Hamilton Spectator

Deaths 1890

January 1, 1890

 

HEAD, MCGUIRE - (Toronto) Early this morning four workmen were engaged in weighing iron at the Ontario Rolling Mills at the Humber river near the spot where six years ago at this time of year a collision occurred in which thirty men were killed. The men had loaded a truck with iron to the weight of seven tons and a half which had been run out of the mills to the scales to be weighed. The scale was guaranteed to stand fifteen tons, but the gearing gave out, being set on a platform, tilted & upset the iron on the workmen. Two men were killed: George Head, married, living at West Toronto junction; and W. McGuire, who is the sole support of his widowed mother, living on Little Arthur street. The wounded are: William J. Coulter, married, 12 Little Arthur street; and Richard Leath, single, 22 Trafalgar avenue.

 

TILT - (Toronto) James Tilt, Q.C., of the legal firm of Tilt, Muloch, & Co., died this morning at his brother's residence at Brampton. He had been unwell since returning from Alaska in the fall and recently went to Brampton for rest. The deceased was a bachelor, 55 years of age, and became a Queen's Counsel eight years ago.

 

January 2, 1890

 

HUTCHINSON -  Died suddenly, Alice, daughter of Thomas J. and Alice Hutchinson, aged 3 years and 3 months. Funeral from her parents' residence, 33 Alanson street, on Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

 

January 3, 1890

 

CHESNUT - Died suddenly on Thursday morning, January 2, 1890, at her mother's residence, 233 James street south, Hamilton, Annie Brodie, well beloved eldest daughter of the late Thomas S. Chesnut. Funeral to Burlington cemetery on Saturday at 2 o'clock p.m.

Miss Chesnut, who with her sister has been managing a young ladies' school at Portland Terrace, James street south, died rather suddenly yesterday of congestion of the lungs. Miss Chesnut was a cultured and estimable lady, and will be mourned by a large circle, of friends and many pupils who had learned to love her.

 

COYLE - A young man named William Coyle, who has been employed in the Ontario Rolling Mills, died at the city hospital on Wednesday. It was rumoured that his death was the result of injuries received in a fight several days ago. Upon inquiry it was found that this is not so. The young man died of inflammation of the lungs.

 

 


HUNTER - Dr. J. Beverly Hunter, late of Detroit, and brother-in-law of John Hoodless of this city, died on Wednesday at Ogden, Utah, where he had gone to visit his brother and in search of renewed health. Many of the doctor's friends here will regret to hear of his death.

 

BLANCHET - (Quebec) The Hon. J. G. Blanchet, M.D., for many years a prominent and popular figure in the House of Assembly and speaker of the House of Commons, Ottawa, passed away at his residence, Lewis Heights, to-day. He resigned his seat to accept the collector ship of customs at Quebec, which post he held up to his death. He was speaker of the House of Assembly for a long period.

 

January 4, 1890

 

IRVINE - Died at the residence of his aunt, Mrs. Davidson, 138 Duke street, William A. Irvine, eldest son of W. A. Irvine, Hess street south, aged 18 years. Funeral Saturday at 3 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

 

GASKELL - Thomas Gaskell, the young man whose arm was so terribly mangled in a steam straw-cutter at Kilbride early this week, died on Thursday from exhaustion caused by excessive hemorrhage.

 

BAXTER - Miss Annie Baxter, daughter of Charles Baxter, a farmer living in East Flamborough about a mile north of Waterdown, was found dead in bed Thursday morning. On Wednesday she complained about, feeling sick and called on Dr. Courtney who gave her some medicine. She retired early that night, and when her father went to call her next morning, he was surprised to find her dead. She had been troubled with asthma and lung disease for a number of years. An inquest was not deemed necessary as it was believed that the deceased died from natural causes.

 

FLAMAND - The district coroner this morning went to Montmorency Falls to hold an inquest on the body of Madame Flamand who was found dead in her bed there yesterday morning. (Quebec)

 

AHERN - (St. Catharines) The mystery surrounding the disappearance of Jimmy Ahern, who for a great many years was an industrious workman employed on the Welland Railway but who of late years has been subjected to epileptic fits and mild affection, was solved this morning by the finding of his body in a wheat field a couple of miles from the city near the Industrial Home. It is supposed that he wandered away and died in the field.

 

HOLBROOK - (Peterborough) About two miles from Havelock lives James Holbrook, a magistrate of the township and ex-member of the township council. Holbrook and his wife, a woman about 63 years of age, lived together. 


On the day before Christmas Mrs. Holbrook left her home, while her husband was away, and her husband, so he says, thought she had gone to visit a neighbour.  On Friday last her daughter, Mrs. Wesse, who lives near, inquired of Mr. Holbrook if Mrs. Holbrook had returned. Her father said she had not, when Mrs. Wesse told him he should make inquiries. This he did but found no trace of his wife, and an alarm was raised. A large number of the neighbours turned out and a search for the missing woman was instituted. The search proved futile until yesterday when a most ghastly discovery was made in a swamp about two miles from the unfortunate woman's home. Lying beside a log was the lifeless body of Mrs. Holbrook presenting a pitiable and repulsive appearance. The mouth was open, the eyes sunken, and the appearance pointed to a death from exposure and exhaustion. No bruises were found on the body except an abrasion on the skin of the leg. A ooroner's jury returned a verdict of death from exposure.

 

WILLIAMS - (Montreal) At four o'clock this morning Thomas Williams, a bricklayer, residing at 145 Basin street, murdered his wife by cutting her throat with a razor and then committed suicide in the same manner. Williams came to Montreal from Wales about five months ago and is said to have been, previous to the tragedy, subject of fits of mental derangement. Apart from this there was absolutely no motive for the crime. His wife's name was Ellen Orchard. She was 28 years old, was married twelve years, and had five children.  Mrs. Williams was found lying on the edge of the bed, having apparently put on her nightgown and retired to rest while her husband cut his throat while evidently standing up at the foot of the bed, and must then have fallen across his wife's feet, for in that position he was found this morning. The family bore an excellent reputation of sobriety and industry, and though poor, were much respected. An inquest was held and a verdict rendered in accordance with the facts.

 

January 6, 1890

 

MCDONALD - Died on January 4, of heart disease, J. D. McDonald, aged 24 years. Funeral from his father's residence, 396 Victoria avenue north, at 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday, January 7.

 

CLARK - Died in this city, on January 4, Elizabeth, relict of the late Mr. Hutchinson Clark, in the 81st year of her age. Funeral will take place from the family residence, 109 Hughson street north, on Tuesday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

SWINTON - Died in this city, on January 4, at his late residence, 75 Pearl street north, James Swinton, in his 16th year. Funeral , Tuesday, January 7, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


CARTER - Died on Sunday, January 5, 1890, at 29 Cathcart street, this city, Jane Tweedle, wife of James Carter, in the 78th year of her age.  Funeral Tuesday, January 7, at 2 o’clock in the afternoon, to Burlington cemetery.  Deceased was a native of Cumberland, England.

 

MCMENEMY - Died in this city, on January 4, Bessie, beloved wife of William McMenemy. Funeral from her husband's residence, 67 Crooks street, on Monday, at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SWINTON - James Swinton, a young married man who worked in the Grand Trunk moulding shops and lived at 75 Pearl street north, died on Saturday night from the effect of a dose of tincture of aconite that, he took by mistake for other medicine. About two months ago Mrs. Swinton had neuralgia in the face and was attended by Dr. Lafferty who prescribed an external application of Fleming's tincture of aconite, a deadly poison if taken internally. The- husband was sick about the same time and was also attended by Dr. Lafferty who gave him some medicine which was to be taken internally. Two weeks ago Dr. Lafferty treated Mrs. Swinton for another complaint requiring different treatment and prescribed oleate of mercury. Instead of purchasing a new bottle what was left of the tincture of aconite was poured into the long bottle containing Mr. Swinton's medicine and the small bottle which was labeled 'poison' was used for the oleate of mercury.

Mr. Swinton went to work as usual on Saturday. When he came home about six o'clock he complained about feeling sick and an hour later he took a dose out of the bottle into which the tincture of aconite had been emptied, thinking it contained his own medicine.  Shortly afterward he was taken very sick. When it was learned that he had taken a dose from the bottle containing the poison, an emetic was given him, and several doctors were telephoned for. Dr. Lafferty was the first to arrive, but he was too late; Swinton was dead. He died about nine o’clock. Drs. Anderson, Philp, and Stark arrived shortly after Dr. Lafferty. Mrs. Swinton did not know that her husband had taken a dose out of the bottle containing the fatal drug.

The deceased had not been married a great while, and leaves a wife and a child, two months old. He was a member of the Canadian Order of Foresters. His father, Charles Swinton, lives on Napier street. After hearing all the facts, Coroner Philp consulted with the Crown Attorney and decided to hold an inquest this morning.

 

DENIS - (Montreal) Michael Denis committed suicide by shooting and died instantly. He had assaulted his brother and he procured a warrant against him. Two constables were sent to arrest him but before they could effect his arrest he killed himself.


STROUD - (Montreal) Ex-alderman Stroud, well known in philanthropic and commercial circles, was buried yesterday and the funeral was attended by a large concourse of citizens

 

LETOURNEAU - (Montreal) A man named LeTourneau, the wholesale paint merchant of St. Paul street, died to-day very suddenly while attending mass in St. James church.

 

GIBSON - (Halifax) John Gibson, one of the oldest, richest, and most respectable of Halifax merchants, died yesterday, aged eighty-four. He was one of the founders of Bauld, Gibson, & Co, and was reputed to be worth $500,000.

 

MORGAN - (Belleville) A young man named Edwin G. Morgan broke through the ice while skating on the bay this afternoon and was drowned. The deceased was 21 years of age, came from Ottawa, and was attending the Ontario business college. The body was recovered.

 

January 7, 1890

 

MACLEAN - (Toronto) John C. Maclean, of the "World" newspaper, died this afternoon. He had been suffering from consumption for the last two or three years. The immediate cause of his death was inflammation of the lungs. He leaves a widow. He was one of the most popular newspaper men in the city and one of the most active before he was afflicted with ill health.

 

POOLE, DENNISON - (Halifax) At Smith's Cove, near Digby, on Saturday, Norman Poole, aged 30 and Mainsard Dennison, aged 12,were drowned by the upsetting of their boat. The bodies have not yet been recovered.

 

GILLUM - (Belleville) Major P. W. Gillum, late of H.M. 54th Regiment, died here yesterday, aged sixty-two. Deceased was awarded the Victoria Cross for distinguished bravery at Delhi. He had lived here about thirty years.

 

MCDONALD - (Halifax) Annie McDonald, daughter of Dougald McDonald, Middlesex road, fell or jumped from the train half a mile from Antigonish to-day and was instantly killed. It is supposed she thought her destination, Antigonish, was passed as the conductor shouted 'Antigonish' just before the girl left her seat. An engine went back and found the lifeless body.

 

January 8, 1890

 

O'NEILL - Died in this city, on January 7, Maria, beloved wife of Felix O'Neill, aged 27 years. Funeral will leave her late residence, 102 Hunter street east, on Saturday morning, January 9, at 8:30 o'clock for Holy Sepulchre cemetery.


HANCE - (Toronto)  Richard Hance, a Grand Trunk brakeman, was killed on the track opposite the Queen's wharf this evening. He left his father's house on Macdonald Square at half past five to go to Little York, and in less than an hour his mangled body was taken home in the ambulance. The presumption is that he slipped while attempting to board a moving train, but nothing certain is known of the method in which he met his death.

 

KEEFER - (Brockville) Samuel Keefer, civil engineer, died this morning at his residence of pneumonia. Deceased had been in poor health for some time past, having contracted malarial fever some two years since, which was followed last winter by pneumonia, from the effects of which he never fully recovered. Mr. Keefer was widely known as a man of more than ordinary ability as an engineer, more especially in connection with the Suspension bridge at the falls and various Canadian public works. He was highly esteemed as a citizen.

 

January 9, 1890

 

COOK - Died at 180 Bay street south, Mrs. Eliza Cook, widow of the late John B. Cook, aged 68 years. The deceased was a native of Nottinghamshire, England. Funeral from the above address at 2:30 p.m. on Friday. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BARR - Died in this city, on January 8, at his residence, No 343 Main street east, William Barr, in the 72nd year of his age. Funeral will take place from the above address on Friday at 2:30 p.m. All friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

MCMULLEN - (Ottawa) William McMullen was blown to pieces this afternoon by dynamite. The unfortunate man was engaged in blasting operations and was carrying dynamite from the magazine where a fellow worker named Farell was thawing the cartridges. When about ten feet from the magazine there was an explosion, followed by a cloud of dust. When the dust had cleared away McMullen was discovered to have been blown to pieces. It is supposed that McMullen let one of the cartridges drop. The magazine was blown to atoms by the explosion, stove and all but Farrell who was sitting by the stove with his hands full of cartridges escaped unhurt. McMullen’s limbs were scattered in all directions and his heart was found one hundred feet away.

 

BRATT - (Toronto) Christopher Bratt, G.T.R. brakeman, was killed in the station yard at Whitby last evening. While engaged in shunting, he fell beneath the cars and was fearfully mangled. A long line of loaded freight cars passed over him. The body was brought to Toronto.

 

DRAKE (Toronto) A little girl named Sarah Drake, aged 14, living at 9 Northern Place, was knocked down by the Northern express on the old Northern track, about 8 o'clock this evening. She was out on a message for her parents, and was on the way home when she met her death.

 

 


January 10, 1890

 

VINTON - Died at Copetown, on January 4, Jeremiah Vinton, in the 79th year of his age.

 

CASE - Died at his residence, 'The Old Homestead', King street east, Barton, on January 8, Adolphus Clinton Case, aged 69 years. Funeral at 3 p.m. on Saturday, January 11. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice. Please omit flowers.

Adolphus Case, one of the oldest, most widely known, and best respected residents of Barton townwhip, died at his home, East Hamilton, on Wednesday, from apoplexy. He was in his 70th year. He was a brother of Postmaster Case, Dr. Case, Mrs. James Cahill, and Mrs. R. A. Land of Hamilton, and Mrs. James Harvey of Barton.

 

RUTHERFORD - Died on January 8, at her late residence, 146 Emerald street south, Sarah Lester, beloved wife of Adam Rutherford, daughter of the late Thomas Lester, and sister of John M. and Thomas W. Lester of this city. Funeral Saturday, January 11, at 2:30 p.m.

Mrs. Rutherford, wife of Adam Rutherford, of Rutherford & Lester, died Wednesday night from peritonitis. She was ill for only twenty-four hours, and on Tuesday evening assisted in dressing her children for the entertainment in St Thomas school room. Mrs. Rutherford was a good and amiable lady and will be much mourned.

 

MILLETTE - (Montreal) A man named Millette dropped dead to-day on Mill street and was taken to his home in the ambulance. Scarcely a day passes but a similar affair occurs.

 

COLLINGWOOD - (Toronto) Robert Collingwood, a carpenter, aged fifty, living at 105 Simcoe street, dropped dead near his house about 8:30 this morning. He had been ailing for some time. The remains were conveyed to the morgue.

 

SPEARS - Toronto) Jane Spears, a woman of about 60 years of age, living alone at 16 Agnes street, was found this afternoon at her house with a rope around her neck in a half-strangled condition. She was at once removed to the hospital where it was found she had sustained terrible bruises all over the body. She died about seven o'clock, having told the doctors that she had been set upon by two men, one of them of fair complexion. This and other facts removed the idea of suicide as first entertained.


LINDSAY - (Quebec) News comes from St. Mary's, Beauce County, to-day of the untimely death at the age of 47 years of Mrs. Charles Lindsay at her husband's residence in that parish, at an early hour this morning. She was the sister of the Hon. Justice Taschereau, of the Supreme Court, and of L. B. Taschereau of St. Foy, Quebec.

 

LANGEVIN - (Quebec) The death is announced to-day of F. X. Langevin, advocate, the doyen of the Quebec bar. He was admitted to practice in December.

 

NICKERSON - (Halifax) Charles Nickerson, a watchman on a schooner lying at Hamilton wharf, walked into the dock at nine o'clock to-night while under the influence of liquor. He was pulled out alive by two men who heard the noise, but died while being carried up the wharf. The water was fearfully cold, the night being the bitterest of the winter, and death must have been largely due to the shock of the sudden immersion. Nickerson belonged to Prince Edward Island where he had a family.

 

MCDOUGALD - (Niagara Falls) Malcolm McDougald, chief of the Ontario Police force, died here this morning. He has had charge of the Ontario Police since their inception by the Ontario government fifteen years ago. He leaves a wife and two children.

 

WALLACE - (Niagara Falls) The wife of William Wallace, train baggageman, of the Grand Trunk Railway, died last night. The lady was of delicate health and being taken by influenza, it terminated in pneumonia. This is the second death this week by the grippe. Mr. Wallace himself is sick in bed with influenza. The malady is spreading. Almost one-third of the citizens are down with it.

 

STEWART - (Brampton) Upon the arrival of the 2 o'clock train this afternoon, a lady accompanied by a bright little boy alighted and gave directions that her trunk be sent to the Canadian Pacific depot. She then dropped dead upon the platform, heart disease being the cause. It has since transpired that she was on her way to Shelburne where she lives and that her name is Mrs. William Stewart.

 

COOK - (St. Catharines) William Cook, harbourmaster of Port Dalhousie, died at his residence last night, never having rallied from the stroke of paralysis he received a few days ago. Mr. Cook filled the postion of harbourmaster for fifteen years and was universally esteemed by all who knew him for his many admirable qualities. The deceased was 65 years of age and a native of Tipperary, Ireland.

 

January 11, 1890

 

BARD - (Belleville) James Bard of Hungerford who failed to turn off the gas properly at a hotel here on Tuesday night died this morning. Deceased was 65 years of age and a prominent man in the township.


MCGOWAN - (St. John, N.B.) The express train for Quebec on the Intercolonial met with an accident near Jacquet River this morning. The snow plough left the track and the engine followed and turned over. Fireman P. Gaudest was taken out in a dying condition. Driver J. McGowan is still in the wreck and is probably dead. The train from Quebec is detained by the wreck.                                                                                                      

 

COLLINGWOOD - Robert Collingwood, the notorious Bob, dropped dead on Thursday morning in front of a cheap lodging-house in Toronto where he was boarding. Heart disease took him off. Bob was one of the most cultured and courteous of vagrants and dead-beats. He spent a large portion of the latter years of his life in jail, and at last came to regard the prison as his natural home. Bob was a philosopher, a cheerful one, and a great letter writer. Many queries of his correspondence have found their way into the "Spectator's" waste basket.

 

January 13, 1890

 

MACNAB - Died at his residence, 53 Beverly street, Toronto, on January 10, John Macnab, in his 60th year. Funeral at 3 o'clock on Monday.

 

SMITH - Died at his late residence, Mount Hope, on January 12, William Lafayette Smith, M.D., in his 52nd year. Funeral at 1 o'clock on Monday.

Dr. William Lafayette Smith of Mount Hope was taken with influenza on Thursday last and died yesterday. He was 52 years of age and was well known and highly respected in Glanford. The funeral will take place at 1 o'clock on Friday.

 

FULLER - Died suddenly of pneumonia, at Bishophurst, Hamilton, Henry Hobart Fuller, son of the late Thomas Brock Fuller, bishop of Niagara, and Cynthia Fuller, in his 34th year. Funeral from his mother's residence, 163 Jackson street west, at 3 p.m., on Tuesday, January 14, to Christ Church Cathedral, thence to Burlington cemetery.

About ten days ago, Henry H. Fuller, a son of the late Bishop Fuller, became ill with influenza. Subsequently he went out before getting well and was so unfortunate as to get wet. He was taken ill with pneumonia, became delirious, and got rapidly until Saturday evening when he died at 7 o'clock.

The deceased was the sixth son of the late Bishop Fuller and was 34 years of age. He was married to Miss Spratt of Toronto and his widow and four children survive him. Mr. Fuller until recently had been managing a branch of the Jersey dairy business in Toronto. He came to Hamilton about nine months ago and had since been living at Bishophurst, Jackson street west. The funeral will take place from there on Thursday at 3 o'clock.


TOBIN - (Montreal) A woman named Tobin was burned to death to-night by the explosion of a lamp in a house on Washington street.

 

BARTHELOU - (Ottawa) Louis Barthelou, the Parisian chef of the Ottawa Club, died to-day from the effects of an attack of the grippe with a complication.

 

CHISHOLM - (Halifax) A special from Antigonish says that Donald Chisholm of James River, while driving home Thursday night, lost his way in the storm and perished. The body was found today.

 

RITCHIE - (Halifax) Thomas A, Ritchie, brother of the Chief Justice of Canada, and half-brother of Judge Ritchie of the supreme court of Nova Scotia, died here to-day, aged 80 years. He spent many years in Cuba where he accumulated a handsome fortune. About a quarter of a century ago he came to Halifax to live and invested his money here. He was a widower and leaves no children.

 

MACMAHON - On New Year morning as Sergeant McMahon was marching the relief squad of police up King William street, a lad about thirteen years of age came around the corner of James street and met the men coming. The boy attracted the attention of the sergeant by sneaking along the wall as if to escape observation, and the officer stopped him to find out what he was doing. He said his name was Edward MacMahon and that his friends lived in Dundas. He was ill, suffering a pain in the stomach, and he stated that he had been wandering about all night. The sergeant smelled liquor on him and accused him of having been drinking, but the boy said that he had been given a glass of brandy by a hotel keeper near the station to brace him up. He denied very emphatically that he drank more than that. He seemed very sick and downhearted and asked to be sent to the penitentiary for four years.

Sergeant McMahon ordered Constable Cruikshank to take the boy to the police station and in the afternoon, as he did not get any better, he was taken to the jail where Dr. Rosebrugh attended him. Next morning he was too sick to attend court and was removed to the hospital on the following day. He was found to be suffering from inflammation of the lungs and the poor little fellow gradually got worse until he died at 3 o'clock yesterday morning.

He was delirious nearly all the time while in the hospital and little could be learned regarding him. His father is dead and his mother is married to a man named Coughlin who lives near the Grand Trunk station at Dundas. Young MacMahon came to the city about the middle of December and worked for George Winn, a shoe manufacturer on King William street until a short time before New Year when he left voluntarily saying he would come back and it was understood that he had gone out to Dundas. His movements immediately prior to being found by the police are not accounted for.


While at the jail the boy told Governor Ogilvie that some men had given him eighteen or nineteen glasses of whiskey and brandy on the night in question, but this does not tally with the story told to the sergeant who found him and who says that the boy did not appear to be drunk, but sick, suffering from loss of sleep and exposure. He could walk quite well and said he had been about all night. That quantity of liquor would have effectually prevented locomotion on the part of a man, let alone a boy. It is possible that MacMahon was already in delirium when he made the assertion.

The body was given up to his friends who removed it to Dundas yesterday. It seems, however, a case which an inquest should be held about.

 

January 14, 1890

 

MCKEOWN - Died in this city, on January 13, Ann, relict of the late Terence McKeown, aged 54 years. Funeral from her late residence, 4 King street west, on Thursday, at 8:30 a.m. to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to R. C. Cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

The second death directly traceable to the prevailing influenza occurred yesterday. The victim was Mrs. McKeown, mother of James McKeown, proprietor of the well known restaurant. In the case of Mrs. McKeown the disease developed into pneumonia.

 

DUNBAR - (Toronto) Richard Dunbar died Sunday might, aged 61. He was for many years successfully engaged in the wholesale grocery business here. Deceased was at the time of his death a director of the People's Loan and Savings Company, and was connected with various other financial institutions.

 

FOWLER - (Watford) In attempting to board a passing train near the Grand Trunk station here this afternoon, Richard, the ten-year-old son of L. Fowler of this place, slipped and was dragged underneath the wheels of the cars. Both legs were amputated and he lived only a short time.

 

January 15, 1890

 

JACKSON - Died in this city, at 107 York street, on January 13, Ethel May Huscher, youngest daughter of T. C. and Caroline Jackson, aged 1 year, 4 months, and 9 days. Funeral will take place Wednesday, January 15, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MILLER - (Toronto) Coroner Johnson, will hold an inquest to-morrow on the body of the woman, Mrs. Miller, who lived with her husband, Bruce Miller, at 37 Stafford street. She died under rather peculiar circumstances which point to a case of abortion performed with instruments by herself.


FERGUSON - (Ottawa) Mrs. Ferguson, wife of John Ferguson, M.P. for Renfrew, died on Sunday of consumption. She was only 36 years of age and had spent all last summer in the Adirondacks in the hope of regaining her health.

