BRILL - Mrs. Brill, wife of J.T. Brill, of Guelph, the well-known cheese dealer, died early on Sunday morning. She was known to be ailing, but her death was unexpected.

 

DOWNEY (Guelph) Jan. 31 - Mrs. P. Downey, mother of J.P. Downey, editor of the Herald, died suddenly in Renfrew on Sunday. She had gone there to nurse her daughter, Mrs. C.C. Collins, who was taken seriously ill sometime ago. Mrs. Downey, who was not very strong at the best, then took sick. Last Monday she took by mistake a dose from a bottle of liniment, instead of the tonic which she was using, and her system in her weakened condition, could not throw off the poison. The remains arrived home this evening.

 

Wednesday, February 2, 1898

 

BERRY - In this city on Jan. 31st, at 856 James st. north, Amelia Berry, beloved wife of John Berry, aged 76 years. Funeral Wednesday at 8:30 a.m. to St. Lawrence church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 


STUART - On Tuesday 1st February, after a long illness born with patience, Annie Miller, beloved wife of Alexander Stuart, city treasurer, in the 69th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence 86 Victoria ave. south, at 2:30 on Thursday 3rd inst. Please omit flowers.

 

TRILLER - At the residence of his daughter, Mrs. D.E. Smith, 108 Emerald st. north, Hamilton, on Monday, Jan. 31st, 1898, Philip Pettid Triller, in the 72nd year of his age. Funeral Thursday at 10:a.m., to the 11:15 train G.T.R. station. Interment at St. Jude’s cemetery, Oakville. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BICKELL - In this city on Feb. 1st, at 41 Inchbury st., John, beloved son of John and Ellen Bickell, aged 23 years. Funeral on Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

O’BRIEN - Edward O’Brien, of Paris, committed suicide by taking a dose of strychnine.

 

WATERBURY (Selkirk) - On Sunday, Jan. 23, Mr. Waterbury, an old and much esteemed resident, passed quietly away to the silent majority. He was honoured by everyone who knew him. For many years he was trustee and was a frequent visitor at the school. His interment which took place on Tuesday at the Disciples’ church, was largely attended. Deceased was in his seventy-eighth year.

 

HOOVER (Selkirk) - Mrs. Jacob Hoover, who had a serious accident about a week ago, by falling down the cellar, died on Sunday night. She was in her eighty-sixth year.

 

Thursday, February 3, 1898

 

COOK - At 94 Victoria ave. north on 3rd inst., Thomas Cook, in his 70th year. Funeral on Saturday, private.

 

MOORE (Grimsby) - Charles Moore, one of the oldest residents of Grimsby, passed away last Friday morning at the age of 83 years. Mr. Moore had lived in Grimsby all his life and was held in high esteem by all who knew him.

 

FITZGERALD (St. Catharines) Feb. 2 - Friends are anxiously searching for H.O. Fitzgerald a well-known farmer, who resides on the Grantham side of the new canal, and who disappeared while on his way home, Monday evening. Mr. Fitzgerald walked into town Monday evening, crossing the canal on the ice to do so. In company with three companions, who reside in the east end, he started for home about 11 o’clock. His companions left him on the corner of Welland avenue, near the Grand Trunk station, and he turned and proceeded toward home. He never reached there. The only conclusion arrived at is that Fitzgerald, in crossing the canal, went where the ice cutters had been at work, and had gone through the thin sheet of ice and had been drowned. If this is so, his body will not be found until spring. His father was a Colonel in the British Army and his brother is manager of the Dominion bank, Guelph. He lived with his mother and sister on the farm.

 


SHARP (Galt, Ont.) Feb. 2 - James Sharp, one of the best-known men in South Dumfries township, died on his farm near Glenmorris, this morning, in his ninetieth year.

 

CODE - The name of the old woman found dead in her home last Tuesday morning is Code, not Cole. When the police searched the place they found $7 in money, a small quantity of food, and a number of old dresses, of little value. Miss Code was miserly in her habits, and let her fire go out, although she had coal in the house. It is expected that medical evidence at this evenings inquiry will show that Miss Code died from the effects of an epileptic fit.

 

Friday, February 4, 1898

 

COOK - At 34 Victoria ave. north on 3rd inst., Thomas Cook in his 70th year. Funeral on Saturday, private.

 

LOVE - On Thursday evening, Feb. 3rd, David Norville, infant son of Harry and Alice Love. Funeral from the parent’s residence, 50 Cannon st. west, Saturday morning at 10 o’clock.

 

MITCHELL - At Boson, Mass., on the 3rd inst., Thomas Featherstone Mitchell, second son of the late John Mitchell. Interment here. Funeral private.

 

ALLISON (Berlin, Ont.) Feb. 4 - James Allison, a youth of eighteen, this morning at 8:03 paid the extreme penalty for Aug. 9 last murdering Mrs. Anthony Orr. The execution which took place in the woodshed in the general jail yard, passed off without a hitch of any kind. Everything worked smoothly. Allison, by all appearances met with a painless and instantaneous death.

 

LYMAN - Edwin W. Lyman, who for many years had been living at 140 Avenue road, Toronto, died suddenly of apoplexy. Mr. Lyman was 56 years of age, and was a nephew of Henry Lyman, of the old firm of Lyman Bros. & co., Montreal.

 

PANTON (Guelph, Ont.) Feb. 3 - Prof. J.H. Panton, of the Ontario Agricultural college, has been sick for some weeks, died at the general hospital last night of cancer of the stomach.

 

CODE - The story revealed by last evening’s inquiry into the death of Miss Alice Code was one that is seldom duplicated before a jury. The various persons who narrated the shreds and patches of history and fact that went towards making this story where Doctors Farewell and Glasgow; Mrs. Mary Fanning, and Mrs. Collins, neighbours; Miss Fanny McCutchen, and old friend of deceased; George Salmon caretaker of the Canada Life building; Mrs. Demun, and P.C. Harris.

A probably reason for deceased not wearing good dresses came from P.C. Harris, in his evidence as to the contents of Miss Code’s house. He said a citizen had informed him that deceased was employed by his mother, and after her death in a Quebec city a number of her dresses were found in Miss Code’s trunks.

The evidence of the other witnesses concerned of finding of the body and the generally destitute condition of the deceased.

 

The jurors, after a short deliberation brought in a verdict that Miss Alice Code came to her death of natural causes and exposure.

 


Saturday, February 5, 1898

 

COOK - At 24 Victoria ave., north, on 3rd inst., Thomas Cook, in his 79th year.Funeral on Saturday, private.

 

HAINING - In this city on Thursday, Feb. 3rd, at Princess st., William, beloved son of William and Annie Haining, in his 27th year. Funeral at 2 p.m. Sunday from above address. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BOLUS - The body of Mrs. Bolus, who died in Rochester, N.Y. yesterday, arrived this morning on the T.H. & B. It was taken to the residence of E. Bolus, on the mountain. The deceased’s maiden name was Miss Rutherford.

 

MERCER - William Mercer, an old man, who for some years had been an inmate at the house of refuge and was removed to the jail because of his obstreperous conduct, died in the jail last night. Mercer, who was 66 years old, had been ailing from Bright’s disease for a long time, and his death was expected. A prisoner was left in the corridor to look after the old man, but he saw nothing out of the ordinary and it was not until Turnkey Stewart went his rounds that he found Mercer dead in his cell.

According to law, an inquest was held by Coroner Griffin, Joseph Mitchell being foreman of the jury. After hearing the evidence the jury brought in a verdict of death from natural causes.

 

MILLIGAN, BAKER (Madoc) Feb. 4 - One of the saddest tragedies that could be imagined occurred here last night and today the home of Milligan, the caretaker of the Model school, is in mourning - three children dead and the mother unconscious, with slight chances of recovering.

The dead are; John Milligan, age 24, Les Milligan, aged 15; Ethel Baker, aged 12. They were asphyxiated with fumes of charcoal. It had been Milligan;s habit to carry live coals from the school furnace, in the evening and place them in an old stove in one of the bedrooms of his house.

No pipe connected the stove and chimney, and of course the fumes lingered in the house. So, when he substituted charcoal for the live coals, there could be no other result than death.

 

Monday, February 7, 1898

 

NICHOLSON - On Feb. 7th, at 88 Burlington street west, Dennis Nicholson, in his 81st year.Funeral will take place from Barton Church on Wednesday at 2 o’clock. Private.

 

MADDEN - At her home in Burlington, on Sunday morning, Feb. 6th, 1898, Bertha C. S. Madden, daughter of the late Rev. G.C. Madden, aged 23 years, and 2 months. The funeral will take place on Tuesday, Feb. 8th, from her late home. Service at the house at 2 p.m. Interment at the Methodist cemetery, Nelson.

 

LISCOMBE - At her late residence Bartonville, on Saturday. February 5th, Ann Liscombe, relict of the late James Liscombe, aged 67 years, 2 months, and 16 days, a native of Somerton, Somertshire, England. Funeral Tuesday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 


McMASTER - At 257 MacNab street north, on the 5th inst., beloved wife of Warren McMaster, aged 21 years. Funeral from the above residence on Tuesday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. McMaster, wife of Warren McMaster, 257 MacNab st. north, died quite suddenly of pneumonia yesterday.

 

MORRISON - John Morrison, who boarded at Mrs. Welsh’s house on Queen st. north, died very suddenly this morning. He had been indisposed for some days, being under the care of Dr. Griffin. When he tried to get up this morning, he fell on the floor of his room. He was lifted into bed, but died before medical aid arrived. Heart disease was the cause of death.

The deceased had been in the employ of the George E. Tuckett & Sons’ company. He was a widower and leaves a daughter.

 

TOPPING (Woodstock) Feb. 6 - With one exception, the oldest native-born person in Oxford county passed away on Friday, in the person of Rev. Edward Topping, better known as “Elder” Topping. Deceased was 84 years of age, and was born in West Oxford. For years he had been prominent in Baptist church circles. In 1845 he assumed the pastorate if the First Baptist church, Woodstock, and subsequently held several of the rural charges.

 

HUNTER - On Sunday Feb. 6th, at her late residence 6149 Kimbark ave., Chicago, Olivia Hunter, widow of the late Dr. John W. Hunter, of Hamilton, in the 79th year of her age. Funeral from Stuart street station at noon to-morrow, Tuesday. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

YOUNG (Toronto) Feb. 7 - Annie Young, a woman who has been living in dire poverty in a hovel at 39 Poulette street, was, according to the story furnished the police, found lying dead on a sofa yesterday morning by her husband and another man, with both of whom she had been drinking the night before. Frank Young, the husband, is a wreck from dissipation, and his companion William Irwin, is of the same type. The trio had been drinking in the Poulette street house on Saturday, and Saturday evening, and nothing accurate is known as to what happened during that time.

At about 10 o’clock yesterday morning Irwin left the place, and went hurriedly for Dr. Coatsworth, who lives at 341 Queen st. east, telling him that the woman was hurt. Dr. Coatsworth immediately went to the house and found that the woman had been dead for some hours. As soon as he ascertained this he sent Irwin for Coroner Greig. To Dr. Greig the husband told his story of the tragedy.

He said that he and his wife and Irwin had all been intoxicated the night before, and that during the evening a quarrel had occurred. His wife flew into a passion, and threw a tumbler at him, she then stumbled and struck her head against the corner of the stove. She seemed stunned by the fall, and so he and Irwin picked her up and laid her on a old sofa. They both then laid down to the floor and went to sleep. Yesterday morning on awaking he said his wife dead.

The woman shows marks of considerable violence. In the centre of the forehead there is a deep contusion, two inches in length, and with a cross break. On the right cheek bone was a large bruise, and the entire face is more or less battered.

An inquest will be held.

 

Tuesday, February 8, 1898

 


MORRISON - At 87 Queen st. north, on Monday Feb. 7th, Alexander Morrison, aged 64 years. Funeral Wednesday at 2 p.m.

 

HAIGHT (Picton) Feb. 7 - This evening, as Henry Haight and wife were returning home from Piston in a cutter, they were run into by one of two teams which were racing along the highway.The occupants of the cutter were not aware of the teams coming from behind in time to leave the track and the pole of the sleigh struck Mr. Haight in the back and threw him violently to the ground, and the team tramped him so badly that life became extinct in about twenty minutes. A coroner’s inquest was opened upon the body this evening.

 

Wednesday, February 9, 1898

 

CHASE - At his residence, North Glanford, on Wednesday Feb. 9, Henry Chase, in his 78th year.Funeral on Friday, Feb. 11, at 1:30 p.m. Interment at Presbyterian Stone Church cemetery, Barton.

 

HOLMWOOD - At Dundas, on Tuesday, Feb. 8th, Francis Freeman, wife of Walter Holmwood. Funeral Friday at 3 p.m. to Grove cemetery.

 

FRAISER (Dublin, Ont.) Feb. 9 - Alexander Fraiser, of this village, committed suicide by drowning himself in a well, at the rear of his house. He got up out of his bed about 1:00 o’clock, and going to the well, plunged in head first. Fraiser had been despondent for some time, being out of work, and fearing that his little family might become in want for the necessaries of life.

 

MORROW (Glanford) - Unexpected news was received on Sunday of the death of William Morrow, of this place, but who has lately been a patient at the Gravenhurst Sanatarium, Muskoka. The parents have the sympathy of the community in their sudden bereavement. The funeral will take place from his father’s residence to Case church cemetery on Wednesday, at 1 o’clock.

 

FLEMING (Rockton) - Mrs. Thomas Fleming, widow of Thomas Fleming, died at her home near the village on Thursday. Deceased was an old resident of the township and was highly respected.

 

GRAHAM - James H. Graham, of Trafalgar township, was killed by a falling strawstack at which he had been working.

 

Thursday, February 10, 1898

 

EFFINGER (Selkirk) - On Thursday evening, at after a lingering illness, Mrs. C. Effinger, Sr., passed away. The interment took place on Sunday at White Church, Rainham.

 

NICHOLSON - Dennis Nicholson, 83 Burlington street west, aged 81 years, was buried yesterday in Barton cemetery. He came to Hamilton in 1846 from Nottinghamshire, England, his family being gentlemen farmers.

The pall-bearers were six grand nephews - Arthur Stares, Henry Stares, Fred Stares, George Gardiner, Alfred Cook, and William Cook. He was a life-long Conservative in politics. Mrs. Mary Cook, Market street, his sister, aged 88 years, and only surviving member of a family of twelve, was present at the funeral. Rev. Mr. Massey conducted the services at the funeral.


Friday, February 11, 1898

 

ROSS - At the family residence, No. 108 Madison avenue, Toronto, on Friday, February 11, 1898, David Ross, son of the late David Ross, aged 81 years. Funeral at Hamilton, Saturday, the 12th inst., on arrival of the 3:25 train at G.T.R. Stuart street station. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MISHAW - In this city, on Friday, Feb. 11th, Dorthea Kintrea, only daughter of Angus, and Lily M. Mishaw, aged 6 months. Funeral, (private) from 92 Steven st., on Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

 

KNOX (Belleville, Ont.) Feb. 11 - Charles Knox of Port Hope, a G.T.R. brakeman, was killed at noon today near the city. He was stepping from one car to a lower one, when he missed his footing and fell between the cars.

 

CLYNE (London, Ont.) - Feb. 11 - A man named J.W. Clyne arrived in the city last night about 11:30, from Walsingham Centre, and registered at the Dominion House. This morning he was found dead in his bed. It is not likely that an inquest will be held, as the indications point to a natural death.

 

DUNCAN (Attercliffe) - A large number from here attended the funeral of the late Archibald Duncan, last Sunday at Canboro. Mr. Duncan was a general favourite with the young people

in his neighbourhood. The family have the sympathy of all in their bereavement.

 

McCREADY (Attercliffe) - Mrs. Jacob McCready, of Caistor, who has been sick for some time past, died on Friday. Her remains were interred in Bristol cemetery.

 

McHARG - The funeral of the late Mrs. James McHarg took place yesterday afternoon from her late home, 457 York st. The pall-bearers were; Alexander Craig, John Keith, James Ogilvie, George H. Richardson, Ian Sutherland, and John Sanders.

Mrs. McHarg, who was in her 84th year, had been a well-known and much respected resident of West Hamilton, for over 30 years. About two weeks ago she had a bad fall, which resulted in injuries that ended fatally. She was a member of Erskine church, and Pastor Rev. J.G. Shearer, conducted the funeral services. John McHarg, a G.T.R. station master at London, is her only surviving son.

 

CARNEY (Belleville, Ont.) Feb. 10 - While John Carney, a farmer who resided in the ninth concession of Tyendinaga, was driving to town this morning with a load of wood, he met with his death in a shocking manner. He turned out of the track which there runs along the river bank, which is about fifteen high to assist a friend whose load had upset when his sleigh slewed and dragged horses and man over the bank. The unfortunate man fell with the wood on top of him. He was released as soon as possible, but was so badly injured that he died on his way down to the hospital.

 

ROSE (Toronto, Ont.) Feb. 10 - George M. Rose, of the publishing firm of Hunter, Rose & Co., died this morning at four o’clock after an illness of several duration.


Saturday, February 12, 1898

 

VANATTER - In this city on Friday, 11th inst., at her residence, 75 Hunter st. east, Caroline, beloved wife of John Vanatter, in her 47th year. Funeral from above address Monday, Feb. 14th, at 8:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ROSS - David Ross, a well-known Hamilton printer, died yesterday in Toronto. Deceased, while in Hamilton, worked on the Herald, and was a prominent member of the Trades and Labour council.He was unmarried. The funeral will take place this afternoon on the arrival of the remains from Toronto, and the printers of the city will attend.

 

ANDERSON(Toronto) - Feb. 12 - At noon yesterday a young man named Charles Anderson, who has been living with his wife at 817 Queen st. west, committed suicide at Jordan station, east of Hamilton, by taking of dose of carbolic acid, which caused death in a few minutes.

Anderson was about 23 years of age, and had only been married four months. Last August he got a share of his father’s estate, amounting to $1700 but he appears to have spent this money extravagantly. Last week he obtained employment with a picture enlarging concern and started out in the country for the company on Monday last. His wife says he then had $15 with him.

On Thursday he wrote his wife from St. Catharines, saying that he had been unable to do business, and was feeling blue enough to commit suicide. His wife received the letter yesterday, but merely considered the contents an idle threat.

 

Monday, February 14, 1898

 

ROBERTSON - On Sunday, 13th inst., at his late residence, Long View, Oakville, Andrew Robertson, in the 65th year of his age. Funeral on Tuesday at 2 p.m. at Toronto cemetery. Friends please do not send flowers.

 

FIELDS - At Kilbride, on Sunday, Feb. 13, George Russell Fields, third son of James J. and Libbie Fields, aged 14 years and 7 months. Funeral on Tuesday at 2 p.m.

 

BLAIR - On Feb. 13th, at the residence of Mrs. Thornton, 137 Hughson street south, Maggie Strong, youngest daughter of the late H. Blair, of Goderich.

 

HOLMAN(London, Ont.) Feb. 13 - Frank Holman, one of the well-known Holman brothers, died at his home Saturday morning aged 76. Mr. Holman was for 57 years a resident of London. With his brothers, he started the Holman Opera company, and was for a time connected with them in their opera house here. When his brothers went to Toronto, Mr. Holman left the theatrical business. A widow and six children survive him.

 

Tuesday, February 15, 1898

 

DUNCAN - At his late residence, 127 Robert street, on Monday, 14th February, 1898, James J. M. Duncan, aged 37 years. Deeply regretted. Funeral Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. His end was peace.


VANATTER - Midgley and Mrs. Murgatroyd, and Miss Jessie Collins, of Smithville, were in the city yesterday attended the funeral of the late Mrs. J.W. Vanatter.

 

BINGHAM - A Galt dispatch says; Mrs. Bingham, wife of Dr. Bingham, of Hamilton, died at the Galt hospital last evening after a long illness. The deceased, who was the daughter of the late Shelden Ward, of Toronto, leaves six children. - J.S. Bingham, M.D., Hamilton,; Fred, Detroit; Harry P. Galt; Mrs. H.J. Graham, Oakland, Cal.,; Mrs. W.J. Millican, Galt, and Mrs. Karl Krans, Berlin.

 

LOUNSBURY (Abingdon) - The funeral of Gladys, the three-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lounsbury, took place on Wednesday and was largely attended.

 

GARDNER (Kilbride) - One of Kilbride’s oldest residents Mrs. Robert Gardner, died on Feb. 3 at the residence of her son-in-law, Alex Robinson, Waterdown. The funeral took place from there to Kilbride, Presbyterian cemetery.

 

DOUGLAS - James Douglas, merchant tailor, of Owen Sound, died Sunday night. Deceased was 66 years of age, and had been in business since 1852.

 

Wednesday, February 16, 1898

 

MILBURN - In this city, on Feb. 14th, at his late residence, 95 Locomotive street, John Milburn, aged 66 years. Funeral on Thursday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

JOHNSTON - At 18 MacNab st. south, on Feb. 15th, 1898, Elizabeth Johnston, widow of the late George Johnston. Funeral from above address, Thursday the 17th inst., at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WILSON - On Feb. 16th, John Maitland Wilson, only son of Mathew and Mary Wilson in his 16th year. Funeral service at All Saints church, on Friday the 18th inst., at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BLOOM (Bothwell, Ont.) Feb. 16 - A fire broke out about 1:30 this morning in a house occupied by Mrs. Bloom, and the woman and one child were burned to death in the building. The fire spread to George Middleditche’s foundry, and machine shop on one side and to N. O’Neil’s butcher shop on the other. Both buildings with their contents were destroyed, together with the residence of Mrs. Gale, adjoining O’Neils shop. Several other buildings in close proximity were badly scorched , but the fire was finally gotten under control about 3 o’clock. The property loss is about $7000.: no insurance.

 


STERNAMAN - (Buffalo Courier Record) - Mrs. Olive Adele Sternaman, who is charged with the murder of her husband, George H. Sternaman, and who has been granted a new trial, is now in jail in Cayuga, Ont. She would have been hanged only for the failure of the justice before whom she was tried to admit certain testimony. Friends of the woman are endeavouring to raise a fund by subscription to enable her to make a better fight for her liberty. Among her most ardent Buffalo friends are the parents of her first husband, Ezra Chipman. It is claimed that the prosecution will be unable to prove that Mrs. Sternaman ever purchased arsenic either in Buffalo or Canada. An effort will be made to show that her husband formed a liking for arsenic, and that he frequently ate it.

 

WILSON - About midnight last night, John Wilson, the only son of M. Wilson, butcher, corner of Queen and King streets, died at St. Joseph’s hospital. The young man was taken ill last week, and on Saturday an operation was performed on him, for appendicitis. He never rallied from the shock.

The deceased was a bright and intelligent lad.

 

McCARTHY - Mrs. McCarthy, mother of Dalton McCarthy, Q.C., died at Barrie.

 

HILL - Mrs. Hill, mother-in-law of Dr. Oronhyatekha died on Monday afternoon at her residence on the Tyendinaga reserve, near Deseronto, at the venerable age of 86 years. She was a granddaughter of the celebrated Mohawk Chief Joseph Brant, and was one of the oldest and most respected residents of the reservation.

 

Thursday, February 17, 1898

 

GREENING - On the 17th inst, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. B.H. Merriman, 129 Herkimer street, Ann Owen, relict of Benjamin Greening, in her 85th year. Funeral Monday,private.

 

WILSON - On Feb. 16th, John Maitland Wilson, only son of Matthew and Mary Wilson in his 18th year. Funeral service at All Saints church on February 18th inst., at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DAVIDSON (Guelph, Ont.) Feb. 16 - After a lingering illness, Charles Davidson, the late secretary-treasurer of the Wellington Mutual Fire Insurance co., and an old prominent and esteemed citizen passed away this morning in his eighty second year.

 

FRASER (Orangeville, Ont.) Feb. 16 - Dr. H.D. Fraser, of this place, died suddenly this evening of heart failure. He was in good health up to the time of death, but had been overworked for some weeks. He lay down to rest before supper, and when they went to call him he was dead. He was a prominent member of the Masonic lodge here. He was 40 years of age, and leaves a widow and three children.

 

Friday, February 18, 1898

 

GREENING - On the 17th inst., at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. B.H. Merriman, 129 Herkimer street, Ann Owen, relict of Benjamin Greening, in her 88th year. Funeral Monday, private.

 

WILSON - It is explained that the death of John Wilson, which took place at St. Joseph’s hospital on Tuesday was not due to the operation for appendicitis, but to peritonitis, from which he had been suffering previous to the operation.

 


McCALLUM - Henry McCallum aged 38 years, of Woodstock, had been in the habit of lifting boxes on his knee. From a contusion thus sustained blood poisoning set in a few days ago. Death resulted from the accident Thursday.

 

CRUICKSHANK (Toronto) Feb. 18 - James Cruickshank, of 20 Lombard street, was found dead at his office shortly after 7 o’clock yesterday morning. Death was due to suffocation. The ground floor was occupied by the Metropolitan Printing co. The two places - the company’s and Mr. Cruickshank’s - were divided only a lathe and plaster partition. At about half-past-two yesterday morning fire broke out in the printing establishment and completely gutted it, the total damage amounting to $3000. The debris emitting clouds of smoke until long after daylight.

At 7 o’clock in the morning John Stewart arrived at the store, but found the front door locked.He could not obtain entrance and finally got a boy to get in through the back window. The lad unfastened the back door and passed into Mr. Cruickshank’s room.

They found him on the floor in a sitting posture dead. The room was full of smoke. Coroner Greig was immediately notified. After examining the body he came to the conclusion that death was due to suffocation by smoke, and that an inquest was unnecessary.

 

Saturday, February 19, 1898

 

GREENING - On the 17th inst., at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. R.H. Merriman, 129 Herkimer street, Ann Owen, relict of Benjamin Greening in her 88th year. Funeral Monday, private.

 

CLARK - In this city on Feb. 18th, 1898, at 229 York st., Carmin A., only son of Mr. and Mrs. William Clark Jr. Aged 1 year and 10 months. Funeral Sunday, at 2:30 p.m. from above address. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HALLIDAY - At her late residence, 209 Main street east, on Feb. 18th, Annie, youngest daughter of William and Eliza Halliday, aged 8 years and 9 months. Funeral from her parents’ residence, on Sunday the 20th, at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

HAIGHT (Picton, Ont.) Feb. 18 - Dr. J.M. Platt, Coroner for Prince Edward, held an inquest to ascertain the facts in respect to the death of Henry H. Haight, who was killed on Monday, Feb. 7, by being run over near Picton while on his way to Milford. The jury today returned the following verdict.

“Henry H. Haight’s death was caused by the furious and unlawful driving of Byron Harrison and Philip Kellar, and it was the team driven by Philip Kellar which ran over Mr. Haight.”

Both men are placed under arrest.

 

Monday, February 21, 1898

 

BRIDGWOOD - At his late residence, No. 48 Jackson st. East, on Friday 18th Feb., George Bridgwood aged 76 years. Funeral from the residence of his daughter, No. 169 Robinson st.Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WILSON - In Toronto, on Saturday, Feb. 19th, Annie, beloved wife of Robert Wilson, and daughter of John W. Hetrum, of this city, aged 22 years and 7 months. Funeral from her father’s residence, 487 Catharine st. North, on Tuesday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


GREENING - The pall-bearers at the funeral of the late Mrs. Greening this afternoon were; S.O. Greening, Joseph Harold, Crawford Jamieson, R.H. Merriman, F.B. Greening, and James Jamieson. The service was a private one from the residence of deceased’s daughter Herkimer st.

 

CHASE (Glanford) - The funeral of the late Henry Chase took place on Friday last, to Barton Presbyterian church, and was largely attended.

 

FIELDS (Kilbride) - The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Fields and family, sorrow with them in the bereavement of their son George, who died on Sunday, Feb. 13. He was beloved by all, was always cheerful and bright, and always ready to lend a helping hand when required. He was a member of the Epworth league and was one of the league choir members and was always found in his place in the Sunday school. Although he was only fourteen years, he became about two months ago a member of the Good Templar lodge. He will be very much missed by all who knew him, and although the day was very stormy the funeral was exceedingly large.

 

GAMEY (Maxwell, Ont.) Feb. 21 - Thomas Gamey, M.L.A., for Centre Grey, died yesterday at his home, the result of two paralytic strokes, upon which he received on Friday last. He had also suffered for some time from heart disease. Mr. Gamey was seventy three years of age.

 

HOFFMAN (Waterloo, Ont.) Feb. 20 - Isaac Hoffman, one of the oldest and most respected citizens, died this morning from paralysis of the heart, in his sixty-fourth year.

 

HATCHBORN (Waterloo, Ont.,) Feb. 20 - Mrs. Hatchborn of Mary street, died at the advanced age of 77 years.

 

GAMBLE - T.A. Gamble, ex-reeve, of Assiniboia, is dead of apoplexy. He was formerly of York county.

 

ULMER - Adam Ulmer, an inmate of the house of refuge, at Berlin, received fatalinjuries in falling down the stairs.

 

Tuesday, February 22, 1898

 

FOSTER - At Lowville, on Feb. 18, John Foster, native of County of Louth, Ireland, in his 80th year, after a lingering and painful illness.

 

BENNETT - At The Home For Aged Women, Wellington st. South, on Tuesday, Feb. 22, Susan Bennett, aged 80 years. Funeral Wednesday at 2 p.m.

 

WEBBER - At her late residence, 132 Stinson street, on Feb. 21, 1898, Isabella Webber, widow of the late Esau Webber, in the 70th year of her age. Funeral Thursday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ARTHURS (Orillia) Feb. 21 - Last night, about 12 o’clock, fire broke out in the dwelling of James Arthurs, a settler in the township of Rama, three miles north of Seabright, and about twenty miles from here. Mr. Arthurs was awakened by the cries of his son James who was sleeping in the attic.


He endeavoured to rescue the young man, but was forced to desist, with his left arm and head badly burned. Mrs. Arthurs ran out of the house, but returned for her nine-year-old son, who slept in the room with his parents. She and Archie, as well as James, were burned to a crisp.

Agnes, the eighteen-year-old daughter, whose slept in an adjoining room attempted to escape through the kitchen, but was driven back by the flames and broke her way out through the window. She then ran 300 yards to arouse a neighbour, Mr. McFayden, her track marked in the snow by blood. She was terribly burned about the head, shoulders, and breast, and from her hips to her feet. The flesh fell from her feet like a pair of sandals, exposing the bare bones.

Dr. Gilchrist of Orillia, was summoned, and did what he could to alleviate her sufferings, but she cannot live long.

Two other children, a son and daughter, were absent from home, and thereby escaped. The fire probably originated from the stove, in which fire was left for the comfort of the absent son on his return, when the family retired about 9 o’clock. Dr. Grant, of Beaverton decided that an inquest was unnecessary.

 

THIBAULT (Kingston) Feb. 21 - A convict in the penitentiary named George Thibault from Ottawa, sentenced in 1896, for passing raised bills, died last night from the effects of typhoid fever. He was 40 years of age, and illiterate.

 

PERTH (Toronto) Feb. 22 - “We, the jury, find that the infant Thomas Perth, came to his death from starvation and exposure, and we believe that the child was taken by Mrs. Elizabeth Malone to the corner of Perth and Bloor streets, Toronto, where she claims to have found it”.

Such was the verdict rendered by a Coroner’s jury last evening in the West end baby case. It took the jury nearly an hour to reach a conclusion.

Mrs. Malone was sent back to the jail at midnight, shortly before the verdict was rendered.

 

JACKES (Toronto) - Feb. 22 - A cablegram was received in the city yesterday from St. Christopher, Trinidad, announcing the death in that place of Joseph Jackes, of Toronto.Mr. Jackes has been in the habit for some years past of going south every winter for the benefit of his health.

Mr. Jackes was born here about 66 years ago, and was for some time engaged in the dry goods business with G. Wylie. In the course of three or four years, he retired and became an articled law student with Roaf & Davies, afterward succeeding Mr. Davies in the firm.

 

BARRY, AVIS (Detour) Feb. 21 - Patrick Barry and Mr. Avis, who got lost in a blizzard on the way to Thessalon, and for six days remained in a light house with nothing but oatmeal to eat, are dead. Avis who expired soon after the rescuing party arrived, was buried at Thessalon, by the Masons. Both men were terribly frozen. The sleigh was recovered but no trace has yet been found of the horses, which the men were compelled to abandoned.

 

CRITTLE (London, Ont.) Feb. 21 - William H. Crittle, for over 40 years a London merchant, died yesterday of apoplexy. Mr. Crittle had reached the ripe age of 73, and was for many years engaged in the grocery business. He was always a staunch Conservative.

 

MARKS(Toronto) Feb. 22 - The death is announced of Mrs. William Marks, one of Toronto’s oldest residents. She was born in the County of Tyrone, Ireland, 85 years ago, and had lived in this city for 60 years.


BRIDGEWOOD - The inquest on the death of George Bridgewood was concluded last evening at No. 3 police station before Coroner Griffin. Evidence was given by Miss Bertha Clay, Hugh Shaw, Dr. Rennie, P.C. Zeats, William Bridgewood, deceased’s son, and James Wall. According to the testimony, deceased was last seen alive by James Wall, between 4 and 5 o’clock on Friday afternoon. Dr. Rennie’s examination of the body went to show that Bridgewood died during Friday evening, and that death was due to suffocation, by coal gas. Constable Zeats stated that he examined the self-feeder which heated the house, and found one of the openings at the back only partly covered by a tin vessel, containing water. There also a crack about an eighth of an inch wide at the back of the stove, and the gas came through both openings. Upstairs he found the end of the pipe placed in the wall choked the soot. When Sgt. Pinch broke into the house on Saturday morning the gas poured out of the lower rooms. Deceased slept in a room just off that in which the stove stood.

William Bridgewood said that he had warned his father to take care of the stove, and see that the gas did not escape.

Coroner Griffin, in charging the jury, said the reason why the inquest was held was that it would act as a warning to the public to guard against carelessness in handling coal stoves. Doctors were frequently called to attend to persons who had been overcome by coal gas, and those who attended to stoves could not be too careful in seeing that proper means were provided for the escape of gas, and that the pipes were kept free from soot.

The jurors brought in a verdict that deceased was poisoned by gas escaping from the coal stove in his house.

 

Wednesday, February 23, 1898

 

WEBBER - At her late residence, 132 Stinson street, on Feb. 23, 1898, Isabella Webber, widow of the late Esau Webber, in the 70th year of her age. Funeral Thursday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

HOFFMAN - In this city, Feb. 22, Letha Hoffman, beloved wife of John Hoffman, aged 22 years. Funeral on Friday at 2 p.m. from her uncle’s residence, Edward Ryckman, 28 Davenport st., to Millgrove cemetery. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

McCLATCHEY (Grimsby) - Mrs. McClatchey died on Saturday. She had been a great sufferer for many months, but on Saturday morning death ended her suffering. She was over 80 years of age. Mrs. McClatchey was laid to rest in the Presbyterian burying ground.