 

KNAPP - (Listowel) This afternoon Peter Knapp, a well known citizen, died very suddenly. A rupture of a vessel of the heart is the supposed cause of his sudden death. Mr. Knapp spent last season in Manitoba where he purchased a farm of 380 acres in the neighborhood of Virden, and was making preparations to remove to the prairie province with his family in the spring. Deceased was a brother-in-law of George Hess, M.P.P., and was a prominent Mason.

 

CUTHBERT - (Belleville) Capt. Cuthbert, the famous yacht builder, died this morning at Trenton in his 50th year.

 

January 16, 1890

 

CROMPTON - Died at Weston, on Tuesday, January 14, 1890, Martha, relict of the late Rev. Thomas Crompton, in the 74th year of her age. Funeral on Thursday, to Burlington cemetery, from Grand Trunk station on arrival of train from Toronto due at 1:45 pm.

 

HUTTON - Died in this city, on January 15, at No 13 Augusta street, Reginald Romeyn, infant son of Frances R. and Wilmott E. Hutton, aged 1 year, and 3 months. Funeral Friday at 2:30 p.m.

 

SMITH - (Ottawa) Vernon Smith, C. E., died at his residence, Gloucester street, at an early hour this morning. His death was the result of an attack of la grippe which developed into congestion of the lungs and pneumonia. The deceased was a very successful engineer. He was a pupil of Robert Stephenson and before coming to this country was engaged upon many works both in England and on the continent. At the time of his death he was engaged upon a report of the survey of the proposed Harvey-Salisbury short line in New Brunswick. He was about 67 years of age. He leaves a family of six, of whom four are quite young.

 

CAMERON - (Montreal) Maggie Cameron, daughter of a Scotch farmer of St. Andrews, died in the waiting room of the Windsor street station while suffering from consumption. She had been on a visit and was returning home.

 

HANNA - (Wingham) A well-to-do farmer named Campbell Hanna threw himself into the Maitland river running through his farm, early this morning and was drowned before assistance arrived. Three of his neighbours witnessed the act and rushed to assist him, but the river being very much swollen, they were unable to do anything. One of these men had a very narrow escape from drowning. A strange co-incidence in connection with this is that the previous owner of


Hanna's farm named Mr. McCourt drowned himself in the same spot and in the same manner some years ago. No cause can be assigned for the act.

 

COLEMAN - (Bowmanville) T. T. Coleman, chief of police, aged 67 years, died this afternoon of acute inflammation of the lungs following upon indisposition from la grippe. He leaves a widow and six children.

 

January 17, 1890

 

CONNOR - Died in this city, on January 16, James Stanley, infant son of James and Cynthia Connor. Funeral at 4 p.m. to-day from his parents' residence, 207 Park street north. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BEGLEY - Died in this city, on January 15, Rachel, beloved wife of James Begley, in the 60th year of her age. Funeral will leave 149 Simcoe street on Friday, January 17, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FORBES - Died in this city, on January 16, Alexander Forbes, aged 85 years. Funeral from the residence of his son, 227 Wilson street, on Saturday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

YOUNG - Died in this city, on January 16, Emily Bown, wife of Hamilton Young, and third daughter of the late John Ferrie. Funeral from her mother's residence, 116 Hannah street west, on Saturday, January 18, at 3:30 p.m.

 

January 18, 1890

 

STRATHDEN - Died at 63 York street, London, on Wednesday, January 15, Mary, beloved wife of William Strathden. Funeral Friday afternoon to Mount Pleasant cemetery.

 

BARNES - Died at the rectory, Uxbridge, the residence of her son-in-law, Rev. W. S. Wasting, on January 16, Martha, relict of the late W. S. Barnes, in her 78th year. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, M. I. Olmsted, Ancaster, on Monday, at 2 p.m.

 

SHEPHERD - (Ottawa) News comes from Carleton Place that late on Wednesday afternoon John Shepherd of Ramsay was drowned in the river there.

 

NORTH - (Toronto) William K. North, for the past seven years superintendent of the House of Industry, died last night.

 

TRADEL - (Montreal) Hon. Senator Tradel died this afternoon at the Hotel Dieu hospital after a long illness and by his death the Ultramontaine party loses its head, L'Etandard newspaper


its editor, and the French-Canadian press of the country one of its most vigorous writers. He was always an intense Catholic and even went further than the bishops in advocating extreme measures for the aggrandizement of the church.

 

January 20, 1890

 

GORDON - Died in this city, on January 18, Wallace Gordon, brother of Alexander Gordon, of Buffalo, N.Y., aged 20 years and 2 months. Funeral will take place from the residence of his uncle, Mr. George Sharp, 170 Main street west, on Monday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

PARK - Died on Sunday, January 19, at Brantford, Alice Gertrude Sterling,, wife of E. C. Park. Funeral on Tuesday at 3:30 p.m.

 

FARR - Died in this city, on January 18, Malloch Farr, son of David Farr, aged 14 years, 2 months, and 15 days. Funeral from 16 Strachan street east, Tuesday, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are invited.

 

LYALL - (Halifax) Professor Lyall of Dalhousie University died last night aged eighty-nine. He was a professor from the time of the organization in 1868.

 

HAMILTON - (Halifax) Louise Hamilton, a coloured woman living at Hammond's Plains, was found in her house, frozen to death. She lived alone in a small shanty half a mile from the main road.

 

January 21, 1890

 

BROWNJOHN - Died at Toronto, on January 15, 1890, Thomas Charles Brownjohn, P.L.S., of Grimsby, in the 61st year of his age.

Many persons in the Niagara district will learn with regret of the death of T. C. Brownjohn of Grimsby which occurred on January 15. He was widely known as an experienced engineer and land surveyor. Born at Beauclerc, Hampshire, England, on April 3, 1829, he came to Grimsby in 1852. He leaves four daughters: Mrs. R. A, Nelles, of Rapid City, N.W.T.; Mrs. Rea Newdale, Manitoba; and two unmarried daughters.

 

O'NEIL - Died in this city, on January 19, Annie, beloved daughter of John O'Neil, aged 18 years. Funeral will take place from her father's residence, No 9 Aurora street, on Tuesday afternoon, at 2;30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

LOCKWOOD - Died at her late residence, No 4 Mill street, on January 19, Sarah Ann Lockwood, in her 59th year. Funeral to-morrow, Tuesday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


DAY - Died at her late residence, 194 Cowan avenue, Parkdale, Ontario, on January 29, 1890, Louisa, beloved wife of Richard Day, of G.T.R., aged 47 years. Funeral on arrival of 1:45 train from Toronto, on Wednesday, January 22. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BOWNARD - (Toronto) George Bownard, public school trustee for St. Stephen's ward, died this morning after an illness of two weeks, mainly from influenza.

 

GARLAND - (Toronto) A carpenter named Alexander Garland, aged fifty-five, was instantly killed this morning through falling backward from a scaffold and breaking his neck.

 

WEBB - (London) When the Sarnia train arrived here at four o'clock this morning, it was found that a gentleman had died on the cars between Strathroy and this city. Deceased was taken to Ferguson's undertaking establishment and the coroner sent for. On the body being searched a ticket was found to Philadalphia and the dead man was found to be a William H. Webb, residing at 714 North Fifth street. On him was found a cheque for $700 and over $200 in bills besides an old draft for $5000 which had apparently been kept for years. A doctor gave a certificate that death had resulted from chronic pulmonary trouble. The body was sent home on the eleven o'clock train.

 

SHERIDAN - (Montreal) Walter Sheridan has died in prison. He was the well known American bank thief arrested here with Barlow on suspicion of being connected with the Banque du Peuple robbery and sentenced on Wednesday last to six months on the charge of vagrancy. At the time he pleaded for mercy saying he would not live a week. He has been in the hospital ever since being sent down, suffering from general debility. The deputy coroner held an inquest to-day, and Dr. Desmarteau testified to the old man's illness from typhoid fever and lung complications, and a verdict was rendered accordingly.

 

BLACKWELL - (Brampton) Mrs. Blackwell, who had been to market here, was walking home on the Grand Trunk Railway track when she was struck by a light engine and instantly killed. Her remains were brought back here by the engineer and handed over to the authorities.

 

January 22, 1890

 

ACLAND - Died on January 20, at Burlington, Charlotte Ovington, the beloved wife of Joseph Acland.

 

KENNEDY - Died in this city, on January 19, William Kennedy, aged 55 years, formerly of Sharon, Pa. Funeral will leave his late residence, 168 Hess street north, on Wednesday, January 22, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.


GEDDES - Died in Montreal, on January 20, of pneumonia, Charles Geddes, Esq., eldest son of the late Dr. James Geddes, assistant staff surgeon, and brother of the Dean of Niagara, in the 83rd year of his age.

 

MYNAHAN - Died on January 20, Margaret Mynahan, relict of the late Michael Mynahan, aged 75 years. Funeral from the residence of her ,son, Cornelius Mynahan, 368 Hughson street north, at 8:30 a.m., Thursday, January 23, for St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulcher cemetery.  Friends are respectfully invited.

 

MCCAULEY - (Toronto) Miss Mary J. McCauley, one of the teachers in Givins street school, died yesterday. She had been in the service of the board for nearly thirty years.

 

GREGORY - (Toronto) John J. Gregory, a young barrister, died to-day from the effects of la grippe which developed into pneumonia and became fatal.

 

GORDON - (Halifax) James R. Gordon, a well known druggist, died suddenly to-day from inflammation of the lungs. He was trained as an apothecary in the British Navy in which he spent many years, seeing many countries and some active service.

 

PEACH (Halifax) The children of Robert Peach were left alone yesterday and in some unknown manner the clothing of one of them, a two-year-old girl, caught fire. She was terribly burned before the flames were extinguished, her legs, arms, and chest being burned to the bone. She died this morning.

 

MURRAY - (Halifax) A serious accident happened on the Intercolonial Railway some distance from Valley station before daylight this morning. A coal train from Stellarton was descending a steep grade some miles long when the train parted. The forepart kept on, the accident not being noticed till Vallay station was reached where the loss of a number of hand cars was discovered.  The forepart of the train put back to secure the lost cars and met them descending the grade beyond the control of the brakes. A collision could not be averted, the two pieces of the train coming together with great violence and a number of cars being demolished and ditched. A brakeman named A. E. Murray who was on the hind part of the train when it parted from the rest was missed after the collision and on search being made, he was found a short distance back, lying by the side of the road with a broken leg and other injuries. It is supposed he jumped from the cars when he saw the impending collision. He died from his injuries several hours later.

 

GORLEY - (St. John) John Gorley and his three children perished by fire last night. Gorley died in the flames while making a third attempt to rescue his children. His remains were found with his head burned off and a child in his arms.


MCLEOD -John McLeod, a man about 28 years old, son of Oliver McLeod, living at 44 Crooks street, died very suddenly yesterday afternoon. The deceased was in good health until Saturday last when he complained of being sick. Yesterday morning in company with John Crooks and his brother, David McLeod, he went to the hospital where he intended to go into a private ward. For some reason McLeod would not remain in the hospital and he left there shortly afterward. Early in the afternoon when his brother and James Henneberry were walking along York street they saw him driving towards home in Mat Hayes's hack. The driver stopped when he saw them and McLeod got out of the hack. Henneberry and his brother David McLeod then persuaded him to return to the hospital and the three of them took the street car to that institution. McLeod was willing enough to remain there until his friends went away. Then he became dissatisfied and the nurse was afraid he would jump out of the window.

All efforts to persuade the young man to stay at the hospital were of no avail and he went away again. About 4:45 his brother and Henneberry met him on York street. The three of them walked along that street, and when they were near Locomotive street, McLeod swooned and fell on the sidewalk. He was carried into Mr. Porteous's house and it was found that he was dead. He expired immediately after he fell on the sidewalk. Dr. Philp was summoned and arrived shortly after the unfortunate man had breathed his last. He thought that heart disease was the cause of death. Under the circumstances he did not consider an inquest was necessary.

Last night Dr. Crosthwaite told the "Spectator" that McLeod was on the verge of delirium tremens when he arrived at the hospital. The man could not be persuaded to remain there. Coroner Philp had no knowledge of McLeod's troubles when he examined the body. When the deceased fell, he said to his brother, "I guess I am done for". He did not speak after that. The fact that McLeod's mother died a couple of months ago makes the affair doubly distressing. The deceased was well known in the city.

 

January 23, 1890

 

MACLEOD - Died in this city, on January 21, John MacLeod, aged 28 years and 11 months. Funeral will leave his late residence, 44 Crooks street, on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CULLINAN - Died in West Flamborough, on January 21, Michael Cullinan, aged 76 years. Funeral from his late residence, Thursday, at 1 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

CONNOR - Died in this city, on January 21, Lizzie J. Connor, only daughter of the late William Connor, aged 21 years. Funeral from the residence of her brother, 169 Cannon street west, Thursday, January 23, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


January 24, 1890

 

HENDERSON - Died at 273 Catherine street north, this city, January 22, William Henderson, aged 65. Funeral Saturday at 3 p.m. from above address. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

The late William Henderson who died Wednesday at his residence, 273 Catherine street north, was born in County Monaghan, Ireland, in 1836. He came to Hamilton in 1844 and resided here continuously until his death. He was at one time in the livery business, and for the past thirty-five years has been a trusted employee in Walker's soap factory, He was a staunch Conservative and a member of Knox church. He was a member of the Hamilton Field Battery for thirty years. He was an Orangeman and will be buried with Grange honours. A widow and one married son and three married daughters survive him.

 

BLACK - Died in this city this morning, January 24, suddenly at the Victoria hotel, Charles E. B. Black, weights and measures department of inland revenue. The funeral will leave the Victoria hotel at 1:15 to-day for the Northern & Northwestern depot. Royal Arch Masons and Knights Templar requested to attend.

 

MOONEY - John Mooney, an old pensioner who boarded at the Delmonico hotel, died last evening after an illness of a week. He was employed at Gurney's foundry. The deceased had no relatives in this country.

 

LEGARE - (Quebec) Monseignour Legare, vicar-general of the archdiocese, died this morning at 4 o'clock of la grippe, complicated with inflammation of the lungs. He was a favourite with everyone, among his best friends being protestants of all denominations.

 

HETHERINGTON - (Quebec) Colin Hetherington, son of T. Hetherington, bread and biscuit manufacturer, died to-day from an aggravated attack of la grippe.

 

MERCAN - (Montreal) Rev. Abbe Andre Mercan, a priest of the order of St. Sulpice, died of pneumonia this morning. Abbe Mercan was born in 1814 at Barzac, France, and was ordained priest in 1840, and taught philosophy at Bordeau until 1846 when he came to Montreal. Here he filled several professional chairs in the Montreal college of which he finally became director. He was chaplain to the ladies of the Hotel Dieu and to the general hospital.

 

January 25, 1890

 

CONWAY - Died at 71 Pearl street north, this city, January 24, Isabella, second daughter of John H. and Mary Conway, aged 3 years and 7 days. Funeral will leave the above address on Saturday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


MCVEA - Died in this city, on January 23, Isabella McVea, relict of the late William McVea, late of Londonderry, Ireland, in the 64th year of her age. Funeral will take place from the residence of her son-in-law, 408 Ferguson avenue north, on Saturday afternoon, at 2 o'clock, to the R. C. cemetery.

 

ADDISON - Died on January 23, 1890, at Hall's Corners, of pneumonia, William Addison, son of James and Mary Addison, aged 16 years and 2 months. Funeral Saturday, January 25, at 2 o'clock, at Binbrook. Friends will please accept this notice.

The many friends of James Addison will regret to learn that he has lost his second son, William, a promising lad who was just approaching his 17th year. He died from influenza which suddenly turned to pneumonia. Mr. Addison recently removed from the city to Hall's Corners, and the kindness of his neighbours, to whom he was an entire stranger, deserves great praise. The remains will be interred at Cheyne cemetery, Binbrook, on Saturday at 2 o'clock.

 

TRAVERS - Died in Toronto, on January 23, Sarah, daughter of the late Denis Travers, formerly of this city. Funeral will leave Grand Trunk Railway station here on Sunday afternoon on arrival of 1:45 train from Toronto.

 

ANDERSON - (Strathroy) A fatal accident occurred yesterday on the farm of William Humphries, North Adelaide, in which a young man named Joseph Anderson lost his life by falling from a tree. It seems that while Anderson, along with Humphires and his son, was out in the woods felling trees, the tree that was being felled lodged in the limb of another tree. Anderson immediately went up to cut it down, but just as he got up he slipped and fell to the ground on his head, breaking his neck. He lived only a few seconds after.

 

STORN - (Wingham) When the Grand Trunk train from Kincardine was coming into Wingham this morning, it struck and killed an old man named Matt Storn, whose duty it was to watch the crossing. When struck he was shovelling snow from the rails and it is supposed thought himself out of reach of the train.

 

LAVERGNE, MCGOWAN - (Quebec) Two very old persons died at Matane a few days ago.

One named Jean Lavergne, aged 103 years, was a native of Quebec. The other, Mrs. McGowan, aged 102 years, was born in Scotland.

 

JOHNSTON - (Kingston) The body of Stephen Johnston, which was stolen from the cemetery at Tweed last November, was found here by his friends to-day and taken back to Tweed for reburial.


January 27, 1890

 

WARE - Died on January 24, at his late residence, 1072 York street, Frederick Ware, in his 38th year.

 

YOUNG - Died at her late residence, 557 York street, on January 25, Martha Jane Kerr, wife of Thomas Young, aged 64 years, a native of Caledon, county Tyrone, Ireland. Funeral on Tuesday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HUDSON - Died in this city, on January 26, Sarah, relict of the late Thomas Hudson, aged 75 years, a native of county Limerick, Ireland. Funeral will leave her son-in-law's residence, R. W. Yalden, 133 James street north, Tuesday, January 28, at two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

REID - Died in this city, on January 26, Joseph Reid, aged 71 years and 6 months. Funeral from the residence of his son-in-law, Capt. J. Johnson, No 307 John street north, Tuesday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

HENDERSON - (Toronto) Abraham Henderson, a well known military man and a member of A Company of Royal Grenadiers, died yesterday. He will be given a military funeral on Monday.

 

MARRER - (Toronto) Michael Marrer, aged 33, married, fell through a hole in the Market Street wharf Saturday night and was drowned in spite of the efforts of several bystanders to save him.

 

AVERY - (Ottawa) Mrs. Fred W. Avery, wife of F. W. Avery, a prominent leader of society, died here to-day. Mrs. Avery was a daughter of Col. Norman Statton of the United States Navy. Her Christian name was Annie Vaughan. She was born in Troy, N.Y., on March 25, 1853 and was married in October 1875 to Fred W. Avery.

 

STEVENSON - (Ottawa) Intelligence was received here to-day of the death at Peterborough of the wife of J. B. Stevenson, M.P. for that place.  Mr. Stevenson has been home since early in the session.

 

STAUNTON - (Montreal) A man named Patrick Staunton, the second engineer of the New York Life building, was killed this morning by falling down the elevator, a distance of 85 feet. He was a native of Brooklyn, N.Y.

 

RODIER - (Montreal) Hon. Senator C. S. Rodier died at eleven o'clock to-night at his residence, 68 Osborne street in this city.


January 28, 1890

 

MORRISON, CAIRNS, MCGEE, DUGGAN - (Quebec) Detective Morrison died this afternoon from inflammation of the lungs, following a severe case of la grippe. William Cairns, an employee of the Court House, died Saturday from la grippe. Dr. J. McGee died last night  of la grippe. Mrs. Duggan, wife of Mr. Duggan, official shorthand writer at the House of Commons, died recently from la grippe. She came here from Montreal on a visit to her mother. She died after 24 hours of illness.

 

SCHARIO - (Guelph) Andrew Schario, aged 12, son of Michael Schario, was out with some companions Sunday morning chasing squirrels. Young Schario climbed a tree after a squirrel and accidentally fell to the ground. He was carried home unconscious and expired this morning.

 

CODY - (Dundas) Richard T. Cody, son of Richard Cody, cooper, of this town, died in Toronto on Sunday afternoon, aged 21 years. The deceased was in the real estate business in Toronto and was one of the many victims of la grippe. His remains will arrive in Dundas at 7 o'clock to-night.

 

SANDLAUS - (Dundas) Charles Sandlaus, a young man employed at J. H. Bowman's furniture factory, died at Mrs. Watson's boarding house at 1 o'clock this morning. He had an attack of la grippe which developed into typhoid fever. The funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon at 2 o'clock.

 

January 29, 1890

 

MCLENNAN - Died on January 27, Annie, beloved wife of Alexander McLennan, aged 51 years. Funeral from her husband's residence, 517 York street, on Wednesday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

Mrs. Annie McLennan, a woman about 50 years of age, wife of Alexander McLennan, caretaker at Dundurn park, dropped dead on Locke street yesterday morning. She had been in bad health for some time and on Sunday complained very much. She suffered from spasms frequently and her husband became alarmed. After making her as comfortable as possible he went over to the park about nine o'clock to attend to some duties, intending to return in a short while, but while he was away his wife went out and walked up Locke street as far as the palace. Just in front of Mr. Buscombe's house she fell to the sidewalk and expired immediately. Dr. Stark and Dr. Philp were called but could do nothing, and the body was sent to her late residence on York street near the park. Dr. Philp deemed an inquest unnecessary. The cause of death was heart trouble. The deceased leaves no children.


FORMAN - Died on January 27, Louisa, beloved wife of George Forman, aged 45 years. Funeral Thursday, January 30, at 3 o'clock from her late residence, 410 James street north. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

MALLOCH - Died on January 28, in the 37th year of her age, Frances Mary, wife of Archibald E. Malloch, M.D. Funeral on Wednesday. January 29, at 1130 p.m. to the G.T.R. station and at Brockville on Thursday afternoon.

Mrs. Frances Mary Malloch, wife of Dr. A. E. Malloch, died yesterday at the early age of thirty-seven. The body will be taken to Brockville for interment. The deceased leaves six children.

 

CARSON - Died in this city, on January 28, at her father's residence, No 35 Davenport street, Anne, daughter of George Carson, aged 21 years. Funeral Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

RONEY - (Portage Dufour, Que) C. P. Roney, advocate and crown prosecutor, died of influenza at his home last night, aged thirty-six years.

 

January 30, 1890

 

YOUNGSON - Died in this city, on January 29, Warren H. V. Youngson, Son of John Youngson, blacksmith, aged 1 year and 10 months. Funeral will leave 485 York street at 3:30 o'clock on Thursday, January 30. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

DOMVILLE - Died on January 29, st his father's residence, 49 Main street west, Herbert Thomas, sixth son of Charles K. Domville, aged 25 years. Funeral Friday at 3:30 p.m.

Herbert T. Domville, sixth son of C. E. Domville, mechanical superintendent of the Grand Trunk, died yesterday morning. The deceased was born in Belfast, Ireland, on Christmas Day, 1864. He served his apprenticeship in the Great Western Railway shops. Until a short time before his death, he was travelling locomotive inspector of the southern division of the Grand Trunk. He was married and leaves a wife and one child. He was sick about three months. Consumption was the cause of death.

 

WILSON - Died in this city, on January 28, William Wilson, in the 29th year of his age, fifth son of the late Joseph Wilson. Funeral from No 42 West avenue north, on Thursday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WALL - Died in this city, on January 29, Ann Jane, beloved wife of James Wall, blacksmith, aged 56 years. Funeral Friday from 136 Jackson street east. Friends will please accept this intimation.


BRADFIELD - Died in this city, at the residence of her nephew, William Royal, No 117 Bay street north, Hannah Bradfield, aged 52 years and 6 months. Funeral Friday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

RAM - Died in this city, at his late residence, 316 Hunter street west, Alfred Ram, Sr., aged 56 years. Funeral Sunday, February 2, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Alfred Ram, a well known contractor, died at his residence, 316 Hunter street west, last night, aged 56 years. Mr. Ram was injured by a fall some weeks ago, and though it was not considered serious at the time, he gradually grew worse and sank rapidly towards the last. He was a prominent member of the Sons of England and took great interest in matters pertaining to the society.

 

FIELDEN - (Dundas) William Fielden, an old resident of the town, died yesterday, aged 81 years. The funeral takes place this afternoon.

 

DANIELS - (Toronto) Harold Daniels, coloured, convicted to Central prison, died to-day from natural causes. He was sent down from Chatham in October 1888 on a sentence of twenty-three months and had still half a year to serve. (Editor’s note from Wikipedia; The Toronto Historical Association sums up the facility's reputation: "Central Prison represents one of the most shameful parts of the city's history, and its severe conditions and brutality are shocking".

 

SINCLAIR - George Sinclair, the Grand Trunk Railway switchman who had two legs cut off the other evening at the Bathurst street bridge, died to-day from the effects of the accident.

 

HUYCK - (Belleville) Joseph P. Huyck, the oldest inhabitant of the city died this morning in his 97th year. The deceased was a veteran of 1812-14 and was for upwards of seventy years a freemason, being the oldest member of the craft in Canada, and the oldest but one on the continent. He will be buried on Friday.

 

January 31, 1890

 

MCMILLAN - Died in this city, at 69 Catherine street north, Lettie, daughter of the late James McMillan, aged 19 years and 3 months. Funeral on Friday at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CAMPBELL - Died on January 30, in the 80th year of her age, Elizabeth, relict of the late James Campbell. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, C. W. Meakins, 314 Main street east, on Saturday, February 1, at 2 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.


DROLET - (Quebec) Gaspard Drolet, provincial auditor, died this morning of a complicated case of la grippe.

 

BOSTWICK - (Toronto) Miss Bessie Bostwick, a young lady of seventeen, who was brought here by her father from St. John, N.B., to attend a private school, died yesterday at the Rossin House. She had taken la grippe on the way here and pneumonia followed, proving fatal.

 

HECTOR, BOON - (Toronto) Two more deaths occurred here as a result of la grippe. The victims are J. W. Hector, solicitor, and son of the late John Hector, Q.C., and W. G. Boon, insurance inspector.

 

NOEL - (Quebec) A young man named Jean Noel, a carpenter by trade, died yesterday afternoon after suffering for two or three years from the effects, it is said, of bad vaccine matter, he having been vaccinated on the train while on his way to Montreal during the smallpox epidemic in that city.

 

ARMOUR - (Bowmanville) Robert Armour, barrister, registrar of West Durham, died this morning after an illness of four months. He was born at Dourie, Perthshire, Scotland, in 1813, and was the third and eldest surviving son of the Rev. Samuel Armour and Margaret Douglas. Chief Justice Armour was his youngest brother. He was admitted as an attorney in 1840, called to the bar in 1847, and appointed registrar of West Durham in 1849 which office he filled at the time of his death. In the rebellion of 1837, he served as a volunteer and was one of the party which cut away the steamer ''Caroline" from the American side of the Niagara river during the disturbance.

He was at one time a commissioner of the provincial lunatic asylum at Toronto. In 1843 he married Marianne Burton, daughter of the late Rev. Edmund Burton, for some time rector of Kildare, Lower Canada, and perpetual curate of Drysart Enos in Ireland, and a cousin of Richard Burton, the celebrated African explorer, and of Lady Saistart whose husband, General Saistart, was provisional lieutenant-governor of Ontario after Confederation. He leaves a widow; and six children, E. D. Armour, Q.C., of Toronto being his eldest son.

 

February 1, 1890

 

ROBERTSON - Died on January 31, of inflammation of the lungs, Lizzie, beloved wife of P. T. Robertson, aged 35 years. Funeral on Sunday, February 2, at 2 p.m., from her late residence, 310 King street west. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. P. T. Robertson, wife of the well known rifleman, died yesterday of congestion of the lungs, the result of an attack of the grip. She was 35 years of age and leaves four children.


BEDELL - Died on January 30, Murray Stannard Bedell, second son of John and Rosa Bedell, of Dundas road, Ancaster, aged 4 months and 6 days. Funeral at Hamilton cemetery on February 1.

 

MORRIS - Died in this city, on January 31, Amelia Florence, beloved wife of Harry Morris, in the 31st year of her age, a native of Birmingham, England. Funeral from her husband's residence, 254 Hughson street north, on Sunday, February 2, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BRADY - (Dundas) Mrs. John Brady, who had a stroke of paralysis on Thursday last week, died on Wednesday and will be buried to-morrow.

 

GEIKIE - (Toronto) Mrs. Dr. N. B. Geikie died here yesterday. Mrs. Geikie was a daughter of the late James Woodhouse of the customs office.

 

MCCARTHY - (Toronto) Timothy McCarthy, who for nearly forty years was an able and respected official in the customs department, died here at the age of 75 from la grippe. He was strongly recommended for a civil service position by Robert Baldwin and he was appointed by Sir Francis Hincks.

 

MORIN - (Moncton) A distressing tragedy is reported from Pilot River Platform, six miles east of Petitcodiac, two young children being burned to death by the destruction of their father's house by fire. Calvin Morin, a section foreman, was at his work on the railway and his wife went out at 9 o'clock this morning, leaving two infant children in the kitchen. The eldest one, two years old, was at that time near the stove, and the other, nine months old, was in a cradle. The mother returned in half an hour to discover to her horror that the dwelling was in flames. It was impossible to save the children. Neighbours had to forcibly prevent the woman from entering the burning house as it meant certain death. It is supposed the oldest child was playing with the fire and started the blaze.

 

February 3, 1890

 

MCKINTY - Died in this city, on February 1, Captain John McKinty, in the 64th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 27 Barton street east, at 8:30 a.m. on Monday, February 3, to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BILLY - Mrs. L. A. Gauvreaff, wife of Judge Billy of Gaspe died suddenly yesterday from heart disease at her residence in New Carlisle.

 

MORAS - (Quebec) A young man named Arthur Moras of Pierre les Becquets yesterday while crossing over to Batiscan broke through the ice and was drowned, His body was recovered to-day.

 


ASHE - (Moncton) Patrick Ashe, an Intercolonial engine driver, cut his throat last night at the Queen's hotel where he boarded with his family. The windpipe was severed but not the jugular vein and there is a possibility of his recovery.

 

February 4, 1890

 

PAISLEY - Died on the Dundas road, on February 2, Miss Margaret Paisley, in the 72nd year of her age. Funeral on Tuesday, February 4, at 10 o'clock.

 

HAWKINS - Died in this city, on February 3, Mrs. Harriet Hawkins, relict of the late Edward Hawkins, and third daughter of James and Margaret Nichol, aged 31 years. Funeral from 195 Rebecca street, on Tuesday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

HENDERSON - Died in this city, on Monday, February 3, at her late residence, 50 Robins street, Isabella Renton, relict of the late John M. Henderson, aged 68 years. Funeral on Wednesday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

EVANS - The funeral of the late Mrs. Evans, of Barton, took place on Sunday and was largely attended by the members of Dover Lodge, No 102, Sons of England, of which her husband is a member. Rev. C. R. Lee officiated. The pall bearers were Brothers H. Hooper, F. Lane, R. Hooper, and W. Brown. Mrs. Evans succumbed to an attack of grippe.

 

HOWARD - (Toronto) J. G. Howard of High Park died to-day. The old gentleman was well known to the citizens of Toronto of which he has been a resident for many years. He was at one time city engineer and was the donor of High Park to the park in return for which he was granted an annuity of $1200. He was 87 years of age. He was born in a small village near London, England. After coming to this country he followed the profession of land surveying. He secured through the influence of Sir John Colborne the position of drawing master at Upper Canada College at a salary of 1100 a year. Not very long after his arrival here he was appointed city surveyor under William Lyon Mackenzie, Toronto's first mayor, and for many years he was one of Toronto's leading citizens. In 1883 the Marquis of Lorne conferred on him the dignity of a Royal Canadian Academician. He died at Colborne Lodge, High Park, near where he had erected some time ago a magnificent tomb or vault at a cost of over $3000 in which his remains doubtless will be buried. His death was caused by chest trouble, superinduced by influenza. Mr. Howard was the scion of one of the most illustrious families of the United Kingdom, being descended from the most noble Lord William Howard of Norwich castle in the county of Cumberland, the Belted Will of Sir Walter Scott's well known poem.

 

 


BEATTY - (Toronto) William Beatty, a well known member of the firm of William Beatty & Son here, died suddenly yesterday from an attack of apoplexy. He was stricken down while completing his toilet.

 

BROWN - (Welland) John Brown, a member of the firm of Brown Bros., merchant millers, died to-day rather suddenly.

 

MCCAMPBELL - (Halifax) Charles McCampbell, registrar of deeds, died suddenly at Weymouth to-day of neuralgia of the heart.

 

BONANG - (Halifax) Brenton Bonang, a lad living near Dartmouth, who accidentally shot himself in the abdomen on Friday while handling a revolver, died last night from the effects of the wound.

 

BENNETT - (Halifax) Mrs. Bennett, wife of stipendiary Bennett of Spring Hill, was working near the kitchen stove when her dress caught fire. Her cries brought assistance and she was wrapped in flames and was so badly burned that she died several hours afterward. She was 32 years old and leaves a husband and two sons.

 

GOSSELIN - (Quebec) A fatal accident occurred at No 3 police station of the city. Sergeant Auguste Gosselin on returning from duty sat at his desk and began cleaning a five-chambered Smith & Wesson revolver of 32 calibre, and after cleaning the weapon nicely he reloaded it, but as his hand trembled, Constables Bloun and Tremblay, who were close to Gosselin looking at him cleaning the revolver, walked away, fearing an accident. Just as they moved off a detonation was heard. Bloun snatched the revolver which was pointed towards the heart, from Gosselin’s hand while Tremblay extinguished the flames from his clothing. Gosselin fell to the ground exclaiming, "Mon Dieu". A priest and a doctor were summoned to the dying man's side. The priest administered to him the sacrament of the church. He expired at 2:30 p.m.

 

LAW - (Victoria Harbour) On Friday evening as William Law and Miss Clara Law were driving home from Coldwater, the horse became unmanageable when about three miles from home. They were both thrown violently on the road which was covered with ice. Miss Law appears to have been held by the robes and dragged a short distance. She sustained such injuries that she died on Sunday morning without returning to consciousness. William Law was not seriously hurt.

 

February 5, 1890

 

ELRINGTON Died in this city, on February 4, Catharine, relict of the late John Elrington, in the 76th year of her age, a native of the county of Wicklow, Ireland.


Funeral from her late residence, 50 Hughson street north, Thursday morning at 8:30. to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence of Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

Mrs. Catharine Elrington, a very old resident of Hamilton, died yesterday at her home, 50 Hughson street north. Mrs. Elrington was a native of Wicklow, Ireland, and came to Hamilton over forty years ago with her husband, the late John Elrington. She reared a large family but only William Elrington. who is employed in the newsroom of the "Evening Times" survives her. Mrs. Elrington, who was a member of the congregation of St. Mary's Cathedral, was a devoted and kindhearted Christian woman. The funeral will take place on Thursday morning at 8:30 o'clock.

 

DINGMAN - Died at his late residence, 101 Locke street north, on Monday, February 3, Peter Dingman, in his 66th year. Funeral on Wednesday, February 5, at 2 p.m.

 

BLAKE - Died in this city, on February 3, at No 185 King William street, Elizabeth Amy, wife of William Blake, butcher, in the 59th year of her age. Funeral Wednesday, February 5, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MACDONALD - (Toronto) Senator Macdonald died this evening. Last week an operation was performed on him to relieve him of an abscess and it was probably the result of the shock to his system that caused his death. He recently returned from an extended trip to the northwestern part of the continent of America, travelling some 9000 miles and visiting Alaska. During the journey his mind was entirely engaged and when he returned to Toronto, numbers of interesting letters giving accounts of his trip were published in local papers here. Macdonald was appointed to the senate about a year ago. He was the head of the well-known wholesale dry goods firm of John Macdonald & Co and was regarded as one of the merchant princes of Canada. He was a wealthy and public-minded gentleman and has left in Toronto many evidences of his munificence.

 

MOONEY - (Kingston) A singular and fatal accident happened yesterday at the Foxton mine in the township of Loughborough. Dennis Mooney was at work in one of the shafts which was about one hundred feet deep. He was in charge of a drill and noticing that one of the points required sharpening, placed it in the basket to be taken to the surface. When he thought everything was clear, he resumed his work, but he did this too soon. The basket was being pulled from the opening just about that time and canting over, the point which is about eleven inches long, descended with great force. It came in contact with Mooney's head endwise, cutting through his hat, then through his skull and wedging itself solidly in his head, one end protruding through his mouth. When he was raised from the pit, he presented a terrible appearance. The bar and hat were ---- , the latter containing a handful of ------. A physician was summoned but nothing could be done to save the unfortunate man's life.

 

 


February 6, 1890

 

BURY, YOUNG, CHAPMAN - (Sombra) James Bury, Fred Young, and Frank Chapman, Sombra, went to Marine City, all residents of Michigan, in a boat yesterday on business. About 7:30 last evening they started on their homeward journey. A heavy gale prevailed and when the boat was midway of the river, a severe gust of wind picked it up, capsized it, and in an instant the men were floundering in the water. Almost instantly two of the men sank, but the third man made a brave struggle for life, and Thomas Whitely, ferryman, and Dr. Parker of Marine City, made strenuous efforts to rescue him, but without avail. The man sank, and it is doubtful if any of the bodies will be found till spring. Bury was 35 years old and leaves a widow and three children. Young was 32 years old. His widow is in delicate health and it is feared the shock will kill her. Chapman was about 25 years old and single.

 

WALSH - (Stratford) While skating on Victoria lake here this afternoon, Michael Walsh, a G.T.R. yardman, broke through the ice and was drowned. The body was recovered after an hour's search. Deceased was 28 years of age and a single man.

 

GOODWIN - (Halifax) John Goodwin, son of Miner Goodwin, was drowned at East Pubnico to-day by his boat sinking. He had gone off to secure a sea-fowl that he had just shot and the boat filled with water. He was 22 years of age.

 

February 7, 1890

 

PAINE - Died at Carlisle, on the morning of February 5, Nathaniel James Paine, grandson of the late Nathaniel Walter, of the Beach, Marden, Kent, England, in the 51st year of his age. Funeral from his late residence at 10 a.m. on Friday, February 7, to Nassagaweya. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BAIN - Died at Toronto, on February 6, of pneumonia, Robert Bain, aged 19 years. Funeral from the residence of his brother, Andrew Bain, 13 Spring street, Hamilton, on Friday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

KENNEDY - Died in this city, on February 6, Catharine, relict of the late Owen Kennedy, tailor, in the 70th year of her age. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, 301 Hughson street north, on Saturday morning at 8:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WATERBERRY - Died in Saltfleet, on Wednesday, February 5, William. Henry Waterberry, in the 65th year of his age. Funeral on Sunday, at 1 p.m., from his late residence, Saltfleet. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

 


DERY - (Quebec) Victor Dery, aged 9 years, son of Joseph Dery, painter, 84 Richelieu street, fell over the cliff at Gallows Hill, yesterday afternoon while sliding with his brother, Albert, aged 13 years. He walked home complaining of a headache and a doctor was sent for, but the child died this morning at 7 o'clock.

 

ROSS - (Embro) Dr. Gordon Ross of this place died to-day from congestion of the lungs resulting from an attack of influenza. The funeral takes place on Saturday.

 

February 8, 1890

 

O'CONNOR - Died in Dundas, on February 7, Cornelius O'Connor, aged 37 years and 4 months. Funeral from the residence of his father-in-law, John Hefferman, at 3 o'clock Sunday afternoon. The members of the C.M.B.A. and E.B.A. of this city are invited to attend. Special train from Hamilton and Dundas station at 2 o'clock.

 

EVANS - Died on February 6, at the residence of his son, Fred S. Evans, Windsor, Robert Evans, formerly of Hamilton, in the 67th year of the age. Funeral from Grand Trunk station, Hamilton, Saturday, February 8. at 2 p.m.  Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SPRINGSTEAD - Died in this city, on February 7, Annie, beloved wife of Hartman Springstead, and daughter of the late Charles Wilkin, aged 22 years. Funeral on Sunday, at 2 p.m., from 221 King William street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HALLEE - (Quebec) Francois Zavier Hallee, aged 71 years, a horse trader residing on St. George street, town of Levis, hung himself yesterday afternoon in rear of his residence. For three weeks he had shown signs of insanity.

 

February 10, 1890

 

MORIN - Died in this city, on February 8, at 342 James street north, John Hubert, infant son of Joseph and Catherine Morin, aged 5 months and 11 days. Funeral Monday, February 10, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation..

 

CALDWELL - Died at her late residence; No 357 Cannon street east, on February 9, Lydia Caldwell, relict of the late Thomas Caldwell of Dundas, Ontario, aged 48 years. Funeral on Tuesday, February 11, at 2 p.m. Interment at Dundas. Friends please accept this intimation.


THEREIN - (Quebec) A young girl named Elise Therein, aged about eighteen, residing at Sillery, met with her death in an unexpected manner yesterday afternoon. In returning to her residence at St. Michael's Cove from Sillery, instead of following the regular road, she took a short cut along the cliff. She slipped and fell, going over the cliff, a distance of about thirty feet. At the bottom she struck a window in the residence of Mrs. Flanagan and went through it head foremost. She was horribly cut and mutilated about the head and face. The poor girl survived only a couple of hours. The district coroner went out this afternoon to hold an inquest.

 

COWIE - (St. John) Reports received here to-day brought the sad intelligence of the drowning of Andrew Cowie of the well known insurance firm of Cowie & Edwards of this city. From the information at present at hand it appears that Cowie started to drive from Sussex to visit his brother, Rector Overstream, of Waterford.

When about four miles out, going over a bridge at Smith's creek, the sleigh slipped and Cowie was thrown into the creek and drowned, while the driver was thrown out on the road and lay unconscious for some time. Owing to the wires being interrupted, full particulars are not yet to hand. Cowie who was a very popular citizen was a native of Liverpool, N.S. as was also his wife, Miss Avery. He leaves a wife and four children.

 

February 11, 1890

 

BUNTIN - Died in this city, on Saturday, February 8, Jane, the beloved wife of James Buntin, in the 40th year of her age. Funeral on Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. from 280 Catherine street north to Christ Church Cathedral, thence to Burlington cemetery. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

A woman named Mrs. Jane Buntin, residing at 280 Catherine street north, died very suddenly on Saturday evening. She complained about feeling sick in the evening and died shortly after 8 o'clock. Dr. A. Woolverton was summoned but before he arrived the woman was dead. Death resulted from heart disease. Mrs. Buntin was 40 years old. She leaves a family of eight children.

 

LONG - John Long, son of Timothy Long, a young man who was killed in Waterloo, Iowa, by falling from a scaffold, was buried yesterday from his father's residence, 346 King William street. The deceased belonged to the Iron Moulders union and a number of the members attended his funeral. A few weeks ago he went to Chicago to work with his brother, Jeremiah, who had a contract for building a water tower at Waterloo, Iowa. Last Thursday when at work on a scaffold, eighty feet high, it gave way and he was hurled to the ground. He received severe injuries and died a couple of hours afterward. The remains were brought here for burial.


COYLE (Toronto) James Coyle, late of the Excise department of Toronto, died on Saturday. He was an old pensioner.

 

BUTLER, LEE - (St. John) Three men were drowned at Harvey's creek, near Depreaux, during

Saturday's fierce gale. They were Charles and John Butler, of the fishing schooner "W. B. Allan", and William Lee, of the Schooner, "Julia". They were together in a boat when it was turned bottom up by the heavy sea. They climbed on the bottom several times and were each time dashed off until they finally succumbed. Charles Butler's body was washed ashore.

 

February 12, 1890

 

MCKAY - Died at 120 Hunter street east, Peter Hope McKay, youngest son of John McKay, street inspector, aged 20 years. The funeral will take place at half past two on Thursday next, February 13. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BABY - Died at 63 Wellington street north, Christina Caroline, eldest daughter of A. D. Baby, Esq., of the Internal Revenue department, aged 8 years and 9 months, of pneumonia. Funeral will leave the residence at 8:15 Thursday morning, February 13, for the G.T.R. station, Stuart street, for interment at Sandwich. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

DEWITT - (Tapleytown) The funeral of Mrs. Jacob DeWitt took place here last Sunday. Quite a large number of friends and relatives attended showing the high esteem in which the deceased was held.

 

BOIESFEUILLET - Died in this city, on February 11, W. H. Boiesfeuillet, aged 35 years. Funeral will take place from his late residence, 12 Stinson street, to-morrow afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock to the G.T.R. station, Stuart street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

William H. Boiesfeuillet, manager of the Hamilton Electric Light Company, died at 12:45 yesterday. He had been sick with congestion of the lungs for some time and was so low that the doctors gave up all hope days ago, and his death was expected to occur at any moment. The deceased was born in Macon, Georgia, about 35 years ago but he had lived in Canada for a number of years. He came to Hamilton about five years ago, and organized the electric company of which he became manager. He was well known and was exceedingly popular among the young men, many of whom will regret his death. He was married.

 

February 13, 1890

 

HANCOCK - Died on Tuesday, February 11, at her late residence, 20 Hannah street west, Catharine Filman, relict of the late Joseph Hancock, in the 81st year of her age.


Funeral on Friday, February 14, at 1 o'clock at the Church of the Ascension, and thence to the burial ground at St. Peter's. Barton. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

PRYDE - Died in this city, on February 11, at his late residence, 206 Wellington street south, John Pryde, Sr., aged 53 years. Funeral Thursday at 3:30. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

KANE - (Toronto) Kane met his death stolidly at the Toronto jail this morning. He walked from his cell to the scaffold shortly before 8 o'clock this morning with a steady stride and a calm countenance. The execution, though in the hands of a novice, was fortunately accomplished with all possible dispatch, and Kane died with possibly as little suffering under the circumstances as could attend an execution by the rope. The scaffold was on the lift principle and at 8 o'clock the weight being detached, Kane's body was lifted from the ground. In thirteen minutes from the time his body was lifted from the ground he was dead...(Editors note; From the Globe and Mail Thomas Kane was sentenced to death for the drunken beating and murder of his wife, Mary, who according to the archeologists who researched the case, was actually his sister-in-law. She had been married to his brother, who died.)

 

THOMPSON - (Montreal) This morning two express trains on the Canadian Pacific Railway, one from Winnipeg and the other going west, collided between Rockcliffe and Bissett's Station. Robert Thompson, a son of tax collector Thompson of Kingston, express messenger, was killed. It is supposed that the heavy packages of the express car fell on him, causing his death. Both engines were badly damaged. The rest of the train hands escaped with a bad shaking-up.

 

MOTT - (Halifax) John P. Mott, head of the firm of John P. Mott & Co, manufacturers of chocolate, spices, etc., died to-day after a short illness, aged 69. He was well known throughout Canada and New England. His estate will realize half a million dollars. He leaves a widow but no children.

 

SINCLAIR - (Halifax) William Sinclair, a sailor of the steamer "Concordia" was lost at sea during the passage from Glasgow to this port.

 

VINCENT - (Nicolet, Que) Mrs. Pierre Vincent, 30 years of age, who lived at St. Brigide, a village twenty miles below here, committed suicide yesterday at 3 p.m. by hanging herself. For the last three or four months the deceased has often shown symptoms of mental derangement, but was never violent, and none of her relatives suspected she would do anything rash. She leaves a husband and small family.


February 14, 1890

 

BUCKLE - Died in this city, on February 13, Matilda E. Buckle, aged 26 years. Funeral from Christ Church Cathedral on Saturday, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.

Matilda E. Buckle, a young Englishwoman with no relatives in this country, died at the city hospital yesterday. Consumption was the cause of her death. The deceased came to Canada a couple of years ago and had worked in the country. When she was taken sick she was brought to the hospital where she died after a short illness. As she had no relatives here the members of the St. George's Society claimed the body and will give the unfortunate girl a Christian burial. The funeral will take place from Christ Church Cathedral to-morrow. The services will be conducted by Rev. E. M. Bland and Venerable Dean Geddes.

 

WILLIAMS - William B. Williams of Dundas, licence inspector for North Wentworth, died Wednesday evening. He was taken sick with la grippe a month ago and it was expected that he would recover. His illness, however, developed into congestion of the brain which disease was the cause of his death. The deceased was a blacksmith and was in partnership with Christopher Fry. He was appointed licence inspector four or five years ago, succeeding Inspector Parker. He leaves a widow and five small children. He was a member of A.O.C.W. and I.O.O.F. societies. The funeral will take place this afternoon at 4 o'clock.

 

February 15, 1890

 

CLOYD - Died at Waterdown, on February 13, Mrs. Margaret Cloyd, relict of the late John Cloyd, in the 74th year of her age. Funeral will leave her late residence, near Waterdown, on Sunday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BROWN - (Halifax) A young man named George L. Brown was instantly killed at St. Margaret's Bay by a tree falling on him while lumbering in the woods.

 

February 17, 1890

 

HORTON - Died in this city, on February 15, Joseph Horton, aged 50 years, a native of Staffordshire, England. Funeral from his late residence, 159 King William street, on Monday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Joseph Horton, an old resident of Hamilton, died on Saturday at his home, 159 King William street. He had been ill about two years. Mr. Horton was born in Staffordshire, England, 50 years ago and came to Hamilton when quite a young man. He was a weaver by occupation. Four daughters survive him.


MORRIS - Nathaniel Morris, an old coloured man, who had lived here for a great many years, died at his residence on King William street opposite police headquarters yesterday morning.