 

PETTIT (Grimsby) - On Friday evening a gloom was cast over our village, when the sad news reached here that Dr. Johnson Pettit had passed away. He died in Buffalo, where he has been for some months, undergoing medical treatment. The remains were brought to Grimsby on the morning train on Saturday, and laid to rest in St. Andrews cemetery. Deceased was well known throughout this vicinity and was highly respected by all. The pall-bearers were: C. Nelles, J. Nelles, T. Rome, J. Randall, T. Clark, and E. Mihell. The deceased was 72 years of age.

 


VANALLEN (Morrisonburg, Ont.) Feb. 22 - Charles VanAllen, a resident of this town employed at Iroquois, started to walk home on the Grand Trunk track in a blinding snowstorm, which was raging this morning. He was probably struck by a passing train, and was not found until the noon express went West. When picked up he was still alive, and was taken home, where he died this afternoon.

 

WATSON(Toronto) Feb. 23 - A telegram was received in the city yesterday from New Westminister, B.C. announcing the death of Rev. Coverdale Watson, one of the most prominent Methodist divines in Canada. Deceased had been actively engaged in the work at Vancouver, Victoria, and throughout British Columbia for the past 15 years. Previous to that time he was for six years in the pastorate in this city, being three years in charge of Spadina avenue church, and three years in charge of Bloor st. Church. He leaves a widow and three children.

 

YOUNG (Orillia) Feb. 22 - An inquest was opened this morning before Coroner Wallwin, of Barrie, on the body of a young girl named Fanny Young, who died at her father’s home from the supposed effects of an attempt of abortion. The case is creating great interest from the fact that a well-known citizen of the town, Thomas Goffatt, is held by the crown suspected of being implicated in the attempt. County Crown Attorney Cotter conducted the inquiry. Jury is composed of prominent business men of Orillia, with G.H. White as foreman.

The evidence taken showed that the deceased had been ill for over a week, having giving birth last Friday, the 11th inst, to a prematurely still-born child. On Thursday last the deceased gave signs of getting well, but took a change for the worse on Friday, and died Monday morning From talk about town Constable Moffatt thought it well to notify the coroner, and the result was an order for an inquest. After hearing the testimony of the parents and the medical attendants it was thought well to await the post mortem examination, and the inquest was adjourned for a week. Immediately after the adjournment of the inquest, Mr. Goffatt was brought before the police magistrate charged with the crime. He pleaded not guilty and bail was accepted in two sureties of $1500 each.

 

Thursday, February 24, 1898

 

ORR - At Calgary, N.W.T., on Feb. 18, Wesley F. Orr, in his 57th year.

 

RICHARDSON (Toronto) Feb. 24 - James Richardson, a young man 21 years of age, whose brother lives on Ontario place, was killed yesterday at Caledonia, Ont., while attempting to board a train. He was a young man who had been leading a roving life for some time past, and had served various terms in prison for minor offences. He was slightly crippled in the left leg, and used a stick in walking. He attempted to climb on a freight train which left Caledonia at twenty to one yesterday, and missing his hold fell under the cars. The wheels badly mangled his right leg, and he also suffered internal injuries. He died from shock and loss of blood a short time afterwards.

 

GADBOIS - Moise Gadbois, of Ottawa, aged 14, was killed by the collapse of a shed in which he was cutting wood. The heavy snow on the roof caused the collapse.

 

MITCHELL (St. Thomas) Feb. 23 - By the burning of a house on the farm of Alexander Mitchell, in Bayham township, Mrs. Thomas Mitchell, mother of Alexander, was burned to a crisp. Mrs. Mitchell lived in the house about 20 rods from her son’s residence, and it was not known to the next morning that the fire had occurred. Mrs. Mitchell’s charred remains were found in the ashes.

 


CHARD (Winfield, Wellington, Ont.) Feb. 23 - Capt. Silas Chard, who was born in the year 1800 in Nova Scotia, died here recently in his 98th year. His parents were United Empire Loyalists from Rhode Island who left the States after the Revolution. He leaves seven children, 64 grandchildren, 130 great-grandchildren, and six great-great-grandchildren.

 

HOLTBY (Ottawa) Feb. 23 - William Holtby, mechanical foreman of the Canada Atlantic railway, was killed at Coteau Junction today. He was superintending the replacing of an engine on the track when he slipped and fell under the train.

 

Friday, February 25. 1898

 

CLEARY (Kingston) Feb. 25 - Today the remains of Archbishop Cleary were taken to the palace drawing-room and hundreds are viewing the remains. On Monday the body will be taken to St. Mary’s Cathedral to remain until the funeral on Tuesday. Flowers will not be allowed, as only emblems of hope of resurrection through the cross are permissible at funerals of Archbishops. Mgr. Farrelly, Belleville, has been appointed administer of the diocese. Vicar-General Kelly and James Swift are the executors of Arch Bishop Cleary’s will.

 

ALWARD (Hagersville) - The death is recorded of one of Hagersville’s most respected residents in the person of Leonard J. Alward, proprietor of the Alward hotel, who died on Monday evening after a brief illness. Mr. Alward was in his usual good health until Saturday evening when he contracted a severe cold which developed into pneumonia. He grew rapidly worse until Monday evening when death came to his relief. He leaves a wife, four sons, and three daughters to mourn his loss. The funeral will take place on Thursday at 2:00 o’clock from his late residence, Main street. The Orange society, of which deceased was a member, will conduct the funeral.

 

ALWARD (Hagersville) - J. Law, of the Tillsonburg Observer, and Mrs. Law, are in town attending the funeral of Mrs. Law’s father L.J. Alward.

 

CAREY (Kingston, Ont.) Feb. 25 - Convict Wm. Carey, who was shot on Feb. 15, by Officer Gibson, who overtook him and convict O’Connor, and used his gun when they resisted arrest, died last night. The prisoner escaped during a snow storm. Carey was 25 years of age, and was sent from St. Thomas in 1894 to serve ten years for arson. An inquest will be held today.

 

Saturday, February 26, 1898

 

WAKELIN - At the hospital, on Feb. 25th, Frederick Wakelin, aged 70 years. Funeral on Sunday at 3 p.m., from Green Bros funeral emporium, cor. King and Catharine sts., to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will accept this intimation.

 

REID - In this city on Feb. 25th, Mary Reid widow of the late Robert Reid, carpenter. Funeral on Monday at 2 p.m. from her late residence, 121 John street north, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 


RAILTON - On Feb. 25th, at the residence of her son, Edward Williamson, Burlington, Caroline Railton, widow of the late Edward Railton, in her 80th year. Funeral on Monday, 28th, at 2 o’clock, to Greenwood cemetery. Service at the house.

 

MITCHELL - H.D. Mitchell, the manager of the Traders bank at Glencoe, died suddenly Thursday evening. Apoplexy was the cause of death.

 

WAKELIN - As was feared, the terrible injuries received by Frederick Wakelin at the fire in his house early yesterday morning proved fatal. The old soldier died about 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon in the city hospital, after lingering in a state of semi-consciousness. The police took charge of deceased effects in his house. A bank book showed that deceased was worth about $100 in cash. Wakelin had no relatives but some of his friends arranged for his burial. Although an old soldier, deceased was not a member of the Army and Navy Veterans association.

No account of how the fire started could be obtained from Wakelin; but it is supposed that he was lying asleep on the bed, and that the bed was set on fire by the explosion of the oil lamp or the burning tobacco in his pipe. He made an effort to get to the door, but the smoke suffocated him and fell insensible.

 

Monday, February 28, 1898

 

NELSON - In this city on Saturday, Feb. 26th, Annie Theresa, beloved wife of John Nelson, aged 56 years. Funeral from the family residence, 165 Florence street, on Wednesday morning, at 8:30 o’clock, to St. Mary’s Cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ATKINSON (KANE)- A young woman, known as Mrs. William Atkinson, died suddenly at the St. Nicholas hotel about 4 o’clock yesterday afternoon. As she was apparently in good health at noon, and there are suspicious circumstances connected with her death, an investigation is being held.

The couple had breakfast and dinner together as usual in the dining room yesterday. After dinner they retired to their room. Shortly after four o’clock, Atkinson rushed to proprietor McLean’s room, and said “My wife is very sick. Lend me a looking glass to see if she is still breathing.” In the meantime, Dr. O’Reilly had been summoned, but when he arrived, the woman was dead.

Later in the afternoon, Mr. McLean took Atkinson to the Chief of police, and Atkinson made a clean breast of his connection with the affair. He denied that he was implicated in any way in the woman’s death. To the chief he said that the woman was not his wife, and that her name was Lizzie Kane, her parents living at Newmarket, Ont. He met her in Buffalo, N.Y., where he was employed by Mason & Welsh. He said he had no idea that she was seriously ill, and appeared to feel her death keenly.

There is considerable mystery about the affair. It is not known positively whether the unfortunate woman had a criminal operation performed on her in Buffalo, or she was responsible for her own death. Detective Bleakley found an instrument in the bedroom and there are other circumstances which made it appear like a woman attempted to perform an operation on herself.

Yesterday afternoon Chief Smith notified the girl’s parents who live about six miles from Newmarket, Ont. This morning he received a dispatch from Constable Savage, saying that there must be some mistake and asking that a description of the girl be sent to him.

Atkinson says that there is no mistake that the girls parents live six miles from Newmarket.


Chief Smith was advised about noon that Michael Kane, father of the dead woman, would leave for Hamilton by the first train to take charge of his daughter’s remains.

 

BURGESS - A.W. Burgess, Dominion lands commissioner died at Ottawa Saturday morning.

 

SHACKLE - Robert Shackle, aged 79 a much respected citizen of Brantford passed away Saturday morning.

 

JOHNSTON - John Johnston, a labourer, 81 Tecumseh street, Toronto, died suddenly Saturday. His death was due to heart failure, brought on by lack of nourishment. He leaves a widow and family in absolutely destitute circumstances. He was an Englishman who since his arrival encountered misfortune at every turn.

 

Tuesday, March 1, 1898

 

DEAN - Edmund Dean, for 40 years a resident of London, died yesterday.

 

MEAGHER - Thomas Meagher, aged 74, a native of Kingston and a customs officer for over 40 years, died today.

 

STEINHOFF - Peter J. Steinhoff, a member of the Woodhouse township council went to sleep feeling alright, but died without awakening.

 

BIRMINGHAM - George Birmingham died at St. Joseph’s hospital, London yesterday as the result of injuries received through falling down an elevator shaft in Palmerston last week.

 

KNIFFIN - Saturday night at 6 o’clock Edwin Kniffin, 84 years old, a shoemaker, of Vitoria, Ont., was found dead on his bench when a member of the family went to call him to supper.

 

JARVIS - Sunday morning Mrs. Jarvis, an old lady, died alone in her home in Simcoe, being discovered lying on the floor by a neighbour. Alcoholism is supposed to have caused death. Deceased is reported to be worth $70,000.

 

MOLES - Thomas Moles, aged 55 years, was arrested in a dazed condition while driving on the sidewalks in Brockville. He was removed to the house of a friend, and died in a few hours. His wife and child disappeared the other day, and it is thought this preyed on his mind. He was a highly respected farmer of Elizabethtown.

 

KANE - Last evening Michael Kane, of Newmarket father of the unfortunate young woman who died suddenly on Sunday, arrived in the city. Accompanied by Detective Reid he called on Atkinson the girl’s paramour, and had an interview with him. He recognized Atkinson as the man who had visited his place to see his daughter. During the interview nothing of an unpleasant nature was said. Atkinson agreed to pay the funeral expenses and gave up all the money he had.


Kane afterwards went to Dwyer’s undertaking establishment and identified his daughter’s body. He was terribly distressed over her death. He had very little to say about his daughter; in fact he knows very little about her doings since she left home. She visited her home about 5 miles from Newmarket, three weeks ago, and Atkinson went up there to see her.

Doctors O’Reilly and McCabe made an autopsy at the hospital yesterday afternoon. It is said evidence was found that an attempt had been made to perform a criminal operation. Coroner Griffin gave a certificate stating the death was due to an attempt at abortion.

 

Wednesday, March 2, 1898

 

CLEARY (Kingston) March 1 - St. Mary’s cathedral was crowded to the doors this morning, conspicuous among the congregation being the members of the different Catholic societies.The funeral of the late Archbishop occurred at 9:00 o’clock. The procession from the palace to the Cathedral was composed of priests, bishops, arch bishops, and other church dignitaries. A solemn requiem mass was chanted. The funeral sermon was delivered by Bishop McQuaid, of Rochester, N.Y.

 

Thursday, March 3, 1898

 

HUTCHINSON - At the city hospital, on March 2nd, Thomas Hutchinson, G.T.R. engineer, in the 57th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 286 Hughson street north, Saturday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, to Christ Church Cathedral. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

Thomas Hutchinson, the engineer of the express that ran into the freight train at Burlington on Tuesday, died last evening at the city hospital. He was terribly scalded about the upper part of the body, and no hope was entertained for his recovery from the first. Deceased was between 50 and 60 years of age, and one of the most experienced engineers on the road. He leaves a widow and several grown-up children.

James Clark, a fireman, was a little better this afternoon but the chances for his recovery are slight.

An inquest on the death of Engineer Hutchinson was opened this afternoon at 3:30 at the city hospital before Coroner Wolverton.

 

HILL - An inquest on the death of Martha Hill’s infant at her father’s home, 147 Breadalbane street last week was resumed and concluded at No. 3 police station before Coroner Mackelcan. Evidence was given by Mrs. Cole, Hill’s housekeeper, Doctors Dillabaugh, and Cochburn, Mrs. Traviskis and Mrs. Murdoch, neighbours, and John Hill, father; Bella Hill, sister, and Harry Hill brother, respectively of the mother of the infant. The evidence showed that death was due to suffocation, and that Martha, the mother, about 17 or 18 years old, and mentally weak, was unfit to care for her child. An attempt was made to get evidence from her, but it was not successful, the girl declaring that she did not know what was being asked from her. Crown Attorney Crerar examined the witnesses.

Doctor Dillabaugh, in his evidence, said it was evident to him that the infant had been dead ten or twelve hours, when he first saw it. He read the reports of the post-mortem, which showed that the child, four weeks old, came to its death by being smothered.

The jurors brought in a verdict that Martha Hill’s child, while in bed with its mother and its aunt, was accidentally smothered.

 


SMITH (Simcoe, Ont.) March 2 - John Smith, on Sunday afternoon, had a row in a house which he occupied together with several other families. It is said he was struck upon the head with a stick of stove wood, from the effects of which he died today. An inquest will be held tomorrow at 10 a.m., Dr. McIntosh as coroner.

 

BENDER (Niagara Falls) March 2 - Niagara Falls lost another old and highly respected citizen in the person of John Bender yesterday. Mr. Bender had only been ill three days with paralysis of the stomach. He was the youngest son of Philip and Elizabeth Misener Bender, who were amongst the first settlers here. The deceased had represented his ward at the council board for several years and represented the town as mayor one year. He was a bachelor and was born 54 years ago, in the old homestead, where he died.

 

DORRIS(Cobourg, Ont.) March 2 - About 3 o’clock this morning fire was discovered in the livery stable of Dr. Moore. It was soon under control and little damage done to building or contents. William Dorris, an employee of Dr. Moore, was asleep in the office when the fire originated and it so badly burned that he cannot live.

 

SHEPHERD - George H. Pigeon, 314 King William st., handed to the police this morning, a clipping from the San Francisco Chronicle, telling of the drowning of Arthur A. and Allen Shepherd, believed to formerly belong to Hamilton. The dispatch was forwarded from Halfmoon Bay, and dated Feb. 26th.It was to the effect that five men, in attempting to land at that place in a sail boat during a storm the boat was swamped and they were drowned. The boat belonged to the sealing schooner C.J. Cox, lately arrived from Hakodate, Japan. From clothing and articles washed ashore the authorities at Halfmoon Bay found that two of the dead men were the Shepherds. In the pocket of one coat was found a testament containing the inscription; “To brother Allan, from his loving sister Katie, Hamilton, September, 1885.”

The detectives have inquired of the various Shepherds in the city, but have not been able to trace the relatives of the drowned sailors.

 

Friday, March 4, 1898

 

CLARK - At the city hospital, on March 4th, 1898, James Clark. Funeral notice later.

James Clark, fireman on the ill fated Toronto express last Tuesday, died at the city hospital this morning about 11:30.

 

BREMNER - On the 3rd March, 1898, Marjorie Eleanor, youngest daughter of Charles and Ellen Bremner, aged 3 years, and 10 months. Funeral today, private.

 

FRIEZ (Niagara Falls, N.Y.) March 4 - The fourth accident and the first fatal one on the new steel arch bridgework occurred at 9 o’clock this morning, when Edward Friez, of this city, fell a distance of about 75 feet onto the rocks of the slope below the high bank, and was instantly killed. He was climbing a rope about the false work on the Canadian end of the bridge, and lost his hold. The remains were brought to this side of the river and taken home. The deceased leaves a wife. His only child died a week ago. In his descent Friez struck on the false work three times, and was probably dead before he struck the rocks below. His parents reside at Smithville, Ont.


CASCADDEN (Kingsville, Ont.) March 3 - David Cascadden, 55 years of age, and a prominent man of Kingsville, died from the effects of chloroform, administered by three physicians prior to performing an operation this evening at 6 o’clock. The doctors were about to amputate a finger, and just as the operation was to commence, the patient looking peculiar, a hasty examination was made, and the patient was found to be practically dead before the knife had touched him. Deceased was apparently very healthy and leaves a widow and several children. The physicians worked hard for two hours endeavouring to revive him, but failed.

 

WOLFE (Berlin, Ont.) March 3 - A fatal accident happened in the woods near Waterloo last evening. Frederick C. Wolfe, a young man, son of Christian Wolfe, Waterloo, and his brother were cutting down trees. The wind caused a tree to swerve in the opposite direction to which they intended it to fall, and young Fred was struck by it and instantly killed. The other boy received injuries on his leg. The deceased’s neck was found to be broken.

 

KANE - In the evidence of William Atkinson, at a coroner’s inquest last night in the city hall was told the final chapter of a young Canadian girl’s undoing. It was a sad tale, though perhaps no different, except in result to many another that might be told of other young women who leave happy homes in Canada and go to the American cities to seek their fortune.

Atkinson met Miss Kane first in Buffalo, at the time of the G.A.R. encampment there last August. It was not a formal introduction that made them known to each other; just a mere chance meeting on the street. “Hello” said the girl; “Hello” said Atkinson. “Do you see those two woman across the road?” asked the young woman. Atkinson did.“Well, they’ve been rubber necking me because I am a Canadian, see!”

And with this informal introduction the pair were friends, and Miss Kane thought she knew her man well enough to ask him what he proposed to do. What did she mean? Why buy of course, and buy he did at a German saloon down the street, Miss Kane drinking whiskey. Atkinson saw her home that night and she volunteered the information that though she was out at service she was on the street every night, and he could see her if he wanted to.

A short time after this she left her place and Atkinson, feeling that he must do something to save what was left of her, told her he would give her money to buy clothes, shoes and stockings, and pay her railway fair to her father’s home. She told him she was in an interesting condition and blamed him for it.

Atkinson’s story of the events occurring from the time of her return till her death was graphic and while he was telling it his voice was often choked with sobs. Together they drove to the hotel, and as Atkinson said she ran up the stairs, just as she used to do before she went away. In the early afternoon he left the room for a short time, and when he returned he found her preparing to retire. She had no sooner done so then she gave a cry and went into a convulsion, from which she never recovered.

Dr. O’Reilly and Dr. McCabe, who conducted the post-mortem, both agreed that death had been caused by an attempted abortion and they were inclined to believe that regular instruments had been used and that some else had done the work or instructed deceased how to use them.

Unimportant evidence by a couple of chamber maids and the jurymen brought in a verdict of death from the effects of an attempted abortion either by deceased herself or by some persons unknown. It was agreed that Atkinson knew nothing of the abortion. He left last night for Toronto.

 


HUTCHINSON - The inquiry into the death of Thomas Hutchinson, engineer on the ill-fated express last Tuesday was opened at the city hospital yesterday afternoon at 3:30 before Coroner Wolverton.

After viewing the remains at the morgue the jurors were taken to the scene of the fatality in a special car provided by Mr. Wallace. Every vestige of the wreck had been cleared away and a few men were engaged in breaking over the earth between the tracks. Mr. Wallace explained the location of the freight train and the working of the switch at the west end of the siding. Attached to the switch apparatus is a disc painted red, and this is shown when the siding switch is open. Nearby is the large semaphore showing whether or not the train line is clear for an approaching train. Conductor Sinclair had charged the freight and Brakeman Modeland was the rear brakeman whose duty it was to attend to the switch. When the train was properly placed on the siding the conductor was at the upper end of the train, and Brakeman Modeland signalled him that all was right at the rear. Conductor Sinclair went to the telegraph office to get his orders, and informed the signal man that everything was right. The signal operator dropped the station and long distance semaphores showing that everything was clear for the fast express.

Unfortunately for the driver and the fireman, who had their eyes chiefly on the large semaphore, the red disc at the siding switch could not be seen distinctly as the red-painted van of the freight was just behind it, and when it was seen at close quarters there was no opportunity to stop the train.

 

Saturday, March 5, 1898

 

CLARK - On March 4th at the city hospital, James Clark, in his 32nd year. Funeral from his late residence, 119 Locke street north, Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SMALL - On March 4th, at her late residence, 64 Garth st. south, Eliza, relict of the late James Small, in her 76th year. Funeral Monday, March 7th, 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

ARTHURS - At Dundas on Friday, March 4trh, John Arthurs, in his 66th year. The funeral will take place from his late residence, North street, Dundas, on Sunday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock, to St. John’s burying ground, Ancaster. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

STEWART (Meaford, Ont.) March 4 - Jas. Stewart, who had been a resident of this town upwards of forty years, passed away this morning aged seventy-two. Mr. Stewart was for many years a leading merchant and grain buyer, was elected several times mayor of the town and had been town treasurer for many years.

 

PATTISON (Caledonia) March 3 - The remains of Mrs. Park Pattison, formerly of this village, passed through here on Monday on there way to Hagersville for interment. Her death, which took place on Sunday in Hamilton city hospital was caused by typhoid fever. The dead woman is best remembered here on account of an attempt a year or two ago by her husband to cut her throat, for which he is still confined within the precincts of Kingston penitentiary.

 

 


Monday, March 7, 1898

 

PARKIN - In this city on March 6th, E.B.C. Parkin, aged 55 years. Funeral from his late residence 87 Crooks street on Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

MURPHY - In this city, on Saturday March 5, Mary, beloved wife of Michael Murphy. Funeral from her late residence 151 Hunter st., on Tuesday morning at 8:30 to St. Patricks church thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

COCHRANE - At Strabane on March 5, Sarah Cochrane, aged 76 years, beloved mother of Arch Cochrane, County Treasurer. Funeral Tuesday the 8th inst., at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Cochrane, mother of Archibald Cochrane, County Treasurer, died at her home in Strabane yesterday. Pneumonia was the cause of death. Mrs. Cochrane, was one of the oldest settlers of that district. She leaves two sons - Archie, and Duncan.

 

ROBINSON - On March 6th, at St. Joseph’s hospital, Miss Jennie Robinson, in her 25th year, youngest daughter of Mrs. A.J. Robinson, 26 Vine street. Private service at the home, and public service at Wesley church at 2:30 o’clock on Wednesday. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MITCHELL - At Beach Road station, on March 6th, Mrs. Sarah Mitchell, aged 79 years. Funeral on Tuesday afternoon at 1:30 o’clock, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.                                                                                               

 

HART - Suddenly in Saltfleet on March 6th, Ellen Rennie, a native of Lancashire, Scotland, and relict of the late George Hart of Saltfleet, aged 69 years. Funeral on Wednesday at 11 a.m. from her late residence to Tweedside cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation. Glasgow and Montreal papers please copy.

 

KEITH (Listowel) March 5 - Miss Ida Jane Keith, sister of Jessie Keith, who was so brutally murdered by Chatelle is dead. She never fully recovered from the terrible strain occasioned by the murder of her sister, and her death was directly chargeable to its effects.

 

DIAGNAULT - Mrs. A.R. Diagnault fell down stairs at her residence, 83 St. Christopher street on Friday night and broke her neck. Death was almost instantaneous.

 

BUCKBOROUGH(St. George) - James and John Buckborough attended the funeral of their uncle, William Buckborough, near Woodstock on Friday.

 

STOREY (Acton, Ont.) March 6 - This morning the community was startled by the announcement of the death of W.H. Storey, founder and head of the Canada Glove works, at this place. For the past six weeks Mr. Storey has been in poor health, and about two weeks ago his medical adviser found it necessary to operate for an internal growth. The operation was only partially successful but Mr. Storey continued to progress favourably until yesterday, when he grew rapidly worse, and succumbed this morning at 7:30.


Mr. Story came to Acton about 40 years ago, and in 1868 established the Canada Glove works, which under his skilful management, has become the largest of its kind in the Dominion.

 

HANLEY - So far as his parents can discover, little John Hanley was all alone yesterday afternoon when he fell into a ice channel Murton’s wharf on the bay front and was drowned. He left home about 5 o’clock in the afternoon and did not return to tea. His people became anxious about him and a search began. At midnight no trace of him had been discovered, and his father came to the conclusion that he had fallen into the bay. Securing a pipe pole he went with some neighbours to the ice cutters’ channel near the end of the wharf, and there after a very short search the body of the unfortunate boy was pulled out.

No one seemed to have seen him around on the ice in the afternoon and it is supposed he went down alone and was playing with a plank laid across the channel, when he slipped in and was drowned. He was about ten years old and his parents live at 694 Catharine st. north. Coroner Wolverton was called, but this morning decided that no inquest was necessary. The police were not notified of the affair until after the body had been found.

 

HART - Death came unexpectedly in the household of Mrs. Hart at Tweedside yesterday. Mrs. Hart did not arise at the usual hour and her daughter went to awaken her, when she discovered that the mother had passed away into her last sleep. The deceased retired on Saturday evening in her usual good health, and her death was most unexpected. She leaves three sons, and three daughters to mourn her demise, the former named; William, Stewart, of Cleveland; Mrs. Schram, of Detroit; Mrs. J.B. Davis, of Stony Creek, and Miss Mary, who resided with the mother, and is the post mistress at Tweedside post office. George Hart, ex-deputy reeve of Saltfleet, is also a son of the deceased lady. Mrs. Hart survives her husband some twenty years, was long a resident of this township, and was one of its most respected residents. The funeral will take place on Wednesday to the Tweedside cemetery.

 

PARKIN - E.H.C. Parkin, 87 Crooks street, died yesterday of blood poisoning. Nine days ago the deceased had a couple of teeth drawn, and this result followed. Doctors Philp, Maloch, and Baugh, were called in, but were unable to save his life.

Mr. Parkin was a prominent member of the Christadelphians in this city. He was 55 years of age, having been born in Birmingham, England, in 1843, and had resided in Hamilton for eleven years, being employed in the Grand Trunk works. He leaves a widow and three children. The funeral will take place on Wednesday at 3:30.

 

SMALL - On Friday Mrs. James Small passed away. The deceased lady was well-known in this city, having come to this country from Nottingham, Eng., some 52 years ago. She was here but a short time when she became acquainted with and was united in marriage to the late James Small, then a farmer near the Delta. The union resulted in a family of nine children, of whom five are at present living - Mrs. L. Foster, James, William, George, and Mrs. John Cooper, all of this city.She leaves a large circle of friends and her loss will be deeply regretted by all.

 


ROBINSON - Miss Jennie Robinson, of Vine street, cashier at the Parisian Steam laundry, and a well-known worker in Victoria avenue Baptist church, and Wesley church, died early yesterday morning at St. Joseph’s hospital, where she had been taken to undergo an operation. Her sudden death was a terrible shock to her many friends. She was at one time a member of Victoria avenue church choir.

 

HUTCHINSON, CLARK - The remains of Thomas Hutchinson, engineer, and James Clark, fireman, of the Toronto Express that ran into a special freight at Burlington last Tuesday, have been laid to rest. The funeral of Engineer Hutchinson took place on Saturday afternoon from his late residence, Hughson street north. The body was taken to Christ Church cathedral, where service was conducted by Rev. W. Bevin. The cortege then went to Hamilton cemetery, a large number of the members of St. John’s lodge A.F. and A.M., of which deceased was a member, railway men and citizens generally following the remains to the last resting place. The pallbearers were Bros. W. Lee, Thomas Beasley, A. Rose, Lyons, Baines, and Hammill. The Masonic service was conducted by W. Bro., J.F. Mercer, W.M. of St. Johns lodge, assisted by W. Bro. R.V. Mathews.

The funeral of Fireman Clark took place yesterday afternoon from his late home, 119 Locke street north, and was attended by a very large throng of mourners, including Grand Trunk employees and citizens. A special train from Toronto brought a large number of railway men. The pallbearers were; Bros. Wm. Pearce, J.S. Larkin, C.O.O.F.; Wm. Burwell, R.Tietiderington, A.O.U.W.; J. Munson, J. Taft, B.of L.F.Rev. J.G. Shearer conducted the funeral services and the ceremonies of the C.O.O.F., and A.O.U.W. were conducted by representative officers. The services at the grave were witnessed by an immense gathering.

Deceased was a member of the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen, A.O.U.W. and Canadian Order of Oddfellows.

 

Tuesday, March 8, 1898

 

PARKIN - In this city on March 6th, E.H.C. Parkin, aged 55 years. Funeral from his late residence 87 Crooks street, on Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

ROBINSON - On March 6th, at St. Joseph’s hospital, Miss Jennie Robinson in her 25th year, youngest daughter of Mrs. A.J. Robinson, 26 Vine street. Private at the house, and public service at Wesley church at 2:30 o’clock on Wednesday. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

McMILLAN - In Dundas, on March 7th, Edith, daughter of Duncan and Elizabeth McMillan, aged 18 years and 3 months. Funeral Wednesday at 3 o’clock

 

HUTCHINSON - The inquest on the death of Thomas Hutchinson, the engineer on the Toronto express that crashed into a freight train on the siding at Burlington station last Tuesday was resumed and concluded last evening before Coroner Wolverton at No. 3 police station. Considerable was interest was evinced in the proceedings, a large number of railway men being present. J.V. Teatzel, Q.C., watched the inquiry on behalf of the Grand Trunk company. The inquest lasted three hours, sixteen witnesses being examined.

Edward Sinclair, conductor of the freight train, said they reached Burlington at 12:37, and it was between 12:40 and 12:50 when he got the freight into the siding. During this time he was up the siding, near the telegraph office. He received the signal that all was clear from Brakeman Modeland, and went to the telegraph office to get his order to go on to Toronto. At the time they reached the siding the Toronto express was due past, but it did not arrive until 1:06. He was in the telegraph office when the crash came.


Witness continued that he did not go up to see if the brakeman had closed the switch, because he knew Modeland to be a reliable and competent man, who had been in the company’s employ for seven years and had worked for witness ten months. A distinct and continually emphasized rule of the company was that the brakeman who opened the switch must close it. Modeland was the rear brakeman, and it was his duty to open the switch.

Robert Turton, engineer of the freight train, said that he had got a signal from Modeland to stop that everything was clear. He considered Modeland was a good man, and when he asked Modeland how he could have left the switch opened, Modeland replied that he could not tell how he had failed to shut it.

The last witness to be called was Brakeman Modeland and a deep hush fell on the auditors when he stepped into the witness box. He gave his evidence in an open and frank manner. He appeared about 35 years old. Witness said his name was Joseph Henry Modeland. He lived in Toronto and was married and had one child. He had been in the Grand Trunk’s employee for six years and two months. Prior to last Tuesday he had never been in an accident, nor had he been reported for neglect of duty. He said he could not complain of being tired or ill, on the day of the accident. He opened the switch to let the train on the siding, and when the train passed over it the last time he jumped on the van. He did not remember closing the switch. He went to work to wash the dishes in the van. “I went to the door and when I did look out I was surprised to see the engine coming on the siding only two cars lengths away. I jumped off; if I had stayed another second I would not have been here tonight. I would have been killed.”

In summing up the evidence, Coroner Wolverton, said it would be clear to the jurors that only one person, Modeland, was to blame for Hutchinson’s death. In law he, doubtless, was guilty of criminal negligence; but he had evidently suffered as keenly mentally as any sentence could make him feel, and nothing would be gained by the jurors taking that stand. He however rested with them.

After consulting together for about ten minutes, the jurors brought in the following verdict.“That Thomas Hutchinson came to his death from injuries received by his engine running into a freight train at Burlington, the switch having being thoughtlessly left open, by Joseph Henry Modeland, brakeman of said freight train. The jury considered that the other members of the crew are in no way responsible for the accident”.

In words the original verdict varied somewhat from the above, and Coroner Wolverton suggested that the word negligently, instead of thoughtlessly be used; but the jurors objected. They told the Coroner it was their wish that Modeland should be let down as lightly as possible and “thoughtlessly” remain.

Modeland will be discharged from the employ of the company.

 

FITCH (Grimsby) - On Saturday morning Mrs. Fitch, Gibson avenue, was found dead in bed, having expired during the night. Her son, William Fitch lived with her. Her remains were interred in St. Andrew’s church cemetery on Sunday afternoon.

 

ANDERSON - Murray Anderson, the first reeve and mayor of London, and a pioneer of Western Canada, died on Saturday last, having reached the advanced age of 84.

 

TYRELL - Frank Tyrell, a prominent barrister of Morrisburg, died Monday morning in Montreal of pneumonia. He went to Montreal on Friday, and was taken ill on the train.


McKIM - Peter McKim of Kingston, aged 85, died on Saturday night after a brief illness. He was a Methodist and a Liberal, and one of a family of five boys who have never tasted liquor or tobacco.

 

Wednesday, March 9, 1898

 

STRACHAN - On March 1, New York City, at St. Cload’s hotel A. Russel Strachan, M.D.

 

NEWMAN (Kingston) March 8 - William Newman, Sr., well-known as a professional climber came to his death today by falling from the Montreal Transportation company’s elevator. He was employed by Jamieson & Co., and had ascended the summit of the tower facing the harbour, when he lost his hold and fell headlong. In the descent he struck one of the piers, breaking his legs above the knee. When his home was reached, life was found to be extinct. Newman fell a distance of 150 feet. His head and face escaped without a bruise.

 

Thursday, March 10, 1898

 

GROVE - At Woodstock, on Wednesday, March 9th, 1898, Samuel Grove, formerly of Hamilton. Funeral from his late residence, Oxford street to the Methodist cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WOODCROFT - On Wednesday 8th inst., Richard Girling, twin son of L.R. and Minnie Woodcroft, aged 6 months. Funeral Saturday at 9 a.m. from 121 Stanley avenue.

 

KITCHEN (Mountsberg) - William Kitchen, well and favourably known in Mountsberg and vicinity, died suddenly last week. He went out to do some work around the pig pen, and not returning his wife went to see what was wrong, and found him dead.

 

SCOTT - Mayor Robert Scott, of Seaforth, is dead.