 

BROWN - Mrs. Frances Brown, the demented coloured woman who was arrested by Constable Hay on Mary street a few days ago, died at the Asylum on Saturday morning very suddenly. The doctor said that death resulted from meningitis. There will be no inquest.

 

HANCOCK - The remains of the late Mrs. J. Hancock were interred in the old churchyard of Holy Trinity church, Barton, on Friday. The late Mr. Hancock was buried in Burlington cemetery, but his relict desired that her remains should be laid with those of her first husband, Mr. Hughson, who was interred in the Barton graveyard, and her wish was respected. When Mr. Hughson's grave was opened the coffin was found to be in perfect condition although it had been in the earth thirty-six years.

 

HOWE - (Halifax) Westpal Howe, aged 19, son of Sydenham Howe, died suddenly to-day.

 

HINES - (Halifax) John Hines, engineer of the steam Yacht, "Mascot", fell overboard while going from the wharf to the vessel last night and was drowned. He leaves a wife and five children.

 

BROUGH - (Halifax) Mrs. Arthur Brough, while filling an oil lamp last night, had her dress catch fire and was so badly burned that she died at the hospital to-night of her injuries.

 

February 18, 1890

 

BROWN - Died suddenly on February 15, at the insane asylum, Hamilton, Frances, beloved wife of George A. Brown, of Toronto, and sister to Richard Jackson, also of Toronto. Funeral took place to-day from Blachford's at 2:30. Burial in Toronto.

 

HAMILTON - Died on Sunday, February 16, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. C. F. A. Locke, Marion S. Hamilton, widow of the late John Macaulay Hamilton, M.D. R.N. Funeral private.

 

CLEMENTS - Died at 74 Bay street north, this city, Mrs. Annie Clements, fourth daughter of the late Patrick Mooney, aged 22 years. Funeral from her mother's residence, 74 Bay street north, to-day, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

MCCREA - (Ingersoll) William McCrea, the section man who was run down in the Ingersoll yard of the Grand Trunk on Saturday night by the mixed train due here at 8 o'clock and had both his feet cut off, died this morning about four o'clock. He was a very old employee of the road. He retained consciousness up to the last. He was 68 years of age.


GREENE - (Belleville) Professor S. T. Greene, B.A., of the institution for the deaf and dumb, died this morning from the effects of being thrown accidentally from an ice boat two weeks ago. Deceased, who was a deaf mute, was born near Portland, Maine, and was in his 47th year. He had taught in the institution from the time of its opening. (Editor’s note; Samuel Thomas Greene was mentioned in the City of Belleville's Heritage walking guide in recognition of his work in Deaf Education.)

 

MCDOUGALL - (Bowmanville) John McDougall, a prominent citizen, dropped dead on the street this evening about 11 o'clock. He had been down to the rink curling and was heard to complain of a pain in his chest. On his way home accompanied by John Lyle he dropped dead. At present it is not known of what disease he died.

 

BAYLEY - (Abingdon) John Bayley, one of the most esteemed young men of this place, died on February 10, after an illness, lung disease, which lasted for nearly three months. Deceased was in the prime of life, being 21 years of age, but had had several attacks of bleeding in the lungs prior to his last illness. He was a general favourite among his friends who were many, and his life was one of unusual integrity. The interment took place at the Presbyterian burial ground of which church the deceased was an active member. The services were conducted by Rev. J. W. Penman, assisted by Rev. C. Stringfellow and Rev. S. S. Harris.

 

February 19, 1890

 

COYNE - Died in this city, on February 18, John Coyne, a native of Dublin, in the 48th year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, 201 Macnab street north, on Thursday morning at 8:30. Friends will please attend.

 

FITCH - Died at his residence, Grimsby, early on Sunday morning. February 16, Jacob Davis Fitch. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

PHILLIPPS - Died in this city, on Tuesday, February 18, Mary, beloved wife of David Phillipps, builder, in the 87th year of her age. Funeral will leave her late residence, 50 Ferguson avenue, on Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ANDERSON - (Halifax) There is still some mystery surrounding the fate of Ellen Anderson, alias Mary Mason, the woman found dead, frozen and bruised in the moat surrounding the citadel. Notwithstanding the verdict of the coroner's jury, some believe the woman was thrown into the moat and killed in the fall.

 

SMITH - (London) Henry Smith, aged about 65 years, residing on Regent street, was arrested to-night charged with the murder of his wife. There appears to have been trouble in the family for some time past and Mrs. Smith, through fear of her husband, left home on Monday and remained


away until six o'clock this evening when she returned. About eight o'clock Smith told the neighbours that Mrs. Smith had killed herself. The police were summoned and found the body of the woman placed upright in an armchair with blood oozing from several terrible wounds in the head and face which had evidently been inflicted with a heavy poker which was found covered with blood and hair in the room. When arrested Smith's hands, face, and clothing were smeared and bespattered with blood. He had been drinking during the day, but was sober when taken into custody. Smith's son is now serving a month in jail for assaulting his father. At the trial the son claimed that the assault was committed while protecting his mother from the blows of her husband.

 

COLE - (Belleville) Hannah Cole, a woman of abandoned character, was found in a dying condition in ex-mayor Lingham's barn this morning, having been most brutally beaten into insensibility by some unknown men who were seen with her last night. She was taken to the hospital and died there this morning about eleven o'clock. The police are in pursuit of two brothers who are supposed to be the murderers. A warrant has been issued for the apprehension of William Arnott as the murderer. The accused is a big man, six feet 1 inch in height, knock-kneed with sloping shoulders, and a brown moustache. An inquest was opened this afternoon and adjourned till to-morrow night. Richard Arnott, a brother of the accused, has been arrested, but the police have been unable to find any trace of the supposed murderer.

 

FALSTICK - Early Monday morning Martin Falstick, a man between 60 and 70 years old, who lived alone on the Brock Road near Haysland, was found dead in his bed by some of his neighbours. Falstick was seen on Saturday night and appeared to be in good health then. Coroner McGregor of Waterdown held an inquest on Monday afternoon. The verdict was that the deceased's death resulted from natural causes.

 

February 20, 1890

 

SHARP - Died at her late residence, 6th concession of East Flamborough, on Tuesday, February 18, Elizabeth Ann, wife of ,John Sharp, third daughter of the late William Smyth, and sister of Mrs. A. D. Baxter of this city, aged 23 years. Funeral on Friday at 1 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MCINERNEY - Died in this city, on February 18, John McInerney, a native of county Clare, Ireland in the 89th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, No 1 Davenport street, on Thursday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.


SAUVÉ - (Ottawa) Arthur Sauvé, a House of Commons page, was killed to-night at the capital slide. He was overtaken by another toboggan while descending the shute.

 

MARQUIS - (Quebec) The body of a man named Marquis has been found frozen to death at St. Francois, Island of Orleans. Marquis was an inmate of the Beauport asylum from which he deserted.

 

MCPEAKE - (St. John) Postmaster McPeake died on Fredericton to-day of la grippe after a very short illness. When appointed in 1880, he retired from the dry goods business which he had conducted most successfully. He was a prominent member of St. Patrick's Society and the Ancient Order of Hibernians.

 

BAILEY, SCOFIELD, FAIRCHILD - (Port Dover) A sad drowning accident occurred here to-day about one o'clock. Three boys named George Bailey, aged 11, Thomas Scofield, aged 12, and Frank Fairchild, were skating on Silver Lake when one of the boys broke through the ice, and the other two boys in trying to help him out also broke through and all three were drowned before help could reach them. All efforts to resuscitate them were unavailing. It is expected the three funerals will take place the same time on Friday afternoon.

 

BERNEY - W. H. Berney, who kept a grocery store at the corner of York and Queen streets, died very suddenly last evening. In company with his eldest daughter, Ethel Berney, he left home about 7:45 for the purpose of attending the temperance revival conducted by Evangelist Whitehead in the YMCA hall. Apparently he was in good health then. They were late in leaving the house and walked rather briskly so as to reach the hall before the meeting opened. When they reached the door of the hall, after climbing the stairs, Mr. Berney complained to his daughter about feeling sick. Realizing that her father was very sick, Miss Berney assisted him to Dr. Hillyer's office at the corner of James and Jackson streets. The doctor saw that it was a critical case and called in Dr. Cockburn to assist him. They gave him stimulants and did all in their power to revive him, but their efforts were of no avail and Mr. Berney died within ten minutes after he was brought into the house.

Dr. Hillyer says that heart disease was the cause of death. The deceased had suffered from heart trouble , but he was not confined to bed and conducted his business from day to day. Last May or June when there was a fire near his store he had a serious attack and was attended by Dr. Philp.

The deceased had lived here for three or four years. Previous to that he kept a general store at Strabane and Millgrove, and about twenty years ago he used to teach school at Millgrove.

He was about 54 years of age and leaves a wife and three daughters. The body was removed from Dr. Hillyer's office to the deceased's residence.


February 21, 1890

 

LESTON - (Kingston) At a late hour last night a fire broke out in a two-storey frame house on Bagot street, occupied by John Leston and family. The fire was burning some time before discovered and when the firemen entered the building four children were found dead in their beds. The bodies were not much burned, death being caused by suffocation. Mrs. Leston, after vain efforts to rescue the children, jumped from the second storey window with her baby in her arms. She had a leg broken by the fall. The baby escaped unhurt. Mr. Leston also made heroic efforts to save the children and only left the building after he was probably fatally burned. The family numbered seven children in all, three of whom were rescued, all being more or less burned.

 

February 22, 1890

 

BERNEY - Died in this city, on February 19, W. H. Berney, aged 54 years. Funeral from his late residence, corner York and Queen streets, on Saturday, February 22. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GILLESPIE - Died Mrs. Sarah Makins, widow of William Gillespie, at her late residence, 280 Hughson street north, on February 21, in her 53rd year. Funeral on Monday, February 24, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

KIEVELL - Died in this city, on February 21, Louisa, beloved wife of James Kievell, foreman of No 3 ward, in the 74th year of her age. Funeral will leave her late residence, 159 Hess street south, on Sunday afternoon, at 1 o'clock, thence to Carlisle cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MAHONY - Died in Dundas, on February 20, Hannah, beloved daughter of Thomas and Mary Mahony, in the 25th year of her age. Funeral will leave her parents' residence, Dundas, on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ROCHE - (Forest) Michael Roche of the Farmers’ Exchange, Forest, about noon to-day hitched his horses to a buggy and while driving out the rear door of the barn, the horses started off on a run and turning a corner at Hamilton & Proul's planing mill, the buggy was upset and Mr. Roche was thrown out forcibly to the ground on the side of the street, the horses continuing until the buggy was smashed. Some parties ran to Mr. Roche's assistance and found him insensible. He was carried to the hotel and Drs. Owen and Boyd called in, who upon careful examination hold out no encouragement for his recovery, he still being unconscious.


PHILPOT - (Quebec) This afternoon a young Englishman named Philpot, aged about 24 years, who arrived some four months ago from England and who has since his arrival here been engaged by the Quebec & Levis Electric Light Company, was killed this afternoon by coming in contact with two wires through which the current was flowing. He was married but leaves no family other than his wife.

 

CHANTELOUP - (Montreal) E. Chanteloup, the well known brass founder, dropped dead this afternoon from apoplexy.

 

GAUTHIER - (Montreal) At Longeuil this morning Mrs. Gauthier, a middle-aged woman, was found hanging dead from a rope suspended to a hook in the ceiling of her house. The discovery was made by her son-in-law who apprised the neighbours. An inquest will be held. No motive can be assigned for the deed other than mental aberration.

 

MCCUSKY - (Barrie) T. D. McCusky, sheriff of the county of Simcoe, died here at two o'clock to-day of paralysis.

 

February 24, 1890

 

CRIKE - Died in this city, on February 23, Mary, beloved wife of J. Crike, aged 34 years. Funeral from 117 Young street, at 2 p.m., Monday, February 24, to the Church of the Ascension, thence to Burlington cemetery.

 

BARRY - Died in this city, on February 23, Margaret, beloved wife of James Barry, aged 36 years. Funeral on Tuesday from her late residence, 59 Oxford street, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CAYLEY - (Toronto) Hon. William Cayley died here to-day in his 83rd year after a long and useful career. Born in St. Petersburg, Russia, he went to England where he studied law and was called to the bar in 1834. He came to Canada a few years later and entered parliament in 1846, retiring in 1861, He afterward became provincial auditor for Ontario and was registrar of the surrogate court for a time, giving up the latter office in 1883

 

FORSYTH - (Kingston) A Grand Trunk Railway struck and killed George Forsyth, one of the trackmen, who was walking over his section near Ballantyne station. Forsyth had been in the employ of the Grand Trunk about seven years.

 

BELL - (Halifax) James Bell, an elderly man, was frozen to death while driving to Preston, a few miles from Halifax, during Thursday's storm.

 

HUTCHINGS - (Halifax) William Hutchings was walking over the ice st Spaniard's Bay with a load of wood on his back. He fell and his skull was crushed by the wood falling on his head.


SCARLETT - (Seaforth) Samuel Scarlett, a prominent Orangeman and well-to-do farmer of the township of McKillop, was trampled to death by a steer in his own yard to-day.

 

DALY - On the occasion of the death of the late Capt. McKinty, his sister-in-law, Mrs. Daly of London, came down to attend the funeral. She caught a cold which developed into pneumonia and yesterday her lifeless body was taken back to London for interment. Mrs. Daly was about 60 years of age and was the mother of the late Hugh Daly, M.C.R. dispatcher at St. Thomas. She resided here for many years before going to London and was well known and highly respected. A large number attended the funeral yesterday at the station.

 

PATTERSON - (Leamington) While Archie Patterson, Jr. was walking on the track of the Michigan Central Railroad at this station this evening he was run over by an engine and instantly killed. The engine was backing through the yard at the time and Patterson was not observed. He was a resident of this place and leaves a wife and one child.

 

WILCOX - (St. John) Yesterday morning Mrs. Steven Wilcox of Loch Lomond was found seated in her sleigh about half a mile from her home, frozen to death. Thursday afternoon during the frightful storm she left this city against the warning of her friends to drive home and was seen about two miles from here by neighbours who advised her not to proceed. She went off, however, for some distance, but finding her horse unable to drag the sleigh through the heavy drifts, loosened it from the shafts and climbed back into the sleigh. Next morning her husband found the horse standing in front of the barn and on proceeding down the road came upon his wife frozen stiff. A Coroner's jury returned a verdict of death from exposure.

 

SIFTON - (London) The St. John mystery has at last been solved. For nearly a week hundreds of men have been scouring the country around and dredging the river, but failed to find the slightest trace of the missing man, Bamlet G. Sifton, until Friday night when his hat was found in a field a considerable distance from the road and this afternoon when his body was discovered in the Medway creek a short distance from where the hat was found. It is thought he had considerable money with him and that he was foully dealt with.

 

February 25, 1890

 

MCPHERSON - Died in this city, on February 23, Donald McPherson, in the 33rd year of his age, of pneumonia, a native of Embro, Oxford county. Funeral from his late residence, 51 Barton street east, to G.T.R. station at 8:30 a.m.

 

JOHNSON - (Dundas) William Johnson, an old man of seventy years, died yesterday.


MAHONY, RYAN, MCINTIRY - (Dundas) There were three funerals in town yesterday. The persons buried were: Miss Anna Mahony, daughter of Thomas Mahony, aged 26; Mrs. Thomas Ryan, aged 73; and Mrs. Mary McIntiry, mother of Mrs. John Currie, aged 82.

 

HARRIS - (Kingston) The wife of Prof. Harris, one of the staff of the Royal Military College, died very suddenly on Sunday.

 

DUBOIS, THIBAULT (Quebec) A terrible murder occurred at St. Alban, some forty miles above Quebec. A man named Dubois, in a fit of the wildest rage occasioned by jealousy seized an axe and murdered his wife, his mother-in-law, and his two children aged four years and two months respectively. During the day, the neighbours suspecting something extraordinary had occurred to the inmates of the dwelling on account of the deadly stillness that prevailed around it, entered the building and to their utter dismay beheld the mangled and bleeding bodies of Mrs. Dubois, wife of the murderer, and of Mrs. Olympe Thibault, his mother-in-law, lying on the floor with their skulls opened and smashed to a jelly, their abdomens open and the entrails hanging out. Portions of the brains were scattered about the place and pools of blood, but. the horrors ended not there. Opening a door that led to a bedroom, they discovered the bodies of the two children, also cut and torn in a most barbarous manner. The two-month-old baby was entirely beheaded while another cut exhibited the heart and lungs. The elder boy as he lay on a bed appeared to have died in horrible agony. His legs hacked to pieces and the body showed indications of having been struck repeatedly before receiving the fatal blow.

The news spread out like wildfire among the parishioners of St. Alban and posses were organized to go in pursuit of the fiend. He was arrested late last night in a wood by a man named Land and he is held in custody until the arrival of the provincial police who are now on their way to the scene of the murder. Coroner Belleau is also gone to St. Alban to hold an inquest on the bodies of the victims.

The opinion of the people of St. Alban is that Dubois was jealous of his wife, who however gave him no cause to be jealous of her and enjoyed a good reputation in the county of Portneuf, but Dubois, the murderer, was considered a dangerous character and has several times acted unmanly towards his wife, ill treating her. He had also a grudge against his mother-in-law whom he accused of conniving clandestinely to his prejudice. The news of the murder caused considerable excitement in Quebec and a large crowd will be at the arrival of the C.P.R. train which will convey the murderous fiend.

 

MARTIN (London) Early yesterday morning an elderly woman named Nancy Martin, alias Ralston, aged 61, who lived with her son, Henry, in Johnson's lane, London South, drank a quantity of carbolic acid out of a bottle, and before medical aid could be secured, she succumbed


to the effects. Whether she drank the poison with suicidal intent or by mistake is unknown. She was a general domestic servant and known in the neighbourhood by the children as "Peggy Martin".

 

February 26, 1890

 

BARNARD - Died in this city, on February 25, at 290 George street, Nellie Cecelia, eldest daughter of John N. and Sarah Jane Barnard, aged 16 years and 6 months. Funeral private.

 

ALLARDICE - Died at her mother's residence, 425 Main street west, on February 25, Elspeth Cameron Allardice, youngest daughter of the late George R. Allardice, aged 6 years. Funeral to-morrow, Wednesday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

DUFF - (Halifax) Charlotte Duff, an unmarried domestic in a south end family, in endeavouring to conceal evidence of confinement, laced herself so tightly as to cause her death. She belonged to the country and her condition was not known till she was dying.

 

MAYBEE - (Port Hope) Yesterday afternoon three sons of James Maybee, lot 33, 1st concession of Hamilton, were in the woods cutting timber. Two of them were engaged in sawing down a leaning tree. The tree commenced to fall before they had got it nearly cut off in consequence of the spitting from the stump and in the fall rebounded to one side and before Warren, one of the young men who had been engaged in sawing, could get out of the way, he was struck on the right temple by the rebounding trunk and instantly killed. The deceased was 21 years of age.

 

February 27, 1890

 

MARSHALL - Died at 'The Beeches', London South, on February 16, Jean Renwick, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Marshall, aged 3 years and 4 months.

 

MCCARROLL - (Dundas) Thomas McCarroll died yesterday aged 46. He had been suffering from paralysis for nearly four years.

 

ARMSTRONG - (Ottawa) A young farm hand named John Armstrong was killed yesterday in a bush close to Peche village on the Gatineau river. Yesterday morning Armstrong and a companion went out at an early hour to shoot foxes. Towards noon they stopped to rest and Armstrong started to clean his gun. He was polishing the muzzle when it suddenly exploded, the charge striking him in the temple, tearing away a portion of the frontal bone. His companion, Albert Lee, did all in his power to alleviate his suffering, but poor Armstrong succumbed to his injuries in less than fifteen minutes.


NASH - (Simcoe) Alice Nash, a 17-year-old stepdaughter of James Petty, died to-day from blood poisoning, resulting from an abortion performed about two weeks ago either by herself or an unknown person. Coroner Stanton is holding an inquest.

 

NICKLE - (Kingston) William Nickle, president of the Thousand Islands Steamship Company, died last night after a protracted illness, aged 78 years. His estate is estimated at $500,000.

 

February 28, 1890

 

JOHNSTONE - Died on February 27, at 76 Main street west, Margaret Armstrong, wife of William Johnstone, in her 63rd year. Funeral on Saturday, at 3:30. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

SMITH - (Newmarket) Robert A. Smith, a merchant and but recently married, was found lying dead in his cellar, shot through the heart. He was preparing to follow his wife to a social. When his wife returned home, she found all the doors locked and after some time a neighbour got into the house through an upper window, and searching the house, found his dead body in the cellar. He was lying on his back with his arms and legs outstretched. His pockets were turned inside out and some loose change was scattered on the floor. His watch chain was wrenched from his vest but not removed. Some drawers upstairs were ransacked and Mrs. Smith's purse emptied of its contents. His keys were also lying beside the body and close by was a small revolver. A small door leading to the cellar under an outside staircase was found removed. From all the surrounding it appears a case of foul murder. A post mortem examination is now being made and at 2 o'clock this afternoon an inquest will take place.

 

MCKENZIE - (Halifax) A. D. McKenzie, underground manager of the Vale colliery near New Glasgow and teacher at the Government School for miners, was killed to-day by a fall of coal, He was a married man, 30 years of age, and a prominent member of benevolent societies.

 

SCARFF - (Woodstock) The Princeton murder mystery is likely to be solved very soon. The body of the dead man has been identified as that of Oscar Scarff of British Columbia.

Mrs. Miller, who resides within four miles of the spot where the body was found, was in town to-day and relates the following facts. Three or four weeks ago a young man from British Columbia arrived in the neighbourhood on a visit to the Turnbulls. His name was Oscar Scarff and he was a relative of Turnbull's wife. A few days ago he left to visit friends in either Petrolia or Sarnia, and that was the last seen of him alive. Tuesday the Turnbulls drove to Princeton and recognized the body as that, of the friend who had been stopping with them. A dark moustache which he had when he left had been shaved off.


The body was positively identified by a scar on the leg. The murdered man was engaged in the seal fishing business for several years and when he came here he had $600 in his pocket.

The body having been identified, all that remains for the detectives to do is to ferret out the murderers which is thought will not be a difficult task.

 

March 1, 1890

 

MCANDREW - Died on February 28, 1890, Lewis McAndrew, aged 85 years. Funeral from 47 Florence street at 3 p.m. Saturday.

 

PICKARD - (Sackville, N.B.) Rev. Humphrey Pickard, D.D., has just breathed his last, aged 77 years. He was the first president of the Mount Allison institution and has been connected with it for thirty years.

 

YOUNG - Henry E. Young, mayor of Blenheim, died yesterday afternoon, after a week's illness. The funeral will be conducted by the Foresters, Sunday.

 

SCARFF - (Petrolia) The report in the papers in regard to the Princeton murder generally make out that the dead man found was Oscar Scarff, which is incorrect. Oscar Scarff, accompanied by his aunt, Miss Woolsey, purchased two tickets from Mr. Branston, the town ticket agent for the Grand Trunk Railway, to Victoria, B.C., on Wednesday, February 19, and left on the noon train of the same date. Mr. Scarff had been visiting the neighbourhood of Princeton and returned to Petrolia in order to have his aunt, Miss Woolsey, accompany him. a message was received from North Bay announcing his safe arrival that far. Mr. Scarff is a seal fisher and was on a short visit to his relations.

Provincial detective Murray, who is working up the Princeton murder case says, "There is no truth in the report that the body of the dead man has been identified as Oscar Scarff of British Columbia. Both Mr. Turnbull and his son with whom the young man had made a short stay, declared unhesitatingly that it was not that, of the young British Columbian. These and a great many other rumours, especially one about his having been an ironmoulder, are altogether misleading."

 

March 3, 1890

 

VENT - Died in this city, on February 28, Mary Rowan Vent, eldest daughter of James and Harriet Vent, aged 7 years, 5 months, and 15 days.

 

SIMONS - Died in this city, on March 1, 1890, Margaret Jane, beloved wife of Charles Simons, eldest daughter of Charles Brydges, Esq., in her 29th year. Funeral from her husband's


residence, 44 Clarke avenue, on Monday, March 3, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BENWELL (Princeton) The murdered man found near Princeton was positively identified to-day by J. Burchell of Niagara Falls as T. G. Benwell, a young Englishman just out from the old country. He left him about three weeks ago for the purpose of looking up a suitable stock farm to purchase. Mr. Burchell had a letter from him about three weeks ago dated London, Ontario, and has heard nothing since from him. He has not the slightest doubt that he has been decoyed by some ruffians and murdered for the money in his possession.

 

STALLWOOD - About two years ago James Stallwood of Oneida, near Hagersville, suffered a paralytic stroke, the effect of which remained until February 18, when death came to his relief.

The deceased gentleman was well known and very popular. He was 61 years old and had spent thirty years of his life in Oneida.

He was a consistent Methodist and a good man. He leaves a widow and large family.

 

March 4, 1890

 

LYONS - Died at Dundas, on Monday, March 3, Edward Lyons, in the 85th year of his age. The funeral will take place on Thursday morning, at 10 o'clock, from his late residence, South street. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WOOD - (Ottawa) Henry Wood, bridge inspector of the eastern Ontario division of the Canadian Pacific Railway, died to-day, aged 67 years.

 

ARCHAMBAULT -(Montreal) Hon. Louis Archambault died at his residence at L'Assomption yesterday morning at 9 o'clock with a severe attack of pneumonia following a severe attack of influenza.

 

MENDOR - (Quebec) Francois Mendor, aged 26 years, was killed on the C.P.R. Railway at the Black River bridge through putting his head out of the window and the bridge striking it.

 

CORNWALL - (Halifax) Isaac Cornwall, aged 39 years, was found dead at his home at Rossway, near Digby, this morning. Heart disease was the cause.

 

March 5, 1890

 

COCKBURN - Died on February 13, at Ormiston Hall, Dundas, Ontario, T. R. Cockburn, only great-grandson of the late Captain George Cockburn, R.N., of Ormiston Hall, Haddington, Scotland, comptroller of Her Majesty's Navy.


VINT - Died in Sarnia, on March 4, James Vint, stonecutter, late of this city.

 

DENISON - Died in Springfield, Mass., February 25, at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. B. J. Craig, George H. Denison, formerly of this city.

 

ROWE - Died in this city, on March 3,, Elizabeth B., beloved wife of Jeremiah Rowe, aged 70 years and 3 months. Funeral from her late residence, 87 Ashley street, on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

March 7, 1890

 

HODGKISS - Died in this city, on March 5, at No 94 Wilson street, of scarlet fever, Edward Hinton, only son of Edward and Nora J. Hodgkiss, aged 3 years and 11 months. Funeral private at 2 p.m. on Friday.

 

SCANLON - Died in Chicago, 111., on March 5, Patrick J. Scanlon. The remains will arrive by the G.T.R. on Friday at 7:10 a.m. Funeral will take place from Dwyer's undertaking rooms on Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GREEN - (Halifax) James Green, one of the crew of the steamer "Borderer", fell into the hold to-day, crushing his skull. He died soon after.

 

MCDOWELL - (Halifax) Conductor McDowell, who was injured at Windsor Junction last week, died at the hospital to-day.

 

ROBENSON - (Parry Sound) A fire occurred here early this morning at which three members of the family of William Robenson, who lives on River street, were burned to death. About half past three o'clock Mr. Robenson was awakened by the noise of fire downstairs, but on running down to it, was driven back by the smoke and in a few minutes the whole house which was only a light frame building was enveloped in flames. Mr. Robenson with his wife and two children escaped from the house by jumping from an upstairs window, three unfortunate ones being left behind. Their names are Benjamin, aged 18; Linda, 16; and Ida, 5. The grief of the parents was most distressing. It was with difficulty that the father was restrained from running into the flames to recover them. Nothing whatever was saved as the remaining members of the family only escaped in their night clothes. The charred remains of the lost ones were afterward recovered.


March 8, 1890

 

ZEALAND Died on the 7th instant, Captain William Zealand, son of the late Captain Edward Zealand, aged 61 years. Funeral from his late residence, 264 Victoria avenue north, on Monday afternoon, at 3:30. Friends are respectfully invited to attend.

 

LOUNT - Died on March 7, at 24 Hannah street west, Hamilton, the residence of her stepfather, Hon. Archibald McKellar, Annie Laurie Mercer, the beloved wife of George W. Lount, barrister, Barrie, and eldest daughter of the late Laurence W. Mercer. Funeral at Barrie on Monday, 10th instant, on arrival of the morning train from Hamilton.

 

ATKINSON - Died in Nelson, on March 6, Sarah Ann, beloved wife of Thomas Atkinson, Esq., aged 65 years. Funeral will leave her late residence, on Sunday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

KELLY - Died on March 7, at 111 Cannon street east, Alice, eldest daughter of Robert L. and Carrie M. Kelly, of Pierre, Dakota, and grand-daughter of E. S. Whipple.

 

TURNBULL - Died in this city, on Friday, March 7, Henry Turnbull, native of Roxburghshire, Scotland, in his 64th years. Funeral from his late residence, 164 Hunter street west, on Monday, at 2 o'clock.

Henry Turnbull, an old resident, died yesterday. He was for many years sexton of the Central Presbyterian Church and was highly esteemed by a wide circle of friends, a wife, three sons and two daughters survive him.

 

CANIFF - (Belleville) Abraham Caniff of Caniffton, a pioneer in Thurlow, died to-day aged 85 years.

 

March 10, 1890

 

BUTLER - Died in this city, at No 42 Liberty street, on March 9, Zella Beatrice, infant daughter of Richard J. and Elsie Butler, aged 1 year and 2 months. Funeral on Tuesday, March 11, at 10 a.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BROWN - Died in this city, on March 8, Minnie, infant daughter oi' Thomas and Mary Brown, aged 1 year and 4 months.

 

CARTER - Died at his late residence, No 99 Cathcart street, on March 8, James Carter in his 78th year. Funeral on Tuesday, March 11, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BAILEY - (Toronto) A skater on the bay broke through the ice on Saturday. Robert Bailey, about 20 years, of 75 Walton street, lately out from Scotland, rescued him from drowning, but was so exhausted in doing so that he was unable to get out of the water, and perished.

 


Bailey was a gardener and his father lives in the old country. Bailey has a brother at Montreal.

 

COLLERETTE - (Montreal) A terrible disaster occurred this morning at Cote St. Michael, a small village ten miles from here on the St. Lawrence, whereby a woman, the wife of a farmer named Collerette, and her seven children lost their lives by burning. At five o'clock the man started a fire, leaving beside the stove a can of coal oil, and went out to attend to his farm duties. On looking back he found his house in flames and from the fierceness of the fire he was unable to rescue his family and his wife and seven children , four boys and three girls, were burned to death before his eyes. Collerette himself now lies at the point of death from the dreadful burns he received in his efforts to rescue the family.

 

WILSON - (Bright) Mrs. Joseph Wilson of Bright committed suicide by drowning herself in her cistern this morning at five o'clock. Her husband missed her for a few minutes. Upon searching, he found her as stated. She tried suicide by poisoning about two months ago. She has suffered from melancholy for some months past.

 

TONGE - (St. John) James Tonge, a teamster for E. M. Robertson, while driving down Mill street this morning, was thrown from the seat by the horse becoming frightened and running away. His head struck against a telegraph pole and he was picked up insensible and died a short time afterward.

 

March 11, 1890

 

MORROW - Died in this city, on March 10, at her husband's residence, 39 Lower Cathcart street, Jennie Ross, beloved wife of William Morrow, in the 66th year of her age. Funeral on Wednesday at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

VANDUSER - Died in Grimsby, March 8, John W. Vanduser, aged 67 years. Funeral from his late residence, on Tuesday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MORIARITY - (Toronto) At six o'clock yesterday morning Mrs. Nora Moriarity, relict of the late John Moriarity, Listirgiven, county of Kerry, Ireland, died in the 100th year of her age at the residence of her son, Murtagh Moriarity, 5 D'Arcy street. Her husband died in Ireland about fifty years ago and it was in 1850 that she came to this country with two daughters and five sons

 

PAPPY - (Halifax) Elisa Pappy, a French-Canadian girl employed in the British-American hotel died in the hospital to-night from being accidentally burned last evening. She was sitting near the fire holding an infant when her clothes ignited.


She ran into a bedroom, depositing the child in a bed in safety, and rushed downstairs enveloped in flames. Before the flames could be extinguished, she was horribly burned.

 

March 21, 1890

 

STONEMAN - The funeral of the late Charles Stoneman took place from his residence at the corner of Queen and Jackson streets yesterday afternoon. The members of the Britannia Lodge, Sons of England, attended in a body, the deceased having been a member of that lodge. The pall bearers were: J. Pascoe, George Alderson, F. Fisher, W. Evans, R. Hannaford, and A. Hannaford. Rev. R. J. Elliott conducted the services at the house and President Layland and Robert White, chaplain, officiated at the grave.

 

SIMPSON - (Ottawa) The news of a sad drowning from the vicinity of Pickacock on the Gatineau river reached this city this morning. It occurred on Sunday last while a family named Simpson were returning from church. The sleigh contained Mr. Simpson, his wife and daughter, and sister-in-law, and as the party was driving leisurely along the river, the horses suddenly crashed through the ice at a spot where the current is very strong. The sleigh also went down with its occupants, arid Miss Simpson who was only nine years old was swept under the ice before assistance could be rendered, and drowned. Mr. Simpson succeeded in raising his wife and sister-in-law after a hard struggle. The body of the child has not been recovered.

 

March 22, 1890

 

ROUSSEAUX - Died in this city, on March 21, at 27 Victoria Avenue north, John B. Rousseaux, son of the late Joseph B. Rousseaux, in the 53rd year of his age. Funeral from the above address to Burlington cemetery on Sunday, March 23, at 2:30 p.m. Friends are invited.

Big good-natured Detective John B. Rousseaux died yesterday at his residence, 27 Victoria avenue north. His death was the result of an injury he received in the St. George accident in February, 1889. He was in the smoking car which passed safely over the bridge, but he was thrown against the seat and was seriously injured about the chest. After the accident he was in bed for two months. He recovered and was around until five weeks ago when he had another bad attack. Yesterday afternoon between three and four o'clock he was attacked with violent pains and his wife and daughter walked him up and down the room, thinking that it would relieve him. Without any warning he fell to the floor and in a few minutes he was dead. It is supposed that his heart was affected.

Few men were better known in Hamilton that the deceased. He was one of the five sons of Joseph B. Rousseaux and was born in Barton fifty-three years ago. He came to Hamilton


twenty-three years ago and a few years afterward was appointed on the police force. He was afterward promoted to be a detective and held that position for about twenty-one years. He assisted in the capture of many of the celebrated criminals, notably the Young brothers. He resigned from the department when ex-chief Stewart was appointed. Since then he had been a detective on the northern division of the Grand Trunk. He leaves a wife, three sons, and three daughters. He was a member of Barton Masonic Lodge and Barton tent, K. of T. M. He will be buried with Masonic honours to-morrow afternoon.

 

WYNDHAM - Died in this city, at No 24 Alanson street, on March 20, of bronchitis, Jennie, also on March 21, Jessie, twin daughters of William and Mary Wyndham, aged 13 months. Funeral Sunday at 3:30 p.m.

 

STROUS - Died in this city, on March 20, Peter Burt, youngest, son of James and Agnes Strous, aged 3 years and 10 days. Funeral from the parents' residence, 120 Hunter street east, on Sunday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

March 24, 1890

 

CONNORS - Died in this city, March 21, Mary, relict of the late Peter Connors, and mother of the late Matthew Sexton, aged 75 years. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, William Fowler, 314 Macnab street north, Monday, March 24, at 2 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

JENKINS - Died in this city, on March 21, George Edgar Jenkins, aged 47 years. Funeral took place from the residence of his brother-in-law, 168 Bay street north, on Sunday afternoon, at 4:15 o'clock.

 

BICKNELL - Died in this city, on March 21, Clara Georgina Bicknell, only child of James and Clara Bicknell, aged 7 weeks and 1 day. Funeral took place from her father's residence, 247 Herkimer street, on Sunday, March 23, at 2 p.m.

 

WILLIAMS - Died on Sunday, March 23, William Williams, in the 50th year of his age. Funeral will take place on Tuesday, March 25, at 1 p.m., from his late residence, 54 West avenue south, Friends and acquaintances are requested to accept this intimation.

William Williams died of blood poisoning yesterday at his home, 54 West avenue south. Nine months ago Mr. Williams moved into Hamilton from Stoney Creek. He was a carpenter and in his 50th year.

 

PENSEY - (Montreal) a man named Toney Pensey, suffering with delirium tremens, jumped out of a window at the Notre Dame Hospital yesterday afternoon and died to-day from the effects of his leap.

 

 


WADE - (Mimico) A young man named John Wade whose parents reside in Hamilton was fatally stabbed last night by John Byron who resides at Mimico. Both men are employed by the contractors of the new asylum building in course of construction a mile and a half west of this place.

Wade who was only 23 years of age was a carpenter by trade and worked for Dickenson Bros.  Byron is an elderly man about 50 years old and is employed by Miles Hunting & Co. The two men had an altercation on the express for Hamilton that leaves Toronto at eleven o'clock when Byron, who was drunk, struck Wade. Wade not wishing to have any trouble on the train did not strike back, but told Byron he would have satisfaction when they arrived here. When the train stopped, Wade walked away with some friends, followed by Byron.

All the parties went towards home along the railroad track, and just after passing Church street, Byron staggered against the murdered man who at once struck him, knocking him down. Byron arose and rushed at young Wade with a large knife, burying it in the young man's neck and severing the jugular vein and making a wound about two inches long and very deep.

The poor young man then called to a friend who was with him and said, "Shorty, I'm stabbed". When asked where, he replied, "In the neck". These were the last words he spoke. His friend then took out his handkerchief to bind up the wound while another of the dying man's companions ran for Dr. Oliver. He was soon in attendance on the poor fellow who in the meantime had been carried to the waiting room of the Grand Trunk station. The doctor, after feeling Wade's pulse and examining the wound, pronounced it fatal. He breathed his last in a few minutes afterward.

Coroner Lynd of Parkdale was notified and this morning Magistrate Wingfield issued a warrant which was placed in the hands of Constable Hickey who arrested the murderer at his boarding house on the Lake shore near here.

The coroner's inquest will be held here at 2:15 to-morrow.

The murdered man was a son of James Wade of 425 Cannon street east. He was 22 years old. He was a carpenter and had been working at Mimico since August. His parents were deeply grieved when they heard of his death. Mr. and Mrs. Wade went to Mimico last night.

 

March 25, 1890

 

WADE - Killed at Mimico, on the 22nd instant, John Pearson, third son of James and Martha Wade, aged 22 years and 3 months. Funeral from his father's residence, 425 Cannon street east, at 2 o'clock p.m. on Wednesday. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

ROACH - Died in this city, on March 23, Margaret, eldest daughter of John and Bridget Roach, aged 19 years. Funeral will take place from the family residence, 452 Hughson street north, on Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 


March 26, 1890

 

COWING - Died at Saint Louis, Mo., on the 25th instant, Mrs. Helen Cowing, late of Hamilton. Funeral services at cemetery chapel here, Thursday, March 27, at 11 a.m.

 

Crickmore - (Windsor) A telegram received by Chief Baines from the coroner of Madison, Ohio, states that the body of a man supposed to be C. G. Crickmore of Windsor has been found in the river near that place. There can be no doubt that the body is that of C. G. Crickmore who at one time was one of Windsor's best lawyers. He formerly held a high position in Hamilton, Ontario, but fell a victim to drink and was forced to resign. This was a number of years ago and he then removed to Windsor. He had an office here but because of his strong passion for drink his business was very small, and about two months ago he sold his library and left town. Very few knew of his intentions and in a few days a rumour was circulated that he had committed suicide, but he reappeared in Windsor about six weeks ago. He stayed in town only a day and left, saying he was going out west.

Note: Charles G. Crickmore, barrister, was once in partnership with Lawyer Spohn in this city. He left here about twenty years ago.

 

BENJAMIN - (Chatham) John Benjamin, aged 35 years, a farm labourer, while walking on the Grand Trunk track, a mile west of here, was struck and instantly killed by the accommodation train leaving here at 4:40 p.m. He was walking on the north track when a freight train approaching, he stepped on the south track to avoid it, unconscious of the accommodation coming behind. His neck was broken.

 

HARRINGTON - (St. Catharines) A young man named Edward Harrington, employed with a gang of labourers cleaning the streets, fell in the roadway at noon to-day and died in a few minutes. Heart disease is supposed to have been the cause. Harrington came from Quebec a couple of years ago and was a steady, quiet, hardworking man, about 30 years of age.

 

March 28, 1890

 

ELLIOTT - (Otterville) Mrs. Elliott of this village was found dead in her bed this morning. She retired last night in her usual health and seems to have quietly slept away. Deceased was in her 65th year and was the widow of the late Rev. John Elliott. Her sons are: Rev. R. J. Elliott, of Hamilton; J. G. Elliott, of the Kingston "Whig"; and W. Elliott, customs officer at. Napanee. Her demise is deeply regretted. The funeral will take place on Sunday to Ayr cemetery.

 

 


KANE - (Hespeler) An old man named Andrew Kane, about 70 years of age, was found dead on the roadside near his home at Killean about five miles from this place to-day. He had been in Galt and was walking home and is supposed to have dropped dead.

 

CORNER - (Caledonia) On Sunday morning last, Wesley Terryberry of this village took a walk up the river to pay a visit to Mrs. E. Corner, an old lady of 84 years of age and who lived alone in a small log house in the township of Onondaga. When he got there it was about 10 o'clock and he found the front door locked. In going round the house he saw a light in the old lady's bedroom, and after knocking at the window for some time and getting no reply, he concluded that something was wrong and broke in the door when he found the lamp still burning and Mrs. Corner lying on the bed dead.

He immediately notified the neighbours and the coroner who was soon on the scene and who decided that an inquest was not necessary. Her husband has been dead for fifteen years. The neighbours say she was in good health as usual the day before. Her two sons in the States were notified and arrived on Tuesday morning.

 

WARD - (Picton) The body of George Ward drifted on the Prince Edward shore about nine miles east of Picton and was found yesterday and brought to Picton last night. It will be remembered that he was a passenger of the ill-fated steamer "Quinte", burned in the bay of Quinte shortly after leaving Desoronto last fall. He was the first to discover the fire and gave the alarm. The last seen of him alive he was working the hand pump. There is still another victim of the disaster whose body has not been recovered, the young lad, Christie, brother of the captain.

 

March 29, 1890

 

RYCKMAN - Died on March 28, at his son's residence, Alvinston, Abraham Ryckman. Funeral Sunday at 2 o'clock to Rock Chapel.

 

March 31, 1890

 

LEAHY - Died at her late residence, 270 Hannah street east, on March 28, Johannah, beloved wife of Michael Leahy, aged 39 years. Funeral on Monday, March 31, at 8:30 a.m. to St. Patrick's Church, and thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BUCKE - Died in this city, on March 30, Maggie, beloved daughter of Nicholas Bucke. Funeral on Tuesday. April 1, at 8:30 a.m. from 167 Catherine street north, to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends are invited to attend.


SUTTON - (London) Mrs. Jane Sutton, a farmer's wife, living near Lambeth, died very suddenly about 5 o'clock this evening. Her husband had occasion to deliver some maple syrup at a citizen's house on Queen's avenue on their way home, and on returning to the wagon he observed his wife suddenly fall forward and drop to the bottom of the wagon. He immediately picked her up, but found life to be extinct.

 

April 1, 1890

 

AINSLIE - Died in this city, on March 30, at 45 West avenue north, Willie, youngest son of James and Margaret Ainslie, aged 9 years and 1 month. Funeral from the above address on Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

STRINGER - Died in this city, on Sunday, March 31, Anne Jane Stringer, in the 81st year of her age. Funeral on Tuesday, April 1, at 2 p.m., from 14 Cannon street east. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

JAMIESON - (Ottawa) Dr. Jamieson, of Pakenham, Ontario, nephew of Joseph Jamieson, M.P. for North Lanark, was found dead in bed at O'Neill's hotel, Arnprior, yesterday morning. He had been suffering from insomnia and when found, a towel with chloroform covered his face.

 

WILSON - (Toronto) Robert Wilson of the inland revenue department here died on Saturday. He was a brother of George Wilson of the Port Hope "Daily Gazette"; also of John Wilson, this city; and Henry Wilson of Markham.

 

ROBERTSON  Montreal) The funeral of the late Andrew Robertson took place this afternoon from his late residence, Elmbank. Among those who attended were several of Montreal's prominent citizens.

 

BURNS - (St. John) William Burns, inspector of the Board of Health for over thirty years, dropped dead this afternoon while standing in Colwell's livery stable.

 

KEMP - A very unfortunate occurrence took place in this city yesterday afternoon. William Kemp, 115 Robinson street, stabbed himself in the region of the heart, from the effects of which he died shortly afterward. It appears that Mr. Kemp, who in the summer made his living by rough painting, has been unemployed since a. few weeks after Christmas, and owing to the loss of. three fingers on the left hand in the employ of the late firm of Burn Robinson & Co, was unable to secure employment in other work and became very despondent in consequence. About four weeks ago he was the victim of a severe attack of la grippe and in his case the disease attacked his brain. His mind, which had been affected some twelve or fifteen years ago and was not over


strong, gave way and his friends deemed it advisable to remove him from his family surroundings. On Saturday he was taken to the residence of his sister, Mrs. Vaughan, of 364 Hannah street west. Mrs. Vaughan and her husband were very kind to him, but he became impressed with the idea that his relations intended to place him in the insane asylum, and yesterday afternoon about 1:30 o'clock when no one was in the house but his sister, he secured an old butcher knife that was lying on the kitchen table and before his sister, who became helpless from fear and excitement, could take it from him, he plunged it into his breast.

The act seems to have been very determined as an examination of the breast shows that the knife which was pointed and very sharp had made two incisions of half an inch in depth and had on each occasion struck bone. The third thrust, however, had cut clean through a rib and the knife plunged up to the handle in his breast. Dr. McConachie was immediately summoned. Everything that could possibly be done by the doctor was at once attended to, but the internal haemorrhage was so great that Kemp died at 5 o'clock in the afternoon. Dr. McConachie at once reported the case to the coroner, Dr. Woolverton, who decided that an inquest was unnecessary.

Dr. McConachie made post mortem examination and found that the knife had first grazed the heart and had been buried in the left lung.

Kemp was a native of this city and was 46 years of age. He had been a member of the old volunteer fire department of years gone by and acted occasionally as a supernumerary later on. He leaves a widow and four children, and his eldest son like himself was unfortunate enough to lose some of his fingers by the stamping machine of the Burn Robinson works. Mr. Kemp was a very quiet unassuming man and one of the last that would be suspected of attempting to take his own life. His aged mother and his family are terribly stricken by the sad occurrence.

 

April 2, 1890

 

KEMP - Died on Monday, March 31, at the residence of his sister, Mrs. Vaughan, 364 Hannan street, west of Locke, William Kemp, in the 46th year of his age. Funeral will take place from the above address on Thursday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

THORNTON - Died in this city, on April 1, Captain Thomas Thornton, aged 32 years. Funeral on Thursday, April 3, at 3:30 p.m. from his father's residence, 17 Young street, to Church of the Ascension, thence to Burlington cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Captain Thomas Thornton, one of the most popular and best known mariners that hailed from the port of Hamilton, died very suddenly yesterday morning. He was around and attending to his business as usual Monday and appeared in good health. In the evening he attended the


- performance of ‘The King's Fool’ at the Grand. He arrived home just as the city hall bell was striking twelve o'clock. His mother heard him come in and took a lamp into his room. About an hour afterward he went to his mother's room and complaining about a pain near his heart. She made a mustard plaster and put it on him, and he went to sleep. About three o'clock Mr. Thornton went to his son's room and was horrified to find him dead. The body was warm and the deceased looked as if he was asleep. The father tried to arouse him but life was extinct.

The deceased was born in Buffalo and was in his 33rd year. He was the youngest son of James Thornton and had lived here for many years. During the last fifteen years he was at different times part owner of the "Dennis Bowen", "Clara Louise", "Lillie", and "Maggie Mason". During the winter he was employed at his father's store. He was a big strong healthy-looking man. He expected to be married shortly.

 

JONES - Died in Rochester, N.Y., on Sunday, March 30, Walter Jones, aged 29 years.

 

FREEMAN - (London) Fanny Freeman, a young woman 21 years of age, who has been reared under anything but favourable circumstances, was seen to walk into the River Thames opposite Griffith's old mill last night, and a few minutes later was taken out a corpse. She left her home about two weeks ago with the intention never to return, but was picked up by the police the following day and returned to her home, a hut with one room 12 by 12, one corner of which is partitioned off for a mule, and the inside nothing but squalor and filth on which the sun never gets a chance to peep. Some neighbours observed the unfortunate girl making for the river and becoming suspicious followed her, but arrived too late to prevent the rash act. Mrs. Freeman says that her daughter fell off a load of hay last summer and that for a month afterward she never spoke a word. The girl, she says, was slightly demented and for this reason was kept locked up when her folks were away.