 

McKEE - Mrs. J. McKee, Pittsburgh township, died yesterday, aged 71. She was the mother of Police officers, David, William, and Robert, of the Toronto force.

 

Friday, March 11, 1898

 

HUMPHREY - Nelson Humphrey died unexpectedly shortly afternoon today at his residence, 128 Main st. west. He complained of being indisposed this morning, and Mrs. Humphrey went to the doctor after some medicine. When she was away Mr. Humphrey felt better, and started to go to the office. He had not gone far before he was taken ill, and had to return to the house, where he fell on the floor. A doctor was summoned and everything possible was done for him, but he passed away about 12:30.

The deceased was 73 years of age, and was born near Rochester, N.Y.He came to Hamilton about 60 years ago. For years he was in the tannery business with C. Newbury. When the partnership was dissolved Mr. Humphrey carried on the business.

Mr. Humphrey was a member of the board of license commissioners, for a number of years.

 


ROSS (Lancaster, Ont.) March 11 - John Ross, the well-known contractor, died very suddenly at the McRay hotel at midnight of acute laryngitis. He was very successful as a railway contractor, and reputed to be very wealthy. It is said of him that he built more miles of railway than other known contractor in America. He was 78 years of age.

 

GERMAIN - Nazarie Germain, formerly wholesale hardware merchant, Ottawa, died at .St. Boniface Thursday evening aged 72, after a prolong illness.

 

CREARER - John Crearer, son of Alexander Crearer, a farmer living on the 6th concession of Elderslie, was found lying dead in his father’s barn, where he had gone to work a few hours before.It is supposed he died from heart failure.

 

Saturday, March 12, 1898

 

HUMPHREY - At his late residence, No. 128 Main st. west, on March 11th, Nelson Humphrey aged 79 years. Funeral Sunday at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MACKENZIE - In this city, on March 12th, 1898, Isabelle Kirk, relict of the late Kenneth Mackenzie, in her 78th year. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, E. Davidson, 107 Victoria avenue south, on Monday at 2:30 p.m. Funeral private,

 

McGUIGGAN (Brockville, Ont.) March 11 - Dan McGuiggan, an employee of he Canada Carriage works, had just finished his days work and on leaving the factory at six o’clock tonight tried to jump on a G.T.R. car, which was being hauled out of the carriage works siding. He missed his footing and fell in front of the car, which passed over his body, killing him instantly, and cutting both his arms. Deceased leaves a widow and three children. He was about 29 years of age, and formerly of Perth, Ontario.

 

McKELLAR - John McKellar, of Ingersoll is dead, aged 57.

 

Monday, March 14, 1898

 

LAIRD - On Sunday, the 13th inst., at the residence of her father, 368 Hughson st. north, Aggie, youngest daughter of T.W. Laird. Funeral Tuesday, the 15th inst., at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

HARPER - At her daughters residence No. 364 Hannah st. west, on Saturday 12th March, Elizabeth Kemp, relict of the late Richard Harper, in her 87th year. Funeral from the residence of her son, Charles Kemp, No. 41 Margaret street, Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Elizabeth Harper, mother of Charles Kemp, fireman, died yesterday at her residence, 364 Hannah st. west, she was 87 years of age.

 

FIELDE - On Monday, March 14th, at his late residence, Waterdown, Frederick A.C. Fielde, in his 38th year. Funeral 3 p.m. Wednesday.


FROSTE - Henry Froste, of Belleville, died Sunday after a long illness. He was a native of England, and was 80 years of age.

 

FERGUSON - John Ferguson, the quarry man who was injured at Crookston, Ontario, on Thursday night, died in the Belleville hospital on Friday night.

 

RANKIN - Sergt. William J. Rankin, Forty Eighth Highlanders, died on Sunday morning at his home in Toronto, after an illness of two weeks from typhoid fever.

 

FERGUSON - Mrs. James Ferguson, wife of the late Registrar of London, died suddenly yesterday morning at the residence of her son-in-law, Justice Ferguson, Toronto. The deceased lady was 86 years of age, and was born in Tipperary Ireland. Her maiden name was Sifton, and she was a great aunt of Hon. Clifford Sifton, Minister of the Interior.

 

HUMPHREY - There was a large attendance at the funeral of Nelson Humphrey yesterday afternoon, many prominent citizens being present. The casket was covered with beautiful floral offerings. The pall-bearers were; W.D. Long, E. Van Allen, J.J. Mason, D.B. Pratt, J.M. Rousseaux, Charles Newbury, Siras King, and Samuel McKay.

Rev. Dr. Smith, pastor of Centenary church, conducted the religious services.

 

KERR -In Nassagaweya, on March 7, Mary Carradice, wife of Andrew Kerr died suddenly. Deceased was in her 77th year, leaves a husband and large family to mourn her loss. The family consists of one son, John Kerr, of Toronto, and several daughters, - Mrs. Joseph Thompson, Emerald st. north, this city; Mrs. James Coulson, Lowville,; Mrs. Alex Fleming, Esquesing; Mrs. James Fleming, Milton,; Mrs. Robert Mills, Cedar Rapids, Mich.,; Mrs. Thomas Harris, Kaslo, B.C., and Miss Barbara Kerr, who lives at home. The funeral took place on Thursday afternoon, to Boston church, Esquesing, and was attended by a large concourse of sorrowing relatives and friends.

 

Tuesday, March 15, 1898

 

FERGUSON - On Tuesday March 15th, at his residence 433 Mary street, John M. Ferguson, in his 69th year, son of late James Ferguson, New Forge Green, Belfast, Ireland. Funeral notice later.

 

BESSEY - In this city, on the 14th inst., Morris E. Bessey, aged 41 years. Funeral from his late residence, 11 Market street, Wednesday, March 16th, at 3:30 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.

Morris E. Bessey, brother of Webber Bessey, of the Star theater, and proprietor of the Union Hotel, is dead.

 

KERR - In this city on Monday, March 14th, Charlotte Kerr, aged 38 years. The funeral will take place from her late residence, 14 Blythe st., on Wednesday, at 2 p.m. to Hamilton cemetery.Funeral private. No flowers.

 


FIELDE - On Monday, March 14th, at his late residence, Waterdown, Frederick A.C. Fielde, in his 35th year. Funeral 1:30 p.m. , Wednesday, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

DODSON - On Tuesday, March 15th, Ann, relict of the late William Dodson, in her 83rd year.Funeral from the residence of her son, William Dodson, 129 Victoria ave. north, Thursday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

STIPE - On the 15th inst, at the residence of her father Francis Battram, 127 Pearl st. north, Priscella Maud, beloved wife of Harry Stipe, in the 29th year of her age. Funeral from above address, Thursday, 17th inst., at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

STOKES - In this city on the 14th inst., Sarah, beloved wife of William Stokes, aged 65 years, a native of London, England. Funeral from her late residence 184 Ferguson avenue south, Thursday, at 2 o’clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

BENNER (Woodburn) - On March 3, John Benner, an old and respected resident of this place, passed peacefully after an illness of six days. His funeral took place from his late residence on the

Sunday following, to Christ Church burying ground, and was largely attended. Rev. J.H. Fielding conducted the services.

 

ROWAT - John Rowat, a farmer at Taylorville, in the County of Russell, near Ottawa, was thrown from his rig by the horses running away and was found dead by the wayside.

 

BETTS - W. Betts’ grandchild was interred in the new cemetery last Thursday.

 

HAINER - Mrs. Hainer, of Grimsby park, died last Saturday and was buried on Monday.

 

LAIRD - The funeral of Miss Aggie Laird, who died on Sunday morning, took place from her parents’ residence Hughson street north, this afternoon, and was largely attended. Miss Laird was very popular among the young people of the north end, and much regret is felt at her demise. For the past three years she had been almost constantly confined to her room, and no doubt the messenger of death was to her a welcome visitor, for during her long illness she suffered intensely.Miss Laird was formerly the clerk in Pratt & Watkins, and Thomas C. Watkins, dry-goods establishments.

 

Wednesday, March 16, 1898

 

DODSON - On Tuesday, March 15th, Ann, relict of the late William Dodson, in her 83rd year. Funeral from the residence of her son, William Dodson, 123 Victoria ave. north, Thursday at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

STIPE - On the 15th inst., at the residence of her father, Francis Battram, 127 Pearl st. north, Priscella Maud, beloved wife of Harry Stipe, in the 29th year of her age. Funeral from the above address, Thursday, 17th, inst. At 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will pleae accept this intimation.

 


McMULLEN - At Ancaster on Tuesday, March 15th, Margaret, wife of John McMullen, in her 77th year. Funeral from her late residence, to St. John’s church, Ancaster, on Thursday the 17th, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

FERGUSON - On Tuesday, March 15th, at his residence, 423 Mary street, John M. Ferguson, in his 69th year, son of late James Ferguson, New Forge Green, Belfast, Ireland. Funeral Thursday at 2 p.m. from his late residence, 423 Mary street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice

 

WOOD - George W. Wood, a well-known real estate broker and insurance man, of Toronto, is dead.

 

BALDWIN - Morgan Baldwin, who was for sixteen years, harbour master of Toronto, died at his residence, 95 Dowling avenue, yesterday morning.

 

HUTCHISON - James Hutchison, a prominent dry goods merchant of Victoria, B,C. died at the Toronto general hospital last night of pneumonia. The deceased was in the east purchasing goods and became ill a week ago.

 

Thursday, March 17, 1898

 

WELLS - On Wednesday, March 16th, Esther E. Denmark, in her 69th year, beloved wife of James E. Wells. Funeral will take place from her late residence, 208 James st. north, on Friday, at 2:30 p.m. to Christ Church cathedral where service will be held. Interment in Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

STOREY (Hannon) - Anson Smith and Jacob Smith were in Acton on Tuesday attending the funeral of the former’s son-in-law, W.H. Storey, of that place. The deceased had many friends in this neighbourhood. He leaves a widow, and five children to mourn his loss.

 

HARKNESS - William Harkness, seven years old, who was struck by a moving electric car in Ottawa, on Monday evening and had his collar bone broken, died yesterday morning, in consequence.

 

BUTLER - The body of a man was washed ashore yesterday, one mile east of the village of Onondaga, and has been identified as that of George Butler, who was drowned in the Grand River at that place a year ago.

 

BESSEY - The funeral of Edward Bessey, late proprietor of the Union Hotel, took place yesterday afternoon. The pallbearers were; A. Crooks, T.J. Senior, W. Langhorn, William Hunter, J. Moore, W. St. John. St. John’s lodge A.F and A.M., had charge and Rev. Mr. Adams conducted the religious service.

 

Friday, March 18, 1898

 

BIGGAR - At Winona, on the 17th inst., John H. Biggar, in his 70th year. Funeral services at his late residence on Saturday, 19th, at 2 p.m. Burial at the Fifty church yard. Friends please accept this intimation. Please omit flowers.


COOPER (Smithville) - Mrs. William Cooper, who had been ill for some time, died last Thursday afternoon, and was buried in the Presbyterian church cemetery. She leaves two sons to mourn her death.

 

MARRIOTT (Ryckman’s Corners) - The funeral of the infant son of Markham and Mrs. Marriott took place last Sunday, to Barton Presbyterian church.

 

YEO (St. Thomas) March 17 - The injury to Henry Yeo, farmer, Sparta road, who was kicked by a horse in the abdomen Monday, resulted fatally. Mr. Yeo who was injured internally had been in a semi-conscious condition since the accident. He gradually grew worse, and death resulting this morning. He was in his fifty-sixth year.

 

SANDERSON (Minnedosa, Man) - One of the oldest settlers, in this district, passed away this morning ( March 10) in the person of Hugh Sanderson. He came here from Guelph in 1879, bringing with him a large family, and took up a homestead about five miles north of what is now Minnedosa, on which he made a comfortable home. He was of a retiring disposition, but secured the esteem of all who knew him. He leaves a widow and a large family to mourn his loss. Only one of his children, William was still at home, all of the others having left the parental roof tree. Of the others Robert J. and Hugh H. have farms north of Minnedosa; Mrs. W. Waddell, lives in Minnedosa; Mrs. W. Ferguson at Hamilton; Mrs. Baird, Mrs. Sinclair, and John Sanderson still live near Guelph.

 

The deceased had reached his eighty-third year. He came from Scotland in 1828, and was a staunch reformer in politics.

 

NELSON (Toronto) - March 18 - A sad case of suicide occurred yesterday afternoon at 15 Franklin avenue, Toronto Junction, when James E. Nelson, a polisher in the Cleveland bicycle works, twenty five years of age, took his life by drinking three ounces of carbolic acid.

A week ago last Sunday, Mr. Nelson cut his hand severely which to a certain extent prevented him working. During the past few days he had been rather melancholy and was not in his usual health.

Yesterday morning he went to his work and, after working carelessly the greater part of the morning, asked the foreman of his department how to do a certain piece of work. Then he threw the tools down and on the suggestion of the foreman went home. His wife took his dinner pail to the factory, but on going there missed her husband, who was returning home as she was going. On arriving at the house Mr. Nelson changed his clothes and walked over to Howell’s drugstore, where he signed his name for three ounces of carbolic acid which he said he wanted to use as a disinfectant.

Then he took the poison home, and appeared as cheerful as usual. He asked his wife if he should make a little tea and he did. They both drank together and he ate his dinner heartily. Just afterwards he went to the sideboard, poured the carbolic acid into a cup, “Molly come here”. Just then he took the whole draught in her presence and asked her “do you know what that is”?

She replied “why, it’s machine oil.”

“No its not” he answered, “it’s poison.”


The deceased, James Nelson, is a son of J.D. Nelson, Mary street, who is employed by Hunter & co., as a bailiff’s clerk. He resided in Hamilton up to a few years ago, and was employed as a polisher in one of the stove foundries. About seven years ago his brother, Sylvester, who lives on Hughson st. north, married the mother of deceased’s wife in Evanston, Indiana, and came to Hamilton to live. Deceased boarded with his brother, and after a few years married Mr. Nelson’s young daughter. John Nelson, manager of the Eclipse bicycle agency, is a brother of the deceased.

J.D. Nelson, the father, and his son Sylverster went to Toronto Junction today by the noon train to arrange for the bringing of the remains here.

 

Saturday, March, 19, 1898

 

JOHNSTON - At 189 Picton street east, on Friday, March 19, 1898, Ada May, youngest child of Ada and Thomas Johnston, aged 1 year, and 6 months.

Funeral Sunday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MILLIGAN - In this city, on March 18th, Thomas W. Milligan, in his 74th. Funeral from his late residence 180 Locke street north, on Sunday afternoon, at 3:30 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Thomas W. Milligan, who suffered from a stroke of paralysis in the market a few days ago, died yesterday. He had resided in the city for about fifty years, and was a well-known resident of the west end. He was a staunch Conservative in politics. He leaves a widow, five sons, and four daughters; William, Edward, and Thomas Nelligan, city; Alfred, and Wilson Milligan, of London; Mrs. W. Pickthorn, Nevada, Mo.; Mrs. W. Logan, Boise City, Idaho, and two daughters at home. The funeral will take place tomorrow at 3:30.

 

NELSON - The remains of the late James Nelson, whose suicided at Toronto Junction on Thursday, were brought to the city last evening by the father, J.D. Nelson, and taken to his home on Mary street. The funeral took place this afternoon to Hamilton cemetery. It was attended by members of the Knight’s of Malta, and St. John, who came up from Toronto, and a number of friends. Rev. Robert Burns conducted the religious services. The pallbearers were chosen from the two societies.

 

Monday, March 21, 1898

 

BYRNE - At Dundas, on the 21st inst., John Byrne, in his 40th year. Funeral notice later.

 

SHARPE (Belleville, Ont.) March 19 - Susan Maria, wife of William Sharpe, James street, died very suddenly this morning. She washed her face just after rising, when she was seized with a sharp pain in the heart, and death resulted almost instantaneously. Mrs. Sharpe, who was nearly 73 years of age, is survived by her husband and a family of, four sons, and two daughters.

 

SANDERSON - Rev. G.R. Sanderson, a superannuated Methodist minister, and one of the oldest and best known divines in Ontario, died Sunday night in London.

 

COLE - The body of the late Mr. Cole, postmaster of Big island, was found near Deseronto Saturday. Mr. Cole, while duck-shooting near Big island last fall, was drowned through the capsizing of the boat.


ALLAN - William Allan, who died in Brantford yesterday, was well-known in Hamilton. He was prominent in Orange circles.

W.F, Allan foreman of the fire department , in Brantford, passed away at noon today. Deceased was one of the first to join the firemen under the present system, and was highly respected. He leaves a widow and two children. Deceased was out on his wheel Tuesday. When coming down Brant avenue the seat broke and he was thrown violently to the ground, but he proceeded to the fire hall, and would not give in. On Wednesday he had to go home, and it was supposed he was doing well until this forenoon when he became worse and died at noon.

 

Tuesday, March 22, 1898

 

FELL - At Stratford, on March 22, Lily, eldest daughter of John Fell, and granddaughter of James Wilds, market gardener, of this city, aged 18 years. Funeral notice later.

 

BYRNE - At Dundas, on Monday, March 21st, 1898, John Byrne, aged 42 years. Funeral will leave his residence, Hart street, Wednesday, March 23rd at 9 a.m. to St. Augustine, thence to

Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

KELLY - On Tuesday morning March 22, 1898, Mary, beloved wife of Thomas J. Kelly. Funeral Thursday morning at 9 a.m. from 88 Cannon street west, thence to St. Mary’s cathedral. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Thomas J. Kelly, for a number of years a prominent member of St. Mary’s cathedral choir, died this morning at St. Joseph’s hospital, after a long illness. The funeral will take place on Thursday morning from 88 Cannon street west.

 

YOUNG (Abingdon) - Rev. James Young, of San Francisco, passed away very suddenly on Monday last. Deceased was in the prime of life, being in his 42nd year. Since entering the ministry Rev. Mr. Young has lived and laboured with the Americans. Everybody with whom Mr. Young was brought in personal contact learned to respect and revere the reverend gentleman. The cause of death was apoplexy.

 

McCABE (St. George) - Word was received here on Monday morning of the death at Paris of the father of Miss N. McCabe, of this village.

 

FIELD (Brockville) March 21 - William Field, a well-known farmer of Fairfield, seven miles from here, was found dead in his bush this morning. He started with his team to cut wood, and not returning at the usual hour a search was instituted with the above result. Heart disease was the cause. Coronor Vaux Brockville, was called to hold an inquest. Deceased was about 60 years of age.

 

BARBOUR (St. Mary’s, Ont.) March 21 - R.F. Barbour, a retired merchant, shot himself dead in the cellar of his residence this afternoon. Two teachers on the St. Mary’s public school staff are daughters. Alcoholism is the cause of the man’s rash act.

 

 


Wednesday, March 23, 1898

 

FELL - At Stratford on March 22, Lily, eldest daughter of John Fell and grand-daughter of James Wild, market gardener of this city, aged 18 years. Funeral Thursday, from Stuart st. station, on arrival of train due at 12:00 o’clock noon. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

KELLY - On Tuesday morning March 22, 1898, Mary, beloved wife of Thomas J. Kelly. Funeral Thursday morning at 9:00 o’clock from 88 Cannon st. west, thence to St. Mary’s cathedral. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SPENCER (Toronto) March 23 - Charles Spencer, a window dresser, was found dead in bed in Thomas Downey’s apartment at Mrs. Martins boarding house, 27 Temperance street, shortly afternoon yesterday. Dr. Garrett, who was called in, said the man had been dead several hours.

Little is known of the deceased, excepting that he came from Ottawa, where he has a wife and child. Downey says that he has known the man for a couple weeks. During his time Spencer had been drinking heavily. He was also a patron of an opium joint at 126 Adelaide street which the police have squelched.

 

Thursday, March 24, 1898

 

ALLAN - Mrs. Allan, relict of the late George Allan, a prominent contractor, died early this morning at her home on Barton street east. She was a member of Knox church congregation. Two daughters, and one son are left to mourn her loss. She was about 70 years of age.

 

CLOUTMAN (Toronto) March 24 - William Cloutman, the five-year-old son of a labourer of the same name, living on Coatsworth street was instantly killed this morning while running across Queen street. He was struck down by a express wagon, driven by William Pollard, and received a blow on the head that proved instantly fatal. An inquest will be held.

 

PURVIS (Toronto, Ont.) March 24 - John Purvis, a carpenter, aged 60 years, fell from the roof of a three-story building, 206 Richmond street west, about 2 o’clock this afternoon and received injuries which caused death in a few minutes.

 

SCRIBNER (Brockville) March 23 - The inquest on the death of J.N. Scribner, who was shot under such distressing circumstances near North Augusta, on Monday night, was opened last night by Coroner Vaux. The deceased was shot in the abdomen, the ball passing through a portion of the spine. It was extracted from the hip. Scribner could not have survived over five or eight minutes after he fell.


William Pear, who fired the fatal shot was arrested some time after the tragedy, and produced at the inquest by a constable. He testified that he came home about 11 o’clock that night. He heard the rap at the door about an hour later. His sister was the first to hear the noise. She asked twice who was there, but got no response. Then Pear shouted at the top of his voice several times, but the man at the door made no audible response. Scribner continued talking and kicking the door, and Pear thought he would kick the door in. Pear said that he would put a bullet through him if he did not answer. He thought it was the work of a tramp, and going down stairs procured a rifle. Then ascending the stairs again he gave him a few more chances to make his identity known. The deceased not responding, Pear drew his rifle and shot through the door. Scribner screamed as he fell, but Pear retired to rest without going outside to see what he had done. Pear thought Scribner to be a tramp. Testimony was given about Scribner being very deaf.

The jury returned a verdict that Scribner came to his death by a shot fired from a gun in the hands of William Pear.

The prisoner was immediately charged with manslaughter by he crown, and preliminary investigation was opened shortly afterwards before Messers. Joynt, and Bellamy. Pear will unquestionably be committed for trial.

The tragedy has resulted in the prisoner coming in for some sharp criticism.

 

SWITZER (Lindsay) March 23 - Word was received here this afternoon from G.W. Rose, who is in charge of the government works at Bottle creek, Peterboro county, that a sad drowning accident occurred there on Sunday morning last. Three young brothers, named Switzer, were crossing lake Ketchum to visit the government camp when one of the boys, named Henry, broke through the ice. The brothers tried to pull him out, but in their efforts one of them also broke through. The remaining one screamed for help and his cries were heard by the government men, who were working in the woods. They ran to the spot, and soon four of them were also struggling in the icy waters. Fortunately, after the determined efforts of those remaining on the ice all were rescued but young Henry Switzer, who had sunk just as the men arrived.

 

JACKSON (Fulton) - The funeral of Wilson Jackson took place on Tuesday, March 15, the remains having being brought from Buffalo to the residence of his uncle, David Jackson, South Grimsby, from where the cortege wended its way to the family burying ground at Abingdon. The services at the house were conducted by Rev. Mr. Grier, of Buffalo, and at the church by Rev. Mr. Caldwell, of Ker circuit, the services throughout being very impressive. Deceased was nineteen years of age, and had a bright future before him, as he had just finished his school days and was entering upon a career of usefulness when he was stricken with appendicitis. All that medical skill could do was of no avail. Much sympathy is extended to the bereaved family in its hour of trial by the old neighbours amongst whom they formerly resided.

 

WELLS (Brockville) March 23 - William A. Wells died in the general hospital here today. Deceased was 25 years old. When a child he suffered from inflammation of the eyes, and became blind. After having secured an excellent education at Brantford Institute for the Blind, he adopted music for a profession. He was organist of St. John’s church at the time of his illness. He was the second son of William Wells, who for many years was Grand Trunk station agent here.

 

BUTLER - The body of the Grand River ferryman, George Butler, who was drowned on March 17, 1897, was by a curious coincidence found on March 17 of this year. The body was in a wonderful state of preservation, considering the length of time it had been in the water. It was found near McKelvey’s flats.

 

Friday, March 25, 1898

 

McARTHUR - At New York, March 24, of pneumonia James McArthur, in his 51st year. Funeral Saturday at 3:30 p.m. from 54 Erie avenue. Private.


A telegram was received here last night from New York announcing the death of James McArthur of the old firm of McArthur & Middleton. The deceased was born here 51 years ago, and will be remembered by many citizens, particularly the old timers. He was formerly a member of the Thirteenth battalion, accompanying it to Ridgeway in 1866. He was also a member of the service company at Prescott. In 1870 he was a member of the Wolseley expedition to the Red River acting as orderly clerk. When he returned to Hamilton he went into business with J.T. Middleton, as hat, fur, and marble dealers. About twelve or thirteen years ago the firm was dissolved, and Mr. McArthur went to Toronto, where he went into partnership with Mr. Gowanlock. The deceased went to New York several years ago. He leaves a widow and two children. The body will be brought here for interment.

 

LESTER - On Thursday, March 24, 1898, James Lester, a native of Yorkshire, England, in the 82nd year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 297 John st. north, on Sunday at 2 p.m.

James Lester, who has lived in Hamilton for 63 years, died at his home, 297 John st. north, last night after a brief illness. Mr. Lester was 91 years of age, and was twice married. He leaves a widow and several children, one son being over 60 years of age. Deceased was a member of Christ Church cathedral, and in politics was a stalwart Conservative.

 

MARTIN - At her late residence, No,. 206 James street south, on Friday, 25th, March, Margaret, beloved wife of Hubert Martin, aged 55 years. Funeral Sunday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. Please omit flowers.

Mrs. Margaret Martin, wife of Hubert Martin, leather merchant, died this morning after a lengthy illness. She was 55 years of age, and had resided in the city since 1858. The deceased leaves two sons, William and Charles. The funeral will take place on Sunday at 3:30, from 206 James street south.

 

McLEAN - A.G. McLean, a Toronto barrister, died at Strathroy Wednesday evening, aged 34.Consumption was the cause of death.

 

COVINGTON (Toronto) March 25 - William Covington, a man about 65, whose family reside in Stouffville, but who, with a daughter, had been living in Claremont for two years, died suddenly at the latter place under suspicious circumstances. Dr. Brodie, the physician who was called, arrived just after he died, and hearing the description of his death and from the condition of the body was satisfied that he had died from strychnine poisoning. He made deposition before Coroner Eastwood, that in his opinion an inquest was necessary.

The result of the post-mortem examination of the body and the examination of the contents of the stomach, and the circumstances attending his death, clearly established death from strychnine.The man was not one who would be likely to commit suicide, being of a cheerful disposition.

The jury wished an adjournment to secure more information before coming to a decision, as they had no evidence of who administered the poison. It was proved that somebody, at the present unknown, called at his place and death took place a few hours afterwards.

 


WHITE (Waldemar, Dufferin county) March 24 - The death occurred yesterday of Samuel White, as the result of an accident he sustained the day previous, while getting off a C.P.R. train. White went to Waldemar station to bid goodbye to a friend. The train pulled out of the station and White rode along with the intention of dropping off near his home. He was on the steps of the car, and attempted to alight when he came to the crossing. The train had gained a lot of speed, and White was thrown outward. He held on with his hand and his feet were then drawn towards the wheels.When he let go he was struck by the truck of the car, and was rolled along side into the ditch. He was carried home, where a doctor examined him and found that his skull was fractured, and his back and ribs broken. He lingered until yesterday when he died.

 

Saturday, March 26, 1898

 

INGLEHART - At Burlington on March 25, Sylvester Inglehart, aged 68 years. Funeral from his late residence, Monday at 2 p.m. Interment in Greenwood cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

LISTER - On Thursday, March 24, 1898, James Lister, a native of Yorkshire, England, in the 82nd year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 297 John st. north, on Sunday, at 2 p.m.

 

MARTIN - At her late residence, No 206 James street south, on Friday, 25th March, Margaret, beloved wife of Hubert Martin, aged 56 years. Funeral Sunday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. Please omit flowers.

 

CHILDS - In Woodstock, on the 26th of March, Annie Louise, beloved wife of George Childs. Funeral from Stuart street depot, on Monday, at 12:15, to Lake church, Beach road. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

FENTON - On Saturday morning, March 26th, 1898, Charles Delmar, only son of Alfred and Teenie Fenton, aged 1 year, and 6 months. Funeral Monday, at 2 p.m. from the residence near the Valley Inn.

 

LOVELL - At his late residence, 46 Murray st. east, on Saturday, 26th March, 1898, A.B. Lovell, aged 67 years, and 6 months. Funeral Tuesday 29th inst., at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

A.R. Lovell, an old and respected Grand Trunk employee, died this morning between 7 and 8 o’clock, at his home 46 Murray st. east. Deceased, who had been employed as clerk in the claims department for 23 years, was taken ill while in his office about a week ago. It was feared he was dying then, but medical care brought him round, and there were hopes for his ultimate recovery. He, however, became worse, and death came today from heart failure.

Deceased was 67 years of age, and leaves three sons - Henry, Niagara Falls, and John, and Ernest, San Francisco, and one daughter. The funeral will take place next Tuesday afternoon.

 

MOFFATT - In Tapleytown, on March 25, Sarah Moffatt, in her 72nd year. Funeral Monday the 28th, at 1:30 o’clock to Presbyterian cemetery, Mount Albion. Friends will please accept this notice.

 


McARTHUR - The remains of James McArthur, who died in New York, arrived in the city this morning, and were taken to the residence of Mrs. Crisp, 54 Erie avenue. The funeral took place this afternoon. At 2:30 a service was held, conducted by Rev. W.L. Rutledge, and the cortege proceeded to the city cemetery. The pall-bearers were: John McArthur, brother of deceased, and J.K. Stewart, Toronto; Alfred Crisp, William Eccleston, Hugh Murray, and S.H. Kent, brothers-in-law.

 

Monday, March 28, 1898

 

LOVELL - At his late residence, 46 Murray street east, on Saturday 26th, March, 1898, A.R. Lovell, aged 67 years, and 5 months. Funeral Tuesday, 29th, inst., at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

RITTENBERG - On Monday March 28th, 1898, Frankie, infant son of O.B. Rittenberg, aged 7 months, and 7 days. Funeral from 25 Park st. south, at 10 a.m., Tuesday, private.

 

DONOVAN - On Monday evening, March 28th, Sarah, beloved wife of Cornelius Donovan, in the 58th year of her age. Funeral Wednesday morning at 8:30 o’clock from her late residence, 193 York st. to St. Mary’s cathedral thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends please accept this intimation.

 

LEBAR (Toronto) March 28 - Maggie Lebar, a pretty nineteen-year- old girl, who came from Port Perry a few months ago, is lying dead in the caretaker’s apartments at the Manchester building, 29-33 Melinda street, having accidentally taken a quantity of morphine, thinking it was quinine.

Miss Lebar was employed as a domestic servant by caretaker Canben, the man who had such a narrow escape from death, in the Osgoody fire, and whose wife was so fearfully injured by her slide down the wires from the top story.

Since the fire, Mrs. Caban had to take morphine. She died a short time ago, and a number of the morphine powders were left in the bureau drawer. On Friday night, Miss Lebar was suffering from a cold, and on retiring about 11 o’clock took one of the powders, thinking it was quinine. Shortly before midnight, Mr. Caban heard loud breathing and went to the girl’s room. He was greatly alarmed at her condition and for over an hour tried to arouse her. At 2 o’clock Saturday morning, Dr. Hooper of Brunswick avenue was summoned, and assisted by his son endeavoured to resuscitate the girl. Their efforts proved fruitless and Miss Lebar died at 6 o’clock. Dr. Hooper found some of the powder on the floor and discovered it to be morphine.

 

KRIBSS - The funeral of Louis P. Kribss took place at Hespeler.

 

SAVAGE - Mrs. Savage, relict of the late Rev. David Savage died at her residence in Tillsonburg, Sunday evening, after an illness of some weeks.

 

WINDATT - Richard Windatt, town clerk of Bowmanville died Sunday night in his 77th year, after nearly two years illness, from kidney disease.

 

SKIPPEN - Thomas R. Skippen, superintendent of Toronto water works stores, is dead, 64 years of age. He was prominent in Orange and Sons of England circles.

 

 


Tuesday, March 29, 1898

 

EVANS - Died on March 29th, Catharine Evans, wife of Reese Evans, 38 Caroline st. north, aged 62 years. Funeral on Thursday at 4 p.m., from her late residence.

Mrs. Reese Evans passed suddenly away this morning, at her residence, 38 Caroline st. north. Mrs. Evans had been in poor health for several years and suffered from heart disease. Mr. Evans went to work in the house next door during the morning, and on returning home about noon found his wife lying dead on the floor. Mrs. Evans who was a lovable and highly esteemed woman leaves besides Mr. Evans, a daughter, Mrs. Makins, and two sons - Daniel Mitchell and Charles A. Mitchell of the Spectator staff. The funeral will take place on Thursday afternoon.

 

DONOVAN - On Monday morning, March 28th, Sarah, beloved wife of Cornelius Donovan, in the 68th year of her age. Funeral Wednesday morning at 8:30 o’clock from her late residence 123 York street, to St. Mary’s cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends pleas accept this intimation.

 

LOVELL - The funeral of the late A R. Lovell, took place this afternoon from his late residence, 46 Murray street east, to the city cemetery. It was largely attended. Rev. C.E. Whitcombe, conducted the religious services. The pall-bearers were, Joseph Wallace, R.B. Leslie, R.W. Gray, - Wells, W.G. Webster, P. Nelson, John Hall, and F. Bradley.

 

McNEIL (Chesley, Ont.) March 28 - This afternoon a boy named Samuel Ralph McNeil, aged fifteen years, a son of Rev. Mr. McNeil, of this place, was drowned by the upsetting of a small sail boat. He and his companion, a son of Joseph McNeil, manager of Elliott & Co’s bank, were out having a sail on Mr. Fenson’s mill pond. There was a strong wind blowing at the time and losing control of their sails, the boat was turned over, and bother were thrown into the water. His companion succeeded in reaching the shore, but Samuel Ralph sank to his death. His body was recovered about half and hour afterwards.

 

MILLER (Chatham, Ont.) March 28 - While working in the bush in Chatham township today, William Miller, eighteen years of age, was instantly killed. Deceased and his brother were cutting the cord wood and were in the act of felling a tree when a branch struck the young man on the head, fracturing his skull. He only lived a few minutes. He was the son of Walter Miller, a well-known farmer of Chatham township.

 

BURNS - William Robert Burns, one of Parkdale’s pioneer residents, died yesterday aged 77 years.

 

YOUNG - Miss Esther Young, of Peterborough, threw herself in the river and was swept away. She was in poor health and despondent.

 

KING - Capt. Bernard King, of St. Catharines, died yesterday. He had only been ill a few days with pneumonia and was over 82 years of age.

 


ANDREWS (Grimsby) March 29 - The funeral of Marjorie Andrews took place on Monday at St. Andrew’s church and was very largely attended. The family has the sympathy of the entire community in this sudden and sad bereavement.

 

Wednesday, March 30, 1898

 

EVANS - Died on March 29th, Catharine Evans, wife of Reese Evans, 38 Caroline st. north, aged

62 years. Funeral on Thursday at 4 p.m. from her late residence.