 

April 3, 1890

 

HARRIS - Died in this city, on April 1, George Harris, late of 23 Strachan street west, a native of Loughborough, Leicestershire, England, aged 83 years. Funeral from his daughter's residence, 48 New street, on Friday at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HARRIS - William P. Harris, a brakeman on the Grand Trunk Railway, was killed near Tillsonburg yesterday afternoon. He was about 21 years old and boarded with James Patton at the corner of York and Ray streets, this city. He left here at 5:40 yesterday morning on a freight train in charge of Conductor L. McCormick. When the train left here it was all freight cars, but at Harrisburg a couple of passenger coaches were attached to it and taken to Tillsonburg.


The accident occurred about three o’clock as the train was entering the latter place. Harris was on top of a freight car and as the train was turning a sharp curve he lost his balance and fell, striking his head against the timbers of a culvert. The blow caused almost instant death. The train was stopped and when the conductor reached the spot he found Harris dead. The body was not disfigured beyond a deep cut on the head. It was taken to Tillsonburg and will remain there until instructions are received as to its disposal from Harris's parents who live in Detroit.

Harris had been brakeman on the road for a couple of years. His father is an engine driver and formerly worked on the Grand Trunk. The family moved to Detroit a few years ago and young Harris remained here. Conductor McCormick returned to the city at 7:40 last night. He was deeply grieved at the young brakeman's death. The body will likely be sent to Detroit.

 

MCCUISH - (Halifax) Alexander McCuish, 18 years old, was killed to-day by a fall of coal at the Gowrie, Cape Breton, coal mine

 

FERGUSON - (Quebec) Gunner Thomas Ferguson of B Battery was found dead this morning at. the guardroom in the Citadel. The body was removed to the morgue for an inquest. A post mortem will be made to-morrow morning by Dr. Sewell. The deceased was 21 years of age and was born at Londonderry.

 

MCLEOD - (Charlottetown) Arm Lebroch was the daughter of respectable parents in Whitehall. She married a man named McLeod about two years ago and lived with him a short time only. McLeod is a shoemaker. His sister Christie McLeod lived with them. On account of extreme cruelties the young wife left the house and undertook to make a living for herself in another settlement. She was McLeod's second wife. In response to urgent solicitations from Mcleod and promises of better treatment, she again took up with him, but was put into quarters in an old house adjoining where McLeod and his sister lived.  For several days he visited her bringing food and drink. Some tea which he brought made her violently sick and she complained of it to her neighbours. In a week she was dead. Previous to burial an examination was asked for by the husband and the medical examiner declared everything all right. This did not satisfy her friends and they had her stomach sent to Dr. Lawson of Halifax and afterward to Mr. Best of St. John. The results of this was that oxalic acid in considerable quantities was found and the adjourned inquest, was held yesterday, and McLeod found guilty of murder.

 

April 4, 1890

 

MORRIS - Died in this city, on April 3, John Morris, Sr., aged 96 years. Funeral will take place from his son's residence, No 11 Park street south, on Sunday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


John Morris, Sr. died yesterday at the residence of his son, William Morris, 11 Park street south. He was born in Devonshire, England, 96 years ago and came to Hamilton thirty-four years since. For many years he was in the butchering business. Deceased was the father of six sons and two daughters, all of whom are living and reside here.

 

April 5, 1890

 

MAGAGHY - (St. Mary's) Rev. T. W. Magaghy, rector of St. James Episcopal Church here, died at 11 o'clock this morning of inflammation of the bowels. The deceased was formerly rector of Seaforth and had only removed here on March 1 last.

 

CHAUVEAU - (Quebec) Hon. P. J. O. Chauveau, sheriff of Montreal, died this evening at the residence of his son-in-law, Dr. Vallee. Mr. Chauveau had been ill for some time and his death was not unexpected.

 

April 7, 1890

 

CUMMING - (Halifax) This morning while the schooner "Nellie Blanche", Capt. Benjamin, bound from Canning to New York, was lying off Parrsboro, Thomas Cumming, of Canning, was knocked off the mainboom while repairing the mainsail, and drowned.

 

MARTIN - (Belleville) A boy named Martin, aged 6 years, fell into an open drain on Coleman street shortly after 4 o'clock and swept under the covered part of the drain, where he drowned. The body was recovered.

 

HERBERT - (St. John, Que) The body of the late Private. Herbert of the Royal Military College who was drowned last fall was recovered to-day and buried with military honours.

 

ROBERTSON - Victor Robertson, eldest son of Judge Robertson, died on Saturday at Portage la Prairie after a week's suffering from inflammatory rheumatism. Mr. Robertson was barrister and practised in Hamilton some years ago.

 

April 8, 1890

 

BROWN - Died at her residence, Burnside, Grimsby, on Good Friday, April 7, 1890, Jane Clara Nelles, widow of the late Robert Brown. Funeral on Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock.

 

MILLIGAN - The body of Thomas Milligan, corner of Hunter and Locke streets, who died on Saturday, was taken to Caledonia for burial yesterday afternoon. A number of the deceased's relatives and friends accompanied the remains.


GRANT, HOPE - Abraham C. Grant, of Oso; Joseph Hope,,of Deloroque; and a Polander whose

name is unknown, were killed in the Copper Cliff mine near Sudbury on Friday afternoon. The men were working in the mine at the foot of the inclined railway and up which a few minutes previously a carload of copper had been sent. The car was drawn up by a wire cable which worked about a steam winch. The car had almost reached the surface when the cable snapped and with great force it ran downward. Before the miners could be made aware of the accident, the car reached them and hurled them to death. The bodies were badly mangled from the force with which they were stricken and jagged rocks on which they were thrown.

 

GREEN - (Kingston) The body found in the bay at Portsmouth on Saturday had been identified as that of William Green who has been missing since January 19.

 

April 9, 1890

 

SNAREY, HUFFMAN - (Dresden) A terrible drowning accident occurred near Croton last night

about 8 o'clock by which two young ladies lost their lives. Miss Etta Snarey, aged 17, daughter of John Snarey, and Miss Tress Huffman, aged 19, daughter of Melvin Huffman, were crossing the river in a small boat accompanied by a young man named Charles Hart. The boat swamped. Hart was unable to save them owing to the swift current. The bodies have not yet been found.

 

April 10, 1890

 

TEEPLE - (Waterdown) The remains of Margaret Teeple, mother of Christopher Teeple, were interred on Monday. The deceased was 86 years of age.

 

NICHOL - (Quebec) One Sun Nichol, aged 37 years, plasterer, residing with his father-in-law, Leon Gauthier, 120 Richardson street, was found dead in a chair this morning.

 

MEYERS - (Sarnia) William McFadden was tried at the assizes to-day on a charge of murder for shooting William H. H. Meyers in Enniskillen at a charivari on the night of March 23. The jury at 9:15 to-night rendered a verdict of not guilty.

 

April 11, 1890

 

MARKS - Died in this city, on April 12, of heart disease, Mary Marks. Funeral from the residence of her nephew, Dr. Anderson, 296 York street, Saturday, at 3 p.m.

 

WELCH - Died at 9 Gwynne avenue, Parkdale, Toronto, on the 9th instant, Victor Gilman, infant son of Thomas J. and Louisa Welch, aged 10 months and 12 days. Funeral from G.T.R. station,


Stuart street, to Burlington cemetery, on arrival of the Toronto train due at 4 p.m. on Friday, April 11. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

MATHESON - (Goderich) The loss of the fishing boat "Parisian" and her crew, the three Matheson brothers, is only too true. Hopes were entertained up to a late hour last night that the boat might have drifted ashore between here and Bayfield, but a dispatch from there says there are no tidings of them. The lifeboat crew and others have been on the lookout, but so far have failed to discover anything of the missing boat. The supposition is that the boat, which was heavily laden with nets, was struck by a big sea, filling her, and that she foundered, as she was sighted by one of the other boats which was about a mile or more shoreward, but on looking again she had disappeared from view. Much sympathy is expressed for Mr. Matheson who is an old man and is almost prostrated with grief at the terrible calamity that has overtaken him.

 

LABREQUE - (Ottawa) A fatal accident occurred in the C.P.R. yard at Chalk River by which a man named Charles Labreque lost his life. Labreque was engaged as fireman on the yard engine and was coupling the tender to the locomotive when he was caught between the bumpers and crushed so seriously that he died an hour afterward. The unfortunate man leaves a wife and child to mourn his loss.

 

BOILEAU - (Halifax) The community was shocked to-day by the unexpected death of the wife of Capt. A. T. C. Boileau of the Royal Artillery. She was only married last summer and was a favourite society belle, being a daughter of Col. Stewart. She died while under chloroform administered to enable an operation to be performed. She leaves a ten-day-old son.

 

LEFEBERE - (Quebec) The wife of Israel Lefebere, farmer, of St. David de Lauberiviere, died suddenly a few days ago after a couple of hours' illness.

 

CROW - (Glencoe) A very sudden and fatal accident befell Parnell Crow, a little boy three years of age, and youngest child of Alfred Crow, jeweller of this place, about five o'clock this evening. The little fellow was put to sleep in the early part of the afternoon and Mrs. Grow went to the station to meet some relatives. During her absence the child awoke unnoticed by the servant girl who was engaged at housework in another part of the house, and strayed to a barn a short distance from the dwelling and in which they kept a cow. Shortly afterward the servant girl was attracted by the screams of the child and rushing out, found him lying just outside the barn door with an ugly wound on the head. Doctors Walker and McIntyre were quickly summoned but were unable to render any assistance. He lived but a few minutes after being removed to the house.The wound was caused either by a hook or a kick from the cow.

 

 


CROTTY - (Ingersoll) Henry Crotty, Esq., one of the oldest inhabitants, having settled here since 1840 and highly respected and well known throughout the province, died here this morning aged 76. The town flag is at half mast.

 

MULBERN - (Cornwall) P. G. Mulbern, father of the present mayor, died at his residence at 3:30 p.m. to-day. He was born in Westport, Ireland, in 1804, and consequently was 86 years old. He settled here fifty years ago and has never been out, of Cornwall during that time.

 

April 12, 1890

 

RANKIN - Died in this city, on April 10, Dougald Rankin, a native of Glasgow, Scotland, aged 41 years. Funeral from 240 John street north, on Sunday at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

STEVENSON - Died in this city, on April 11, Thomas Stevenson, aged 56 years. Funeral will take place from the late residence of the deceased, 37 Mary street, at 2:30 o'clock on Monday afternoon.

 

NOEL - Charles Noel, teller in the Quebec Bank Agency at Ottawa, died suddenly last evening from an attack of apoplexy.

 

MARLING - (Toronto) Alexander Marling, LLB, deputy minister of education, died here suddenly this evening of heart disease. He was a little over a fortnight ago prostrated by pneumonia. To-day was his 59th birthday. He was for thirty-six years connected with the Education Department. He was appointed deputy minister of education about a year ago. He leaves two daughters and a son.

 

April 14, 1890

 

HUTCHISON - Died at 10 Gifford street, Toronto, on the 12th instant, William, Eldest son of James Hutchison, aged 45 years. Funeral from G.T.R. station, Stuart street, to Burlington cemetery on arrival of 1:45 train from Toronto.

William Hutchison died in Toronto on Saturday from a pulmonary disease. He was the eldest son of James Hutchison of this city and was born here about 45 years ago. Between seven and eight years ago he moved to Toronto and remained there. Mr. Hutchison married a San Francisco lady who with four children survives him. The remains will be brought to Hamilton for burial.

 

SMITH - (St. John, N.B.) A telegram from Medford, Mass. yesterday announced the death of William M. Smith for nearly twenty years steamboat inspector for the Maritime Provinces.


On being superannuated he went to Medford to live with his son. One of his daughters is the wife of William Raymond, Royal Hotel. The body will be brought here on Tuesday for interment.

 

SMITH - (Petrolia) A young child of Mr. Smith, market gardener, was drowned here to-day. Mr. Smith's residence is on the bank of the creek and it is supposed the child was playing on the bank and fell into the creek unobserved. The corpse was found a short time after the child was missed

 

April 15, 1890

 

MCINTOSH - Died in this city, on April 14, James McIntosh, Sr., aged 77 years. Funeral from his son's residence, 49 Macnab street north, Tuesday, April 15, at 2:30. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

LITTLEJOHN - Died on April 13, at 1804 (?) Jackson street east, Mary, relict of the late Alexander Littlejohn, aged 77 years. Funeral will leave the above address on Tuesday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

FOSTER - Died on Sunday, April 13, 1890, Henry Foster, aged 45 years. Funeral will leave his father's residence, 23 Wellington street north, Tuesday afternoon, at 3:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully Invited to attend.

 

LAWRIE - (Dunnville) Detective Murray of Toronto was in town again to-day in connection with the murder of the man found in the canal here on November 9, 1888. He was accompanied by John Lawrie of Toronto who identified the body as that of his father, David Lawrie, of Toronto, a harness maker, formerly of Montreal where he at one time carried on an extensive business and gave it up on account of ill health. Mr. Lawrie says his father had considerable money with him at the time, about $800 or more, and was looking about among the small country towns with the object, of starting in business.

The murdered man last wrote his family from Cayuga on October 28, since which time no trace of him could be found. Mr. Murray says he is indebted to the public press for being able to have the body identified as it was the description there given some months ago that was noticed by the unfortunate man's family. There seems to be little doubt that Mr. Murray is making the connecting links in the chain of evidence very close to Mr. Clemo who will be tried at Cayuga on April 28. He informed your correspondent that the Crown's case against the prisoner is very strong. He says there are others connected with the crime who are not yet in custody.


April 16, 1890

 

SIMONS - Died on Monday, April 14, Frank Edward, youngest son of Charles and the late Margaret Simons, aged 2 months. Funeral from the residence of his uncle, William L. Hay, No 21 Burton street, on Wednesday at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FOX - Died at his late residence, No 27 Florence street, on April 14, John Fox, aged 78 years. Funeral Wednesday at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

REID - Died in London, on Sunday morning, April 13, Barbara, beloved wife of William Reid, aged 67 years. Funeral took place on Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock, from her late residence, 789 Richmond street.

 

VILLIES - (Ottawa) A German named Matthew Villies was found dead on the roof of a shed on Redpath street this morning, Villies was a stranger in the locality and very little is known about him. He was about 45 years of age and as far as known was unmarried. The cause of death is unknown. An inquest will be held.

 

AUSTION - (Oakville) During the delivery in the English church yesterday morning of a sermon especially for the Masonic fraternity of Oakville, Mrs. Austion whose husband is a respected farmer living near Bronte became faint and in fifteen minutes after being assisted out of the church she died. Her death was caused by strangulation produced by her artificial teeth which lodged in her throat during a fit of vomiting. A young family of six children and her husband remain to mourn her sudden death.

 

April 17, 1890

 

CHISHOLM - Died at Detroit, Michigan, on April 15, James Chisholm, inspector Michigan car company, formerly of this city, aged 58 years. Funeral at Detroit on Thursday, April 17, at 2 p.m.

James Chisholm, a former resident of this city died in Detroit on Tuesday, aged 58 years. The deceased was a brother of Robert Chisholm of this city and was engaged in business as a contractor with him here about twenty years ago when he went to Detroit and accepted the inspectorship of the Michigan car company. Mr. Chisholm was an uncle of James Chisholm, barrister. He leaves a family of eight children, all of whom reside in Detroit.

 

STUART - Mrs. Alexander Stuart, wife of the Michigan Central Railway freight agent in London, died in that city on Monday night. Both Mr. and Mrs. Stuart were once residents of Hamilton and Mrs. Stuart's relatives now live here. The body was brought here yesterday for burial.


ROBINSON - (Montreal) The body of George Robinson, the much esteemed and popular Grand Trunk conductor who, it will be remembered, fell from the Grand Trunk Railway bridge near St. Ann's one dark night last autumn and was drowned, was found this morning in the river.

 

August 18, 1890

 

MCPHERSON - (St. Thomas) Allen McPherson, a farmer of Aldborough, near Rodney village on the Michigan Central Railway, becoming despondent through the effect of a lingering attack of la grippe, went into his father's cellar last evening and fired a bullet through his head, causing instant death.

 

RODMAN (Quebec) News has reached here of the burning yesterday of the schoolhouse at St. John's river on the Labrador coast. The building was occupied by Peter Rodman and his wife. Mrs. Rodman has been deranged for the last three or four months and was locked up. She was burned to death. Her husband had left the house for a short time before the fire broke out. Rodman has acted as telegraph instructor on the North Shore government lines for some time.

 

April 19, 1890

 

PALMER - Died in Barton, on April 17, Mrs. Emma Palmer, a native of Devonshire, England, aged 31. Funeral from her uncle's A. W. Taylor's residence, Pleasant Point, on Sunday at 3:30 p.m. to Burlington cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WOLFE - Died in this city, on April 18, Mrs. Caroline Wolfe, relict of the late Samuel Wolfe, aged 64 years. Funeral from 403 James street north, on Sunday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

REARDON - Died in this city, on April 17, Dennis Reardon, in the 29th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 122 Peter street, on Sunday, April 20, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

Dennis Reardon, who was for several years engaged behind the scenes at the Grand Opera House, died a day or two ago of consumption and was buried yesterday. The Grand Opera House staff sent a large and beautiful floral cross to be placed upon poor Denny's coffin.

 

HIRST - Died in this city, on April 17, Maude, infant daughter of Fred and Fannie Hirst, aged 2 years. Funeral from 201 Wentworth street north, Saturday, April 19, at 3:30. Friends will kindly accept this notice.


CONNOR - Died in this city, on April 17, Thomas Connor, printer, aged 29 years. Funeral from the residence of his brother, 207 Park street north, to-morrow, Sunday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BUICK - Died in this city, on April 18, at her son's residence, 13 Eliza street, Martha Buick, in her 67th year. Funeral will leave the above address on Sunday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this invitation.

 

MENARD - (Windsor) Dalore Menard, a farmer of Sandwich East, died in fearful agony yesterday from being poisoned by eating wild parsnips in mistake for carrots. The sufferings of the unfortunate man were horrible and it required the combined efforts of three men to hold him.

 

April 21, 1890

 

BEST - Joseph Bryant Best, father of Joseph E. Best, of this city. Was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, December, 1816. Died March 9, 1890, in VanBuren township, Lake County, Ohio.

 

SCHARF - (Montreal) The death is announced of Mr. Scharf of Templeton from the effects of a bite by a horse while administering medicine for a supposed case of distemper, but which was undoubtedly glanders. Mr. Scharf was an ex-councillor and school commissioner of the township and highly respected. His remains will be interred to-day.

 

SAW - (Bowmanville) A lad about 18 years of age, son of William Saw, an employee of the Harbour Company, was accidentally shot yesterday afternoon by Langlin, an older lad. The discharge took effect in the side near the shoulder. The boy is still living.

 

MCNERNEY - (Windsor) Edward McNerney, aged about 40 years, foreman of the Detroit "Evening News", but residing in Windsor, committed suicide on Main street to-night about half past nine o'clock by shooting. Mr. McNerney had been in a depressed state for some time past owing to domestic troubles and this is supposed to have led him to commit the rash act.

 

MCCONBREY - James McConbrey, a prominent Dundas Orangeman, died on Saturday and was buried yesterday afternoon. Grand Master William Nicholson, County Master E. T. Richards, District Master R. Allies, and District Secretary, S. R. Hammond, went out to Dundas to attend the funeral.

 

MCLAUGHLIN - (London), Thursday night there died at Grace hospital, Detroit, of general debility, William, better known as Bill, McLaughlin, one of the widest known drivers of trotting horses in the United States. He was born near Guelph about 55 years ago and for quite a number of years acted as a rider of running horses, displaying on many occasions an amount of nerve and


reckless dash that astonished all who saw him. In 1861 he made his first appearance as a driver of trotting horses in Chicago and for over twenty years thereafter figured in most of the big race meetings that took place in that country. About three years ago he began to break down and has been unable to do much since. He is survived by two sons, one who resides in Saginaw and the other in Jackson.

 

April 23, 1890

 

FANNING - (Quebec) This morning, William Fanning, a brakeman in the employ of the Lake St. John Railway Company, died at the Hotel Dieu hospital from the result of the accident he sustained yesterday while coupling cars. The poor fellow lost one of his legs, an arm, and was otherwise lacerated.

 

BELANGER - (Quebec) Edouard Belanger, a mason, was found dead in his bed at Beauport on Sunday morning.

 

DAVIES - (Toronto) Samuel Davies, fourth son of William Davies, Jarvis street, this city, died in New York yesterday morning. He was one of three brothers who left Toronto for the Bahamas last November in search of health. The health of all three became worse at Nassau where two of them were buried on Monday, and the last of the three died while being brought home by his mother.

 

CLAPP - (Toronto) Dr. J. C. Clapp, a well known physician of this city, died suddenly to-day at his residence on Church street, aged sixty-one.

 

ISLAND - (Orangeville) Mr. Island of this place, while about to board a train at the station this morning, was struck by a train which he had not noticed. His injuries resulted in his death this evening.

 

April 25, 1890

 

STEWARD - Died in this city, on April 24, Thomas Steward, in the 68th year of his age. Funeral from his son's residence, 368 King street east, on Saturday, April 26, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

HALORAN - (London) A West Nissouri farmer while driving into the city yesterday forenoon overtook a man to whom he gave a lift, but when a short distance on this side of Dreaney's Corners, the stranger alighted from the vehicle and said he would try and walk the rest of the way. In the afternoon the farmer on his homeward journey, while nearing the asylum gate, noticed quite a crowd of people gathered there, and on learning the cause of the excitement viewed the body and had no difficulty in identifying it as that of the man who had ridden with


him in the morning. It seems that the unfortunate man had been loitering around Pottersburg and that vicinity for several hours during the afternoon and was found lying across the sidewalk east of the asylum gate and appeared to be very sick and motioned for something to drink. This was about half past five o'clock, and a cup of tea was tendered him, but before he had swallowed it all, death relieved him of further suffering. He was apparently about 45 years of age, medium height, sandy moustache and whiskers, and looked like a labouring man. In his pocket was found a bottle of medicine with the name E. Haloran.

 

EVEREST - (Toronto) About one o'clock this morning fire broke out in the patent barrel cooperage of William Knowles, corner of Yonge and Maitland streets, and when the brigade arrived the whole top flat was in flames. They were soon checked sufficiently to allow the firemen to enter. One of those entering was Thomas Everest of the Yorkville Avenue brigade. Groping through the smoke he did not see an open hatchway and fell through it into an open cellar with a concrete floor, forty feet below. A comrade heard the sound and went to his assistance. Everest was found with his skull smashed. He died in half an hour. Deceased leaves a wife and five children. The fire was soon put out, doing about $1000 damages.

 

MCLELLAN - (St. John, N.B.) Mrs. Simon McLellan, wife of a well known tailor, dropped dead this morning while attending to her household duties. Heart disease was the cause.

 

ARTHURS - (Belleville) Jane Arthurs, a charwoman, lost her life and her husband, William Arthurs, was seriously, if not fatally, burned by a fire in their dwelling last night. The couple, who are about 60 years of age, lived in a small frame house on Church street. At about 9:30 flames burst from it, and Walter Hargreaves and John Weir burst the door in and entered the building. Arthurs, who was in a bed that was on fire and whose night clothes were partly burned off him, was rescued. The woman was seen a few minutes later groping her way towards the door, but she fell back into the flames and was burned to a crisp. Arthurs is badly burned on the arms and head.

 

MORRISON - (Shelburne) A terrible tragedy occurred this morning about a mile and a half north of here at the residence of Thomas Morrison, a heretofore respectable farmer. Mrs. Morrison had gone away from home for a couple of days to visit a sick sister, leaving her husband with five children, the eldest a girl of thirteen years of age, and the others ranging in age down to a bright little lad of a couple of summers. The youngest slept with his eldest sister. When the latter awoke this morning she was surprised to find that he was not by her side. She went in search of him and to her horror found the little boy stiff in death, laid out upon a quilt on the kitchen floor.


Beside him lay the body of his sister, aged five, and his brother, aged seven. A barrel half full of water stood in the corner of the room. By the dripping of the water on the floor, the tale was told of their death by drowning. Morrison could not be found. On a table in the dining room was a cup smelling of carbolic acid and an ounce bottle of the drug two-thirds full. The neighbourhood being aroused and diligent search being initiated, the murderer was found writhing in agony on the banks of a creek a quarter mile from the house. Here was evidence of a terrible struggle. The poor unfortunate man had thrown himself into the water, rolling from bank to bank in his agony, the muddy soil being worked smooth and bearing the deep impression of his body. Morrison, who was speechless, was at once borne to his desolate house.

Dr. Morton, coroner, was sent for. Upon his arrival he used the stomach pump and administered antidotes, and at the hour of writing, the patient had rallied somewhat, but is still only partially conscious. His recovery is doubtful. Mrs. Morrison, broken-hearted, has just returned to the sad home. No reason can be assigned for the awful act. Temporary insanity must be the only explanation. Morrison had always been a kind and indulgent husband and father and was highly esteemed by all how knew him.

 

SNIDER - (Waterloo) One of the patriarchs of Waterloo County, Elias Snider, passed away to-day about noon in his 75th year at his residence just north of the Waterloo town boundary. Mr. Snider, about three weeks ago, was driving homeward in his covered buggy when it was overturned by a railway train coming from behind. Mr. Snider was injured about the head in such a way as to cause his death as stated.

He was a man of much enterprise in his active years, having until a few years ago owned and operated the Snider mill in the town of Waterloo, and his sons have been for years among the most successful and extensive millers in Western Ontario. His son, William, has been warden of Waterloo County and mayor of the town. His son, T. B. Snider, has been reeve of Waterloo township, and his son, E. W. B. Snider of North Waterloo is the representative in the Ontario Legislature. It is a coincidence that a sister of the deceased, Mrs. Samuel Snider, also a resident of this town, is to be buried to-morrow, having preceded him by only one day.

 

April 26, 1890

 

BUCKLEY - Died in this city, on April 24, Bridget Buckley, daughter of Daniel and Bridget Buckley, aged 17 years. Funeral will leave her parents' residence, No 20 Duke street, west of Locke, on Saturday, at 8:30 a.m., to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to the R. C. cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

JOHNSON - Died on the 22nd instant, at Clarence, New York, Mrs. Maria C. Marr Johnson, in her 40th year. Funeral took place on Thursday, April 23, at Hunt's Comers.


NEWTON - Died at Woodstock, on April 19, Richard Newton, aged 68 years, father of Mrs. (Rev.) T. Albert Moore, of Hamilton.

 

BURKHOLDER - (Thamesford) A very sad and fatal accident happened to Joseph Burkholder, a farmer living about one mile from this place. He was drawing out manure when on his way from the field his team ran away, killing him instantly. He leaves an aged father, mother, and three sisters who have the heartfelt sympathy of the community.

 

MCGREGOR - (Toronto) Principal McGregor of McMaster college, who has been ill for some time, died this afternoon. The reverend gentleman had been ill since last June about a month after he assumed the principalship of the college. He died in St. Luke's hospital, New York, where he had been under treatment since Christmas. He was 43 years old and leaves a widow and three little girls, the youngest a year old. The funeral will take place on Monday afternoon from McMaster Hall.

 

MCDONALD - (Toronto) Thomas McDonald, for twenty-five years in the service of Messrs Blachford, shoemakers on King street, dropped dead from heart disease this evening at six o'clock as he was putting on his coat to go home. He was 75 years old.

 

FARRELL - (Toronto) The infant child of George Farrell was found dead in bed with its parents at 3 o'clock this morning.

 

ROBINSON - George Robinson, aged 60, was killed on Thursday, in George A. Chambers's apple orchard near Winona. He was employed by Mr. Chambers to prune the trees, and while engaged in this work, he lost his hold and fell to the ground. His neck was dislocated and he died in a few minutes after the fall. Robinson formerly lived in Hamilton. He leaves a wife but no children.

 

April 28, 1890

 

STEVENS - Died on April 27, at 43 Evans street, Sarah Agnes, infant daughter of Thomas and Sarah Stevens, aged 4 weeks.

 

CLARKE - Died on Saturday, the 26th instant, Robert Albert, twin son of W. H. and Susanna Clarke, aged 1 year and 17 days. Funeral to-day, at 3 o'clock, from 236 King street west. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

 

CURRAN- Died in this city, on the 27th instant, John Willson Curran, printer, in the 34th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 58 Garth street, on Tuesday, the 29th instant at 4:14 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

John Willson Curran, a well known compositor, died suddenly yesterday morning at his residence, 58 Garth street. Two months ago he was compelled to leave his 'case' in the "Times"


newsroom where he had worked since he was a boy and remain at home, part of the time confined to bed. Deceased was in his 34th year. He leaves a wife and four children.

 

WILSON - Died in this city, on April 26, R. Ross, son of Ross and Isabella Wilson, aged 3 years and 3 months. Funeral took place on Sunday from 250 King street west, at 3 p.m.

 

HILLIARD - Died on April 26, at his late residence, No 10 O'Reilly street, Thomas Hilliard in the 79th year of his age. Funeral at 3:30 p.m. on Monday, April 28,  Friends will please accept this intimation.

Thomas Hilliard, who died on Saturday, was the eldest son of the late Denny Thomas Hilliard, of Castle Gregory, county Kerry, Ireland. He was born at Castle Gregory on March 17, 1811, and consequently was in his 79th year. He left Ireland when about twenty-seven years of age and located here in 1836. He became connected with the Grand Trunk Railway shortly after it was built and remained with the company until 1880 when he retired.

He was greatly respected for his honesty, integrity, kindheartedness and generosity to everyone who was acquainted with him. For the past ten years he had devoted his time to looking after his home garden in which he took great pleasure and pride, and was always pleased to give a hearty welcome to all his friends. He was a member of the Church of England and in politics a staunch Conservative. He leaves one daughter to mourn his loss. Mr. Hilliard's death was caused by a combination of asthma and bronchitis.

 

COLLINGWOOD - Died in Chicago, on April 24, of typhoid fever, Albert, youngest son of the late Thomas Collingwood, aged 37 years.

 

PERRIN - (Montreal) Donat Perrin went to Dr. Gendreau to have a tooth extracted and had nitrous oxide gas administered from which the man never rallied. A corner's inquest was held and the usual verdict returned, exonerating the doctor. This is the first case that has occurred in Canada.

 

PEPLER - (Toronto) Ex-Alderman James Pepler, aged 64 years, Dominion inspector of hides, and ex-chairman of the collegiate institute board, died yesterday of kidney disease from which he had long been suffering. Mr. Pepler was an Englishman by birth and was the father of Mayor Pepler of Barrie. He was a member of the council for St. Patrick's ward for two years.

 

ANDERSON - (Halifax) The wife of James Anderson, living on Gerris street, was using paris green as an insect destroyer yesterday. In the evening she treated a couple of neighbours to hop beer, drinking her own from a cup. She was suddenly taken violently ill, became unconscious, and died this morning. It is believed the cup from which she drank contained some of the paris green she had been using during the day. An inquest will be held to-morrow.


April 29, 1890

 

WALTON - Died at Monmouth Park, Omaha, April 17, Alberta, third daughter of the late Rev. John Walton, of Toronto, Ontario, aged 27 years.

 

WILLIAMS - Died suddenly at Milton, Ontario, on Sunday, April 27, Charles F. Williams, in the 61st year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, 116 Catherine street south, on Wednesday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Death has removed another pioneer resident of Hamilton in the person of C. F. Williams who suddenly passed away yesterday in Milton where he was employed. Mr. Williams was born in Bristol, England, October 6, 1829, and came to this country with his parents when a boy, and settled near Hamilton where he since resided. He was a member of Barton Lodge, A.F. & A.M., for upwards of thirty years and will be buried with masonic honours on Wednesday at 2:30. Heart disease was the cause of death.

 

PROWSE - The body of Herbert G. Prowse, who was drowned in Muskoka Lake when crossing the ice on December 27, was recovered last Monday and interred at Point Kaye church, April 23. He was 34 years old.

 

April 30, 1890

 

ROBINSON - Died in this city on April 29, Julia, beloved wife or William Robinson, in the 51st year of her age. Funeral will take place from 13 Picton street west, on Thursday, May 1, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BERUBE - (Quebec) A man named Antoine Berube, of Strumald Etcheman, aged about 53 years and married, fell in an epileptic fit last night into a little stream, and was drowned in eight inches of water. His wife discovered him about thirty minutes after he had the fit, but life was then extinct.

 

CORBIN - (Quebec) This afternoon a joiner named Joseph Corbin was working on a scaffold in LaChevotiere street. The scaffold gave way, bringing him to the ground, a distance of 60 feet, breaking his neck. He died a few minutes afterward.

 

May 1, 1890

 

PYE - Died on April 28, Elizabeth Ibbotson, wife of Robert Pye. Funeral from her parents' residence, 80 Bay street north, on Thursday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


CASTLE - Died at his residence, in Proton township, April 5, 1890. The deceased was the eldest son of the late Joseph Castle, formerly of the township of Nelson, and brother of Mrs. John Harris, of Hamilton, Ontario.

Call not back the dear departed

Anchored safe where storms are o'er.

On the border land we left him

Soon to meet to part no more.

Far beyond this world of changes,

Far beyond the world of care,

We shall find our missing loved one

In our Father's mansion fair.

 

PAQUIN - (Windsor) Hermaline Paquin committed suicide at Comber, Ontario, Saturday night by plunging into a well. Two months ago she went to work at the tailoring establishment of J. S. Gordon of Comber to learn the trade. Her brother, who lives in Bay City, promised to pay her board while she was learning. She had another brother working for Gordon and she worried not a little about the board bill, but he did not think anything strange of it, and told her it would come out all right. Friday she told him the board bill was to be paid, and when he asked her how. she said he would know by Monday morning. About eight o'clock Saturday night the girl went to the well, a short distance from the house, ostensibly to get a drink, and not returning as soon as she was expected, search was made for her. In less than twenty minutes after she disappeared, Tailor Gordon fished her apron up out of the well and a few minutes later he hauled up the girl's body. The doctors worked over her for several hours, but could not resuscitate her, and she vas buried Monday morning at Tecumseh. Miss Paquin wis a handsome, refined girl, about 19 years of age, and was educated at a convent in Windsor.

 

MATHEWS - (Strathroy) Mrs. Catherine Mathews, one of the oldest people that Strathroy ever claimed as a resident, died at the residence of her son-in-law, William Sherman, Emily street, on Friday morning last. She was born in Kilglass, county Sligo, Ireland, in 1782, being one of a family of five girls and two boys, all of whom she outlived and whose age is given on good authority as 107 years. Mrs. Mathews enjoyed excellent health and it was only the past year of so that she found it advisable to remain within doors, although even then she was not confined to bed. Last week she was up and around as usual, and it was not until the evening preceding her death that anything serious was anticipated. She leaves two sons and three daughters.

 

May 2, 1890

 

GORDON - Mrs. Gordon, wife of Rev. Daniel Gordon, of Harrington, was one of the delegates to the Women's Foreign Missionary Society which met here three weeks for. While here she took ill, and she died last Friday at the house of her son, Dr. Gordon, in Toronto.

 

 


ECKER - (Tapleytown) The funeral of the late Mrs. Ecker, wife of Rev. D. Ecker, took place on Wednesday last, the deceased being buried in Delhi cemetery. Mrs. Ecker had not entirely recovered from the effects of la grippe, but thinking a change might benefit her some, went to her parents at Nixon. Contrary to the hopes of her friends the change produced reverse results and she gradually grew worse until her death. Mr. Ecker has the deep sympathy of his friends and the community will greatly feel the loss of a woman so highly esteemed and respected as Mrs. Ecker.

 

MOORE - (Ayr) Three boys, Fred Clark, G. Copling, and John Moore, went down to the river in a canoe for the purpose of fishing, and while so doing the canoe upset, precipitating them into the water. Clark and Copling managed to reach the shore, but Moore failed to do so and was drowned.

 

OAKMAN - (Toronto) An inquest was held this afternoon in the case of Mrs. Caroline Oakman, the woman who died at the hospital this morning from the effects of a beating supposed to have been given by her husband, Richard Oakman. It transpired that the husband had stated to the policeman who arrested him when told his wife was dead, "It's a good job. I wish the old -----had died forty years ago", and that he had hit her with a bed slat in self defence. It appears that the deceased was suffering from pneumonia and that the violence offered a woman in her condition would have caused or accelerated her death.

Nellie Weir, who was in the house it is believed when the assault took place gave evidence to the effect that she did not see Richard Oakman hit his wife with a bed slat notwithstanding that she stated to the constable who arrested her that Oakman had hit his wife with a bed slat and that she would not tell a lie to save him. The jury returned a verdict to the effect that Richard Oakman by inflicting injuries on the deceased while she was in a weakened state caused her death, and that Nellie Weir was an accessory to the fact.

 

WALLER - (Norwood) The five o'clock Canadian Pacific express going west, conductor J. Smith, ran over two little girls, Annie, aged 7 years, daughter of Abraham Waller, a retired farmer, and Regina, aged 8 years, daughter of Mr. Fry, wheel maker. Annie Waller was almost immediately killed, living but fifteen minutes. Regina Fry was caught by the cowcatcher and carried 300 yards. She is badly cut on the head and may recover. Cora Waller, another little girl was pushed off the track and saved by Thomas Elliott, a young cheese maker, who risked his own life to try to save the children. The accident happened about six hundred yards east of the station. The children were walking westward on the track and it supposed did not hear the approaching train.


COOK - (Halifax) James B. Cook, a farmer, was found drowned in a brook running through his farm at Guysboro yesterday. He had become melancholy lately after an attack of la grippe.

 

May 3, 1890

 

TROTMAN - Died in this city, on Friday morning, May 2, Lizzie Held, beloved wife of William Trotman, aged 23 years and 3 months. Funeral will take place from her husband's residence, 407 York street, Sunday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

PRYKE - Died on May 2, at 32 John street, Toronto, after a lingering illness, Amelia A. (Minnie), daughter of the late Charles Pryke, of Annapolis, Nova Scotia. Funeral on Saturday, May 3, at 1:45 p.m. from Grand Trunk station.

 

HOLMES - Died on Friday, May 2, in the 64th year of his age, George Mower Holmes, Esq., of Beach Road, third son of the late Gervais King Holmes, Esq., JP., of Tavistock, Devon, England, formerly of East Retford, Nottinghamshire, and afterward of Budliegh, Salterton, Devonshire.

 

NOTMAN - (Toronto) John Notman, late Queen's printer, died this morning at his residence, on St. George street. He had been in failing health for a long time, and about a month since the Ontario government gave him a retiring allowance and he resigned his position, being unable to attend to the duties of his office. Mr. Notman was appointed Queen's printer by the John Sandfield Macdonald government and held the position for nearly twenty years. He was a clerk under the provincial government and the government of Upper and Lower Canada. Mr. Notman was 61 years old and a native of Scotland.

 

SEELON - Joseph Seelon, a wealthy Halifax merchant, died yesterday aged 65 years.

 

INGRAM - Alexander Ingram, aged 55 years, and a farmer in Sarnia township, died suddenly on Thursday night from heart disease shortly after retiring to bed in apparently good health.

 

NADEAU - (Quebec) A fatal catastrophe has occurred at St. George, Beauce. Pashal Nadeau,

a farmer, was working at sugar making in company with his daughter, aged 14, and a boy, aged 15. During the night while they were asleep, a fire started in the stable attached to the sugar cabin. The horse got away from being roasted alive. The father, awaking in a half stifled condition by the smoke, caught up the boy who was sleeping in the same bed under his arm, and then went over to another couch and carried out the bedclothes thinking it was his daughter. When he got outside he perceived his mistake, but it was too late, as the roof of the sugar house had fallen and the unfortunate girl was burned to death. The charred remains were afterward taken from the ruins.


VINET - (Montreal) The very Rev. Jacques Jean Vinet, honourary chaplain to his holiness Pope Pius IX, died at the residence of St. Janvier, at Sault au Recollet, the residence for retired priests, this morning. The deceased had reached the age of 84 years.

 

MAINER - (Orillia) This afternoon a number of young lads were practising shooting at a target in the yard of R. Mainer, and while one of them, Willie Mainer, was in the act of shooting at the target, Oliver, the fourth son of Mr. Mainer, ran out of the shed and received the bullet in the temple. He at once fell and became unconscious, and shortly after died. Mr. and Mrs. Mainer were both away from home when the accident happened.

 

CUSACK - A telegram was received yesterday stating that W. M. Cusack has been killed in Victoria, B.C. Mr. Cusack was well known in this city and was one of the most popular young men. He went out to British Columbia and opened a commission business and was a representative of a number of Hamilton firms there. He travelled at one time for J. M. William & Co. His mother and sisters reside on Park street here and a brother lives in Oshawa. The telegram states that Mr. Cusack was killed by a train.

 

May 5, 1890

 

CUSACK - Killed by a train, at New Westminster, B.C., on May 2, Will L. Cusack, aged 31 years and 2 months, a dearly beloved son and brother. Funeral took place at New Westminster , Sunday, May 4.

 

WETHERALL - Died on Friday, May 2, Joseph Lindsay Wetherall. Funeral from his mothers's residence, 510 Hughson street north, at 3:30 on Monday.

 

PRESNELL - Died on Saturday, May 3, at No 50 Greig street, Mrs. Sarah Presnell, relict of the late Alfred Presnell, aged 63 years. The funeral will take place at 2:30 p.m. to-day from the above address. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MARSHALL - Died at 47 Robinson street, Hamilton, on Saturday, May 3, Darling, youngest daughter of William and Julia Marshall, aged 1 year and 5 months. Funeral from the above address on Monday, May 5, at 2:30 p.m.

 

May 6, 1890

 

CHISHOLM - Died in this city, on May 4, J. Hamilton, the youngest son of James and Maggie Chisholm, aged 1 year and 4 months. Funeral Tuesday, at 3:30 p.m., from the residence of his parents, 148 Macnab street north. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.


DICK - Died in this city, on May 3, Mrs. Elizabeth Dick, wife of the late Peter Dick of Brantford, aged 65 years. Funeral from her late residence, 188 Locke street north, on Tuesday, at 8 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCMANNIS - (Winnipeg) James McMannis, known as Uncle Jimmy Boyle, a wealthy farmer, was found murdered on Saturday. Not long ago John Low, a tenant on one of Uncle Jimmy's farms, had some trouble with him. Low coaxed Michael Connor, aged 16, who had lived with Uncle Jimmy since he was four years old, to kill his benefactor. He was ambushed by Connor and his head shot almost off. Low and Connor were arrested and the former confessed.

 

TIBBETT - (Gravenhurst) An old man named George Tibbett, a well known character in town, committed suicide about one o'clock yesterday afternoon in his own house by nearly severing his head from his body with a razor. The cause of the suicide is supposed to be through drink as Tibbett had been on a protracted spree for some days.

 

LACOMB - (Quebec) Francis Lacomb, the brakeman who was so seriously injured on Friday morning last by being run over on the Quebec & Lake St. John Railway, died yesterday morning at the Hotel Dieu where he was conveyed.

 

BOUCHER, RENE - (Drummondville, Que) Two drivers named Boucher of Louisville and

Joseph Rene of St. Monique were drowned here this afternoon in St. Francis River.

 

May 7, 1890

 

LACHANCE - (Quebec) Mrs. Delvina Blann, aged 48 years, wife of Mose Lachance, residing at 204 Richardson street, with her son Paul and daughter, died this morning from the effects of poisoning. The coroner, Dr. Belleau, has been notified and the body has been put under the charge of the police. Sergeant Harper and Detective Welch are working up the case. The inquest will commence at 9 o'clock and the post mortem will be made by Professor Lavers and Dr. Lamothe. It is supposed she committed suicide as she bought paris green recently.

 

BRIDSON - (Halifax) The body of William Bridson, a seaman who jumped from a barque in West Bay near Parrsboro two weeks ago, was found on the beach to-day. He leaped overboard with a pack on his back and it is said he was attempting to escape from ill treatment on board, intending to swim to shore. Startling disclosures are expected at the inquest to-morrow. Bridson belongs to Douglas, Isle of Man, and was 30 years old.

 

ALLISON - (Bowmanville) Dr. W. Allison, formerly president of the Medical Council of Ontario, widely known throughout this section and largely throughout the province,


died this morning at the ripe age of 85 years. For many years he was a prominent figure in political and municipal circles. He was a member of St. Paul's Presbyterian Church and a Conservative in politics.

 

May 8, 1890

 

WESTPHAL - Died in this city, on May 6, Lottie, daughter of Henrietta and William Westphal, aged 2 years and 4 months. Funeral from 60 Canada street, on Friday, May 9, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HOPKINS - Died in this city, on May 2, at his parents' residence, No 1 Nightingale street, Henry Lutz, eldest son of S. F. and Hannah Amelia Hopkins, aged 7 years and 2 months.

 

MAHER - (Quebec) An old man named John Maher was seen last night to walk down the Louise embankment and leap into the river St. Charles. His body was recovered some time afterward. An inquest will be held to-day. Deceased is from St. Catharines, County of Portneuf.

 

May 9, 1890

 

HALLETT - Died in this city, at 27 Crooks street, on the 8th instant, Maggie W., youngest daughter of Thomas Gaines, Burlington Plains, and beloved wife of A. T. Hallett, in her 28th year. Funeral on Sunday, at 2 o'clock, to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to the Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

May 10, 1890

 

THOMPSON - Died in this city, at 136 Cathcart street, on Thursday, May 8,, Myrtle Gladys, infant daughter of James and Maria Thompson, aged 2 months and 11 days. Funeral takes place to Burlington cemetery on Saturday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MADLE - Died at 9 a.m. on Friday, at 21 Mill street, Mrs. William Madle. Funeral on Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock

 

CARSCALLEN - James Carscallen, a farmer living close to town, died suddenly this afternoon at the Royal Hotel. Deceased had been drinking hard for the last few days. (Napanee)

 

BROWN - (Tara) At 5 o’clock this afternoon a sad accident happened here at the Grand Trunk station by which a young man, Henry Brown, lost his life. At the time of the accident he was on top of a box car putting on the brakes when the train shunting brought the cars together with such force as knock him off. He fell between the cars, two wheels passing over his body,


causing almost instantaneous death. He was the son of a widowed mother and has only been in the service of the Grand Trunk for a few days.

 

FOWLER (Gananoque) Three men started this morning to cross from Grindstone Island to Bostis Island in the St. Lawrence. A stiff breeze was blowing at the time, the mast sail broke, the skiff upset, and one man named Ernest Fowler was drowned. The other two had a close call, but were fortunately rescued by James Turcott who having observed the accident from Bostis Island, promptly put off and arrived just as one of them had become exhausted.

 

May 12, 1890

 

HAWKES - Died in this city, on May 9, Edna May, infant daughter of Walter and May Hawkes, aged 4 months. Funeral took place from parents' residence, 84 Inchbury street, Sunday, May 11.

 

CONNOR - Died in this city, on May 10, Charles Stanley, infant son of William H. and Jennie Connor, aged 10 months. Funeral took place from 169 Cannon street west, Sunday, May 11.

 

May 13, 1890

 

HARPER - Died at her late residence, corner Main and Burlington streets, on May 12, Margaret, relict of the late Andrew Harper, in her 63rd year. Funeral Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CLEGG - Died in this city, at his late residence, 29 Tom street, John Clegg, in the 62nd year of his age. Funeral on Wednesday at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

TAYLOR - Died in this city, at 183 Emerald street north, on May 12, Albert Edward, second son of J. G. Taylor, aged 20 years and 6 months. Funeral on Wednesday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

OSBORNE - Died on Monday, May 12, Alice Ewing, beloved wife of John Young Osborne, and daughter of Robert H. Park, aged 27 years and 6 months. Funeral on Tuesday afternoon, from the residence, 265 Macnab street north, at 3:30 o'clock

 

SOULES, WYNN - (Campbellford) At about 5:30 o'clock this morning a fire occurred in a small  frame building on the outskirts of the village which resulted in the death of two persons, a boy named William Wynn, aged 13, and his grandmother, Mrs. Catharine Soules, aged about 80 years and quite helpless. His grandmother was upstairs in bed and the rest of the family at


breakfast downstairs. When the fire was discovered in the roof, evidently started from a defective flue, the first thought was to carry out the goods, but the boy thought of his grandmother and rushed upstairs to bring her out and was overtaken by the flames and perished. When removed the body of the boy was not badly burned, but only the trunk of the other was left. There was no insurance.

 

COTTON - (Ottawa) A sad event is reported from Regina. Mrs. Major Cotton died last night. She leaves twins, an infant boy and girl. The deceased was a daughter of the late Hon. Thomas White.

 

MCMASTER - (Toronto) At half past six o'clock this morning while Watchman Stott was going his rounds in the neighbourhood of Clendenning's boathouse at the foot of York street he noticed a body floating in the water and by means of a pole he dragged it ashore and raised it on the dock. The body was that of a man, poorly clad, about 38 years of age with hair turning gray and smooth-shaved face. The patrol wagon was summoned and the body was removed to the morgue for identification. It was much decomposed and the features were swollen and distorted almost beyond recognition. Upon the clothing being searched a number of papers were found. One was a promissory note for $50 signed by George A. McMaster made in favour of James A. Hedley, editor of the "Monitary Times". This led to almost positive identification in spite of the condition of the corpse. It is not known whether the deceased committed suicide or accidentally fell into the water. He is a nephew of the late Senator McMaster and at one time held an excellent position with favourable prospects. He was an unmarried man and in late years had become greatly dissipated, having several times been arrested for drunkenness. It is thought that, as he had not discounted the promissory note, he must have fallen off the wharf before he could do so. An inquest will be held.