 

ORR - This morning at the residence of her parents, Irene May, youngest daughter of William and Mary Ann Orr, aged 13 years, and 3 months. Funeral from 166 ½ Main st. east, at 2 p.m. Friday. Friends will pleas accept this intimation.

 

CLARK - In this city on Wednesday March 30, John Thomas Clark, aged 31 years. Funeral will take place from his late residence, 201 Picton street on Friday at 2:30, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please this intimation.

 

WHITNEY - Charles M. Whitney, plumber of Woodstock, is dead age 50 years.

 

CLANCY - Jacob Clancy, a well connected and highly respected farmer at Camden township, living two miles north of Newburgh, Ontario, committed suicide by hanging himself in his own barn.

 

CAMPBELL - Thomas Campbell, aged about 56, a farmer living on the outskirts of Ottawa, hanged himself early yesterday morning. The only cause assigned is that he had a bad attack of biliousness.

 

Thursday, March 31, 1898

 

MARTIN - At his son’s residence 18 Albert road, on March 30, Thomas Martin of Barton, on the mountain, aged 68 years, formerly of Plymouth, Devonshire, England. Service at the Church of the Ascension on Friday at 2:30 p.m. Funeral private.

 

CLARK - In this city on Wednesday March 30, John Thomas Clark, aged 31 years. Funeral will take place from his late residence, 201 Picton street, on Friday at 2:30, to Hamilton Cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

O’DONNELL- At 109 Wentworth st. south, on March 31, Patrick Joseph O’Donnell, aged 58 years. Funeral private.

 

MULLEN - A dam on the Buckshot creek, near Levant, Ontario broke yesterday. One lumber man, J. Mullen, was drowned, and three were badly injured by being caught by the logs and swept through the break.

 

HATT (Toronto) March 31 - Lying at the F.W. Mathews undertaking establishment, Queen st. west, is the body of Charles Hatt, a handsome tall and well-built of about 21 years of age. The story of his death is a sad one, and little is known of his history.


About two weeks ago, Hatt, had for some time being residing at Guelph, left that city for Middleton, N.S. the home of his people. He purchased a ticket for Toronto, which left him without further funds, how he intended to reach his eastern destination will never be known.

On his way to this city, he was taken seriously ill, and was in such a condition when he arrived at Union station that the ambulance was summoned, and he was taken to the general hospital.

While at the hospital, Hatt wrote to his friends, but no communication was received from them until after the young man had died. Hence the body lay at the hospital a week before it was claimed.

Yesterday the remains were removed to Mathew’s establishment. The firm has received a telegram from Middleton, asking them to embalm the body, and forward to the deceased’s late home.

Nothing is known of Hatt prior to his illness.

 

Friday, April 1, 1898

 

HARRIS - George E. Harris, born at Cedarville, N.J. April 11, 1836, died in Philadelphia, Pen. March 17, 1898.Buried in Bridgeton, N.J. March 29, 1898.

 

BLOOM (Glencoe, Ont.) March 31 - About half-past-four this afternoon Jacob Bloom of this village was instantly killed by being thrown upon the saw in his own sawmill, near the C.P.R. station at North Glencoe. He had raised up a board, the end of which caught in the flywheel, throwing him back upon the saw. He was thrown about 30 feet, his body being badly mutilated.

 

SMART - John Smart, for 36 years, employed on the Northern railway, died yesterday at Collingwood, after four years illness, leaving a widow, three sons, and two daughters. He was highly respected.

 

LENNON - Winnifred Lennon, the five-year-old daughter of M. Lennon, a farmer living near Maidstone, was drowned yesterday by falling into a well. The child was on her way home after school, and in crossing a slippery path near an old disused well lost her footing in some way and

fell in.

 

MORLEY ( Bismarck) - Mrs. Morley, of St. Ann’s, died on Saturday March 26th. She will be missed by many friends. She was very much respected by the community.

 

INGLEHART (Kilbride) - Mrs. J.J. Fields is in Burlington attending the funeral of her uncle Mr. Inglehart.

 

McARTHUR - J. McArthur, 105 Cannon street east, who stood at the graveside of his brother James last Saturday, was called to Toronto yesterday by the death of his brother Henry McArthur, who died rather suddenly. Deceased who was 47 years old, formerly lived here and had been in poor health. He attended his brother’s funeral on Saturday, and was quite ill then. The funeral took place this afternoon from 105 Cannon st. east.

 

Saturday, April 2, 1898

 


MURRAY - On April 1st, of pneumonia, Edward Gordon Murray, aged 1 year and 4 months. Funeral from his parents residence 171 York st. at 2 o’clock Sunday afternoon.

 

MOORE - On March 31st, at general hospital, Buffalo, Parker Keith Moore, eldest son of J.H. Moore, formerly of Hamilton, aged 16 years, 8 months, and 13 days. Funeral Sunday afternoon from Centenary church at 4 o’clock.

 

DUBLIN - In this city on April 1st, 1898, Elizabeth Dublin, relict of the late J. Dublin, in the 65th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence 52 Augusta street, to St. Paul’s A.M.E. church, 2:30 p.m. on Monday. Interment at Burlington cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SILVER (Halifax, N.S.) March 31 - Elizabeth, daughter of the late Thomas Silver, of this city and beloved wife of William Silver jr. of Halifax. Funeral from 369 John st. north, on Tuesday, April 5th, at 2:30 p.m.

 

DEACON (Toronto) April 2 - At 4:30 yesterday afternoon a fierce fire broke out in the factory of George H. Hees, Son’s & Co., at 276 Davenport road. Owing to the strong west wind, the flames rapidly spread to a row of brick houses adjoining the building, doing damage in all to the amount of $40,000 which is only partly covered by insurance.

The factory was a four story brick building 40 by 250 feet long, and was used by Hees & Company in manufacturing of window shade cloth, poles and trimmings.

About 50 hands were in the building at the time the fire broke out, by all escaped unhurt.

The fire started in the pole department in the basement near the engine, and the first to discover was the foreman who heard someone calling “fire” from the outside.

The Yorkville of the brigade was speedily on the scene, but could do little to any effect. On the arrival of the Waterous and Ronald engines, the fire was soon under control, and the houses on the east side saved from being totally destroyed.

Shortly after the arrival of the engines, a branch and six men were put at work on the west side of the burning factory. This proved a fatal spot, for a shed at the north west corner took fire and while working on this west wall of the factory fell out, caving in the roof of the shed, which fell near the men, badly injuring five of them, and a streetcar conductor who was lending a hand and killing Thomas Deacon, was one of the firemen.

Deacon was completely covered by the fallen wall and as soon as he was missed his comrades started to dig him out, which took nearly half an hour, for the bricks were so hot that the men had to play water on them, while they continued their mournful work.

When taken out the body had been dead for some time. Deceased leaves a widow and two children.

Doctors F.C. Hood, of Spadina avenue, Parsons, of Bloor street, and E.E. King were quickly on the scene and attended the injured men until the ambulance could remove them to their homes, while the body of the dead fireman was taken in the patrol wagon to the undertaking establishment of R. Humphrey.

The houses that were damaged by the fire and water were 255, 260, 242, 262, 264, 266, 268, and 278 Davenport road. These as well as the factory were owned by the Ontario Loan and Investment company. All were occupied save 260, which has been vacant for some time.

 


Monday, April 4, 1898

 

ROSE - At Cleveland Ohio, on April 3, Flossie, youngest daughter of John and Nellie Rose, aged 4 years and 8 months. Funeral on Tuesday at 3 p.m. from 60 Vine street. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WALDRON - In this city, April 3rd, Thomas Waldron. Funeral from his son’s residence ,L.W. Waldron, 7 Emerald st. south, Tuesday at 2 p.m., to G.T.R. Stuart st. station. Interment at London, Wednesday afternoon. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

ENGLISH - On April 4, Ruby Alexandria, only daughter of A.R. and M.A. English, aged 5 years, 8 months, and 30 days. Funeral from the family residence 276 Victoria avenue north, on Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

WILLIAMS (Columbus, Ohio) - On Sunday April 3, 1898, of typhoid fever Emma, wife of W.J. Williams, and youngest daughter of the late James Jolly.

 

THOMPSON (Lucknow, Ont.) April 4 - Adam Thompson, a member of the village council, died yesterday very suddenly. He leaves a widow and large family.

 

MATHIE (Lucknow, Ont.) - Thomas Mathie, an old resident of this village died suddenly yesterday. He leaves a widow and family. Heart failure is supposed to have caused the death.

 

ORTON - Arthur Orton, the Tichborne claimant, died in London.

 

McKEON - Maude McKeon, of London, who was so badly burned Friday night, died Sunday.

 

HARRIS - Five weeks ago Carrie May, daughter of Ira V. Harris, of London, received a bad fall from the effects of which she died Sunday.

 

HENDERSON - Henry Henderson, photographer, Kingston, died Saturday night, aged 62 years. He had been a sufferer for some months, with kidney affection.

 

JOHNSTON - William Johnston died Saturday at Burlington after suffering nearly two years with consumption. Mr. Johnston was 58 years of age, and for years had been a member and officer of the grand Orange lodge of the village.

 

DYNES - Mrs. Dynes, wife of John Dynes, died at the Beach yesterday. She had been ill ten days. The deceased was 62 years of age.

 

HOWITT - Mrs. Jane Howitt, relict of the late Henry Howitt, of Guelph, and mother of Rev. F.E. Howitt, of this city, died yesterday at her residence, Homewood.

 


MOORE - The funeral of the late Parker Keith Moore, formerly of this city whose death occurred in Buffalo on Thursday last, after a brief attack of typhoid fever, took place from the Centenary church yesterday afternoon, and was attended by a large gathering of sorrowing friends. Prior to his removal from the city some months ago, deceased was a member of Centenary church, and took an active interest in the work of the Sunday school. He was also secretary of the Epworth league, in connection with that church. The Sunday school held a short session yesterday and there was a large attendance of the members at the funeral. Rev. Dr. Smith conducted the services, and Joseph Greene, the superintendent of the school, delivered an address, touching the early death of the young man, whose gentle but manly nature had won the love and respect of all who knew him, and whose brief but exemplary life would long exert and influence for good for those who mourned his loss. Many beautiful floral offerings decorated the casket and filled the church with their fragrance. At the conclusion of the impressive service, and as the remains were being carried down the aisle, L.H. Parker played the Dead March in Saul. The pall-bearers were; Fred Griffith, F.D. Robinson, Norma Jones, F.M. Robinson, A.H. Ward, and Harry Pratt.

During his residence in the city deceased was a member of the Thirteenth battalion.

 

HARTWELL - Joel Hartwell, blacksmith, of Hannon, died this morning after a very brief illness. He became ill on Friday, suffering from typhoid pneumonia, deceased was 34 years of age, and was born and had lived most of his life in that locality, the widow, who is the daughter of Ira Horning, and three young children mourn the loss of a fond husband and father. The funeral will take place to the family burying ground at Trinity Church on Wednesday afternoon. Mr. Hartwell was insured in the K.O.T.M. for $2,000.

 

Tuesday, April 5, 1898

 

DYNES - At her late residence, Burlington Beach, on Sunday April 3rd, at 1:30 p.m., of pneumonia, Mary, beloved wife of John Dynes, in her 53rd year. Funeral on Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

McCABE (Kleinburg) April 4 - A farmer from Bolton, named Alexander McCabe, died on the C.P.R. train just after boarding this morning. McCabe had hurried to get to the station in time and it is thought that the excitement had its effects on his heart.

 

TUTTLE (London) April 4 - At 8 o’clock this evening the Coroner’s jury which investigated the killing of James Tuttle brought in a verdict that William D. Emerson had done the shooting while under great provocation and in self defence. The verdict of the jury is as follows; “we find the death was caused by a pistol shot received at the hands of William D. Emerson, while said Emerson was under great provocation and in a great state excitement and in self-defence.” The verdict was unanimous and meets with general approval.

The evidence given before Coroner Flock today merely corroborated the details of the tragedy already published. It was sworn that Tuttle, after refusing to pay Emerson, applied a very uncomplimentary name to him, and followed it up by a blow. Emerson was already much worried by the loss of a purse which contained all his ready money, and left him and his family depended upon what he could secure from the manager. From the evidence it was shown that Tuttle was of a hasty disposition and when his temper gained control he lost his head.

The police court investigation was continued this morning when Actor Wesley told his story of the killing. The hearing will be resumed tomorrow.


(Brantford, Ont.) April 4 - The funeral of the late James Tuttle, who was shot in London music hall took place this afternoon from his father’s residence here, the American hotel. It was very largely attended. The funeral service was conducted by Rev. J. Schofield, pastor of the Congregational church.

 

DOYLE - Mrs. Doyle, mother of James Doyle, grocer, James st. north, died last night. She had been a resident of Hamilton for a number of years.

 

WILSON(Zimmerman) April 5 - A very sudden death occurred here yesterday forenoon. John Wilson, townline, a highly respected farmer while working around his barn, suddenly expired in the presence of his son. Death is thought to have resulted from heart disease.

 

Wednesday, April 6, 1898

 

COPE - At her son-in-law’s residence, No. 90 Hunter street west, on Tuesday, 5th April, Ruth Cope, late of Copetown, aged 90 years. Funeral service at the house Thursday morning at 9 o’clock. Funeral private. Interment at Copetown.

Mrs. Cope died last night at the residence of her son-in-law, John Kerner, 90 Hunter street west. The deceased was 90 years of age. The body will be taken to Copetown for interment. That village was named after her husband’s father.

 

SHAVER - On Tuesday, April 5, 1898, John B. Shaver, aged 73 years. The funeral will take place from his late residence, in the township of Barton, on Friday at 2:30 p.m. Interment in Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will accept this intimation.

 

SLAUGHTER - In this city on April 5th, 1898, John Slaughter, 28th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 56 Mulberry st., on Friday, April 8th, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice. Toronto and Guelph papers please copy.

 

Thursday, April 7, 1898

 

DICKENSIN - At his late residence, No. 408 James st. north, on Wednesday, 6th April, Thomas Dickensin, in his 83rd year. Funeral Friday at 2:30 p.m. (Private).

Thomas Dickensin, an old resident, died yesterday afternoon at 408 James st. north. He was 83 years of age.

 

LAMONT - The funeral of Mrs. L. Lamont, sister of Mrs. George F. Clark, of this city, took place at Guelph yesterday. The deceased died on the train while on her way to Guelph.

 

DYNES - There was a large attendance at the funeral of Mrs. Dynes, wife of John Dynes, of the Beach yesterday. The body was taken from the Beach to Hamilton cemetery, being followed to the grave by a number of sorrowing relatives and friends. There were many beautiful floral offerings. The religion services at the house and grave were conducted by Rev. C.E. Belt, of Stony Creek. The pallbearers were; Joseph Latz, E. Williams, John Taafe, R. Taafe, Daniel McGwynn, Henry Freed, John Thomas, and Lewis Bates.

 


LATHAM (Hagersville) - John Latham, of Walpole, died on Tuesday morning after an illness of several weeks. Deceased was a father of Mrs. A. Dalgleish, Tuscarora street, who has the sympathy of the entire community in her sad bereavement.

 

CHRYSLER (St. George) - Lewis E. Chrysler, aged 22, son of E.H. Chrysler, died on Friday last, and was buried in the Methodist cemetery on Monday.

 

Saturday, April 9, 1898

 

SEMMENS - At No. 462 King st. west, on Saturday April 8th, Marjorie, daughter of Thomas Semmens, aged 28 years. Funeral Monday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BURNS - At 298 Victoria ave. north, on 9th inst., Margaret, beloved wife of William Burns, aged 65 years. Funeral notice later.

 

FENTON (Toronto) April 9 - A fatal runaway occurred yesterday morning, by which William J. Fenton, a partner in the well-known firm of College st. dentists, Patterson & Fenton, lost his life.

Mr. Fenton took advantage of the bright spring weather and went for a drive accompanied by his partner’s wife, Mrs. Patterson. On reaching the corner of Queen and Simcoe streets, the horse bolted at the approach of the Toronto Railway company’s sprinkler, and soon after started on the mad dash toward Yonge street. At Elizabeth street the wheel of the vehicle struck the curbing, and the rig upset throwing the occupants out. Mrs. Patterson had a miraculous escape, but Mr. Fenton’s head struck the curbing and he became unconscious. It was soon seen that he had received serious injuries, and Doctor Garrett of Bay street, was called and had the injured man removed to his home, 169 College street. At 11:00 o’clock death relieved the injured man’s sufferings.

Death was caused by a fracture of the base of the skull. Deceased was a prominent citizen and was a follower of the Christian Scientists.

 

FRAME(Toronto) April 9 - Holiday travellers who left Toronto at 5:10 last evening for Peterborough had their spirits dampened in a fatality which occurred on the C.P.R. tracks at Wexford crossing, but a few minutes before the train reached that point.

A Canadian Pacific freight train coming into Toronto struck a young boy who was crossing the track on horseback and going towards Wexford.

When the train was brought to a stand it was seen that both the boy and horse had been instantly killed.

It was some time before the unfortunate lad was identified, but he proved to be John Frame, aged fifteen years, son of Alexander Frame, a veterinary surgeon of Wexford. He had been to the Wexford post office, and was returning when he met his death.

The unfortunate lad tried to hurriedly cross the tracks.

 

SHAVER - The funeral of Mrs. Shaver, of Barton, took place yesterday and was attended by a large number of residents of the township.

 

SLAUGHTER - The funeral of the late John Slaughter took place yesterday and was largely attended. The pallbearers were; John Leander, Albert and Frederick Slaughter, sons of the deceased, Wm Smith, grandson, and C.H. Bollen, Guelph, son-in-law. The services were conducted by Rev. J.L. Gilmour.


Monday, April 11, 1898

 

BURNS - At her late residence, No. 229 Victoria ave. north, on April 9th, Margaret, beloved wife of William Burns. Funeral Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation. Kindly omit flowers.

 

JACQUES - At 107 Cannon st. on Sunday afternoon, Robert Wesley, only son of Joshua S. and Martha Jacques, aged 14 months, and 21 days. Funeral from above address Tuesday afternoon at 4 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MURRAY - In this city, on Saturday April 9, John A. eldest and beloved son of James and Annie Murray, in the 31st year of his age, printer. Funeral will leave his parents’ residence, 298 Ferguson ave. north, on Tuesday morning, at 8:30, to St. Mary’s cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

John A. Murray, a printer, died on Saturday night at his parents’ residence at the corner of Robert street and Ferguson avenue. The deceased was 31 years of age, and was employed on the Times and Tribune. He went from Hamilton to Chicago, and from there to New York. He was taken ill about a year ago and came home.

A meeting of the Hamilton Typographical union will be held tonight to arrange about attending the funeral.

 

WALKER - At her late residence, corner Hildred and Gilkinson streets, on Monday morning, 11th April, Helen Walker, wife of William Walker. Funeral Tuesday at 2 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this information.

 

MULLIN - At the Homestead, No. 198 Main st. east., on Monday, 11th April, David Farley Mullin, son of the late James Mullin, aged 56 years. Funeral, private, at 4 p.m.

David Mullin, well-known in the city, and owner of the John hotel building, John st. s., died yesterday at the residence of his brother-in-law, Myles Hunting, Main st. east.

 

MILLER - On April 10, at the residence of his sister, Mrs. J.W. Horning, George Miller, in his 36th year. Funeral from the above address, Tuesday at 3 o’clock to Millgrove cemetery.

 

BLACK (Almonte, Ont.) April 11 - Gilbert Black, six years old, has been missing since Saturday morning. His cap was found in the river, and it is feared he has been drowned, but so far efforts to find the body have failed. His mother is a widow, and he was her only child.

 

FLOODY (Kingston) April 10 - Word has been received from the West that Alex Floody, who left Kingston about a month ago to work on the Crow’s Nest Pass railroad, was shot and killed by a fellow-workman about a week ago. Floody was well known in Kingston, and his widow is still living in the city. He was an ex-county constable.

 


CHILDS (Wallaceburg) April 10 - William Childs, about 21 years of age, was drowned by falling off the barge Effort. Childs was working on the Effort, and on their trip from Detroit from this place before leaving the Snye, coming into the creek, Childs was in the act of dipping a pail of water, when he fell into the water. Deceased was an Englishman, and had only been out in this country a short time. He hailed from the vicinity of Dresden.

 

Tuesday, April 12, 1898

 

MULLIN - At the Homestead, No. 196 Main st. east, on Monday 11th April, David Farley Mullin, son of the late James Mullin, aged 56 years. Funeral, private, at 4 p.m. Wednesday.

 

HIGH - At his late residence, corner Mary and Rebecca streets, on Monday, 11th April, 1898, Matthew High, aged 60 years, and 9 months. Funeral Wednesday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MURRAY - There was a large attendance at the funeral of John A. Murray this morning.

 

HILLMAN - G.L. Hillman, of Toronto, whose daughter, Naomi, a young girl of 13, died on the train last week, while on the way home from the south, is well-known in Hamilton, and his many friends extend to him their sincere sympathy bereavement. The funeral took place yesterday and was very largely attended. The floral tributes were exceptionally numerous and beautiful, Miss Hillman having being a great favourite with all who knew her.

 

MURPHY (Prescott, Ont.) April 11 - A sad shooting accident occurred here today. Four young boys named Horwood, White, West, and Murphy, all from town, went down to Spencer’s island shooting duck this morning. One of the boys saw some ducks, but the range was too far to shoot, and laid the gun down in the boat with his trigger raised. Young West was bailing out the boat, when it gave a lurch, and the gun went off, completely shattering Harry Murphy’s leg near the thigh. He was brought to shore, but died from loss of blood before medical aid could reach him.Murphy was a son of John Murphy, customs officer.

 

YATES - Mrs. W.S. Yates, an old and much respected resident of Belleville, died yesterday morning, aged 68.

 

McMULLEN - John McMullen, of Belleville, who has been ill for about six months, is dead, at the age of 72 years.

 

INSLEY - Aaron Insley, a life-long resident of Bloomfield, Ont., died suddenly yesterday morning of heart failure, aged 70.

 

READ - Charles Read, a well-known farmer, of Sydney, son of Edwin Read, and nephew of the late Senator Read, passed away at the age of 40 years.

 

KENNY - A dispatch from Lethbridge, says that M.J. Kenny, of Elmvale, Ont., died at the hospital on Saturday. This is the fourth victim of the Crow’s Nest Pass railway bridge disaster. The other patients are doing favourably.

 

Wednesday, April 13, 1898

 


HESSE - At her late residence, 117 Hunter st. east, on Tuesday, April 12th, Dorothy, widow of the late Peter Hesse, in her 84th year. Funeral on Thursday at 2 p.m. Interment at Presbyterian church yard near Ryckman’s Corners. Funeral private.

 

MONK - In this city, on April 13th, at her late residence, 118 Locke st. north, Catharine Aitchinson, beloved wife of Wm. Monk. Funeral notice later. Kelso papers please copy.

Mrs. Monk, wife of Tax Collector Monk, died this morning. She had been ill off and on, for some time. The deceased was an estimable lady and was well known in the West end. In times of trouble she gave her sympathy and assistance. When the old Central Fair was held she had charge of the directors dining hall. Besides Mr. Monk, she leaves four sons, and a daughter.

 

CAMPBELL - Capt. H. Campbell, the well-known commander of the Beaver line steamer Lake Ontario, died at sea on April 2.

 

AIKMAN - Alexander Aikman, for many years a prominent citizen of Halton county, died at the home of his daughter at London. Mr. Aikman was in his 77th year.

 

STRONG - Robbie, a five-year-old-son of Rev. J.L. Strong, of Sour Springs, Tuscarora reserve, formerly of St. Jude’s church, Toronto, was drowned in a cistern at his home Tuesday afternoon.

 

TERRY (Bowmanville, Ont.) April 12 - A sad accident here today on the farm of M. Burk, south of the town, whereby Louis Terry, aged sixteen, lost his life. The boy was driving a team attached to a field roller, when he fell off, the roller passing over his body, breaking his ribs, and rupturing his heart. Just how the accident happened may never be known, but it is thought that he dropped one of the lines and reaching for it fell, and the roller passed over him. Not coming into dinner, another brother went out to the field and found him lying here quite dead, and the horses standing nearby.

 

HIGH - The funeral of Matthew High took place this afternoon from his late residence at the

corner of Rebecca and Mary streets, and was largely attended. Members of Eureka council, Chosen Friends, and Osborne lodge, Sons of England, were present. The pallbearers were; Wm  Stewart, Fred Aldrich, and W. Weir, of Eureka council, and George Kemp, James Maynard, and W. Wilkinson, of Osborne lodge. The religious services were conducted by Rev. W. H. Wade of the Church of the Ascension.

 

BURNS - After an illness of over two years, Margaret D. Burns passed quietly and peacefully at the residence of her husband, 223 Victoria avenue north, on Saturday, April 9, at 2:15 p.m. The deceased was born in the North of Ireland and was 65 years of age. She was a faithful and earnest Christian being an active member of the Centenary Methodist church, and an earnest member of the W.C.T.U.; a kind, loving mother, and a faithful and affectionate wife. Among those who will miss her genial smile and kind words are William Burns, her sorrowing husband; Robert Burns, pastor of Simcoe street Methodist church, of this city; Miss S.C. Burns, William K. Burns of Chicago, Ill.


The funeral took place yesterday afternoon and was largely attended by friends and acquaintances. A number of the clergy of the city were present to show their respect to the deceased and sympathy for the family. Rev. Dr. Smith, conducted the service at the house, assisted by Rev.’s W.F. Wilson, G.K. Adams, and S.E. Marshall. The pallbearers were John W. Bickle, Cyrus E. Birge, M. Garvin, R.L. Whyte, S.F. Lazier, and Joseph Greene.

 

Thursday, April 14, 1898

 

ROBERTSON (Toledo, Ohio) April 13 - After the Coroner and several other physicians had today made an autopsy on the body of Miss Eleanor Robertson, aged nineteen, late of Toronto, Ont., but for some months past employed as typewriter in this city, it was announced that the deceased had come to her death by a criminal operation. The death certificate issued by Dr. W.G. Gardiner, who attended the young woman, gave inflammation of the intestines as the cause. The dead girl’s father, John Robertson, was about to take the body to Toronto when the Coroner interposed. The arrest of a prominent local physician is hourly looked for. A local business man is said to have betrayed the unfortunate girl.

 

ARNOLD (Windsor, Ont.) April 13 - Mrs. Henry Arnold, aged 28, wife of a young farmer living in Maidstone township, met death yesterday in a shocking manner. While her husband was absent from home for a few hours, in the forenoon she either fell or through herself into a cistern in the yard, and when Mr. Arnold returned he was horrified to find her dead body, partly doubled up lying at the bottom of the well. For some months Mrs. Arnold had been suffering from nervous prostration, and it is feared that during one of these attacks she became imbued with the idea of suicide. She had been married about six years, and leaves one child. A coroner was called, but after hearing the circumstances, decided an inquest to be unnecessary. The funeral will occur tomorrow afternoon.

 

WYCOTT (Picton, Ont.) April 13 - The shooting of A.S. Carson, by Adelbert Sycott, occurred this morning about three miles from Picton, on Mr. Carson’s farm. Wycott, who is a neighbour, owns and lives on an adjoining farm. He went over to Mr. Carson’s in the yard, and after some time spent in conversation Wycott drew a revolver and fired. The first shot grazed Carson’s head, the second passed through his clothes, and the third shot took effect in the fleshy part of the hips, where the bullet remains imbedded. The wound is not considered dangerous.

Mr. Carson is about 45 years old, and has been prominent in business, and political circles for some years.

Adelbert Wycott is the same Wycott who tried to commit suicide by cutting his throat at in Kingston last fall. At that time he had some $10,000 in cash, in a valise in his room. His father died some ten or twelve years ago, leaving an estate of $40,000, Adelbert being the sole executor.

Since the affair in Kingston last fall, efforts have been made to get the estate out of his management. Mr. Carson, as a friend, has been trying to effect a settlement, and it is supposed the conversation between Wycott and Carson this morning prior to the shooting was regarding the estate. It is thought Wycott’s mind is unsettled caused by worry.

5:00 p.m. - Adelbert Wycott, who shot Mr. Carson this morning has just died from the effects of a dose of carbolic acid. Two constables went with a warrant for his arrest this forenoon, but were afraid to approach him. About 5:00 o’clock, he took carbolic acid which he must have had in readiness and died in a few minutes. The wound to Mr. Carson is not considered dangerous.

 

Friday, April 15, 1898

 


JOHNSON - On Thursday April 14th, Chester Williamson, only and beloved son of Mrs. T.L. Johnson, aged 25 years, 3 months, and 3 days. Funeral from the family residence, 32 Erie ave., on Sunday to G.T.R. depot. Interment at Hornby, Halton county. Friends will please accept this intimation. Kindly omit flowers.

Chester W. Johnson a well-known and popular young man, died at his mother’s residence, 32 Erie ave., yesterday afternoon, after a short illness. Owing to the unavoidable absence of the Rev. J. Young, from the city on Sabbath next, a service for the relatives and friends of the deceased will be held at his late home tomorrow afternoon at 4 o’clock.

 

MONK - In this city, on April 13th, at her late residence, 116 Locke st. north, Catharine Aitchinson, beloved wife of Wm. Monk. Funeral on Saturday afternoon at 4 o’clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.Kelso papers please copy.

 

MORRIS - At Toronto, on April 13th, 1898, in his 22nd year, Arthur, fourth son of Moses and Mary Morris, of this city. Funeral from his parent’s residence, 196 Macauley st. east, on Saturday afternoon, at 3 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

MARTIN - In this city, on April 14th, James Martin, a native of Glasgow, Scotland, aged 56 years.Funeral on Saturday, April 16th, at 4 p.m. from his late residence 170 Cannon st. west, to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

REYNOLDS - In Hamilton on Thursday, 14th April, 1898, Wm., infant son of Wm. and Elizabeth Reynolds. Funeral Saturday from parents’ residence, 31 Locke st. south, at 2 p.m.

 

TILLIE (Kilbride) - Mrs. David Tillie, who has been a great sufferer for nearly four years, died in Toronto on Saturday. The remains were brought here for interment.

 

KNOTT (Stratford, Ont.) April 14 - Mrs. Wm. Knott, of Carlingford, from this city, was found dead in the doorway of her house. She had evidently risen to get some wood for he stove, and had fallen and expired instantly in the doorway. The children were out at a neighbours and no one was with her at the time. Death was due to heart failure. She was a native of Sligo, Ireland, and was seventy years old. She leaves a husband and a family of seven.

 

MAXWELL (Chesley) April 14 - Intelligence has been received in Chesley of a very sad case of suicide in Hepworth. Robert Maxwell, who has been conducting a dry goods business in partnership with his brother-in-law Mr. Smellie, committed suicide by taking carbolic acid. On Saturday Mr, Maxwell attempted suicide by drowning, but was rescued. Although a careful watch was kept on his actions he succeeded in obtaining a bottle of carbolic acid that was in the house, and in a few minutes after taking it died. He was for several years in business in Pinkerton, and afterwards in Chesley.His mind has been somewhat clouded for some time past.

 

Saturday, April 16, 1898

 

JOHNSON - On Thursday, April 14th, Chester Williamson, only and beloved son of Mrs. T. L. Johnson, aged 23 years, 3 months and 3 days. Funeral from the family residence, 32 Erie ave. on Sunday at 8 a.m. to G.T.R. depot. Interment at Hornby, Halton county. Friends will please accept this intimation. Kindly omit flowers.


PRESTON - William Preston, a farmer of Ernesttown township, was stricken with typhoid fever and taken to Kingston hospital. His death ensued last night. Two of his son are in the hospital with the same disease.

 

COVINGTON (Claremont, Ont.) April 15 - The inquest on the late William Covington was resumed this evening before Coroner Eastwood. There was not much new evidence. The only additional important fact brought out was by Witness James Harvey, who passed the house about daylight on the morning of the death. He said he distinctly saw a light in Covington’s bedroom which conflicts with the evidence of Miss Covington, who swore there was no light, as it had been put out and the blind raised, the mood giving sufficient light. After the jury was addressed by the Coroner and Mr. Farewell, they retired to consider their verdict. They returned in about half an hour. The verdict was as follows; we, the jury empanelled to investigate the cause of the death of Wm. Covington, find that said Wm. Covington died Sunday, March 13, from the effects of strychnine poisoning, but we are unable to say how said poison was administered to him.

 

MORRIS (Toronto) April 15 - At the morgue yesterday afternoon Coroner Johnson held an inquest touching the death of Arthur Morris, the young man from Hamilton, who was killed by a Grand Trunk train, at the foot of Dunn avenue on a Wednesday afternoon. The jury returned a verdict of accidental death and adding a rider to the effect that the crossing at Dunn avenue was very dangerous and should have gates or an overhead bridge. Several witnesses were examined particularly regarding the rate of speed at which the train was going, when it struck the unfortunate young man. It seems to have been travelling at a rate of anywhere from 35 to 50 miles an hour.

 

BOLTON - Charles Bolton, the thirteen-year-old son of William Bolton, 137 Wood street east, died unexpectedly yesterday afternoon, having being ill since Sunday. Heart disease was the cause of death.

 

Monday, April 18, 1898

 

LAVALL - At No. 398 Victoria avenue north, on Sunday morning, April 17, John, son of John, and Victoria Lavall, aged 10 years. The remains will be removed from St. Mathews church by his comrades at the choir at 10 a.m. Tuesday. Burial service at 3:30 p.m. Funeral at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WARNER - On Monday, 11th April, at Carlisle, Mrs. Harriet Warner, aged 80 years, wife of Stephen Warner. Funeral took place last Wednesday, April 13, 1898, from her late residence to Carlisle cemetery.

 

ROLSTON (Walkerton, Ont.) April 16 - When Charles Rolston, a farmer about a mile from

Walkerton, was driving home this afternoon, his horse took fright at a bicycle, and ran away. Mr. Rolston and his son were thrown from the wagon and seriously cut about the head. They were carried into a neighbour’s house, where, although Dr. Stalker was called in immediately, the father died shortly afterwards, without recovering consciousness. The son will probably recover. Rolston leaves a widow and several small children.

 

BELL - Rev. Dr. Bell, formerly of Queen’s University, died in Toronto, Saturday.


BLACK - The body of Gilbert Black, who has been missing since April 9, was found in the river below the falls at Almonte Sunday.

 

Tuesday, April 19, 1898

 

STOREY - At her late residence 80 Peter street, on April 18, Sarah Storey, aged 69. Funeral took place today. Interment at Hawkstone.

 

MACKEAND - On the 18th inst, at Oak Hurst, Queen street south, Jane H. Cochrane, relict of the late Lieut.-Col. Alfred Mackeand, 90th Rifles, Winnipeg. Funeral private.

 

GARVIE - In this city, on April 18, at 44 Locke street north, Alexander Garvie, aged 58 years. Funeral Thursday, 3:30 p.m. from above address. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DYKE - In this city, on April 17th, at his late residence, 34 Pearl st. north, John Dyke, father of Rev. J. Dyke, B.D., of Edmonton. N.W.T., brother of J.N. Dyke, of Bright, Ont. Funeral Wednesday, 20th April. Private service at the residence 3 p.m. Public service at Zion Tabernacle 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

John Dyke, died last night at his residence, 34 Pearl st. north. He was born in Denbighshire, England, in 1818, but did not come to this country until 1883, living here ever since. He was a prominent member of Zion Tabernacle. He had been ill three weeks, death being due to consumption of the lungs.

The deceased leaves a widow, one son, Rev. J. Dyke, B.D., Edmonton; a brother, Rev. J.H. Dyke, Bright, and two daughters, Mrs. Thomas Dawes, of this city, and Miss B. Dyke, Superintendent of the Perley home, Ottawa.

 

WARNER (Carlisle) - Mrs. Warner, an aged lady of this place, died suddenly of heart disease on Monday of last week, and was buried on Wednesday.

 

RUSK (Carlisle) - John and Mrs. Rusk have the sympathy of the community in the death of their infant son, which occurred last week.

 

MONTGOMERY (Carlisle) - The funeral of Mrs. Montgomery, the aged mother of Mrs. John Burton of this place, will take place at Kilbride on Tuesday.

 

HESS (Ryckman’s Corners) - The remains of the late Mrs. Peter Hess, of Hamilton, were laid to rest in Barton Presbyterian cemetery last Thursday afternoon.

 

HARTWELL (Hannon) - A very large turnout of mourners attended the funeral of the late Joel Hartwell. At the Trinity church burying ground, the pastor Rev. George Ferguson, assisted by Rev. J.H. Fielding, of St. George’s church, Rymal, conducted the funeral services. The burial service of the K.O.T.M., of which society of which deceased was a member was read at the grave by George Riach, and H. Symington, of Barton tent No. 2, of Hamilton. Pall-bearers were; Edgar Tidy, William Daniels, William Almas, Albert Long, A. Ramsay, and P. Ralston.

 


LeBARRE (Glanford) - The remains of the late Marshall LeBarre, of Hamilton, son of William LeBarre, formerly of this place were interred at the White church burying ground last Wednesday afternoon.

 

Wednesday, April 20, 1898

 

GARVIE - In this city, on April 18, at 44 Locke street north, Alexander Garvie, aged 68 years. Funeral Thursday, 3:30 p.m., from above address. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MORTON - On April 20, at her grandmother’s residence, 406 Cannon st. east, Eva Lorraine, eldest daughter of William and Elizabeth Morton, aged 4 years and 5 days. Funeral Friday at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

JOHNSON - On April 19, at her residence, 272 Young street, Toronto, Nellie Mackenzie, beloved wife of J.W. Johnson. Funeral Thursday, from the T.H. and B. station, at 12:55 noon, to Hamilton cemetery.

 

ISSELL - In this city, on the 19th inst., Catharine Issell, in the 78th year of her age. Funeral private.

 

BIRD - On the 20th April, at the residence of her son, No. 56 Walnut street south, Susannah

Gunn, relict of the late Dr. Thos. Bird, of Lindsay, Ont. Funeral notice later.

Mrs. Bird, widow of the late Dr. Thomas Bird, of Lindsay, and mother of C.J. Bird, of this city, died this afternoon at 56 Walnut street. She was 75 years of age, and had been ill for a couple of months.

 

BEDELL - George Bedell, 87 years of age, died at the city hospital this morning. He was suffering from lung trouble.

 

OSTROM - Isaac Brock Ostrom, who as a child was dandied by Gen. Brock, in 1812, died at Sidney, Ont.

 

CUTHBERTSON - Robert Scott Cuthbertson, last surviving son of the late Rev. Samuel Cuthbertson, died in Toronto on Monday, aged 79.

 

TALCOTT - Elisha W. Talcott, aged 76, a prominent farmer and life-long resident of Bloomfield, Ont., died last evening of pneumonia. A widow, four sons, and three daughters survive him.

 

ALEXANDER - William Alexander, public school inspector for the county of Perth, died at Stratford, Tuesday in his fifty fifth year of typhoid fever. He had held the position of inspector for the past 27 years. He came originally from Haldimand county.

 

Thursday, April 21, 1898

 

MORTON - On April 20th, at her grandmother’s residence, 406 Cannon street east, Eva Lorraine, eldest daughter of William and Elizabeth Morton, aged 4 years and 3 days. Funeral Friday at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.


BIRD - On the 20th April, at the residence of her son, No. 56 Walnut st. south, Susannah Gunn, relict of the late Dr. Thos. Bird, of Lindsay, Ont. Funeral on Friday morning at 8:30 o’clock to

St. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WALLACE - On April 21, at his residence, 17 Wilson street, J.W. Wallace, aged 28 years. Funeral on Saturday at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

Shortly after midnight this morning J.W. Wallace died after an illness of two months duration. The deceased gentleman came originally from Port Colborne. He had been a resident of Hamilton and a traveller for Birely & Co., for eleven years, during which time he made hosts of business and personal friends. He was married about eighteen months ago, and leaves a widow.

 

PIERCE - W. Pierce, furniture dealer and undertaker of Brantford, is dead, aged 74.

 

TOWNSEND - William Townsend of the township of Thurlow, Hastings county, died Tuesday night aged 65.He leaves a widow, two sons, and one daughter.

 

BOLTON - Clara Bolton, widow of the late Henry Mayo, who was a well-known engineer on the Grand Trunk died at Belleville, Tuesday night in her 72nd year. She leaves seven daughters and two sons.

 

FULLER - John Fuller, the Winona man who was injured in a fight following a dog fight, over the mountain the other night, died at Winona early this morning. The residents down there now have a sensation on their hands. An inquest has been ordered to discover the cause of Fuller’s death and there is talk of some persons being arrested pending the result of the inquiry. A manslaughter case may be the final result.

 

Friday, April 22, 1898

 

WALLACE - On April 21, at his residence, 17 Wilson street, J.W. Wallace, age 28 years. Funeral on Saturday at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

CROSS - On Friday morning, April 22, at 407 York street, Lloyd Henry, infant son of William and Agnes Cross, aged 2 months, and 22 days. Funeral at 2:30 Saturday afternoon. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DALTON - In this city, on Thursday, April 21, James, eldest son of Francis and Lizzie Dalton, aged 9 years. Funeral from his parent’s residence, No. 249 John st. north, at 2 p.m. Saturday. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

PEDLAR - In this city on Friday, April 22nd, Alfred Walter Pedlar, aged 40 years. Funeral will take place from his late residence 212 Bold street, on Monday at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

PIGOTT - At St. Joseph’s convent, Park street north, on April 21st, Mother M. Ignatius Pigott, aged 64. Funeral Mass Saturday at 9 o’clock.


MARTIN, FRASER (Cornwall, Ont.) April 21 - Two labourers on Brennan & Foster’s contract on the Ottawa and New York railway on Cornwall island, were drowned in the river here yesterday afternoon. They were Richard Martin, a pensioner of the British government, about 45 years old, and Jerry Fraser, of Boston, about 25. They were in town in the morning, and Martin drew his pension. When they went to the paper mill in the afternoon to cross to the island, Martin was considerably intoxicated. Their boat leaked badly, but went along safely till they struck a rapid current near the opposite shore, when the boat upset, and they were swept off down the river, clinging to it. They were never seen again, and there is no doubt but that they were drowned. The boat was found late in the evening, but no trace of the men.

 

DYKE - The funeral of the late John Dyke took place on Wednesday afternoon. A service was held in Zion tabernacle. As the coffin was carried in, Miss L. Bailey, organist, played the Dead March in Saul. Rev. Dr. Brethour was unavoidably absent, and Rev. Dr. Clark kindly officiated, preaching a timely sermon from Job X1V, 14.Rev. W.F. Wilson read the scriptures and led in prayer. Rev. F. Coleman closed the service, after which the remains were conveyed to the cemetery.

 

PIGOTT - Many friends of M.A. Pigott, contractor, of this city, will regret to learn of the death of his sister, Mother M. Ignatious Pigott, which took place at St. Joseph’s convent, Park st. north, yesterday morning. Deceased was a member of the community for more than 40 years, and during her life filled many important offices in the congregation. She was for a time superior of the houses in Dundas, Paris, and Oakville. In her, the poor, and sick, and the suffering had lost a truly devoted friend.

 

FULLER - Crown Attorney Crerar, when notified of the death of John Fuller, the Winona man who got into a fight the other night, ordered a post-mortem and inquest. The post-mortem took place this morning at Winona, and the inquest began at 1:00 o’clock this afternoon. The jurymen after viewing the body adjourned to meet when the crown had some evidence to offer in the case. Dr. Simpson attended Fuller. The people in Winona say his death was caused by pneumonia.

Fuller was a married man and leaves a wife and one child. He was 29 years of age. The funeral took place at 3 o’clock this afternoon, and was largely attended.

 

Saturday, April 23, 1898

 

PEDLAR - In this city, on Tuesday April 22nd, Alfred Walter Pedlar, aged 40. Funeral will take place from his late residence, 212 Bold street, on Sunday at 4:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

MACDONALD - In this city, at her late residence, 56 Peter street, on April 22nd, Miriam Macdonald, widow of the late Alexander Macdonald, in her 71st year. Funeral Sunday afternoon

 at 3:30 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


Mrs. Miriam Macdonald, widow of the late Alex Macdonald, for many years a trusted employee of the hardware firm Juson & Co., died yesterday in her 71st year. Mrs. Macdonald was born in Garafraxa township, Wellington, and was the first white child born there. She had been a resident of Hamilton for 52 years, and notwithstanding her great age retained her physical vigour until a short time before her last illness. She was well-known and universally respected. She leaves three sons-William Macdonald, of the Dog and Gun hotel, York street; Lewis Macdonald, milk inspector, and Fred Macdonald of Detroit.

The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 3:30.

 

MOSS - As he walked along the Grand Track by the bayside this morning with fishing rod on shoulder, an elderly unknown man met a sudden and violent death. He was going westward n the south track, when the west-bound 10:26 Toronto express came speeding along, with Engineer Heron and Fireman Johns on the engine. The engineer whistled to warn the man of his danger, but instead of stepping off the track, he continued on it, and the engine struck him with great force hurling the mangled body into the ditch. The train was stopped and the remains were placed by the track side, and the officials at the Stuart street station were advised of the fatality.

The police were in turn informed and P.C. Cruickshank, with Officer W. Hunter, went in the patrol to the station. There the party was taken out to the scene of the fatality by Yardmaster Hammill, and the body was brought to the city on a flat car. The spot where the deceased was struck is just three quarters of a mile from the station. The unfortunate had been struck on the back of the head, which was terribly crushed in, and his left leg was broken. By his side lay a long bamboo pole and line, showing that deceased was on his way to fish at he western end of the bay.

The clothing was searched for a clue towards deceased’s identity, but as so often happens in such cases, nothing was found to tell who the dead man was. There was some fishing lines in one of the pockets, and in a small chamois leather purse with steel snap fastening was a five cent piece. Deceased is believed to have been a resident of the west end, as it is common practice as fishermen to take a short cut down the bank by the side of the railway, and take the track to the fishing grounds.

Thomas Greenaway, timekeeper at the Rolling mills, went to the morgue this afternoon and identified the remains of those of William Moss, 56 Locke street south, a mill employee. There are left behind to struggle with the world, a widow, and five or six children. Deceased was not deaf and had frequently been warned by his fellow workmen not to walk on the track.

 

WILSON - In this city, on April 22nd, at 20 Grant avenue, Edwin Erie, infant son of E.J. and May Wilson. Funeral Sunday, private.

 

FULLER - It is said the post-mortem will show that deceased died of pneumonia, and that the jury will bring in a verdict to that effect. At the same time some people around Winona would like to have the story of the fight in which Fuller was injured ventilated.

 

PARRY - Mrs. Parry, wife of Harry Perry, general western passenger agent of the New York Central, died at her residence in Buffalo this morning. She had been ill for some time.

Mr. Parry has a large number of friends who deeply sympathize with him in his bereavement.

 

MOYER (Preston, Ont.) April 23 - This morning while several boys were walking along the

Grand river here, they discovered the body of a man floating in the river. The boys at once pulled it out on the shore, and notified Dr. Mumery, the coroner for the county. The body is believed to be that of a man named Moyer, who has been missing from Bridgeport for about three weeks.

 

SCHRAM (Bismarck) - John Schram died on Saturday last.

 


HEASLIP (Bismarck) - Leonard Heaslip, of Wellandport, died suddenly on Monday from heart failure.

 

CLARKE - Alister M. Clarke, barrister, of Palmerston, died yesterday. He was at one time a prominent lawyer at Toronto.

 

FRAME - Henry Frame died suddenly in Kingston yesterday.

 

MURRAY - William Murray, aged 65, died at Kingston.

 

DAVIDSON (Port Hope) April 22 - Andrew Davidson, an old man who flagged for the G.T.R. at Perrytown Station, was knocked down by the engine of the noon train today, and so badly injured that he died in a short time. He was hard of hearing.

 

ALEXANDER - William Alexander, for twenty seven years inspector of public schools, in Perth county died of typhoid fever at Stratford, April 19. He was loved and respected by all who knew him, and his death will be a distinct loss to the educational interests of Perth county. The Stratford Herald says;

Mr. Alexander was the second son of the late John Alexander, of the county of Enniskillen Ireland, who came in 1832 to Canada and settled in Caledonia, Haldimand county, where William was born on Jan. 15, 1844. He obtained his education chiefly at the Goderich, and Caledonia high schools, Victoria college at Cobourg, and at the normal school in Toronto. Having qualified for the teaching profession, he engaged successfully in public teaching in Seneca, Rainham centre, Thorold, (then called Beaver Dam), and finally for five years at Millbank, in this county. He had taught about ten years in all when, in 1871, at a comparatively early age, he was honoured by the appointment as public school inspector for Perth county.

Mr. Alexander married on Christlia, of Stratford, and Miss Mary Jane Swayze, of Thorold, who survives him (Note: this is correct from the paper. Ed.)with a family, consisting of Mrs. W.H. Taylor, of Owen Sound; D’Arcy of Chicago; Frank, at home, and Grayson also of Chicago. Mr. Alexander’s death is the first in the family. He has three brothers and two sisters surviving him, namely; John and Hiram,of Sparta, Elgin county, Matthew, of Seneca township; Miss Amelia, of Stratford, and Miss Mary Jane, of the town of Simcoe.

Mr. Alexander was strongly attached to the Methodist body, having been an attendant of the Central Methodist church, and died a peaceful and happy death, with full trust in a fortunate reception in the great beyond.

 

Monday, April 25, 1898

 

McCOWELL - In this city, on April 24, 1898, Bernard, only son of the late John McCowell, aged 47 years. Funeral from his late residence, 99 Bay st. north, on Wednesday morning at 9 o’clock, to St. Mary’s cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

Bernard McCowell, died yesterday at his residence, 99 Ray st. north, after a few days illness. Pneumonia was the cause of death.

The deceased was well-known in this city. For twenty-one years he was baggage master at the Stuart st. station of the Grand Trunk. He was always polite to the travelling and had a large circle of warm friends.


The funeral will take place on Wednesday at 9 a.m. There will be a service at St. Mary’s cathedral. The interment will be in Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

 

REID - In Saltfleet, on Sunday morning, Peter Reid in his 49th year. Funeral on Tuesday at 1 p.m. from his late residence in Saltfleet to Stony Creek cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Peter Reid, a well-known citizen of Saltfleet, died yesterday after a somewhat protracted illness. Few men have been more deservedly honoured by his fellow-citizens than was Mr. Reid. He had been called upon to fill the position of Councillor, Deputy Reeve, and Reeve of his native township and was Warden of the county in 1893. During his long public career he discharged his duties with the utmost fidelity and advantage to the county. He was a prominent and consistent member of the Masonic fraternity, and his early demise will be deeply deplored by his many friends throughout the county and city.

 

PEDLAR - The funeral of Walter Pedlar took place yesterday afternoon. It was conducted by the members of Temple lodge, A.F. and A.M. The pallbearers were; A. Hulek, Frank E. Walker, John Cape, C. Yuker, George Dunn, and A.B. Clark. The religious services were conducted by Rev. W.H. Wade. W. Bro. A. Zimmerman, conducted the Masonic services, being assisted by A.M. Cunningham, James Mercer, C. Smith, and R.V. Mathews.

 

MOSS - An inquest on the death of William Moss was opened at the city hospital on Saturday afternoon, J.W. Board, being foreman of the jury. After viewing the remains the jurors adjourned this evening at No. 3 police station.

 

Tuesday, April 26, 1898

 

POWEL - On Tuesday, April 26th, Isabella Powel, in her 65th year. Funeral from her son’s residence, 27 Burlington street west, on Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o’clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

McCOWELL - In this city, on April 24, 1898, Bernard, only son of the late John McCowell, aged 47 years. Funeral from his late residence, 99 Bay st. north, on Wednesday morning at 9 o’clock, to St. Mary’s cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

FULLER - The coroner’s jury investigating the cause of the death of John Fuller, at Winona, last night returned a verdict that death was caused by pneumonia, and that while pneumonia might have induced by shock from a fight, in which deceased had participated a few days before, there was no direct evidence that this was so. The evidence of the doctors who conducted the post-mortem - Dr. Carr, of Stony Creek, and Simpson of Grimsby - was taken last night, and they agreed that pneumonia caused death. Nor would they admit that the injuries at the fight had anything to do with it. One of deceased brothers swore that Fuller had a bad cough for about two weeks before his death.

Crown Attorney Crerar was present looking after the interest of justice, but he could make nothing out of the witnesses. The brothers, who were in the fight, and said that they were struck too, and did not see just what happened to deceased. The fight over some stake money due on the dog fight. The widow of deceased did not appear at the inquest.


MAAS - An inquest into the death of William Maas, (Moss in earlier articles. Ed.) who was killed on the G.T.R. track near the junction was held at No. 3 police station last evening before coroner Griffin. The first witness examined was Albert Maas a son of the deceased. He last saw his father alive between eight and nine o’clock Saturday morning. Thos. Herron, the engineer on the train that struck Maas was the next witness to give evidence. He swore that as his train was going through the yard he saw the deceased walking on the parallel track some distance in front. When the train came within 40 or 50 feet of the deceased the witness saw him cross to the strip between the two tracks. He blew the whistle as a warning, and the bell had been ringing all the way through the yard. The deceased paid no attention to the warning and the engineer shut off the steam and applied the brakes. When the train stopped he took his train back and found the body about 100 yards from where the train came to a standstill. Heron said that he “concluded from the man’s action that he was dead when picked up,” but he heard afterwards that he was not.

William Maas, another son of the deceased told what he knew of his father’s actions before the accident. William Cole, a fireman on the train, corroborated his mate’s testimony in the main. Alfred Johns, the conductor, testified that there was nothing new in his evidence, he simply confirming what had been said by his engineer and fireman.

Dr. Edgar gave the result of the post-mortem examination, and said death resulted from

injuries caused by a severe blow, the force of which was evidently applied from the left. Dr. O’Reilly’s evidence was substantially the same as that given by Dr. Edgar.

William Vandewater and Constable Cruickshank also gave unimportant testimony, and the jury after consulting for a few minutes returned the following verdict: “That the said William Maas was accidentally killed while walking on the tracks of the Grand Trunk railway on Saturday last. And we further find that the Grand Trunk authorities are in no way to blame for the said

William Maas death”.

 

DICKSON - P.A. Dickson, of Brantford, aged 40, died yesterday morning.

 

CHAPMAN - Robert Chapman, a veteran of the Crimea war, died at his home in London.

 

WALSH - John Walsh, of Trafalgar, cut his throat several weeks ago, died at the city hospital on Sunday.

 

DOODY - Mrs. Doody, an elderly widow living on MacNab st. north, died rather suddenly last evening. The cause of death was heart failure. She is survived by three daughters and two sons.

 

Wednesday, April 27, 1898

 

BALL - At the residence of his nephew, James Carson, 113 Victoria ave. north, on Wednesday, April 27th, Samuel Ball, in his 70th year. Funeral Friday at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BEDELL - In this city, on April 27th , Sarah Bedell, widow of the late Stephen Bedell, a native of England, aged 75 years. Funeral on Friday at 2 p.m. from her late residence, 207 Victoria ave. north. Please omit flowers. Funeral private.

 


KERSEY (Windsor, Ont.) April 26 - William Kersey, coloured, a resident of Colchester, was run over by a Michigan Central passenger train a few miles east of Ann Arbour, Mich., late last night, and instantly killed, his head having being cut off, as cleanly as though done with a knife.

The headless body was found on the track by two boys this morning. The head was found some distance away.

 

GIRVEN (Peterborough) April 26 - On Saturday evening James Girven, sr., met a sudden death at Downer’s corners. He was ascending the stairway at the residence of his son, when losing his balance he fell backwards, striking the left side of his head violently on the steps, and inflicting a deep gash on the temple. He was knocked unconscious by the shock and died shortly afterwards.

 

HILES - Charles H. Hiles, formerly of Hamilton, but late of Milwaukee, died in that city on Friday last. The remains were brought for interment, and the funeral took place from the Stuart st. station, yesterday afternoon.

 

McCOWELL - The funeral of the late Bernard McCowell, took place from his residence Ray st. north, this morning. There was a large attendance of sorrowing friends, quite a number of G.T.R. employees being present. Mass was said by Father Holden, and Father Mahoney, conducted the funeral service. The pallbearers were: John Brick, J.B. Nelligan, John Austin, P. Galvin, John

Crooks, and James Gorman.

 

REID - The funeral of the late Peter Reid took place yesterday afternoon from the Methodist church Stony Creek. It was one of the largest funerals ever held in the township. Rev. Mr. Walker of Binbrook, was the minister, and a Masonic service was conducted by W.M.J.W. Jardine, assisted by P.W.M.F.M. Carpenter, of Stony Creek lodge. The pall-bearers were: M. Pettit, H. Coombs, C. DeWitt, H. Lee, T. Corman, and G. Millen.

 

Thursday, April 28, 1898

 

BALL - At the residence of his nephew, James Carson, 113 Victoria avenue north, on Wednesday, April 27th, Samuel Ball in his 70th year. Funeral Friday at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BEDELL - In this city, on April 27th, Sarah Bedell, widow of the late Stephen Bedell, native of England, aged 75 years. Funeral on Friday, at 2 p.m. from her late residence 207 Victoria ave. north. Please omit flowers. Funeral private.

Mrs. Bedell, widow of the late Stephen Bedell, Saltfleet, died yesterday at her late home, 207

 Victoria avenue north. Deceased was 75 years old came to Hamilton 65 years ago. She leaves one son, John, who resides on the Dundas road. Three brothers and two sisters also survive deceased. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon.

 

WINTON - At the Aged Women’s Home, Wellington street south, on Wednesday, April 27th, Agnes Winton, aged 74 years. Funeral Friday, April 29th, at 3 p.m., from Aged Womens Home,

Wellington street south. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 


BRAY (Toronto) April 28 - John Bray, who was an advance guard of six Klondikers from Toronto, has been foully murdered at Vancouver, B.C. He left Toronto a couple of months ago, and was outfitting at Vancouver.

Bray was found dead in a miserable shack, five miles from Vancouver last Thursday with three bullets in his head. He had been foully murdered for money he was supposed to have, and the arrest of the murderers is expected hourly. When found Bray’s face, ears and hands were terribly gnawed by rats, and he presented an awful appearance. He had probably been dead for two days before discovery.

Bray arrived in Vancouver about six weeks ago, looked over the situation to go into the Yukon, and found that he had arrived before the proper season, and advised the rest of the party in Toronto, not to come at present. In the meantime he became friendly with two men, thinking they might be useful to him, as they claimed to be practical miners. He also met a man named Morgan, living here to whom he revealed the facts which cleared up the mystery surrounding his death.

The identity of the man named in the dispatch has not yet been discovered, although the police here have received word of the murder, and a request that the relatives of the dead man be found. Edgar Bray, a surveyor, left Oakville some months ago as surveyor for a party enroute for the Klondike. His description fits that of the murdered man, but it is not thought it is he, as Mr. Bray of Oakville, is said to be now well on his way to Dawson, nothing having being heard of him for some time. Mr. Bray has a wife and two children at Oakville, and a brother, Oscar Bray, at Toronto Junction. Another brother is Marshall Bray, the sheriff of Nanaimo, British Columbia.

 

CHAMBERS (Toronto) April 28 - John Chambers, who was taken to the general hospital on

Tuesday suffering from opium poison, died this morning. On a search being made of Chambers’ house a letter was found addressed to his wife, who is out of town, saying he was tired of life, he leaves five children. This was the second attempt Chambers had made on his life.

 

Friday, April 29, 1898

 

LANGTON - At his residence Waterdown, on April 28th, Lanty Langton, aged 69 years. Funeral from his late residence on Saturday at 2 p.m., to the Waterdown cemetery. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

HAGAR - At her parents’ residence, Idelwilde, township of North Grimsby on Thursday April 28th, 1898, Ethel Louise, second daughter of Louis L. and Selena A. Hagar, aged 20 years, 2 months, and 11 days. Funeral Saturday, at 2 p.m. Interment at St. Andrew’s church, Grimsby. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

PAULEY - In this city, on April 28th, Joseph Pauley, in his 77th year, a native of Germany. Funeral

from his late residence 474 Hughson st. north, on Saturday morning at 8:30 o’clock, to St. Lawrence church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Joseph Pauley who died yesterday at his residence 474 Hughson st. north. The deceased was born in Germany and had lived in Hamilton for forty years. He had been ill six of seven weeks. He leaves five daughters and one son.

 


BOOTH (Thorold, Ont.) April 29 - Willie, the seven-year-old and only son of Albert Booth, was drowned yesterday in an old cistern in rear of an old and unoccupied dwelling on the outskirts of the town. The little boy had been missed since about 4 o’clock in the afternoon. In the evening searching parties started out with the result of finding the body in the well.

 

WARING - Francis Waring, aged 6, was fatally burned at London.

 

GILLERLAINE - John Gillerlaine, a farmer of Elizabethtown, Ont., was found by his son hanging from the rafters of the hay mow, cold in death. He had been despondent for some time and had committed suicided with a strap.

 

MILLS (Rodney, Ont.) April 28 - The wife of Daniel Mills of Palmyra, dropped dead at the home of her daughter, Mrs. E. Werner, of Rodney, about 6 o’clock this evening. Death was caused by apoplexy. Her husband is a brother of Hon. David Mills, Minister of Justice.

 

WHITEHEAD (Wyoming) April 28 - The fifteen-year-old son of James Whitehead, of Enniskillen, was killed by falling beneath a land roller. He had been cautioned not to ride but to walk. He disobeyed his instructions, was jolted off the seat, and was found dead with the roller on his chest.

 

FULLER (Fruitland) - A number of Foresters of this vicinity, attended the funeral of John Fuller at Winona last Friday.

 

Saturday, April 30, 1898

 

STARES - At her mother’s residence, No. 126 Catharine st. north, on Saturday, 30th April, 1898, Alice Maude, second daughter of Mrs. Hannah Stares, aged 13 years, and 10 months. Funeral Monday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WEBB - At her late residence 177 Jackson st. east, on April 30, 1898, Margaret Rankin, beloved wife of John Webb. Funeral on Monday, May 2, at 2 p.m. to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. John Webb, the wife of John Webb, a retired contractor living at 177 Jackson st. east, passed away last evening. Mrs. Webb has for the past eighteen years been a resident of this city, before which time she lived near Tapleytown, in Saltfleet township. About fifteen months ago she stepped on some ice and fractured her hip, from which injury she never fully recovered. About three weeks ago Mrs. Webb happened with another accident, and this was the indirect cause of her death. Besides a loving husband, the deceased leaves two sons, and two daughters to mourn her loss. They are: Thomas W. Webb, Stony Creek; W.R. Webb, granite dealer; Mrs. J.P. Cline, and Mrs. W. Gastle, of this city. The funeral will take place from the family residence on Tuesday afternoon at 2 o’clock.

 

EATON (Kingston) April 30 - In an unused stall in the American hotel stables this morning was found the decomposing remains of a man doubled up in the manager. The face was almost gone. The coroner was summoned. No one could identify the man until some time after. The body proved to be that of John Eaton, pensioner, age 60. He had evidently fallen into the manger while intoxicated and suffocated to death.


McNAULTY (Longwood, Ont.) April 29 - William McNaulty, a very respectable farmer living near this place, was found dead in a pasture field at the rear of his farm this afternoon. A revolver was lying a few feet from the body when found, and it is supposed the unfortunate man took his own life. No cause can be assigned for the rash act, as he was well-to-do, and appeared to be in his usual good spirits when he left for work after dinner.

 

Monday, May 2, 1898

 

HARR - On May 2nd, 1898, Arthur G. Harr, aged 40 years, a native of Stamford, England. Funeral from the residence of B. Warrren, 96 Tisdale st. 3 p.m. Tuesday, 3rd.

Arthur Harr, a well-known young man of the east end, employed for several years, byJ.G. Raynor, grocer, died at the city hospital this morning from a complication of diseases. Mr. Harr’s parents live in England, and he paid them a visit last year. He was well-known and well-liked and his many friends will regret to hear of his death.

 

ROGERS (Port Credit) May 1 - Section Foreman Rogers, of the G.T.R., at this place was struck and instantly killed on Saturday night by the C.P.R. train from Hamilton, due in Toronto at 9:05, and which passes Port Credit shortly after 8 o’clock. The body was badly mangled.

 

POOLE (Glanford) - Messrs. D.G. and J.S. Case, attended the funeral of their aunt Mrs. Poole of Flamboro on Sunday last.

 

KIRK (Burk’s Falls) May 1 - Mrs. George Kirk was drowned here on Saturday evening while crossing the river in a boat, which capsized by striking a log. Mr. Kirk was standing on the opposite bank, but rendered his wife no assistance, as he is unable to swim and there was not a boat handy. Mrs. Kirk floated down the river a considerable distance before sinking, and endeavoured to catch hold of the rods of some boys who were fishing on the bank. Her body was recovered an hour afterwards in eight feet of water. Mrs. Kirk leaves a husband, son, and two daughters.

 

Tuesday, May 3, 1898

 

HARR - The funeral of the late Arthur Harr, took place this afternoon from the residence, of R. Warren, Tisdale and King William st.Rev. John Young was the minister and the pallbearers were W. Warren, R. Warren, J. Holmes, and G.J. Rainer. Mr. Harr’s death was caused by a tumour on the brain.

 

FORBES - Mrs. James Forbes, widow of the late Capt. James Forbes, who sailed the Argo, the first ferry boat to cross the Detroit river, died in her home at Windsor yesterday. Deceased was 68 years old, and a resident of Windsor for forty years.

 


BOXALL (Toronto) May 3 - Mrs. Mary Boxall, wife of William H. Boxall, 270 Salem avenue, died on the steps of the Anglican Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Delaware avenue at 2:15 yesterday afternoon. She was seized with a fainting spell while walking down the street and sat upon the church steps, where she expired after a few minutes suffering. The patrol wagon was summoned from No. 3 police station, and the deceased was moved to her home which she left only a short time before.

 

WIGLE (Windsor) May 2 - Solemn Wigle, aged 76 years, one of the pioneers of Essex, died at his home in Kingsville, Saturday. Mr. Wigle gave many years to public service, having been reeve of the township of Gosfield for twenty years, and first warden of the county. He was the first member of the legislature for Essex after confederation. Mr. Wigle was married twice, and is survived by his widow and four sons.

 

SHIELDS (Caistorville) - An old and highly esteemed friend has passed from our midst in the death of the late William Shields. The funeral was largely attended. His five sons, and two daughters survive him.

 

Wednesday, May 4, 1898

 

McMASTER - On Wednesday May 4th, at her late residence, Sanford avenue, Mrs. Donald McMaster, aged 57 years, a native of Argyleshire, Scotland. Funeral on Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock.

 

WEAVER (Binbrook) - The funeral of Nora Weaver took place on Sunday last, when there was a large turnout of friends and relatives.

 

ERNST - Christian Ernst, postmaster of New Hamburg, Ont., which position he has occupied for the past 35 years, died yesterday in his sixty-fifth year. His death was the result of haemorrhage of the stomach.

 

Thursday, May 5, 1898

 

ROSS - On Wednesday May 4, at his late residence, 110 Wellington st. north, Robert Miller Ross, aged 62 years, eldest son of the late Alexander Moffat Ross. Funeral Friday afternoon at 2 o’clock Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

AILLIS - In this city, on Thursday May 5, Violet Maude Aillis, aged 4 months. The funeral will take place from her parent’s residence 38 Pearl st. north, on Friday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation. Toronto papers please copy.

 

MILLER, MORTSON, PETERS, LINSTEAD (Newmarket) May 4 - An inquest was held here tonight to inquire into the level crossing fatality whereby Mrs. Luther Miller, Mrs. Mathew Mortson, W.H. Peters, and Edwin Linstead lost their lives at Lundy’s crossing on Saturday last. Evidence was given by witnesses, who saw the accident, proving that the engine had given two whistle signals before reaching the crossing, and that the occupants of the buggy approached the track while looking at the train. One of the men waved his hat and hurrahed as he approached the track. It was pointed out by several witnesses that the crossing was a very dangerous one. The inquiry was directed simply along the line of the accident. Many persons, who expected the inquiry to go deeper into the case to include the actions of the people that day, went away disappointed.


The jury, after an absence of about 50 minutes, returned a verdict. “That deceased came to their deaths by being struck by the special freight train going north at 6:20 p.m. on April 30, and expressed their opinion that the railway company should give better warning by blowing the whistle continuously in the vicinity of this dangerous crossing, and not going faster than twelve miles an hour.”

 

KENNEDY - John William Kennedy, 89 years of age, dropped dead last night in Toronto while he was cutting wood.

 

MORRISON - Mrs. Ann Morrison, probably the oldest resident in the Queens city, is dead, aged 105.

 

SMITH - Yesterday John M. Smith, of Toronto died from pneumonia. His mother died of the same disease. Mr. Smith was a machinist in the Massey Harris works, who is 44 years of age, while his mother was 68 years old.

 

STAFFORD (Toronto) May 6 - The death of Mrs. E.A. Stafford, widow of the late Rev. E.A. Stafford, D.D., and daughter of the late Edmund Baird, of Montreal occurred yesterday at her late residence 567 Church street. Rev. Dr. Stafford was formerly pastor of the Metropolitan and other Methodist churches in this city, and was also stationed in Hamilton, where his death occurred some time ago. The death of Mrs. Stafford had been expected since last Thursday, she suffered a stroke of paralysis. She was a sister of the wife of Rev. Dr. Ryckman. The funeral will be private.

 

HARFORD (Otterville) May 6 - Last night about 7 o’clock several boys were playing with a

shotgun behind Gordon Forman’s barn. John Forman, a boy about fourteen years old, had completed loading a shotgun with fine bird shot, and was about to shoot at a mark, when the gun accidentally went off, and the whole charge of shot was discharged into the right lung of Fred Harford, a boy about nine years of age, son of Thomas Harford. The boy lived only one hour.

 

Friday, May 6, 1898

 

HUTCHINSON - At No. 19 Joy street, Detroit, Mich., on Thursday, May 5th, Elizabeth, wife of Alexander Hutchinson, aged 54 years, late of this city. Funeral at 2 p.m. Saturday from Blachford & Sons undertaking rooms, 57 King st. west. Interment at Hamilton cemetery.

 

PATTERSON - On Thursday, May 5th, 1898, at his late residence, 203 Ferguson ave. south, John Patterson, aged 69 years. Funeral from his late residence Saturday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

John Patterson, tailor, died last night. He had been a resident of Hamilton for a number of years and was well and favourably known. For years he was in business as a merchant tailor on John street.

The deceased was a member of Barton lodge, A.F. and A.M.

 

DUNCAN - On Thursday May 5, Mrs. Thomas Duncan, widow of the late Thomas Duncan at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. James Pearson, Mount Albion, aged 73 years. Funeral Sunday at 1:30 p.m. to the above residence.

 


DODDS (Grimsby) -Margaret Dodds, mother of Mrs. D.J. Cox died on Wednesday last. She was interred in Queen’s Lawn cemetery on Friday afternoon.

 

HAGARS (Hagar) (Grimsby) - The funeral of Miss Hagars daughter, of L. Hagars, took place on Saturday last and was attended by a very large number of friends.

 

CUMMER - A dispatch from Cleveland announces that Frank Cummer was killed by a train in that city on Wednesday evening. The dispatch came from Mrs. Cummer and lacks detail. The dead gentleman ran an extensive engine building business in Cleveland and was a son of Mr. Cummer of Burlington. He was also a brother-in-law of Harry Davis of this city.

 

FILMAN - There was a large attendance at the funeral of William Filman held at Ancaster. The deceased had reached his 70th year, and had lived all his life on the farm where he died.He was never married, and was of the most successful men in the township, having accumulated a large property. In private life Mr. Filman was the most retired of men, extremely well read, yet took little or no part in politics. His idea was to vote to the party out of office, and then we shall have the best government. Mr. Filman was a quiet, God-fearing man, and although he belonged to no church was well esteemed by all. He was of U.E.L. stock, his father having fought at Queenston Heights, and was close beside Gen. Brock, when the General was killed. On this occasion Mr. Filman was not wounded, although he had a narrow escape. His mother, who survives him, and is also of American origin, and can remember the battle of Lundy’s Lane.

Mrs. Filman retains all her faculties. She has survived all her family, and has the sympathy of the whole neighbourhood.

 

CAMPBELL (Smithville) - John A. Campbell died last Thursday after a long illness. His remains were interred in the Methodist cemetery.

 

FITCHER (Smithville) - John Fitcher died last Friday, after a long illness. His remains were interred in the Union burying ground.

 

Monday, May 9, 1898

 

ARGENT - In this city, on May 7th, 1898, Rubin James, second twin son of Geo. Argent, 4 years. Funeral May 9th, at 2 p.m. from parents’ residence 104 Birch ave. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Rubin Argent, the four-year-old son of George Argent, Birch avenue, was fatally burned on Saturday. Some boys had built a bonfire, and when the little fellow was watching his clothes caught fire. Non of the other boys had the presence of mind to quench the flames. Mrs. Argent and a neighbour, being attracted by the screams ran to the rescue and tore the burning clothes off the child’s body.

The boy was terribly burned about the body, the skin peeling off in several places. Dr. Bingham was quickly summoned and did what he could for the patient, but the little fellow suffered terribly until death came to his release about midnight on Saturday.

The funeral took place this afternoon. The religious services by Rev. S.E. Marshall, of the Barton street Methodist church.


Tuesday, May 10, 1898

 

IRVINE - Suddenly of apoplexy on Monday afternoon May 9th, at her husband’s residence, 138 Duke street, Ellen, beloved wife of W.A. Irvine, aged 57 years. Funeral on Wednesday at 2 p.m. Private.

Mrs. Irvine, wife of William Irvine, 138 Duke street, dropped dead yesterday. She was apparently in good health up to the time of her death, which was due to apoplexy.

 

STEWART - David Stewart, postmaster and general store keeper at Thistletown, died very suddenly on Saturday night from paralysis of the throat.

 

JACKSON (Belleville) May 9 - On Saturday evening James Jackson, an aged resident of Ameliasburg, was found dead at the spring on his farm, whether he had gone for a pail of water. The old man, who was 77 years of age, had fallen into the water head first and had been unable to extricate himself. Deceased was a bachelor and lived alone. He had some relatives in this part of the country.

 

Wednesday, May 11, 1898

 

HERRON - At his late residence 90 Wellington street south, on Wednesday May 11, 1898, Joseph Herron, aged 67 years. Funeral Friday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Joseph Herron, the oldest and best known and merchant tailor of Hamilton is dead. For over 40 years he had lived in Hamilton, conducting a tailoring business, and for over thirty years he occupied his present King st. east premises. He was stricken down a week ago with pneumonia and in spite of the best care died early this morning at his home, 99 Wellington st. south. He was an Englishman from Newcastle-On-Tyne. He leaves no children. His widow survives him. He was 67 years old, and has no relatives in this country. He was a member of St. John’s lodge, A.F. and A.M. and Excelsior lodge, I.O.O.F.The funeral will likely take place on Friday. Mr. Herron will be remembered as the citizen who on two different occasions was assaulted near his home being sand-bagged and attempts being made to rob him.

 

McDOUGALL (Huntsville, Ont.) May 11 - John McDougall, of South River, a river driver for M. Brennan & Sons, Hamilton, was drowned yesterday while working on McBrien’s rapids.

McDougall is not a Hamilton man.

 

DUNCAN (Hannon) - After a lingering illness Mrs. Jessie Duncan, aged 78 years, past away on Thursday evening last. Deceased came to this country from Scotland about 40 years ago, and has lived in this section mostly ever since. Two sons and two daughters remain to mourn her loss. The funeral took place to the burying ground, Mount Albion, on Sunday. The Presbyterian minister Rev. Mr. Walker conducted the service at the house.

 

LOOSLEY - At Niagara Falls, Ont., May 9th, Ada E. Beloved wife of E.W. Looseley aged 36 years. Interment at Hamilton cemetery Wednesday, on the arrival of the 3:30 train at Stuart st. station. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Loosley, wife of E.W. Loosley, died at Niagara Falls on Saturday. The body will be brought to Hamilton for interment on Wednesday.


BELL (Oakville, Ont.) May 9 - George Bell, a pedlar from Hamilton, committed suicide here Sunday evening in the training room by cutting his throat with a pen knife. He had a hawker’s license to sell goods in Hamilton. Chief inspector had only left him a few minutes to get him his supper. When he returned he had the knife in his throat severing the windpipe. Doctor Urquhart was called, but did nothing for him. Bell is about 65 years old, 5 foot 8 inches, rather slim, sandy mustache, streaked with grey, hair cut short, wore a light brown overcoat and brown hat.

Bell, the suicide mentioned in the dispatch is well-known around the city. He had been around here for the past twenty five years, and for the past year or two has lived while in the city at a cheap lodging house, at 112 James street south. He was there on Friday last and started out with his pedlar’s kit in the afternoon, considerably under the influence of liquor. He owed for some board and said he would settle when he came back from the country. It is believed by the men at the lodging house that he committed suicide while under the influence of liquor. He is not known to have had any relatives anywhere. He was a man about 50 years old.

 

FORTIER - A fatal accident occurred yesterday afternoon on the Soulanges canal, opposite Coteau Landing. A workman named Joseph Fortier, 50 years of age, and a resident of Ottawa, while engaging in land excavation, was suddenly buried alive by a cave-in. Although prompt assistance came, the man was quite dead when rescued.

 

PURDY (Westover) - Once more our community has been visited by the grim reaper. Some weeks ago one of our old and respected residents in the person of John Purdy was followed to his last resting place in the Westover cemetery. He was taken ill with pneumonia, accompanied by abscess of the liver, and after ten days illness succumbed to the effects of the disease. While mourning sincerely his loss, his friends are thankful that his period of suffering was not lengthy, and that when “God’s finger touched him and he slept.” It was a release from pain. Deceased was 63 years of age, and was among the early settlers in Beverly. His life was that of a quiet inoffensive man,

and a kind neighbour. The tenderest sympathy of the community is extended to the bereaved widow and family, and our prayer is that the God of the widow and fatherless may fill their hearts with His abiding comfort and peace. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Mr. Treleaven, pastor of the circuit.

 

ROSS - Sergt. Ross of the St. Thomas police force died Tuesday morning as the result of paralytic stroke a week ago last Sunday.

 

Thursday, May 12, 1898

 

HERRON - At his late residence, 99 Wellington street south, on Wednesday, May 11, 1898, Joseph Herron, aged 67 years. Funeral Friday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CRAWFORD - In this city, on May 11, Egbert Stanley Crawford, aged 44 years. Funeral Friday at 2 p.m. from Burlington, to Plains road cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 


HENDERSON (North Baxton, Kent County, Ont.) May 12 - About 3 o’clock this morning a house occupied by Mrs. Henderson, a widow, and her ten-year-old daughter, took fire and was totally destroyed. Mrs. Henderson and the little girl were burned to death. No cause as yet been ascertained for the fire. An inquest will be held.

 

SCOTT - A two-year-old-son of Charles Scott, Arden, died as the result of the lodgment of some popcorn in his wind pipe.

 

McCARTHY (Toronto) May 12 - Dalton McCarthy, Q.C., M.P., died at his residence, 174 Beverly street, shortly after 9 o’clock last night, the immediate cause of death being acute pneumonia, superinduced by injuries received in a run-a-way accident which occurred on Sunday evening last.

The melancholy incidents connected with the tragic event are still fresh in the public mind. Mr. McCarthy left his residence on Sunday evening in a high dog-cart, drawn by a very spirited horse. He was accompanied by his coachman, Taylor, but was handling the reins himself, and was driving to the Union station to take the train to Ottawa. When opposite the Beverly street Baptist church, the horse bolted, and at the corner of Queen and Beverly streets the coachman was thrown to the sidewalk, sustaining serious injuries.

A short distance further on the rig overturned, and Mr. McCarthy still clinging tenaciously to the lines, was dragged some distance in the debris of the cart. When picked up he was unconscious and until his death never fully regained his senses, although partially conscious at times.

The end came rather suddenly as it was not thought by the doctors that death was so near. A few minutes after 9 o’clock Dr. Pepler, who has never left the injured man’s bedside for more than a few minutes since the accident occurred, noticed a rapid change for the worse, and hastily summoned Dr. McCarthy, and Dr. Grasett, who was at his home, but before arrival of the later, Mr. McCarthy had breathed his last, death coming quietly, without any very great pain.

The funeral of the late Dalton McCarthy will take place on Saturday. It will be of a private character, but very many citizens will no doubt take advantage of the occasion to show their respect for the deceased. Many messages of sympathy with the bereaved family were received this morning at the house of he deceased on Beverly street.

 

Friday, May 13, 1898

 

ROSS - In this city on May 12th, Charles Ross, aged 29 years. The funeral Sunday at 1:30 p.m. from his late residence, 129 Peter street, to the Ancaster Presbyterian cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

Charles Ross a carter in the employ of Hendrie & Co., died at his home on Peter street early this morning under rather peculiar circumstances. On Wednesday morning he went to work with his team, but came home after a few hours feeling sick. He went to bed and to sleep, so his wife thought, but it turned out to be a stupor from which he never regained consciousness. Dr. Wallace and Dr. Holmstead were both called in, but could do nothing to relieve the unfortunate. Yesterday the case was aggravated by an attack of pneumonia. It was thought at first that there might have been suspicious circumstances connected with the affair as Ross was said to have told his wife as he lay down on Wednesday that he guessed those fellows had been fooling him again. Dr. Wallace thinks brain trouble caused death and will hold a post-mortem this afternoon. Ross leaves a widow and two small children - one five years old, and the other is 6-months old baby. He was 30 years old.

 


DOYLE (Brantford) May 13 - John Doyle, aged about 21, for the past two years operator with the G.N.W. Telegraph company, Hamilton, was killed by a G.T.R. train this morning. The deceased had been ill for some three months. He came to his home in Brantford about a month ago and was improving. For better facilities of medical treatment went to the hospital last Wednesday. The day being fine, it is supposed he was taking a walk from the hospital to his home, coming down the track for a short cut and for some at present unaccountable reason got in front of the train. He was a great favourite with all who knew him, both in Hamilton in Brantford. His Hamilton office associates were greatly upset when they heard of the sad death.

 

ASHQUABE (Sutton, Ont.) May 12 - The adjourned inquest in connection with the death of the infant child of the Indian girl Isabelle Ashquabe, of Georgina Island, was resumed this evening before Coroner Cotton of Toronto. The verdict was to the effect at the said Indian infant came to her death on April 19 last at Georgina Island, county of York: no marks of violence appeared on the body, but how or by what means she came to her death the jurors were unable to say. The practice of burying the bodies of deceased Indians without burial permits was condemned.

A magistrates court to consider the charge against Adam Wilson, of Hefferlaw for inciting to murder in connection with the death of the Indian infant was withdrawn by the crown, and another criminal charge laid against him under the Charlton act. Prisoner pleaded not guilty, waived examination and was committed for trial at the next court of competent jurisdiction.

 

MERKLEY - Asap Merkley was found drowned in the flume at Morrisburg. It is not known whether it was a case of accident or a suicide.

 

HERRON - The funeral of Joseph Herron, tailor, took place from his late residence, 99 Wellington street south, this afternoon. Mr. Herron being well and favourably known in this city, having lived for over 40 years, it is not surprising that the funeral was very largely attended.

Deceased was a member of St. John’s lodge, A.F. and A.M. and Excelsior lodge, I.O.O.F., and the pall-bearers were selected from the ranks of these bodies. Members of both societies attended the funeral.

 

Saturday, May 14, 1898

 

MELLON - At her late residence, No.11 Nightingale street, on Saturday morning, May 14th,

1898, Martha, relict of the late John Mellon in her 70th year. Funeral Monday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SCOTT - On May 12th, at his late residence, 142 Hannah st. east, William Scott, formerly of Oshawa and Buffalo, in the 70th year of his age. Funeral on Sunday at 2:30, private.

William Scott, who lived on Hannah street, died last evening. He had been ill for some time. He leaves a widow and a large family. The sons and daughters are: W.G. Scott, city; C.W. Scott, Oshawa; R.J. Scott, Chicago; Miss Carrie Scott, Miss Bessie Scott, and Mrs. W.A. Howell, Mrs. William Heeney, Mrs. J.W. Archer, Collingwood’ Mrs. James Gillespie, Tonawanda; Mrs. Henry Norris, Mrs. George Carroll, Buffalo.

 


EVANS - On May 14th, at her late residence, 15 Mulberry st., Hamilton, the beloved wife of Peter T. Evans. Funeral from above address to English church cemetery, at Burlington, at 2 o’clock, on Monday.

 

GAY - At her late residence, 126 Cannon street west, Saturday, May 14th, 1898, Helen Buchanan, relict of the late Walter Gay, aged 75, a native of Dunbartonshire, Scotland. Funeral from the above address on Monday 16th at 3 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances respectively invited to attend.

Mrs. Gay, widow of Walter Gay, died this morning. She had been ill for some time. The deceased was born in Dumbartonshire, Scotland and came to Hamilton when she was quite young, having lived here for fifty seven years. She was estimable lady, and had a large circle of warm friends. She leaves one son, John B. Gay, and two daughters - Mrs. J.J. Evel, and Miss Gay. J.B. Jardine is a nephew of the deceased.

 

McCARTHY (Toronto) May 14 - The remains of the late Dalton McCarthy were on view this morning from 10 to 12 o’clock at his residence, 174 Beverley street. Not very many citizens called, however, owing to the reluctance of the family to have any feature of the last scenes made more public than necessary. There was a very large attendance of leading citizens at the funeral itself.Many residents of Barrie and Collingwood, and other parts of North Simcoe, came to town and formed part of the funeral procession.

Members of the Country and Hunt club attended almost in a body, following on foot from the residence to St. George’s church. Representatives of the Irish Protestant Benevolent Society, of which Mr. McCarthy was a leading member, also attended in a body. Members of other societies were present in great numbers, and the procession of carriages filled with citizens of paying a mark of respect to the dead statesman was a lengthy one.

 

JENNINGS (Toronto) May 14 - About 9 o’clock last evening John Spedding, a butcher in the St. Lawrence market discovered a body floating in the water at the foot of Yonge street about 50 feet west at the Hamilton Steamboat company’s wharf. With the assistance of some boys the body was brought ashore and the police notified.

At the morgue it was found that the clothing and linen on the body were marked C. Jennings, and later in the evening the remains were identified of those of Charles Jennings, a man 35 years of age who had recently been released on probation from the Mimico lunatic asylum.

About a year ago he was sent from Barrie to the asylum, and four months ago his cousin got him released on probation. He was last seen alive by his relatives on Wednesday afternoon.

 

KENNEDY (Perth, Ont.) May 13 - A terrible accident happened at the Canadian Pacific Railway company’s shops here this afternoon, in which Philip Kennedy lost his life. Kennedy, who had completed his part of the work on a car, was talking to two companions engaged in adjusting the couplings to the almost finished car. Another box car also completed, was eight feet distant on the same track, and deceased’s head was in line with the couplers, when, without the slightest warning the shunting engine struck the train of cars, sending the two together with great force. The couplers caught Kennedy’s head, smashing it to a jelly. Several other workmen narrowly escaped with their lives. Deceased leaves a widow and family.

 


McCARTHY - An emergency meeting of the Hamilton Law associates was called yesterday afternoon at the library in the courthouse with E. Martin Q.C. in the chair, and a large number of the members being present. The chairman explained that the object of the meeting was to take some action in reference to the funeral of the late Dalton McCarthy, whereupon Mr. Mackenzie moved and Mr. Lazier seconded a resolution expressing the deep feeling of regret entertained by the members of the association at the loss of the distinguished leader of the bar, and conveying in proper language an expression of sympathy to his widow and family, which was carried by a standing vote.

 

MULHOLLAND (Troy) - Mrs. Janet Mulholland, relict of the late George Mulholland, died on Wednesday May 4, aged 73 years, at her son’s residence, Wellington Mulholland, and was buried on Saturday. She was held in very high esteem by a very large circle of friends and acquaintances. She leaves three sons, and two daughters-Wellington, and Walter, of Troy: M.cKendrie, of Galt; Mrs. Thos. Badger, of Manitoba, and Mrs. J.M. Peregrine, of Hamilton.

 

Monday, May 16, 1898

 

MADEN - At her late residence No. 135 Ferrie, on Saturday May 14, 1898, Betsy, relict of the late John Maden, aged 65 years. Funeral Tuesday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MEDLEY (Toronto) May 16 - An eighteen-months-old daughter of Cornelius Medley, second-hand dealer Toronto Junction, was run over by a car of the Toronto suburban line on Dundas street, Toronto Junction this morning, and terribly mangled, death resulting within half an hour. An inquest will be held. The child was playing on the street.

 

ROSS - The funeral of the late Charles Ross, whose almost sudden death occurred last Friday, took place yesterday afternoon and was largely attended by the members of the Ancient Order of Foresters, Hendrie & Co’s employees and his many friends, thus showing the great respect in which the deceased was held. As the interment took place at the Presbyterian church, Ancaster, the society escorted the remains to the city limits and returned. The cortege was a very long one. The services at the house were conducted by Rev. J.G. Shearer, and a full service was held at the church by Rev. Mr. Rogers and a full choir, the whole service being very appropriate. The service of the society was conducted by A.E. Smith, P.C.R., assisted by J.D. Buckingham. P.H.C.R. C. Wheeler, P.C.R. was marshall for the occasion.

 

Tuesday, May 17, 1898

 

CROFTON - In this city, on the 16th inst., Thomas Crofton, aged 40 years. Funeral will leave his late residence, 11 Cathcart st. Wednesday at 8:30 a.m. to St. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

Thomas Crofton, molder, died yesterday afternoon at his late resident, 11 Cathcart street. His death resulted from blood poisoning. Mr. Crofton was a great lover of baseball, and in the early days of the old Standard club played first base. He leaves a wife and two children, and many friends to mourn his loss.

 

STOREY - The body of John Story has been sent to Orillia for interment.


When the body of the man found on Mr. Kitchen’s farm was identified as that of John Storey, it was not believed that the inquest would be continued, but Coroner Brandon, and some of the jurors wanted evident taken. This was done at Ancaster last night, when several witnesses were examined. The verdict of the jury was that the deceased died from exposure. Under the circumstances there was no necessity for the continuation of the inquest.

 

Wednesday, May 18, 1898

 

ALEXANDER - In this city on the 18th inst., Elizabeth A. relict of the late Frank Alexander, aged 34 years and 8 months. Funeral will leave her late residence, 68 Canada st. east, on Friday morning at 8:30 to St. Mary’s cathedral thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

O’BRIEN (Creemore, Ont.) May 17 - While John O’Brien of the firm of O’Brien & Bowden, millers here, was working in the mill this afternoon, he was caught in the machinery and before it could be stopped had both legs and one arm broken in several places, and also all the ribs on one side.

Mr. O’Brien’s injuries were so serious that from the first his recovery was despaired of and he died tonight at 10 o’clock

 

MORRISON (Brockville, Ont.) May 17 - John Morrison, a carpenter living at Orillia, tried to jump a train last night near Landsdown, but was caught by the wheels which crushed his legs to pulp. He was considerably under the influence of liquor at the time. Dr. Shaw, of Landsdowne was notified and he ordered to be brought to the general hospital here, which was accordingly done. He was so weak from dissipation and exposure that Dr. Bowie decided not to amputate the leg, and at noon he died. Deceased was about 35 years old. He will buried in Orillia.

 

Thursday, May 19, 1898

 

DODD - At Nelson on Wednesday May 18, 1898, Margaret, beloved wife of John Dodd, aged 76 years. Funeral takes place on Friday at 1 o’clock to Greenwood cemetery, Burlington. Service at the house. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

FRID - At his late residence 306 Hannah street west, John W. Frid, in his 37th year. Notice of funeral later.

John Frid, brickmaker, brother of ex-ald. Frid, died this morning at his residence, 306 Hannah st. west. He had been suffering for about a month from typhoid fever, and it was not expected that his illness would prove fatal. He leaves a widow and four children.

 

SCHADEL - In this city, on May 18th, Frederick William, the only son of Fred and Ettie Schadel, aged 3 months and 18 days. Funeral fill leave his father’s residence 24 Cannon st. west, Friday at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

EFFINGER (Selkirk) - On Tuesday last Chris Effinger passed quietly away after a lingering sickness. All that medical could do was done for him, but he gradually decline since the loss of his wife some three months ago. The funeral services took place on Thursday morning at the White church, Rainham, conducted by Rev. Mr. Hehn.

 


Friday, May 20, 1898

 

FRID - At his late residence 306 Hannan street west, John W. Frid, in his 37th year. The funeral will take place at 2 o’clock tomorrow afternoon.

 

ROUTH - At his late residence, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Capt. Percy Gore Routh, late of the Thirteenth battalion.

Capt. Percy G. Routh, brother of John T. Routh of this city, died yesterday at Niagara-on-the Lake. The deceased was 57 years of age. He was the fourth son of Capt. Henry Routh, of the Fifteen Hussars, and was born in Bangalore, India. He lived in Hamilton for a number of years, being with Kerr, Brown & Co. He went from Hamilton to Detroit, where he joined Rankin’s Lancers and after leaving there he went with the Thirteenth Battalion to Ridgeway where he was wounded. On his return to Hamilton, the citizens presented a sword to him for his bravery. Capt. Routh went from Hamilton to Toronto where he lived for a number of years subsequently going to Niagara-on-the-Lake.

 

AITKEN - In this city, on the 20th inst., of heart failure, Christina Elizabeth, widow of the late S.M. Aitken. Funeral private.

 

McGARVIN (Toronto) May 20 - The child’s body, which takes up a very small portion of one of the marble slabs at the morgue, was the subject of an inquest last night, and now the mother of the babe is in custody charged with murder, for the jury, shortly after midnight, rendered the verdict, that the infant had been starved to death. Mary McGarvin was immediately arrested by morality officer Chapman and taken from the morgue to police headquarters.

When the jurors were shown the emaciated little body, they were visibly shocked. The child was taken from Mrs. Beasley’s maternity home, 114 Adelaide st. west, to the morgue on Wednesday. It had died suddenly that morning, and Dr. Farriar refused a burial certificate.

Mary McGarvin, the mother of the child, is a healthy-looking woman, about 24 years of age. She is single. She admitted that the child was hers and said she never noticed it sick at all until it was taken suddenly ill and died. She said she had fed the child with milk whenever she thought it needed it and that she did not know it was dangerous to wean a baby. Two nice-looking girls, who had recently been confined in Mrs. Beasley’s house testified that to the best of their knowledge, the child had been sufficient fed.

The jury added a rider to their verdict, urging the authorities to at once conform with the law and institute the system of rigid inspection of maternity homes.

Mary McGarvin, who claims to come from Napanee, wept copiously when she heard the verdict and was detained.

 

PASHLEY - Mrs. Pashley, of Rowdon, was thrown from a rig and instantly killed.

 

COOPER - Boys playing on the canal at Perth threw stones at what they thought was a dead animal in the water. It proved to be the body of an old man named James Cooper.

 


LAMBERT (Harriston, Ont.) May 19 - R.G. Lambert, one of the most widely-known residents of this section, died suddenly this morning. He had gone to his place of business as usual, and had just seated himself to read the paper, when he sank back in his chair. By the time his sons who were attracted by a slight noise, reached him, he was dead.

 

Saturday, May 21, 1898

 

BOLES - In this city on the 20th inst., Robert Boles, aged 27 years and 10 months. Funeral from his late residence, 149 Canada st., on Sunday at 4 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

A special meeting of Concord lodge No. 291, A.O.U.W. , is hereby called for the purpose of attending the funeral of our late brother, R. Boles, on Sunday May 22, at 3 p.m. Members of sister lodges invited.

 

SMITH - Alexander Smith, a farmer living near Peterborough, was trampled to death by a bull.

 

STANSFIELD - Joshua Stansfield, for many years postmaster of the Dominion house of commons, died Wednesday evening. Owing to ill-health he was superannuated two years ago.

 

DUNN - Thomas Dunn, a Kingston grocer, died last night, after a week’s illness from haemorrhage of the bowels, aged sixty-one. He was a Roman Catholic, a strong Conservative and a well-known citizen.

 

GRABURN, BAKER (Winnipeg) May 20 - Two lives were lost in the burning of the opera house at Rat Portage. The remains of M. Graburn, a former resident of Winnipeg, and bookkeeper for the Western Lumber co., were found about 10 a.m. The other victim is a girl named Baker.

 

Monday, May 23, 1898

 

TANGNEY - In this city on the 22nd inst., Ellen, daughter of the late John Tangney. Funeral took place this afternoon.

 

WILLIAMS - On the 21st inst., Alice Maude, only daughter of George J. Williams. Funeral Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. from the residence, 23 Homewood avenue, to the Church of the Ascension. Interment at Hamilton cemetery.

 

MacLEAN - In this city, on the 21 inst., William A. MacLean, in his 40th year. Funeral from his late residence, 295 Hannah st. west, on Tuesday at 3:30 p.m., to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HUNTER - In the death of D.H. Hunter, B.A., principal of the Collegiate institute, Woodstock loses a citizen of great worth. In addition to his intellectual culture, broad sympathies and personal magnetism, Mr. Hunter combined great executive ability, which was demonstrated by his success in placing the Collegiate in the front rank of Ontario’s educational institutions.


Previous to coming to Woodstock in 1884, Mr. Hunter had earned a wide reputation by his good work in Rockwood academy and Waterloo High school. He was one of the many successful Canadians who received their early training under the late Dr. Tassie, in the Galt Grammar school. Graduating from Toronto University in 1871, he at once devoted his attention to educational matters, being an earnest believer in the nobility of the teaching profession and its many responsibilities. Early and late he was to be found at his post, and many young men and women will mourn his death, not only as an honoured teacher but as a warm personal friend, whose advise and assistance was always at their disposal. In religious matters he was equally zealous, being for years an elder and Sunday school superintendent in Knox church. His influence has been felt on the side of progress and right. In Freemasonry the deceased occupied a very high position. Residing in the Hamilton district for a number of years, he was the mainstay and master of Waterdown lodge 357. At that time he became a member of the Scottish Right and Murton Lodge of Perfection in Hamilton. Upon his removal to Woodstock, the brethren of Wilson district elected him D.D.G.M., twice in succession. His thoughtful and instructive addresses on the History and Work of the Cruft will long remembered by his brethren, not only of Woodstock but also of the district he so ably presided over.

A year ago Mr. Hunter was suddenly attached with lung trouble. Early in November last, accompanied by his wife and brother, Dr. John Hunter, of Toronto, he visited Southern California. The change of climate caused a temporary improvement, but two weeks ago he returned to spend his last days with the friends to whom he was so deeply attached in Woodstock. A widow and four children mourn the loss of a devoted and father. His eldest son is attending Toronto university. Two sons and a daughter are at home. Mr. Hunter was a brother of Mrs. John Hoodless. of this city, and has many warm friends in Hamilton.

 

HUNTER - D.H. Hunter, B.A., principal of the Woodstock Collegiate institute, died on Saturday evening at seven o’clock. He was taken suddenly ill, one year ago and went to California.

 

MARSICANO (Ottawa) May 22 - Little Henry Marsicano, the fourteen-months-old child of an Italian living at 82 Besserer street, died at noon yesterday from concussion of the brain. The father was dancing the child in his arms, the catch missed, and the child fell to the floor, its head striking heavily. It was unconscious when picked up.

 

LAVELLE (Fulton) - The funeral of the late Mr. Lavelle took place from his late residence here to the Smithville cemetery on Sunday last. Deceased was in his eightieth year, and had enjoyed good health until a few months previous to his death. For a number of years he preached in the Universalist church at Smithville and in Toronto, and was a good conversationalist on any subject.

 

SALAMSKY (Toronto) May 23 - The victim of drowning was eight-year-old Joseph Salamsky, 37 Center avenue. The boy with two companions of about his age, went to the waterworks slip to swim. Young Salamsky, after hanging onto a rope at the side of a cribwork of the dock, suddenly dived and did not come up again. His companions laughed at the length of time he stayed under the water, and did not realize the seriousness of the case until the lad had been down several minutes. They than ran for help, and Assistant Engineer Hall of the pumping station, grappled for the body, and recovered it after some little difficulty.

 

COUSINS (Bradford, Ont.) May 21 - This afternoon John Cousins, son of James Cousins, a young lad about ten years of age, while looking in the shorts bin in Samuel Luke’s flour mill, lost his balance and fell into the bin. Before he could be caught he disappeared down the chute and, not withstanding that it was immediately open at the bottom, the little lad was dead when he came out. Great sympathy is felt for the father of the boy in this sad calamity.


FARRELL - William Farrell, of 741 Euclid avenue, Toronto, who suffered a compound fracture of the leg in a run-a-way accident on May 15th, died on Saturday at the general hospital from blood poisoning.

 

FREEBORN (Toronto) May 23 - David Freeborn, an employee of the Massey-Harris company who boarded with the Martin family at 124 Macdonnell avenue, Parkdale, was the victim of a fatality, which occurred at about 6 o’clock, in the lake, between Sunnyside and the Humber. The young man in company with Fred and Irvine Martin, went to Maw’s boathouse at Sunnyside early in the afternoon, and hired a rowboat. The four then rode to the Humber, where they spent a portion of the afternoon. When on their way back the boat was overturned while the oars were being changed, and the four young men were precipitated. They all clutched for the boat, which would hardly support their combined weight and Dave Freeborn started to swim to the shore, which was about three quarters of a mile away. He had only covered a short part of the distance when he became exhausted and sank. The accident was witnessed by hundreds of people, who were enjoying the lovely afternoon on the Lake Shore road and the cries of the men hanging on the boat could be distinctly heard. Half a dozen boats went to the scene and the three young men were almost exhausted when they rescued. Devine lapsed into unconsciousness and it was a long time before he recovered. The three were rolled in blankets at Maw’s boathouse, and were not able to leave for some time after the accident. Freeborn’s body has not yet been recovered.

 

WELTON - Michael Welton, of Glanford, passed away on Sunday last, in the 73rd year of his age. Deceased was a native of Haltwhistle, Northumberland, England, but spent the most of his life in Glanford. He was a blacksmith by trade. He was stricken with paralysis a short time ago from which he never recovered. Deceased leaves a widow to mourn his loss. The funeral takes place on Wednesday, May 25, to Unity church, Seneca.

 

ATKINSON - On Saturday, Hamilton lost one of its old residents, in the person of Mrs. Elizabeth Atkinson, 89 Wilson street, widow of the late Joseph Atkinson, painter. She had suffered from illness for a long time and her demise was not unexpected. Deceased was in her 86th year. She had been for 45 years a resident of Hamilton, and had a large circle of friends. Two daughters survive her.

 

Wednesday, May 25, 1898

 

HULL - At her son’s residence, Federal Life building, on the 25th inst., Jane, relict of the late John Hull, of Garnet, Haldimand county, age 69 years. Funeral notice later.

 

WOOD - In this city, on May 24th, Phoebe Holland Cowing, beloved wife, of James Wood, of the G.T.R. Funeral from her husband’s residence, 279 John st. north, on Friday, May 27th, at 2:30 o’clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

POTTRUFF - In this city on the 24th inst., Ruth, relict of the late Levi L. Pottruff, in her 79th year. Funeral from her late residence 82 Hunter st. east, at 1:30 p.m., May 26th, to Stony Creek cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 


SAUVE - Clarence Sauve, aged 6, was drowned at Cornwall in full view of a number of people, who made no effort to save him.

 

Thursday, May 26, 1898

 

LEVY - At 143 James st. south, Hamilton, on Wednesday, May 25th, Edgar youngest son of Herman and Camilla Levy, aged 17 years, and 3 months. Funeral notice later.

 

HULL - At her son’s residence, Federal Life building, on the 25th inst., Jane, relict of the late John Hull, of Garnet, Haldimand county, aged 69 years. Funeral service at 8 a.m. Friday. Remains will be conveyed to the King st. station to 9 o’clock train. Interment at Garnet on arrival of train.

 

HUGHES - At Chesterfield, Walter Hughes was fatality injured while playing ball.

 

HALE - William Hale, of Malton, well-known throughout the county of Peel, died at his hotel at Malton on Tuesday night. He was 65 years of age. Apoplxy.

 

MARTIN - C.W.H. Martin, pianist at the Bijou theatre, Toronto, and an ex-member of the Queen’s Own, and Royal Grenadier bands, died yesterday. His death was due to dirty dental instruments, which caused blood poisoning after the extraction of a tooth.

 

JENKINS (Toronto) May 26 - A coloured child named Johnny Jenkins, son of John Jenkins, of 63 Centre avenue, lost his life yesterday afternoon, about 5 o’clock by being run over by a pedlar’s wagon. The driver of the wagon, Frank Curaso, a pedlar, is under arrest charged with manslaughter.

 

A few minutes before five, John Jenkins, the father of the child, gave him a cent to buy candy. The little one ran out eagerly and reached the middle of the street, when his hat fell off. Curaso’s

wagon was coming south on the street, but the child evidently did not notice it, as he turned and attempted to pick up his hat.

At that instant hooves of the horse struck the boy, full in the face, and in a second the two wheels of the rig had passed over his body crushing out life instantly. Curaso ....... his horse for a moment and then without leaving his seat drove rapidly away.

Mrs. Jenkins, the boy’s mother, was ill in bed, having recently been confined. One of the child’s companions hurried into the house and told her of the tragedy. She jumped from her bed, and rushing out into the street picked up the bleeding form of her child. Jenkins was working in the garden at the back of his house, and his wife’s agonized cries brought him to the street. He took the boy from the frenzied woman’s arms and carried him to a drug store. There seem to be a spark of life left, but it lasted only a few moments. Doctors were summoned, but life was extinct when they arrived.

Meanwhile the police had been notified and had proceeded to the scene of the fatality to investigate. While there, Curaso drove up the street again with his rig loaded with bananas and was pointed out to the police and arrested. He denied all knowledge of the affair, and still continues to deny it, but the police say that he was fully identified by the boys who saw the accident. He was locked up at No. 3 police station, charged with manslaughter and will be remanded to await the action of the coroner’s jury, who will tonight under Dr. Greig’s direction, inquire into the matter.


DEACON (London, Ont.) May 25 - While despondent, after a spat with her husband, Mrs. John Deacon committed suicide today by taking paris green. Some children playing near the window of her home on Clarence street, saw the unfortunate woman lying on the floor, writhing in agony.  Thinking she had been taken with a fit, neighbours summoned the ambulance and the driver asked Dr. McCollum to attend to the sick woman. He found her suffering from paris green poisoning, the dose having been taken at least two hours before. The doctor’s worked until 6:30 this evening, but so large amount of poison had been swallowed, that they could do nothing. Mrs. Deacon, who is 51 years of age, was despondent for the lat few days, and is supposed to have been irresponsible when she ended her life. Her husband is a labourer in the city employ.

 

LALONDE (Kingston) May 25 - Mr. Lalonde whose arm was crushed in a mill at Collins bay on Monday died this morning. Deceased was 56 years of age, a native of Coteau, Que. He had been in the service of he Collins Bay Rafting company, for 21 years. A year ago today his wife died.

 

GRANT (Toronto) May 26 - Miss Mable Grant, the young lady whose home was at 237 Logan avenue, was walking north on Belleview avenue near the corner of College street, at 3:30 last night, when she was attacked with a violent fit of coughing, which resulted in a haemorrhage of the lungs. She fell upon the sidewalk and a friend who was with her, called to the men in College street fire hall for assistance. Miss Grant was carried into the fire hall, and Doctors Steacy, and Moore were summoned, but the haemorrhage had caused death in a few moments.

Deceased was nineteen years of age, and a daughter of William Grant, and had been visiting her cousin at 73 Belleview avenue. Her father was sent for and her body removed to her home on Logan avenue. The young lady had been a sufferer of weak lungs, and had twice before been attacked with haemorrhage.

 

HURLEY (Eastwood, Ont.) May 26 - A sad accident happened here this evening about 6 o’clock by which an old resident Anthony Hurley lost his life. He was returning home with a team, wagon and cultivator owned by J. Maloney, which he had been using during the day. He had just reached the top the little grade from underneath the railway bridge which passes over the Brantford road at this point, when the 5:50 express came rushing along. The horses immediately took fright and ran away throwing the old man off the wagon, only to be caught by the teeth of the cultivator, which was attached behind. He was dragged fifteen or twenty rods along the hard ground, and when found some minutes after by Rev. A.B. Miller, life was extinct. He leaves a widow and two sons, both grown up.

 

RANKIN (Bracebridge, Ont.) May 25 - A man named James Rankin, of Stisted, was shot and killed by his nephew, a boy named Frankum, last winter. Frankum and a Mrs. Stevens, his mother, were driving along a bush road, when they came to a place where deceased Rankin had a load of tan which so obstructed the road as to render it impossible to pass. A quarrel ensued.Mrs. Stevens sent the boy home for a shotgun, he came back with it and shot his uncle, who died from the effects a few days thereafter, in the Huntsville hospital.

 

Friday, May 27, 1898

 


LEVY - At 143 James st. south, Hamilton, on Wednesday, May 25th, Edgar, youngest son of Herman and Camilla Levy, aged 17 years, and 3 months. Funeral from the family residence, Sunday, May 29th, at 2 o’clock. No flowers.

 

PLOWMAN (Toronto) May 27 - A private post-mortem was held last night on the body of Benjamin Plowman of Weston, who died on Tuesday. The death certificate issued stated the deceased has succumbed after a ten weeks illness from paresis, but that the immediate cause of death had been delirium tremens. His friends asserted that he had not had any liquor for weeks, and to prevent the statement of the death certificate from affecting the deceased’s insurance, the post-mortem was held at the instance of W.P. Bull, of Gallagher & Bull, solicitor for one of the widows of the deceased.

Benjamin Plowman was formerly an iron founder at Weston, and was passed 60 years of age. He had had considerable domestic trouble in his day, and his first wife lived a few doors from him on the same street; but he was alleged also to have been married to the woman he lived with latterly. Though formerly well-to-do the deceased estate will amount to only about $2,000.

 

Saturday, May 28, 1898

 

LEVY - At 143 James st. south, Hamilton, on Wednesday, May 25th, Edgar, youngest son of Herman and Camilla Levy, aged 17, and 3 months. Funeral from the family residence, Sunday, May 29th, at 2:00 o’clock. No flowers.

 

HENDRIE - At Hamilton, on Friday evening, May 27th, John Hendrie, aged 57. Funeral Monday May 30. Private.

 

JONES - At Stony Creek, on May 28th, Helen Katharine May, only daughter of J.H. and M.S. Jones, aged 4 months, and 28 days. Funeral on Monday afternoon at 2 o’clock. Private.

 

HAMILTON - In Cleveland, Ohio, on Thursday May 26th, James Hamilton, aged 50 years. Funeral will take place from 13 Locomotive st., on Sunday at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

FLEMING (St. George) - The funeral of the late Mrs. Robert Fleming took place to the Methodist cemetery last Saturday.

 

KIRKTON (Ryckman’s Corners) - The remains of the late Mrs. Kirkton were interred in the Barton Presbyterian cemetery last Wednesday.

 

KENNEDY (Ottawa) May 27 - John Kennedy, a farmer residing in Russell village, committed suicide on Tuesday night last, by taking carbolic acid. He returned home on Tuesday evening after having finished his days work. About 11 o’clock his wife heard a noise as of a body falling, and, going below, discovered writhing on the floor in agony. A cup was found beside in which was carbolic acid. He died before anything could be done. So far no inquest has been held, although there is a strong feeling that there should be one. The funeral took place yesterday. Kennedy had been very despondent of late, and showed signs of a troubled mind. He was one of the sufferers in the Casselman fire and brooded over the disaster.

 

PALMER - Ethel Palmer, aged eight, was run over by a wagon in Elgin county and died.


BROWN - Dr. Brown, of Holstein, died very suddenly at his home yesterday. Cause unknown.

 

LIDDELL - Amelia Liddell, widow of the Peter Post, of Thurlow, whose husband died two weeks ago, expired yesterday. She was about 75 years of age.

 

EDDIE - William Eddie, of Beverly, a farmer, died yesterday. Deceased was at one time a station agent at Alma, Goldstone, and Drayton, but went into farming. He was 69 years of age.

 

Monday, May 30, 1898

 

BAINE - At noon, Sunday, May 29th, 1898, Alexandria, daughter of James Baine, 44 Robert street. Funeral private, 3:30 p.m., Tuesday May 31st.

 

DOERING (Milverton, Ont.) May 29 - While Henry Doering, who lived about a mile west of this place, was driving on Saturday evening, his team ran away, throwing him out and breaking his arm, as well as bruising and cutting his head to such an extent that he died about three hours afterwards. He was over 70 years old, and leaves a family all grown up, several of whom are in Philadelphia. He was a progressive up-to-date farmer, an ardent Liberal and a member of the Swedenborgian church.

 

EGGLESON (Ottawa) May 28 - Edgar Eggleson, 19 years old, was drowned in the Young Men’s Christian association swimming baths this afternoon. He was seen passing into the baths about 5 o’clock. He was alone, and about half-an-hour afterwards when someone went to have a bath, he was found with his bathing suit on in the water dead. Just how it happened is not known, but it is likely that he took a fit in the water. Heart disease might be the cause of death. Young Eggleson is a brother of John Eggleson, who was at one time president of the Y.M.C.A., and was attending the Collegiate. He was going to write on his matriculation examinations next month.

 

HOGAN (Ottawa) May 28 - A lad named Hogan about twelve years of age fell into the Ottawa river and was drowned this afternoon.

 

BAINE - The death of Miss Alexandria (Ally), Baine, daughter of James Baine, 44 Robert st., at St. Joseph’s hospital between 12 and 1 o’clock yesterday, came as a great blow to her family, and will be keenly felt by her many friends. Miss Baine was taken ill on Wednesday last, and her physicians found she was suffering from appendicitis. She was removed to the hospital on Friday, and underwent the necessary operation. The doctors found other complications; but the operation was successfully performed, and there was every hope that Miss Baine would recover. Unfortunately she became worse and gradually sank until death claimed her yesterday.

Deceased entered the office of Superintendent Stiff at the Grand Trunk in 1882, and remained as secretary for Joseph Wallace, when he was appointed general agent a few years ago. She was a most estimable young lady and had a host of friends. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon, and, at deceased’s request, will be private.

 


HENDRIE - The funeral of John Hendrie took place this afternoon from his late residence. It was private. The pall-bearers were; W. Hendrie jr., John Leggat, J.B. Gillies, J. Gartshore, D.S. Gillies, M. Hendrie, M.H. Leggat and George M. Hendrie, Detroit. The chief mourners were; W. Hendrie, George Hendrie, (Detroit), A. Gartshore, A.D. Braithwaite, M. Leggat, and James W. Hendrie. Rev. Dr. Lyle and Rev. Canon Forneret conducted the religious services.

 

Tuesday, May 31, 1898

 

STEPHENSON - At his mother’s residence, 74 Wellington st. south, on Monday, May 30, George W. Stephenson, aged 34 years. Funeral Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

McKIBBEN - Rev. W.M. McKibben, B.A. clerk of the Stratford Presbytery, is dead, aged 56.He had suffered for some time with disease of the throat. He lives a wife and six children.

 

RANKIN (Bracebridge) May 30 - At the opening of the assize court this morning, prisoners Walter Frankum, and Margaret Stevens were arraigned on the charge of killing James D. Rankin. The tragic end of Rankin was the result of a family quarrel in which the right of way over a private road played a part. The Stevens had been forbidden to use the road. On Dec. 21, deceased and his father, seeing Mrs. Stevens and the boy Walter Frankum driving towards them on the road, ordered them back. The woman refused to do so and sent the boy, “away home for the gun and Mr. Jennings”. While the boy was gone deceased and prisoner were quarrelling. The boy came back with the gun, and two younger boys brought axes. Walter pointed the gun and fired. The charged entered James Rankin leg between the ankle and knee. He went to a neighbour’s and bathed the wound, and then was taken to Huntsville hospital, where he died in four days. The medical testimony was to the effect that death was caused by gangrenous poisoning from soiled linen coming in contact with the gunshot wound. The jury brought in a verdict of not guilty, as against Margaret Stevens, and guilty as to Walter Frankum with a recommendation to the merciful consideration of the court. The chief justice sentenced the boy to three years in the reformatory.

Wednesday, June 1, 1898

 

SEAL - In this city, on May 31st, 1898, Edgar aged 6 years and 9 months, second son of William and Missie Seal, 179 Catharine st. north. Funeral took place this afternoon.

 

STEPHENSON - At his mother’s residence, 74 Wellington st. south, on Monday, May 30, George W. Stephenson, aged 34 years. Funeral Thursday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

STRAUGHAN - At her late residence, 12 Jackson st. east, on Wednesday June 1, Harriette, relict of the late Alexander Straughan, aged 70 years. Funeral Friday at 2 p.m. Interment at St. John’s church, Ancaster.

 

PRENTICE (Toronto) June 1 - A train of flatcars shunting at the foot of Bathurst street shortly before 6 o’clock last night, crushed the life of James Prentice, a section foreman, employed by the Grand Trunk railway.

Prentice was about 45 years of age, and had been in the employ of the Grand Trunk for eleven years. He lived at 520 Front st. west, with his wife and nine children. His tragic death seems to have been purely accidental. With about a dozen other section employees, and Roadmaster James


 Piper, Prentice had come on the flat train from Parkdale. He was on the end of the rear flat car and several men were standing close beside him. The conductor’s car had been uncoupled and was being shunted on a siding, while the flatcars were to be shunted onto another siding. The train was therefore going backwards. Some men had alighted from the train by stepping onto the conductor’s car and then dropping the step. It seems that Prentice was about to follow their example when the train, with a jolt, increased its speed a little to give more impetus to the conductor’s car. Not being coupled the car shot ahead and the unfortunate man stepped or was jolted into space. The wheels of the car he had been on passed over his head and body, and he was dragged a car length before the train could be stopped. Death must have been instantaneous.

The mangled remains were carried into the tool house, and the police were notified of the fatality. An immense crowd gathered around the scene before the body was removed to the morgue, and the sad news was carried to the bereaved family of the deceased who were waiting for him to come home for supper.

 

BLAKELEY (St. Thomas) May 31 - J.W. Campbell, M.C.R. conductor, 140 Ross street has received a letter from Kansas city stating that his brother-in-law, William Blakeley, was murdered in that city on Thursday last. No particulars of the foul deed were given. The deceased was formerly a brakeman on the M.C.R., but went to Kansas City about eleven years ago. He was about 38 years of age, and was born in Courtland, Ontario, where his mother at present resides. The remains may be brought to St. Thomas for interment. J.R. Morford, division superintendent of the M.C.R., got a telegram from Kansas City announcing that Blakeley had been shot in the stomach and killed, and that the murderer was under arrest.

 

BARNES - A freight going west through Lucan village struck Mrs. Theresa Barnes, killing her instantly. The train did not stop, the train hands evidently not noticing the accident.

 

HENDERSON, BASS (Chatham) May 31 - Two weeks ago the remains of Mrs. Henderson and her adopted daughter, Bertha Bass, were found in the rooms of their home, on the eighth concession of Raleigh. The house, which stands in a lonely spot in the woods, had burnt during the night. An inquest was held, but developed nothing except that Mrs. Henderson was an inveterate smoker, and had last been seen alive about 5 o’clock on the day preceding the fire. But there were some things that the inquest did not discover; who set the fire, at whose instigation, and what motive. These are the points which the authorities are endeavouring with more or less success to clear up. One of the most important facts the inquest failed to bring out was that when the trunks of the bodies were recovered some of those present looking for missing members removed the ashes that had lain underneath the charred bodies and found beneath them clotted blood. Inquiry has established the fact that thought Mrs. Henderson was an inveterate smoker, she was scrupulously careful to guard against fire, never smoked in bed, and always put the pipe carefully away in a tin box. These and other incidents had lead the authorities to a belief in foul play, and will probably lead to two or more arrests shortly.

 

YEAGER - Mrs. Yeager, 71 Queen st. north, has received a letter announcing the death of her son, Robert Yeager, who was a sailor on the United States Warship. He died in Cuban waters and was buried at sea.

 


HUFFMAN (Kingston, Ont.) May 31 - Miss Victoria Huffman, a trained nurse, who was arranging to leave for Boston, where she was engaged, died suddenly on Monday at the residence of her brother-in-law, Edward Kaylor, of Morven. She was at church Sunday went home and was found unconscious in the morning. Heart failure was the cause. She was 28 years of age.

 

EWING (Salem, Ont.) June 1 - Alexander Ewing, aged 74, an old and well-known resident of the township of Pilkington, was found dead on the street here late last night. It is supposed that his horse ran away, and that in turning a sharp corner he was thrown from his buggy, and lighting on his face, was instantly killed, as there was no sign of a struggle.

 

Thursday, June 2, 1898

 

CONNOR - In this city, on June 1, Henry Connor, a native of County Wexford, Ireland, aged 78 years. Funeral from the residence of his nephew James Connor, 84 Merrick st., Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WALKER - On Thursday, June 2, Thomas R. Walker, aged 51 years. Funeral private from the residence of his brother-in-law, William Gay, 323 York st., Saturday at 2 p.m.

 

MONETTE (Ottawa, Ont.) June 2 - Albert Monette, aged about 22, son of George Monette, St. Andrews street, was run over by an electric car on Sussex street this morning. Both legs were cut off, and his body was terribly bruised and cut up from head to foot. He died in the Water street hospital about an hour after the accident.

 

O’GRADY (Ottawa) June 1 - Thomas O’Grady, about 35 years of age, who was employed by William Mason & Sons, on a steam scow on the Ottawa river, dropped dead this afternoon about 2 o’clock. As soon as he fell his fellow-workmen went to his assistance and did everything possible to revive him. Their efforts were unavailing, and Dr. Smith, of Hintonburgh, who was immediately called, pronounced life extinct.

 

Friday, June 3, 1898

 

BECKMAN - In this city on Thursday, June 2nd, 1898, William Beckman in his 48th year. Funeral from his late residence, 305 Hunter st. west, on Sunday, at 2 p.m. to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

MAY - On the 2nd of June, Harry May, aged 34 years. Funeral will leave his late residence, 129 MacNab st. north, on Sunday afternoon at 3:30. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WALKER - On Thursday, June 2, Thomas R. Walker, aged 51 years. Funeral private from the residence of his brother-in-law William Gay, 323 York st. Saturday at 2 p.m.

 

MILES - In this city, on the 2nd inst., Maggie Hood Miles, native of Belfast, Ireland. Funeral from her late residence 247 Ferguson avenue north, on Sunday, 5th inst., at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.


BRETTINGHAM (Toronto) June 3 - At midnight on Wednesday Mrs. Avlina Brettingham, a patient in Grace hospital, died suddenly, it is thought, as the result of a blow on the head, which she accidentally received on March 17 last.

Deceased was 36 years of age, and was the wife of George Brettingham, a wholesale tailor, who lives at 91 Duke street. On St. Patrick’s day she was walking from her home to her husband’s place of business, and when passing along Adelaide st. east, she encountered a crowd of boys teasing a man. The man chased his tormenters and, being unable to make a capture, threw a black thorn stick at them. The stick missed the boys for whom it was meant, and struck Mrs. Brettingham on the head, inflicting a nasty injury. The man who threw it ran away when he saw what he had done, but he is known to the authorities.

The wound bled freely, but the lady hurried to her husband’s office, where was attended to.In a short time it healed up and little more was thought of it.

Recently Mrs. Brettingham became ill from an internal ailment and May 2 was admitted to Grace hospital, where she appeared to be progressing favourably until a few days ago, when symptoms of a brain trouble became manifest. Her head rapidly got worse until death occurred.A post-mortem examination was made yesterday by Doctors Anderson, and McPherson. The examination showed that death had been due to the result of a blow and an inquest was opened last night. Mrs. Brettingham leaves four children.

 

BIRKS - Rev. William Birks, for over 40 years a minister of the Methodist church, died suddenly from apoplexy yesterday in Toronto.

 

DAY - Peter W. Day, of the township of Kingston, died yesterday aged 75 years. Death was hastened by an accident which occurred on May 23, when his horse took fright at a passing train running away and throwing Mr. Day out, injuring his spine.

 

OUIMETTE - George Ouimette, an employee of the McClary Manufacturing co. of London was hail and hearty on Sunday last, and took part in the funeral procession that followed the remains of a comrade Joseph Holman to the grave. Ouimette became overheated by the march then suffered a chill grew worse and died yesterday of pneumonia. He was 37 years old, and leaves a widow and six children.

 

McKEEN (Hagersville) - James McKeen, an old and respected resident, died at his home, Howard street, on Sunday morning after an illness of several weeks. Deceased was 81 years old. His remains were interred in the Springvale cemetery on Tuesday afternoon.

 

BENSON - Diligent search was made yesterday afternoon for the body of young John Benson, who was drowned in the Desjardins canal. The searching party consisted of P.C’s Fuller and Aiken, and William Hamilton, Fred Lyons, Donald Reid, and David Anderson. About 6:30 the search was successful the body being found a little north of the place where deceased sank. The appearance of the body indicated that deceased had been seized with cramps. The water in the canal was still quite cold. The remains were removed to the parent’s residence on Napier street. No inquest will be held.

 

 


Saturday, June 4, 1898

 

BECKMAN - In this city, on Thursday, June 2nd, 1898, William Beckman, in his 48th year. Funeral from his late residence, 203 Hunter st. west, on Sunday at 2 p.m., to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

CRANSTON - On Saturday morning June 4th, at the family residence, 167 Garth street, John Alexander, youngest son of John and Bella Cranston, aged 17 years and 9 months. Funeral from above address Monday at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

McCONNELL- In Barton on Saturday June 4, Thomas McConnell, aged 60 years. Funeral will take place from his late residence Mountain Brow on Monday, at 2:30 p.m. to old Barton church. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

Monday, June 6, 1898

 

CLARKE - At the City Hospital on Sunday 5th June 1898, Robert Clarke, aged 35 years. Funeral took place this afternoon at 5:30 o’clock from Blachford and Sons undertaking rooms, King st. west.

 

POWIS - At the residence of her brother, Mr. Alfred Powis, Hamilton Beach, on Sunday June 5, Clara Antoinette, daughter of the late William Powis. Funeral from the above address on Wednesday at 1 p.m. to St. Thomas church, Hamilton. Service at church at 3 o’clock. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WHITTING - In this city, on Saturday June 4th, 1898, Martha Ann Whitting, aged 32 years, beloved wife of Benjamin Whitting, gardener. Funeral from her late residence, 58 Augusta st., on Tuesday at 2 p.m., to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

DEITCH - Fred Deitch, a twelve-year-old boy, son of Frank Deitch, Toronto, was drowned in the Grand River near Cayuga yesterday. The boy was out there on a visit when last night word was sent to his mother who was visiting relatives in Hamilton. It is not known how the sad affair occurred, but it is supposed the boy was in the river bathing. The mother and father left this morning for Cayuga and the body will be interred there. Mr. and Mrs. Deitch have many friends and relatives in Hamilton.

 

ELMER (St. Thomas, Ont.) June 6 - A sad fatality occurred this morning about 11:30. Mrs. Elmer, a widow, who lived on Curtis street, west end, had entered a pantry in her home with a lighted lamp to procure some things for dinner, when the lamp exploded, setting fire to her clothing. She was so badly burned before help arrived that she died almost immediately. The house was set on fire, but the blaze was put out, before much damage was done. Mrs. Elmer leaves four or five little children.

 

Tuesday, June 7, 1898

 


DALTON - At Thorold Cottage, Barton, on the 5th inst., Jane, relict of the late John Dalton, in her 75th year. Funeral Thursday the 9th, at 2 o’clock p.m. to St. Peter’s church, Barton.

Mrs. Jane Dalton, widow of John Dalton, died last night at her residence near Hess Corners, Barton. She had been ill for three years. The deceased had been a resident of Barton for 60 years. She was a sister of Mrs. Hutton.

 

WHITLING (Whitting in June 6 obit. Ed.) - In this city, on Saturday, June 4th, 1898, Martha Ann Whitling, aged 32 years, beloved wife of Benjamin Whitling, gardener. Funeral from her late residence, 56 Augusta street, on Tuesday at 2 p.m. to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

POWIS - At the residence of her brother, Mr. Alfred Powis, Hamilton Beach, on Sunday June 5,

Clara Antoinette, daughter of the late William Powis. Funeral from the above address, on Wednesday at 1 p.m. to St. Thomas church, Hamilton. Service at church at 3 o’clock. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ROBERTSON (Brantford, Ont.) June 7 - Alexander Robertson died last night. The deceased was for over 25 years manager of the Bank of British North America in this place. Four years ago he resigned and had since lived retired. He had been ill for some little time past, and was thought to be improving, but the change came last night.

 

EBERTS - Dr. Duncan W. Eberts, of Montreal, a former Chathamite died of blood poisoning contracted in the course of his professional duties.

 

FOWLIE - The body of Albert Fowlie, of Orillia, was found fearfully mangled by a passing train on the railway track near Severn bridge on Saturday morning. About 40 feet from the body was a revolver, and it is said that several pistol shots were heard in the vicinity. The remains were taken to Orillia and buried there on Sunday morning. No inquest has yet been ordered, and this fact has caused comment in the neighbourhood.

Mr. Fowlie, who was well insured was clerk and treasurer for the township of Orillia and leaves a widow and grown up family.

 

MACDONALD (London, Ont.) June 6 - Eliente Christina Macdonald, the four-year-old daughter of D. Cameron Macdonald jr. of London South, while playing with matches, set fire to her clothing, and died yesterday evening of her injuries. The child was alone in the back yard, and in some way procured some matches. Her mother was attracted by frantic screams and rushed out to fine the little one enveloped in flames. Quickly the fire was smothered, and medical aid summoned. The doctors could do nothing, as the chief injuries were internal, cause by the little one breathing in the flames.

 

Wednesday, June 8, 1898

 

STENABAUGH - At her son’s residence 216 King st. east, on Tuesday evening, June 7th, Mary Stenabaugh, relict of the late Isaac V. Stenabaugh, of Jerseyville, in her 66th year. Funeral from 216 King st. east, to the Stenabaugh burying ground, Jerseyville, on Thursday afternoon at 1 o’clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.


LOCKHART - At her late residence, No. 86 Bay st. south, early Wednesday morning, June 8th, Mrs. Mary E. Lockhart. Funeral notice later.

 

HALL - At Woodstock, Ontario, on 7th June, 1898, in her 18th year, Grace Davidson, eldest daughter of John Hall. Funeral from Hamilton station on Thursday, June 9, on arrival of 12:23 p.m. G.T.R. train.

 

RICHARDS - John Richards, of Montreal, dropped dead at Prescott. He was a canal labourer and the heat overcame him.

 

BERRYMAN - The inquest on the body of John Berryman, of York township, has been concluded. The jury brought in a verdict stating that the deceased had come to his death from the result of a kick inflicted by Fred Pratt, and that his brothers Henry and Edward, were accessories. The charge will now be changed to manslaughter.

 

McCONNELL (Ryckman’s Corners) - The funeral of Thomas McConnell, of Limestone Ridge, took place from his residence, mountain top, to the old Barton church, last Monday afternoon.

 

LOCKLIN (Trenton, Ont.) June 7 - At 5 o’clock this evening a young man named Walter W. Locklin was drowned in the Bay of Quinte, about a mile out from shore. In company with E.J. Sweet, hotel keeper and Foster Smith, he was out in a yacht. Locklin climbed up the mast to fix the sail, and, missing his hold fell on the deck, hurting his back. Before his companions had time to lift him up, he fell overboard, and though Mr. Sweet plunged in after him, he never rose to the surface. Locklin was a tailor by trade, and was unmarried.

 

Thursday, June 9, 1898

 

LOCKHART - At her late residence, No. 86 Bay st. south, early Wednesday morning, June 8th, Mrs. Mary E. Lockhart. Funeral Friday at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

McGLOSHEN - The unfortunate deaf mute, Thomas McGloshen, who was struck by a street car near the corner of James and Barton streets yesterday, died within a couple of hours after he was removed to St. Joseph’s hospital. , Joseph Taylor was the motorman on the car that struck deceased. , He says his car was following the street sprinkler at a moderate rate of speed., as he was nearing the switch at the corner of Barton street; but the wet rails prevented the car from stopping as quickly as it would had the rails been dry.

McGloshen was crossing the street between Colborne and Barton streets, and a man on the sidewalk motioned to the mute to turn back, but McGloshen evidently mistaken the warning for a greeting, waved his hand in reply and kept on walking. Motorman Taylor, when he saw McGloshen was not going to stop or turn back, shouted and rang his bell; but of course, deceased heard neither and was struck by the car.

Coroner Balfe ordered an inquest to be held and Constable Fuller empanelled the following jury:

William T. Hunter, John Wilson, John Bentley, John Whittington, William Murphy, Byron Richardson, William Barlow, George D. Barr, Charles Smith, C.A. Bucke, John Stacy, A. Irving, John Sweeney, John Devine, Thomas Stevenson, Thomas Hill, John Mann.


The jury met at the hospital last evening and elected W.T. Hunter foreman. After viewing the remains the inquest was adjourned until tonight at 8:30 o’clock at No. 3 police station.

The only mark or bruise noticeable on the body of the deceased was a scalp wound on the back of the head. The opinion of the doctors is that death resulted from the pressure of a clot of blood on the brain.

 

TRIMMER (Hagersville) - The remains of David Trimmer, who died at his home in St. Thomas, on Thursday last, arrived on the Grand Trunk train from Jarvis on Saturday morning and were taken direct to the Hagersville cemetery for interment. The deceased was a son of Daniel Trimmer, Howard street. He had been in the employ of the Grand Trunk for the past eighteen years, as conductor, running between St. Thomas and Fort Erie.

 

DEARBORN (Hagersville) - Mrs. E. Dearborn, formerly Miss Minnie Winger, of this place, died at her home in Toronto after an illness of only two days. The deceased had been visiting her parents and had just returned home a few days previous to her death. Her remains were brought home on the morning train from Toronto on Monday and were taken to the Springvale cemetery for interment. She leaves one daughter about two years old. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the whole community in their sad affliction.

 

Friday, June 10, 1898

 

CLIFF - On June 9, Norman Bates, only son of Frank and Stella Cliff, aged 6 months. Funeral from the residence of his grandfather, Frederick Rice, 106 Cannon st. west, Saturday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

JUTTEN - In this city, on 9th June, at 549 Wellington st. north, Elva Jutten, daughter of J.W. Jutten. Funeral June 10th, from parent’s residence at 10 a.m. Private.

 

BERRYMAN (Toronto) June 10 - Fred Pratt, of Elia, was arraigned before Magistrate Ellis at the court house yesterday on the charge of manslaughter. His brothers, Henry and Edward were arraigned as accessories, All pleaded not guilty and were remanded on bail, until Thursday next. The bail was substantial in the case of Fred Pratt, being $2,000 personally, and $2,000 by his father. The bail of his brother’s was fixed at $2,000 each. The charge arises out of the death of John Berryman of Elia. It is alleged that he died from the effects of a kick administered by Fred Pratt, and that the latter’s brothers had taken a part in the row in which deceased’s injuries were said to have been received.

 

McGLOSHEN - The funeral of Thomas McGloshen, who was killed by a trolley car, took place this afternoon. The employees of St. Nicholas hotel sent two handsome floral tributes.

 

DALTON - The funeral of the late Mrs. Jane Dalton, of Barton, took place yesterday afternoon. Rev. S. Bennetts conducted the funeral service at Holy Trinity church, at which there was a large attendance. The pallbearers - all nephews of deceased - were as follows; F.R. Hutton, W.R. Deans, A. Turner, J. and R. Darke, and W. Dalton.

 


STENABAUGH - The funeral of the late Mrs. Mary Stenabaugh took place at the Stenabaugh burying ground Jerseyville, yesterday afternoon. Rev. J.F. Barker preached the funeral sermon at the Jerseyville Baptist church, assisted in the service by Rev. J. Yorston, pastor of the church. The funeral was a very large one.

 

Saturday, June 11, 1898 - No death notices.

 

Monday, June 13, 1898

 

CAMERON - In this city, on June 12th, at her mother’s residence, 127 Hughson st. north, Elizabeth (Libby) fifth daughter of the late Hector Cameron, of Fergus, and sister of Constable John Cameron, aged 23 years. Interment on Wednesday morning at Fergus.

Miss Elizabeth, (Libby) Cameron, fifth daughter of Mrs. Cameron 127 Hughson st. north and the late Hector Cameron of Fergus, died between 6 and 7 o’clock last evening. Death was due to consumption. Miss Cameron caught cold while bicycling to the beach on Queen’s birthday, last year, and the dread disease set in. Deceased was highly esteemed and had a large circle of acquaintances. She leaves four sisters, and three brothers, one P.C. John Cameron. She was 23 years of age.

 

HEADLAND - In this city, on Sunday, June 12th, 1898, Margaret Headland, a native of Clones, Monaghan, Ireland, aged 45 years. beloved wife of Harry Headland. Funeral from her late residence, 55 Mary street, on Tuesday at 2 p.m. Service in Christ Church cathedral at 2:30.Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

A devoted wife and mother, Mrs. Headland, wife of Harry Headland, care taker of No. 3 police station, passed away at the city hospital at 7:20 yesterday morning. Deceased was taken ill week before last, and her physicians diagnosed the disease as appendicitis. An operation was performed on Saturday before last, and it was said to be successful. A change for the worse, however, came last week, and death resulted yesterday. Besides the sorrowing husband, two young children are left to mourn a mother’s loss.

Mrs. Headland was matron of the police station and did her duty faithfully. The funeral will take place tomorrow afternoon at 2:30. Canon Bland will conduct the services, and the remains will first be conveyed to Christ Church cathedral, where a service will be held.

 

FINDLEY - At 33 Bold street, Hamilton, on Sunday, June 12th, Flora McNab, eldest daughter of W.F. Findley. Funeral private. Tuesday, 3:30 p.m.

The hundreds of friends of Miss Flora Findley, will be shocked to learn of her death which occurred at the residence of her father, W.F. Findley, president of the Board of Trade, yesterday afternoon. Miss Findley had for some years being an enthusiastic worker in musical circles in the city, was an accomplished soloist and accompanist on the piano, and played the organ well. She was accompanist of the Hamilton choir and the Choral society during its first season. Her death at such an early age was caused by consumption from which she had suffered for several years. The funeral will take place on Tuesday afternoon at 3:30.

 


HUNTOON - At her late residence, 611 Main st. east, on Sunday, June 12th, 1898, Betsy Josephine, wife of J.S. Huntoon, aged 67 years. Funeral service at residence, tonight (Monday) at 7:30 o’clock, to which friends are invited. Funeral to H. & W. Station at 7 a.m. tomorrow (Tuesday), interment at Collingwood, Ont.

The circumstances in connection with the death of Mrs. J.S. Huntoon, of 611 Main st. east, are particularly distressing. Mrs. Huntoon’s husband is a rich rancher and mine owner in Montana, and when his wife was taken ill, a short time ago, he at once started for Hamilton. He arrived here on Saturday evening. Five minutes before he reached his home, Mrs. Huntoon died. His train was ten minutes late and this prevented by five minutes in a trip of 2000 miles husband and wife ever looking into each others faces or greeting each other again. The remains will be interred at Collingwood tomorrow.

 

DOUGLAS - At his parents residence, No. 56 Stuart st. west., on Saturday, June 11, 1898, Ernest, youngest son of Angus and Harriett Douglas, aged 12 years. Funeral Tuesday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Death’s messenger came with awful suddenness to Ernest Douglas, the thirteen-year-old son of Angus Douglas, Stuart street west. The little fellow was as well as he had ever been on Wednesday night, but on Thursday morning complained of not feeling well. No serious results were contemplated at the time, but when he became no better on Friday Dr. Wallace was called in, but he did not consider the sickness serious. When the doctor called again Saturday he pronounced it a slight attack of inflamation of the lungs, result of drinking ice water and going swimming when overheated, but even then he did not anticipate any serious results. Just as the storm broke over the city Saturday afternoon the lad took worse and rapidly sank, dying shortly after 11 o’clock the same evening.

The deceased was a member of the Junior C.E. of Simcoe street church, and a constant attendant at the Sunday school. He was also a member of the juvenile branch of the Foresters, and the funeral, which will be held at 2 o’clock tomorrow afternoon, will probably be conducted by that body.

 

DONALD - On June 12, at her mother’s residence, 86 Victoria ave., Jeannie, second daughter of the late Wm. Donald, Aberdeen, Scotland. Funeral at 3 p.m., Tuesday (private). Intimate friends expected to attend.

The many friends of Miss Jeannie Donald will learn with much regret of the death of this estimable young lady. The deceased died at the family residence on Sunday morning. She was the second daughter of the late Wm. Donald, miller and grain merchant, Aberdeen, Scotland. Previous to coming to this country the deceased was in poor health, and at the advise of the family physician her mother decided to locate in Hamilton, Canada. Miss Donald was well known having acted as one of the assistants in the public library for the first six years of its existence, but her health again failing her she resigned about three years ago. She passed away very peacefully.

 

EVANS - On Saturday, June 11, Annie, widow of the late M.T. Evans, and formerly associated with the Art school. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, James D. Harris, 299 Victoria ave. north, on Tuesday June 14, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WILSON - At her parent’s residence, King street east of Sanford avenue, on Sunday morning, June 12, 1898, Janet, daughter of Andrew and Jane Wilson. Funeral Wednesday at 2 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.


Late on Saturday night, the family of Andrew Wilson, King st. east, was shocked beyond expression by a frightful accident which brought death to Miss Janet Wilson, a lovable sister and daughter in the home. Another member of the family was unwell, and Miss Wilson started down the stair with a lighted lamp in her hand, to get something for the sick one. Hardly had she started when she missed her footing and fell from top to bottom, striking on her head and breaking her neck. The flame of the lamp was extinguished in the fall, which prevented a fire. Drs. were at once called but could do nothing for the poor woman, and in a short time she died. Besides the dislocation of her neck she was severely bruised about her head and shoulders.

 

MATTHEWS - At his parent’s residence No. 253 Mary street, on Sunday, June 12, 1898, William J. L. Matthews, son of Henry and Helen Matthews, aged 18 years, 10 months, and 14 days. Funeral Wednesday at 4 o’clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SULLIVAN - In this city, on June 12th, Daniel, second son of the late Michael Sullivan, aged 38 years. Funeral from his mother’s residence, 214 Hunter st. east, on Wednesday morning at 8:30 o’clock to st. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

Daniel Sullivan, proprietor of the King st. east saloon, near the Ferguson avenue station, died last night after a very brief illness. Mr. Sullivan was around yesterday, but was taken ill during the evening with heart trouble. Dr. Wolverton and Dr. Baugh attended him, but death had first claim. Mr. Sullivan had been worried for some time over the prospect of losing his license, and it is thought this had something to do with his illness. He had a brother, who died last summer. A sister kept house for him.

 

THOMPSON - In this city on June 12th, Luke Thompson, aged 65 years, a native of County Cumberland, England. Funeral will take place from his brother’s residence, 235 Emerald st. north, on Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. to Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this notice.

One of the best known figures along the lake front was called suddenly away early yesterday morning. Luke Thompson, boat-builder, was known by every yachtsman who has ever sailed on Hamilton Bay. His death was a shock to his many friends. Some time ago he had a stroke of paralysis and recovered. Yesterday morning, while at Dillon’s hotel, Bay st. north, he had another stroke, which proved fatal in a very few minutes. Doctor Balfe was called but could do nothing for the sufferer. Mr. Thompson was about 65 years of age, and has lived in Hamilton for many years.

 

NOBLE - In Saltfleet, on 12th June, John Noble, aged 51 years. Funeral Tuesday at 1 :00 o’clock to Hamilton cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

HUNT - A telegram was received on Saturday afternoon by William Truman 161 King William street, that Henry R. Hunt, his brother-in-law died that morning in Milwaukee. Deceased lived in Hamilton sixteen or seventeen years ago, and was employed in the late Thomas Lawry’s packing house. At the time of his death Mr. Hunt was foreman in the largest pork packing house in Milwaukee. He was 68 years old, and leaves a grown-up family. Besides Mrs. Truman, Mrs. Nicholl, wife of Inspector Nicholl is a sister of deceased.

 

ORTON - Alvin Orton, an Essex farmer was struck in the abdomen with a wagon tongue dying as a result.

 

SOR - The three-year-old daughter of Victor Sor fell into the lake at Rat Portage, and was drowned.


HOLMES - Rev. John Holmes, Kingston, a superannuated Methodist minister, died yesterday, aged sixty-two years.

 

INCE - Col. G.V. Ince, of Ottawa, en route to Nelson, B.C. died suddenly shortly after the train left Whitewood, Man. Apoplexy was the cause of death.

 

NEIL - At six o’clock Saturday morning, Patrick Neil, of 88 Wright avenue, Toronto, dropped dead while on his way to work. Heart failure was the cause.

 

Tuesday, June 14, 1898

 

WILSON - At her parent’s residence, King st., east of Sanford avenue, on Sunday morning June 12, 1898, Janet, daughter of Andrew and Jane Wilson. Funeral Wednesday at 2 p.m. Interment at Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MATTHEWS - At his parent’s residence No. 253 Mary st., on Sunday June 12, 1898, William J.A. Matthews, son of Henry and Helen Matthews, aged 18 years, 10 months and 14 days. Funeral Wednesday at 4 o’clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SULLIVAN - In this city, on June 13th, Daniel, second son of the late Michael Sullivan, aged, 38 years. Funeral from his mother’s residence 214 Hunter st. east, on Wednesday morning at 8:30 o’clock, to St. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

 

CAMERON - In this city, on June 12th, at her mother’s residence, 127 Hughson street north, Elizabeth, (Libby) fifth daughter of the late Hector Cameron, of Fergus, and sister of Constable John Cameron aged 23 years. Interment on Wednesday morning at Fergus.

 

FARROW - In this city, on June 13th, at 184 Queen st. north, Thomas Farrow, aged 70 years. Interment at Elora, on Thursday.

 

GILROY (Smith’s Falls, Ont.) June 14 - Fred Gilroy, a well-known commercial traveller who resides here, left last night about 7 o’clock to go up the river alone to Poonamalee trolling for fish. At 9 o'clock his boat was found partly filled with water. In the boat were his hat and pipe. The alarm was given and search was made for the body, which was recovered about midnight. It is supposed that Gilroy fell out of his boat and being crippled in one arm and thus unable to swim, could not save himself. He leaves a widow and two children.

 

LAWSON - Mrs. Lawson, mother of the wife of Principle Grant, died at Kingston on Saturday aged 87 years.

 

BEDDOME - F.B. Beddome, for many years one of London’s best known citizens, died yesterday at the age of 78.

 

SIMS - F.H. Sims, a well-known resident, and for years head shipper for the Rathbun company’s sash shops at Deseronto, committed suicide yesterday by shooting. Deceased had been in ill health for a number of weeks.


SLATER (Georgetown) June 13 - Some time during last night Joseph Slater, caretaker of the high school committed suicide by hanging. The pupils attending the school from Acton came in on the early train this morning and they discovered the body hanging from the top of the door.

Deceased, who was a man of about 65 years, had been drinking quite heavily of late and had not been enjoying the best of health, and it is supposed that in a fit of despondency he committed the rash act. He went about yesterday apparently in as good health as usual, attended church twice, and after retiring to his room in the school took off his Sunday clothes and donned his work suit, in which they found him. No inquest is being held, as the coroner thought one unnecessary.

 

Wednesday, June 15, 1898

 

REED - At Glanford, on the 14th inst., Agnes, beloved wife of Henry Reed, in her 45th year. Funeral from her late residence on Thursday at 1:00 o’clock to White Brick burying ground, Ancaster. Friends will please accept this notice. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

WESTERN - At St. Joseph’s Hospital at 1 a.m. Wednesday, June 15, Henry Baldock Western, in his 43rd year. Funeral strictly private.

Death came to Henry B. Western about 1:00 o’clock this morning at St. Joseph’s hospital, after lingering 56 hours from the time he fired the fatal bullet into his breast, in the Canada Life building on Sunday afternoon. Although there was little hope for his recovery from the first, the watchers by the wounded man’s bedside last evening were cheered by the signs of an apparent improvement; but it proved to be only the beginning of the end. At 1:00 o’clock, Mrs. Western, and her son saw the unfortunate man draw his last breath and he passed from the earthly bondage that had borne him to self destruction.

No attempt was made from the first to locate the bullet. It is thought it passed near the apex of the heart, and either passed through the left lung or its covering, and, striking a rib, glanced off and settled in the muscles of the back. The haemorrhage was not excessive, and inflammation was the cause of death.

All the personal effects belonging to deceased were taking in charge by the police on Sunday afternoon, and they were this morning handed to J.E.P. Aldous, a friend of deceased acting for the sorrow-stricken widow. One of the letters, that was supposed to be addressed to the coroner was to C.S. Scott, and contained a request that Mr. Scott act as one of deceased’s executors.

Owing to the circumstances of Western’s death being so fully known, it has not been necessary to hold an inquest. Coroner Balfe consulted Dr. Cockburn yesterday afternoon on the matter, and it was decided that it would not be necessary to lay the matter before the crown attorney when ensued.

 

BULL - In this city at 189 Jackson st. west, on June 14, 1898, Mary Wilson, beloved wife of Geo. H. Bull, and daughter of the late Wm. Notman, M.P. Dundas. Funeral Thursday afternoon at 3:30 o’clock, private. No flowers.

 

HODGSON - At Washington D.C., on Sunday, June 12th, Herbert Harper, third son of Thomas Hodgson, of this city aged 25 years. Funeral took place from Fort Myer on Tuesday, June 14.

 

FREDERICA - On the 14th inst., at St. John’s hospital, Toronto, sister Frederica, Provincial Superior of the Sisters of the Church. Funeral at Shanty Bay, Thursday.


TURNBULL (Glanford) - Members of the A.O.U.W. of this district turned out in good force to attend the funeral of the late David Turnbull, at Caledonia on Sunday last.

 

CHAPMAN (St. George) - George Chapman, proprietor of the Red Star shoe store, died of pneumonia on Sunday.

 

JACKSON, WATSON (Tilbury, Ont.) June 14 - Two bright boys, Roy Jackson, aged 11, son of Thomas Jackson, and George Watson, aged 9, stepson of F. Shoultz, of Tilbury North, while returning from school today went into a pond on the farm of A. Vinters to bathe, and being unable to swim both were drowned.

 

SULLIVAN - There was a large attendance at the funeral of Daniel Sullivan this morning.

 

BULL - Mrs. Bull, wife of George H. Bull, died last evening. She had been an invalid for some time. The deceased was a daughter of the late William Notman, M.P., of Dundas.

 

HOLLAND (Fort William, Ont.) June 15 - Fire completely destroyed the McDougal block, corner of Cumming and Simpson streets, at 2:30 o’clock this morning. The building was occupied on the ground floor by Mrs. Mary Spooner, as a men’s furnishing store, and by License & co. fruiterers, and on the second story as a dwelling and lodge room. None of the contents was saved, a man named Holland, his wife and child were injured in jumping from a second story window. The child has since died.

 

Thursday, June 16, 1898

 

STONEHOUSE - Oliver Stonehouse, aged 38, a farmer, was killed by a falling tree, near Edy’s Mills.

 

REDMOND - The man who was killed on the G.T.R., near St. Paul’s turns out to have been John Redmond, of Mitchell.

 

McDONALD - At Woodstock a writ was issued by the estate of the late Archibald McDonald, claiming $10,000 damages against the Grand Trunk. Mr. McDonald was killed at the Woodstock station.

 

STOODLEY - Samuel G. Stoodley, a native of Ilminster, Somersetshire, England, died in Toronto on Tuesday, aged 65 years, having lived in that city since 1868, with the exception of seven years spent in Oregon.

 

WOOTEN - Richard Wooten, yard master C.H. and D., at Hamilton, Ohio, and until a year ago a M.C.R. conductor living in St. Thomas, had both feet cut off on Tuesday night, and died Wednesday morning. His wife died a year ago.

 

MOIR - George Moir, a well-known Conservative organizer, died Tuesday night at the Convalescent home, Ottawa, after an illness of less than a month. An attack of acute meningitis was the cause of death. Deceased was 51 years of age.


DONOVAN - Eugene Donovan, of Peterboro, one of the best known printers and labour men in Canada, died very suddenly in Toronto early yesterday morning. When he failed to come down for breakfast, his friends went to arouse him, and found him lying on the bed, dead. Life had been extinct some hours.

 

MATTHEWS - The funeral of William Matthews took place yesterday afternoon from his parent’s residence Mary st., and was largely attended by his friends and relatives. The floral offerings were many and beautiful. The pallbearers were; W. Malcolmson, W. Muir, R. Miller, C. Crow, J. Howes, and W. Dunnett.

 

Friday, June 17, 1898

 

CAMERON - On Thursday, June 15th, Alice, daughter of J.R. Cameron, aged 15.

 

PATTERSON (St. Catharines) June 16 - Some fears are entertained as to the safety of Albert Patterson, a sailor, who has been on the barge Lisgar, in tow of the Clinton. The Lisgar passed down the canal a few nights ago, and Mr. Patterson left the city to overtake her. His coat and hat were found on the canal bank, near lock 6, and it is thought by some that he may have fallen into the canal and been drowned.

 

WENZEL (Detroit) June 17 - John Herman Wenzel, of 1164 Canton avenue, arose from his breakfast table yesterday morning and told his wife that he was going up to his workshop for a time. He left her and three little children still eating. He went upstairs, loaded a shotgun with a big charge, set it in a vise, picked up a long iron rod with a crook in it, and stood in front, of the gun, his heart almost against the muzzle. The little children down below and the breakfast table were laughing when he pushed the trigger.

Mrs. Wenzel knew in a flash what had happened when she heard the explosion and the fall of the heavy body. She screamed and then sat trembling. She would not go upstairs, so little Louise, eight years of age, made the trip. She came down almost in hysterics and rushed to her aunt’s house a few doors away for aid.

Wenzel was a mechanic, 52 years old. Six weeks ago he and his family left Tavistock, Canada where they had lived eleven years, in the belief that times were less hard in the United States, and that he could get work at better wages. They moved near his married daughter, Mrs. Albert Buelow. Wenzel traversed the town in search of employment every day. Last week he secured work and earned $7.00, but this week he could get nothing. He frequently remarked to his wife that someday he would be gone. He had worked hard all his life and grew frightfully despondent over his inability to support his family. He left behind him only the $7.00 cheque he had earned last week for their support. He had no debts and his rent was paid. Wenzel leaves, in addition to his married daughter, and the three little children three sons, Walter Wenzel, of Detroit, Herman Wenzel, now in Mexico, and Otto Wenzel, furniture finisher of Windsor.

 


CLARK - School children wandering along the lakeshore near Fitche’s hotel, on the beach yesterday afternoon saw the body of a man being washed back and forth by the waves. They told some of the fishermen and George Corey, and other men pulled the remains ashore. Coroner Griffin was notified and went at once to the beach, viewing the body and ordering an inquest. The remains had been in the water for some time and were badly bloated. Nothing about the clothing served to identify them, and the only thing found in the pockets was some American money - small coins. The clothing was good, consisting of a dark corded tweed suit, cream coloured shirt, black for-in-hand tie, the finest of underwear and heavy shoes. The height of the remains was about 5'6", and the weight would be between 150 and 200 pounds. The jury viewed the remains this morning, and adjourned.

The disappearance of W.F. Clark of Toronto, reported in another column is coupled with the finding of the body, and Dr. Griffin thinks they many be the same person. It is likely someone from Toronto who knew Clark will come to Hamilton today to try and identify the remains. The fact that strong east winds have prevailed all this week, makes it more than probable the body is from the vicinity of Toronto.

The inquest was adjourned until Monday evening next. The body has not yet been identified though inquiries have been made from Toronto.

 

Saturday, June 18, 1898

 

FAWCETT - At 307 Barton street west, on Friday, June 17, Louis James, infant son of James and Mary Faucett, aged 1 year, and 10 days. Funeral on Sunday afternoon at 3:30 to Hamilton cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

JUDD - At her late residence 127 Florence street, on Thursday 17th. June, 1898, Selina, relict of the late James P. Judd, aged 69 years. Funeral Sunday at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WESTERN - The funeral of the late H.B. Western took place yesterday afternoon. Although it was of a private nature, it was largely attended by friends of deceased. The staff of the Canada Life office followed the remains to the grave. Rev. Samuel Daw and Rev. C.E. Whitcombe conducted the services. Members of the Hunt club and intimate friends acted as pallbearers.

 

COUTCH - James Coutch, aged ten, was drowned while fishing at Owen Sound.

 

MITCHELL - Mrs. W.A. Mitchell, of Kingston, partook of some sliced cucumbers which caused a violent illness that she burst a blood vessel and died of haemorrhage.

 

MOUCK (Tanworth, Ont.) June 17 - Mrs. Mouck, wife of John Mouck, of this village, committed suicide today by taking paris green. No cause can be attributed for the rash act.

 

FREEBORN (Toronto) June 18 - The coroner’s inquest on the body of young David Freeborn, who was drowned in Humber Bay some weeks ago by the upsetting of a boat, was concluded last evening at police headquarters before Coroner Johnson. The jury after hearing the evidence of a number of witnesses returned a verdict of “accidental death.”.

 

MARENTETTE - MRS. A. Marentette, of Sandwich, mother of A. Marentette, of the weights and measures department, Hamilton, died at her home yesterday. Mrs. Marentette was 90 years of age, on March 8.

 


Monday, June 20, 1898

 

WREN - In this city on Sunday, 12th inst., John Patrick Joseph, eldest and beloved son of Maurice and Elizabth Wren, aged 45 years, 3 months and 6 days. Funeral will leave his parents’ residence, 218 Ferguson avenue south, on Tuesday morning at 8:30 to St. Patrick’s church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

John Wren, the-fifteen-year-old son of Maurice Wren, 218 Ferguson avenue south, started off between 2 and 3 o’clock on Saturday afternoon on his bicycle to take a few spins round the old bicycle track east of Sherman avenue. He was in the best of health and spirits, but before the noon hour struck yesterday he was lying cold in death in St. Joseph’s hospital. The circumstances surrounding young Wren’s death are such that Coroner Wolverton will hold an inquest to ascertain the facts.

It appears that Wren and William Hallisey, a son of P.C. Hallisey, went to the bicycle track together indulged in fast sprinting. In some way not yet determined Wren was thrown from his wheel and received serious injuries on the head. Hallisey says he did not see the accident, but he saw that his companion was hurt, although he did not think the injuries serious, and having only hired the wheel he rode, he came back to the city, leaving Wren behind. This was between 2 and 3 o’clock. Wren became worse and was seen lying near the track by men plowing some distance away. When they went to him the boy asked them to place him in a shady spot and leave him alone. This they did and the unfortunate boy laid there for three hours before anyone else noticed him. About 6 o’clock some persons driving past the bicycle rounds saw the lad, and word was left at J.T. Middleton’s residence on Main street, and the police informed.

The ambulance went out to the bicycle track and brought Wren to his home. Here Dr. McCabe saw him about 8 o’clock in an unconscious condition. He continued unconscious all Saturday night, and yesterday morning between 7 and 8 o’clock he was removed to St. Joseph’s hospital where he died about 3 hours later. Dr. McCabe found that the boy was injured on the right side of the head, the face and knees indicating that he had pitched from his wheel with considerable force. The principal injury was a fracture of the skull, which was the cause of death. Deceased was a fine healthy lad, weighing about 150 pounds.

 

An inquest was opened at 10:15 this morning at the home of deceased before Coroner Wolverton. P,C. Lowery empanelled the following jury: J.E. Berrying (foreman), M. Birrell, R.J. Wood, J. Whittington, J. Devine, D.Lehane, C. Simons, T. Johnston, F. Barling, A.W. Wright, J. Roth, W.T. Murphy, John Littlehales, C. Cline.

After viewing the remains, the jurors adjourned until Thursday night at No. 3 police station.

 

FOSTER - In this city, at his residence 40 Park st. north, on Sunday evening, June 19, Charles S. Foster, expressman, son of Charles Foster, post master, Millgrove. Funeral Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 o’clock to Millgrove cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Charles S. Foster, son of the post master at Millgrove, died at his residence, 40 Park st. north, yesterday after a short illness. He was in the prime of life, only 32 years of age, and was highly esteemed by all who knew him. The funeral will take place tomorrow to Millgrove cemetery.

 

THURLOW - An old man named Thurlow fell off a dock at Barrie and was drowned.

 


PHILLIPS - The body of Charles Phillips, a butcher, was found in Little lake, near Peterborough. It is thought to be a case of suicide.

 

Tuesday, June 21, 1898

 

HARGROVE - In this city, at her residence, 197 Emerald st. north, on Monday, June 20, Mary Mills, the beloved wife of Joseph Hargrove, in the 66th year of her age. Funeral Wednesday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation. Manchester Garden and Lister Express please copy.

 

TULE - In this city, on June 21, 1898, Maggie Maxwell, youngest daughter of Alfred and Mary Tule, aged 3 years, and 1 month. Funeral from her parent’s residence, No. 86 Macauley st. east, this Tuesday afternoon. Private.

 

ANDERSON - At his parent’s residence, No. 15, O’Reilly street, on Tuesday June 21, 1898, Walter Anderson, son of William and Ann Anderson, aged 27 years. Funeral Thursday at 3 p.m. (Private).

Walter Anderson, son of William Anderson, 15 O’Reilly street, died unexpectedly this morning. While the deceased had been in delicate health for several years, his sudden death was a great shock to his relatives and friends. He got up earlier than usual this morning, intending to take a sail to Toronto on the boat. When he was dressing himself he was attacked with haemorrhage of the lungs, and died shortly afterwards. The deceased was a popular young man, and had a large circle of friends.

 

CRANSTOUN (Brockville, Ont.) June 20 - James Cranstoun, one of the best known travellers between Toronto and Montreal, died suddenly last night of heart disease. He retired feeling unusually well. His wife noticed him breathing heavily and in less than five minutes he was dead.He represented Gilmore & Co., Brockville, for over 25 years. He was 54 years of age, leaves a widow and two children. Deceased was a prominent member of the Commercial Travellers association.

 

WATSON - William and Mrs. Pringle have gone to Ayr, to attend the funeral of their niece Mrs. A.E. Watson, who passed away on Sunday morning after a long illness.

 

Wednesday, June 22, 1898

 

ANDERSON - At his parent’s residence No. 15 O’Reilly street on Tuesday, June 21, 1898, Walter Anderson son of William and Ann Anderson, aged 27 years. Funeral Thursday at 3 p.m. (Private).

 

CURRIE (Owen Sound, Ont.) June 21 - Fred Currie, aged seventeen, son of Neil Currie was drowned this afternoon. He was riding a bicycle on the C.P.R. dock, close to the waters edge, and tumbled in. He never rose to the surface. The body was recovered about half an hour afterwards.

 

Thursday, June 23, 1898

 


ATKINSON - On Wednesday morning, June 22, 1898, at the residence of her son, 119 Prince Arthur avenue, Toronto, Sarah, widow of William Atkinson, formerly of Hamilton, in the 79th year of her age. Funeral Friday.

 

STEWART - Suddenly, at Ancaster, on June 23rd, 1898, Robert R. second son of Peter and Agnes Stewart, aged 24 years, and 4 months. Funeral from his father’s residence, Lot 20, concession 4, Ancaster township, Saturday afternoon at 2 o’clock, to the Ancaster Presbyterian cemetery.

 

HOFFMAN (Woodstock) June 22 - Charles Hoffman, proprietor of the Plattsville stave factory, met death in a horrible fashion, while at work in the factory this morning. Hoffman’s arm in some way became caught between a belt and the pulley, and was pulled off at the elbow. He also received other injuries from which he died soon after. The unfortunate man was about 30 years of age, and leaves a widow and family.

 

McCANNELL - J.S. McCannell died at St. Joseph’s hospital this morning, typhoid pneumonia being the cause of death. The deceased was taken ill several weeks ago and his friends had been expecting his death for a week of ten days, but he rallied and there was some hope of his recovery. He took a bad turn last night and the end came this morning.

The deceased was about 35 years of age, and was born near Mount Forest. For ten years he was a traveller for Knox, Morgan, & co. After leaving the employ of that firm, he established a stock commission office. He was an exceedingly popular young man, having a generous and cheerful disposition.

The body will be sent to Mount Forest for interment.

 

Friday, June 24, 1898

 

MOFFATT - At the residence of his father-in-law Mr. Cunningham Jamieson, Tapleytown, June 23, 1898, Thomas W.M. Moffatt. Funeral from above address on Saturday at 1 o’clock. Service at Grimsby Presbyterian church. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

Thomas Moffatt, formerly a clerk in Carpenter’s grocery, died at his father-in-law’s residence Tapleytown yesterday, of Bright’s disease. Deceased had been married only eight months.

 

BLYTHE - Robert Blythe, reeve of Guelph township, who was gored by a bull on Sunday last is dead.

 

FEWSTER (Hagersville) - Wm. Fewster met with a serious and probably fatal accident on Saturday afternoon at a barn raising, on the farm of Samuel Grey, Springvale. A pipe-pole, which was being used to support one of the beams became loosened and fell a distance of thirty feet and struck Mr. Fewster on the head, fracturing his skull. Drs. Smith and Howell were immediately called. Up to a late hour on Monday night the unfortunate man had not regained consciousness and there is little hope of his recovery.

Later - Mr. Fewster, who was so seriously injured on Saturday afternoon, died at six o’clock on Tuesday never having regained consciousness. Funeral service will be held in the Methodist church on Thursday afternoon at 1:30 and thence to Springvale cemetery for interment. The C.O.C.F., of which the deceased was a member, will conduct the burial service.

 


McCANNELL - Yesterday the body of J.S. McCannell was taken to Mount Forest where the funeral will take place today.

 

MORIARITY - The police notified Dr. Ryall this morning of a supposed case of diphtheria in a family named Moriarity living on John st. north, near Brock street. One had also died and a second was seriously ill. Dr. Ryall, on investigation, found the Moriarity’s were suffering from purpura, haemorrhagica which is not contagious.

 

Saturday, June 25, 1898

 

ROBINSON - At her late residence, No. 95 Kelly street, on Saturday, 25th June, 1898, Judith Campion, relict of the late George C. Robinson, aged 89 years. Funeral private.

 

JOHNSON - In this city, on June 24th, Thomas Johnson, age 73.Funeral tomorrow at 2:30 p.m., from his son-in-law’s residence, F. Simon, 245 MacNab st. north, thence to Dundas R.C. cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CROSSLEY - In this city, on the 25th inst., John Crossley, in his 80th year. Funeral from his late residence, 182 Herkimer st. west, on Monday, the 27th instant, at three o’clock.

 

POOLE (Brantford) June 24 - Henry Poole, aged 50, passed away very suddenly this morning.  Deceased was in good health up to 10 o’clock last night, when he had an apoplectic stroke which  resulted fatally at 7 o’clock this morning. He had been employed at the bicycle works for some time and was a very highly esteemed citizen. He leaves a widow and two children.

 

ASSELIN - Archie Asselin, Grand Trunk railway car repairer, was under a car repairing it this afternoon when a car was shunted against it. The car went over Asselin, taking off both legs. He lived but a short time. Deceased was long employed in this capacity, and was much respected.

 

TWOHEY (London, Ont.) June 24 - Policeman Michael Twohey was murdered while in the execution of his duty shortly after 9 o’clock tonight, and the perpetrator of the awful deed is still at liberty. The murder was committed at the corner of Ontario and Elias streets, East London, where C.P.R. Watchman Murray had trouble with two tramps whom he had ejected from a car. The tramps, one of whom had only one leg, sat upon Murray, and were beating him, when policeman Twohey was called. He attempted to place the tramps under arrest, and while he was attending to one of them the other fired two shots at him from a revolver.

The first bullet entered the policeman’s left hand, passing through it and becoming embedded in his watch. The second entered the officer’s forehead just over the right eye, cutting into the brain, and causing instantaneous death.

In the confusion which followed the murderer and his companion successfully alluded capture, and although a thorough search of the vicinity was made they are not yet caught. It is surmised that they boarded a C.P.R. freight train bound eastward shortly after the tragedy.

A description of the desperados was telegraphed down the line and it is thought that they will be captured today. The fact that one of them has lost a leg forms a substantial clue for the searchers to work on.


Twohey was about 45 years of age, and was an efficient officer, having being connected with the London police force for many years. He lived at 499 Oxford street, and leaves a widow and three children.

The dead man lay where he had fallen for some time, until the arrival of the Coroner, when the remains were removed to the home of deceased’s family. A warrant for an inquest has been issued.

Later details.

The Adelaide street Grand Trunk railway watchman was knocked down by the crutch of the one-legged tramp who was attempting to walk east on the track. P.C. Twohey who was on his beat on Dundas street, and was called and followed him to the corner of Elias and Ontario streets. The tramp resisted arrest and shot first in the breast, the bullet being stopped by his watch and the second in the right temple. A C.P. R. Freight train was pulling out at the time-nine thirty-and the tramp may have boarded it. Detectives are on the track of the murderer, who wore a brown suit and a slouch hat. Deceased was 45 years of age, and has been on the force about twelve years.

 Twohey, the London policeman who was killed Thursday night, was a resident of Hamilton thirteen or fourteen years ago He was then an employee of the street railway company.

 

Monday, June 27, 1898

 

FITZSIMMONS - On June 25th, at 195 Cathcart, Charles, son of Charles Fitzsimmons, age 3 months and 16 days. Funeral (private) today at 2 o’clock.

 

TWEEDLE - At Tweedside, on June 26th, Joseph Tweedle, in his 73rd, year. Funeral on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o’clock to Tweedside cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CROSSLEY - John Crossley, who formerly kept the dry goods store, on the corner of James and King William streets, died on Saturday. The deceased was 80 years old, and had been in business at the same store for 50 years. Some years ago he retired and turned the business over to his sons, James and William Crossley. The deceased had been ill for some time.

 

MOFFAT - The funeral of the late Thomas Moffat took place on Saturday afternoon at Grimsby. There was a large attendance and the funeral service was conducted by Rev. J.G. Shearer and Rev. Mr. Whitworth. The pallbearers were: W. and E. Freel, W.J. Patterson, E. Clark, and A. and E. Alexander.

 

Tuesday, June 28,1898

 

LAMONT - James Lamont, one of Chatham’s merchants, passed away yesterday.

 


TWOHY (Twohey)(London) June 27 - The funeral of the late P.C. Toohy, took place this morning. The cortege left the house at 10 o’clock for St. Peter’s cathedral. Long before the appointed hour for the service at the house, the immediate vicinity of the cathedral was crowded with people, who showed in every way possible their sympathy with the friends of the murdered policeman. The procession was headed by the London police force, then the firemen, followed by the Catholic Order of Foresters and the A.O.U.W.In addition, Chief Young, of the Chatham police force was present, with three of his men. The different organizations represented drew up on either side of the doors of the cathedral with bowed heads, forming a body guard for the casket, born by six stalwart policemen to pass through and up the isle to the solemn strains of the Dead March in Saul.

Requiem High Mass was celebrated by Rev. Father Tiernan, assisted by Rev. Fathers Brady, and L’Herus. Many beautiful floral tributes were sent by friends and societies and were placed on the casket. The mother, brothers, and sisters, and other relatives of the murdered policeman were among the mourners.

The funeral was one of the largest ever seen in London. The cathedral was crowded and the entire block, from Richmond to Park avenue, was crowded with people, who wished to pay their tribute to respect to the memory of a man who died in the discharge of his duty.

 

WREN - The jury empanelled to inquire into the death of the boy, John Wren, brought about by injuries sustained on the old bicycle grounds in the east end a week ago last Saturday, concluded its labours last evening. The adjournment on till last night was made at the request of the dead boy’s father, and a number of witnesses were heard; but no additional information was forth coming. Norman Prentice, John McMurray, Percy Cope, Paul Stewart, Walter Soule, and William Henderson, boys who saw deceased on the bicycle grounds at various times during the fatal Saturday afternoon; Mrs. Hallisey and Doctors McCabe and Thompson gave testimony.

The evidence at the previous hearing went to show that young Wren walked about 39 feet after he was thrown from the wheel, and Mr. Wren recalled the doctors to ask if that was possible.

Both they and the coroner explained that everything depended on the extent of the haemorrhage on the brain, and the consequent pressure of the blood clot. Persons so injured were known to have walked long distances.

Mrs. Hallisey’s evidence had no direct bearing on the matter, but was chiefly explanatory of what her boy had done, or had not done.

At the close Mr. Wren said that he never thought that young Hallisey had injured his boy; all he wanted was to get out the truth.

The jurors returned the following well-meant but rather odd verdict;

“John Wren came to his death accidentally falling off his bicycle on his head; and while there was negligence shown in not more promptly procuring medical attendants, there is nothing to show that had it been otherwise, the result would have different”.

 

Wednesday, June 29, 1898

 

SYMONS(Guelph) June 28 - County Crown Attorney Peterson received word from Dr. McCullough, of Everton, this morning, that a young man named Symons had shot himself on Sunday morning.

The deceased, who was about 26 years of age, had been working for Robert Talbot of Everton. He left Talbot’s Sunday morning for his home, but never arrived. When found this morning on the rocks beside the village, a pistol was lying a few feet away from the body. The bullet had penetrated the right temple, and he evidently died without a struggle.

It is understood that the suicide was caused by a suddenly terminated love affair. Deceased leaves a widowed mother to mourn his untimely demise.

 


SHEPPARD (Windsor, Ont.) June 28 - Alexander Sheppard, one of the oldest residents of Windsor, committed suicide by throwing himself into the river this morning. He was a nurseryman in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and was brought out to Windsor at the age of 22 to manage Dougall nursery. He prospered in business and at one time owned a great deal of land that is now