 

SMITH - (Toronto) Abraham Smith, a reputable Hebrew citizen who carries on a clothing store at 103 Queen street west, was horrified this morning to discover his wife dead in bed. Heart disease is supposed to have carried her off. Mrs. Smith retired in her accustomed health last night. The funeral will take place at 4 o'clock this afternoon.

 

GRIDDLE - (Toronto) William Griddle, who has been employed for several years in the city hall as a temporary clerk, died very suddenly yesterday. He was at work as usual last Saturday.

 

FOWLER - (Toronto) A son of John Dick this morning brought word to the city that County Constable William Fowler was drowned in the Humber river on Saturday evening. Fowler and several others went to the river to fish and late in the afternoon, his companions missed him. After a short search, Dick says they found the body in the water. An inquest has been ordered.


May 14, 1890

 

CLOWES - Died in this city, on May 13, Grace, infant daughter of V. S. and Mary Clowes, aged 9 weeks and 1 day. Funeral will take place from her parents' residence, 154 Sophia street, on Thursday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this invitation.

 

PILKEY - Died at Brantford, on May 12, Joseph Pilkey, aged 85 years and 9 months, father of Joseph B. Pilkey and Alfred Pilkey of this city, and P. J. Pilkey of Brantford. Burial will take place at the old White Church cemetery near Mount Hope, at 1:30, Wednesday, May 14. Friends are respectfully invited at attend.

By the death of Joseph Pilkey of Brantford which occurred on Monday morning last, one of the few remaining pioneers of the province has passed away. The deceased was born at Little York (now Toronto) on August 4, 1804, at which time there was but one other house in that place. He subsequently took up land in Scarborough township about ten miles out of Little York where he lived for some years, and finally removed to Glanford township. About ten years ago he removed to Brantford and lived as a retired gentleman. During the whole of his life he was a staunch Reformer and a strong supporter of Joseph Rymal in all political contests. His death was mainly attributable to a severe cold contracted about two weeks ago which finally developed into an attack of la grippe. Eight of his family survive him. Deceased remembered many incidents of the war of 1812 and related them with all the enthusiasm born of those times. His father fought in the battles of Stony Creek and Lundy's Lane and was the possessor of a medal presented by Lord Durham for services during that time. Deceased was a man of excellent principles and of great personal courage. The funeral will take place on Wednesday, May 14, to the old White Church, Glanford.

 

PELL - (Stratford) Thomas Pell, employed at Hodd & Cutler's flour mill here, while shovelling bran in the upper storey this afternoon, by some mishap fell into the chute and was suffocated. His feet appearing through the lower end of the chute was the first intimation that his fellow employees had of the accident and he was released as quickly as possible, but life was extinct. Deceased was 65 years of age.

 

SOMERTON - (Halifax) George Somerton, a seaman on the barque "Stella" while on the voyage from Greenwich for St. John's, Newfoundland, fell from the rigging to the deck, striking on his head and was instantly killed. He was a native of Portugal Cove, Newfoundland.

 

BYERS - (Kingston) The body of Henry Byers was found in Cataraqui bay this evening. It is believed to be a case of suicide. He was seen at Cataraqui bridge early in the evening. He was formerly a Methodist minister.

 

 


HUDSPETH (Ottawa) The flags are flying at half mast on the parliament buildings out of respect to the late Adam Hudspeth, M.P.

 

WHITELY - (Ottawa) A funeral took place yesterday afternoon from the residence of W. H. Whitely, grocer, that of his eight-year-old son, Robert John, who died of scarlet fever. The friends and relatives were all assembled and the funeral service as performed by the Brethren had commenced when Dr. Robillard, medical health officer, entered the room. He said he was sorry to interrupt a funeral service but as the child had died of scarlet fever, which was most contagious, he would have to request everyone to leave at once. He then turned to Mr. Whitely's other children who were present and who were just over it and asked where they were. Being told he ordered them to be at once taken upstairs. Those present then left, the funeral proceeded, and the child was buried.

 

ENGLAND - W. H. England, well known in Montreal athletic circles, fell dead yesterday afternoon in the Montreal athletic grounds while playing a game of cricket.

 

LOVE - William Love, an elderly farmer, was kicked in the breast on his farm near Glasgow, N.B. yesterday and injured so seriously that he died in half an hour.

 

RUSSELL - Dr. John Russell, one of the best known members of the medical profession in Toronto, who died suddenly of apoplexy at his residence, 172 Simcoe street, at half past six yesterday morning, retired the previous night in apparently perfect health. The deceased was in his 69th year. He graduated in Edinburgh in 1846.

 

May 15, 1890

 

DAY - John Day, a coloured man, who used to work in Tuckett & Sons tobacco factory here, was killed in Buffalo to-day. He was standing near the track at the railway station when an iron pipe projecting from a passing locomotive struck him on the head. He died almost instantly. Day was a native of Virginia and left this city a week ago to go home.

 

RIPLEY - About a week ago a small boy named Joseph Ripley, an inmate of the Boys' Home, ran a splinter under his nail. The splinter was removed and the finger attended to, and nothing much was thought of the matter for two or three days when he commenced to complain of pain in the muscles of the neck and a stiffness of the jaws was apparent. Dr. Shaw was summoned on Friday evening and found that the lad was suffering from lockjaw. Everything possible was done for him, but he got worse and died on Sunday night in terrible agony.


At times the most excruciating spasms convulsed the unfortunate boy until he rested only on the back of his head and his heels. Everything possible was done for him by those in attendance and Dr. Shaw took every means to alleviate his agony. Drs. Russell and Mullin were also called in to consult on the case, but lockjaw is generally fatal and only in rare cases can a person, affected with it be saved. The wound in the finger never even festered.

The boy is the son of James Ripley, formerly a well known member of the labour party here. Mr. Ripley has been in Geneva, N.Y., but arrived in the city as soon as he heard of his son's illness.

 

May 16, 1890

 

ROMBOUGH - (Aultsville) The boiler in the steam sawmill of Kerr Bros., Farran's Point, exploded this morning about six o'clock, completely demolishing the mill and killing a young man by the name of Rombough, who was at work on the outside. The explosion occurred at an opportune moment as the men had not yet gone to work, and the engineer had returned to breakfast after having started the fire. Parts of the boiler were carried on to Croil's Island, a distance of half a mile. One large piece of iron, weighing at least three or four hundred pounds, was carried over the village and deposited in the road near Stubbs's marble shop. Another about the same size was carried over John Farran's house and crashed through the roof of a shed in the rear. It is a matter for congratulation that the explosion did not occur a few minutes later as the loss of life would have been great. Young Rombough was killed almost instantly, a piece of iron striking him across the chest and crushing it fearfully. Dr. Ault, coroner, was called, but did not deem an inquest necessary.

 

MORTON - Mrs. Morton, the old lady who was frightfully burned on Wednesday evening by the explosion of a lamp, died last evening at the hospital. Her injuries were so terrible that it was not expected she would recover. Her son, Edward Morton, of Toronto, arrived yesterday and was present at his mother's death. Coroner Woolverton was notified. He did not think an inquest was necessary, but he will consult with Crown Attorney Crerar to-day.

 

FEE - (Peterborough) Thomas Fee, head miller in Hilliard & Peplow's flour mill, met a terrible death in the machinery of the mill about half past eleven this morning, being crushed between two large bevelled cogwheels. He belongs to Port Hope.

 

GARBUTT - (St. Thomas) Robert Garbutt, a well known conductor running from Windsor to Buffalo on the Michigan Central Railway, met with his death last night near Welland station while walking on the top of freight car. He fell between the second and third cars and was instantly killed. He was a native of this place and had been connected with the Michigan Central for a number of years.

 

 


May 17, 1890

 

PATTON - Died in this city, on May 15, Andrew Patton, a native of Glasgow, Scotland, aged 53 years. Funeral from 263 Ferguson avenue on Sunday at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

On Thursday, Andrew Patton died in the city hospital where he had been confined for three months. He had been suffering for about a year from a combination of diseases, resulting from asthma. Mr. Patton was a native of Glasgow, Scotland, and had been a resident of Hamilton for about seven years. He was a prominent member of the Ironmoulders' Union and the funeral will be conducted by that body. The funeral will take place on Sunday, at 3 o'clock, from 263 Ferguson avenue.

 

CAREY - Died in this city, at 329 Bay street south, on Friday, May 16, William Carey, in the 46th year of his age. Funeral on Monday, May 19, at 3:30 p.m.

William Carey, one of the proprietors of the "Spectator" printing company, died last evening about 8 o'clock after a somewhat lingering illness. The announcement will prove a shock to many, for though it was known that he was gradually getting weaker for several days past it was not expected that the end was so near. Yesterday morning he fell asleep and rested quietly during the day, but towards evening it was found that he was unconscious. He remained in that state until 8 o'clock when he passed peacefully away.

Mr. Carey was born in Ireland in 1844 and came to Canada at an early age, his parents settling in London. He received his education there and entered business, subsequently becoming a member of the firm of E. A. Taylor & Co, booksellers. In 1877 he came to Hamilton in company with Mr, Southam and purchased the "Spectator" from the estate of Lawson, McCullough, & Co, and formed the "Spectator"printing company which they have since conducted. Mr. Carey leaves a widow and three young children, one son and two daughters. Mrs. Carey was formerly Miss Margaret Roper of this city.

The deceased was a prominent Mason, a member of Barton Lodge, a Royal Arch Mason, a member of Murton Lodge of Perfection, Hamilton, Sovereign Chapter of Rose Croix, and Moore Sovereign conservatory, 32 degrees. He was a member of the Church of the Ascension and one of the promoters of the Church Defence Association of the Diocese of Niagara. Though never aspiring to public honours, he was public-spirited citizen, a shareholder in several financial institutions, and a member of the Board of Trade. He took a prominent part in promoting any measures that he believed to be in the interest of Hamilton. He was a gentleman of kindly nature and was esteemed by all with whom he came in contact, alike for his sterling virtues and manly independence of character.


 

The immediate cause of death was paralysis of the brain and is supposed to have resulted from an injury to his spine which he received by a fall two years ago. He was never entirely recovered from the effects of the accident. In the summer of 1888 he went to England and consulted several eminent physicians but received no relief and gradually lost strength. For the past two months, he was confined to his room and was attended by Dr. Husband. He was conscious up to Thursday afternoon. The funeral will be held on Monday afternoon.

 

DUNN - About 5:15 yesterday afternoon, Thomas Dunn, son of Stephen Dunn, 18 Guise street, dropped dead on James street north near the slip. He had an attack of pleurisy last August and was confined to his bed all winter. When the weather became fine he used to take short walks. Yesterday afternoon he was sitting on the stone wall near the slip. He appeared to be in better health than he had been for some months. He got up to get a drink and was on Mackay's scales when he fell. He called to a Mrs. Roach to inform his mother that he was dying, but before Mrs. Dunn arrived he was dead.

The deceased was about 33 years old. He was unmarried. Dr. White who attended him during his illness did not think an inquest was necessary.

 

May 19, 1890

 

STEVENS - Died in this city, on May 18, Nelson Stevens, beloved husband of Jane R. Stevens, in his 58th year. Funeral from his late residence, 140 King William street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MORTON - Died in this city, on Thursday, May 15, Ann, widow of the late Andrew Morton, aged 66 years. Funeral from her late residence, 93 Kelly street, Sunday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

JEFFERIES - Died at 58 Victoria avenue north, on Saturday, May 17, 1890, Nancy Bridge, relict of Col. Jefferies, CM., born October 18, 1794. Funeral on Monday, May 19, at 2 p.m., from the residence of J. S. Robinson, 58 Victoria avenue north.

Mrs. Nancy Bridge Jefferies, relict of Col Jefferies, who was perhaps the oldest woman in Hamilton, died Saturday morning. She was born in Montreal on October 18, 1794, and was therefore 96 years old. Her father was a U.E. Loyalist. She was married three times. In February 1815 she married Philman Terrill, who died in December 1820. Her second husband was Dr. Parker whom she married on May 13, 1824. He died on October 20, 1825. In March 1831 she married Col. Jefferies who took part in putting down the rebellions of 1812 and 1837. He died in August 1886.

Mrs. Jefferies lived in Montreal most of her life and used to take great pleasure in talking about


the growth of the city. Three or four years ago she came to Hamilton and lived with her grand-daughter, Mrs. J. S. Robinson, 58 Victoria avenue north. She enjoyed good health until three or four months ago when she was taken sick, but her illness was not considered serious until a couple of days ago. Her memory was clear and she was very active for a woman of her age. Her two children, Dr. Terrill and Mrs. Creighton, wife of Rev. William Creighton, are both dead.

 

MURRAY - (Moncton, N.B.) Alexander Murray, an Intercolonial brakeman, was almost instantly killed at Hampton last night by falling between the cars. Five loaded gondolas and a van passed over his body, crushing his head and chest and severing an arm and leg. He belonged to Moncton and leaves wife and two small children.

 

VAUGHAN - (Moncton) The mangled remains of John Vaughan, a farmer, were found on the Intercolonial track between Hampton and Bloomfield this morning, It is not known what train killed him. He belonged to Bloomfield.

 

HUNT - (Toronto) Three weeks ago a well known character named Edward Hunt was sent to jail on a charge of vagrancy on his own application to the police, he having no home and being ill with consumption. Saturday he died in jail. Deceased is reported to have had wealthy parents in England who discarded him because he associated with low companions.

 

May 20, 1890

 

PETERSON - Died on May 17, at the residence of her sister, Mrs. Chittenden, 167 Bay street south, after a lingering illness, Sara Curtis, second daughter of the late P. H. Peterson, M.D., of Union Springs, N.Y. Private funeral took place on May 18.

 

SEWELL - Died at his residence, Grant avenue, on May 19, John Adamson Sewell, in the 46th year of his age. Funeral on Wednesday, May 21, at 3:30 p.m.

The business community of Hamilton was surprised as well as grieved when it learned of the death of John A. Sewell, of the firm of Sewell Bros, grocers and wine merchants. Mr. Sewell had been suffering from heart disease for nearly two years, but his complaint did not take a serious form until about three weeks ago when he was obliged to quit business and remain in the house. The end came at an early hour yesterday morning. It came suddenly and unexpectedly while Mr. Sewell was asleep and he passed away without a struggle and painlessly. Mr. Sewell was 46 years of age. He was born near London, Ontario, came to Hamilton fifteen years ago and entered his brother's store. Nine years ago he was taken into partnership. Mr. Sewell had been two years married, his wife being a daughter of E. Pinch of this city. The deceased gentleman, though of a quiet retiring disposition, had many friends in Hamilton, and was held in high esteem for his numerous good qualities.

 

 


ALEXANDER - (Essex Centre) A man named John Alexander, living near Cottam in Gosfield township, suicided on Friday night by cutting his throat. He suffered from cancer of the lip. He informed Thomas Wahoo, a companion, he intended to commit suicide and when Wahoo replied if he (Alexander) knew the consequences if he did, Alexander said, "Yes I know the consequences and I can stand them better that I can stand this cancer". He was found Saturday morning sitting on the side of the bed with his throat cut and directly underneath the bed was a pail half filled with blood. Alexander was 70 years of age and had never been married.

 

WATERHOUSE - Amy Waterhouse, a young Dundas girl, died on Saturday from the effects of a dose of 'rough on rats' administered by her own hand. From her own confession it appears that she did not intend to kill herself but merely took a dose of poison to make her sick. The girl had lived with the family of George Davidson for four months. On Friday she had some trouble with Mrs. Davidson about the disappearance of about $3 which the girl was suspected to having stolen. She wanted to leave the house, but Mrs. Davidson would not let her go because she knew the girl had no place where she could stay.

The foolish girl then went to her room and took a small dose of poison. She was taken sick, but Mrs. Davidson, believing that the illness was brought on by worrying, did not consider it serious. At 10 o'clock that night Dr. Ross was summoned but he could not discover the cause of the girl's illness. It was not until Saturday morning that she threw her arms around Mrs. Davidson's neck and confessed that she had taken the poison. It was too late to save her life and she died shortly afterward. She told Dr. Ross that she did not intend to take enough poison to kill her.

An inquest was opened on Saturday before Coroner Ross and a jury. After viewing the body the jury adjourned until Thursday night. The deceased was about 20 years old. She was born in England and her parents being dead, she was brought to this country by Miss Rye. For some time she was in the Children's Home here. She left there a couple of years ago and was at service in Lynden before going to George Davidson's. Although the girl left the Children's Home two years ago, the officials of that institution made all the arrangements for her burial. The funeral took place yesterday morning.

 

LEBEAU - (Quebec) Felicité Lebeau died suddenly at her residence, St. Sauveur, yesterday at the age of 79 years.

 

 


May 21, 1890

 

BAYNE - Died on Tuesday, May 20, Ellen Hackett, the beloved wife  of Peter Bayne, in the 63rd year of her age. Funeral from the residence, 39 Queen street north, on Thursday afternoon, at 3:30 o'clock.

 

RAYMOND - Died in this city, on Sunday, May 18, John H. M., youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. M. Raymond. Funeral took place on Monday, May 19.

An infant son of M. Raymond, 41 Emerald street north, died in bed on Sunday morning. It slept with its parents and it is supposed that the child was overlaid during the night.

 

BIGGAR - Died at the residence of his son, S. D. Biggar, King street east, Hamilton, on Tuesday morning, May 20, Christopher Biggar, aged 70 years. Funeral from above address to Stewart's Church, Saltfleet, on Thursday, May 22, at 1 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MCCARTHY - It is surprising the number of sudden deaths that have occurred recently. Monday night Mrs. McCarthy, about 90 years old, the wife of Charles McCarthy, 135 Dundurn street, dropped dead. She had an attack of about two months ago, but had recovered from it and was apparently enjoying as good health as a woman of her age could expect. She complained Monday of being sick, but the woman was able to attend to her household duties. When she was talking to a young man named McGowan who was inquiring after her health, she fell and was dead before medical aid could be secured. The doctors say heart failure was the cause of death.

 

MUIR - Andrew Muir of Grimsby, the father of Judge Muir, died at an early hour yesterday morning. He had just entered upon his 88th year, having been born on April 12, 1803. He was the only son of the late Andrew Muir, who came from West Calder, near Edinburgh, Scotland, to Niagara in 1792 and settled in Grimsby the following year. Andrew Muir died in 1855 aged 92 years.

 

BLACK - (Montreal) The funeral of the late James F. D. Black, city treasurer, took place to-day and was well attended by a number of prominent aldermen, civic officials, and personal friends of the deceased. There was a squad of forty policemen under Chief Hughes and Sub-Chief Benoit in the cortege. The ceremony was of a simple character as possible, Mr. Black having expressed a wish that his funeral should be quiet and without ostentation. Immediately following the coffin were the principal mourners: his three sons, Messrs Edward R., James F., and Howard D. Black; his son-in-law, Charles Levin; his brother-in-law, Mr. Flanagan, city clerk of Kingston, Ontario; and his nephews, Mr. Jagoe of Hamilton and the mayor of Kingston. At the church the service was conducted by Rev. Messrs Canon Ellegard, Mullock, and G. D. Troop.


LORANGER - (Montreal) The funeral obsequies of the late J. M. Loranger ,Q.C., took place in the church of Notre Dame this morning, Rev. Curé Sentenne officiating. The pall bearers were: Mr. Justice Gild, Senator Alexander Lacoste, Q.C., F. T. Berque, Q.C., J. C. Hutton, Q.C., L. W. Marchand, Q.C., L. W. Sicotte, clerk of the crown and peace, J. C. R. Lacroix, and Joseph Bell. The chief mourners were Mr. Justice Loranger and his sons. The Bar attended in a body.

 

FISHER - (Toronto) John Fisher, a partner of the commission firm of John Fisher & Co., died yesterday in the 72nd year of his age. Deceased was connected with various financial institutions and a director of the Northern Railway.

 

May 22, 1890

 

MUIR - Died at Grimsby, on May 20, 1890, Andrew F. Muir, Esq., in the 88th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence on Thursday morning.

 

MERRICK - (Toronto) Dr. E. H. Merrick, who for three years has practised in this city, died this evening after a week's illness from inflammation of the lungs. He practised at Gananoque for fourteen years and was born at Merrickville, Ontario. His brother, H. Merrick, ex-M.P.P. for Leeds and Grenville, is immigration agent for Ireland at Belfast, and his other brother, A. A. Merrick, is a resident of Toronto. Deceased was in his 53rd year. A widow and two children survive him. His remains will be taken to-morrow night to Government, N.Y. for interment.

 

BROWNE - Edward Browne, for many years one of Hamilton's most prominent and influential citizens, died suddenly yesterday morning of apoplexy. Mr. Browne had been feeling unwell for a day or two but not suffering sufficiently to prevent him from attending to business. About eight o'clock in the morning just after he had completed his toilet and was still in his bedroom, his daughter, Mrs. Tandy, heard a fall in the room. She hurried into the room and found her father prostrated on the floor unconscious and breathing stertorously. Dr. White, the family physician, was summoned, but Mr. Browne was beyond the reach of medical skill. He remained unconscious until about eleven o'clock and then he died.

Mr. Browne had long been a conspicuous figure in the business and social world of Hamilton. He was one of the oldest business men and saw the growth of the city from an insignificant town to the chief manufacturing centre of the Dominion. He will be missed in the streets of the city too, for everybody was familiar with the hearty rosy old gentleman, bluff but kindly, and always ready with a cheery greeting for his acquaintances.

Mr. Browne was born in Castle Connell, county of Limerick, Ireland, 72 years ago. While yet a youth he came to Canada and was employed by his elder brother, the late James Browne, who


then carried on business as a wharfinger in Toronto. He was not long in mastering the business and was soon sent to Kingston to manage the Kingston branch of the business of MacPherson & Crane who owned wharfs in every Canadian port, and about 1845 Mr. Browne came to Hamilton and resided here permanently ever since. He went into partnership with his brother, M. W. Browne, and the firm did the largest dock business of any firm west of Toronto in the era before the railways came this way. Later the brothers dissolved partnership and each continued in business on his own account. In 1846 Mr. Browne married Miss Rutherford of Toronto. She died some years ago. The surviving members of the family are; Miss Browne, Mrs. George Tandy, Mrs. Thomas Corsan of Toronto, Miss Clara Browne, Herbert Browne of New York, and Mrs. H. H. Robertson. For many years the deceased gentleman dispensed princely hospitality at his fine mansion, Arkledun, but a year or two ago he sold the property and moved to a more central residence on Duke street.

 

MCHAFFEY - (Port Colborne) Mrs. McHaffy, a widow of this place, employed to cook on the steam barge "Isaac May", while coming off the boat about nine o'clock to-night, fell between the boat and the wall of the dock, striking her head and fracturing her skull. The body was recovered from the water in a short time but life was extinct.

 

MATTERSON - (Ottawa) A fatal accident occurred on the farm of Thomas Mungey on the second concession of West Templeton on Friday afternoon last by which a workman named Henry Matterson lost his life. The framework of a haymow in which fifty tons of hay were stored had become loosened by the weight of the hay and Matterson was detailed to repair it. He successfully', removed a couple of long cedars from the mow when the whole framework gave way and fell on him. A couple of other men were around and came to the unfortunate man's assistance, but not in sufficient time to save his life, for when extricated his skull was found to be fractured. His face and body were also frightfully bruised.

 

May 23, 1890

 

MORRIS - (Kingston) On Wednesday afternoon a fatal accident occurred at Howe Island by which a farmer named Joseph Morris lost his life. He was training a colt when it became frightened and ran away, dragging him, it being caught in the harness. He could not extricate himself. When found he was unconscious and bleeding from many wounds. He breathed only half an hour after the accident.

 

MACKIE - (Kingston) The body of Miss Mackie who was cook on the "Jessie Breck" was recovered to-day. The search for the bodies of the remainder of the crew is being vigorously carried on. (Editor’s note entire crew: Thomas Mackie, Wolfe Island, captain, in his 35th year, Joseph Mackie, Wolfe Island, his brother, mate, 30; Marian Mackie, Wolfe Island, their sister, cook, 28; James Mackie, Wolfe Island, another brother, sailor, 24; William Mullins, Wolfe Island, sailor, 60, leaving a widow and three orphaned daughters; John Mullins, Wolfe Island, sailor, his son, 20; Donald McDonald, Wolfe Island, sailor, 20.)


May 24, 1890

 

HARRISON - Died in this city, on May 23, James Eltham Harrison, aged 51 years. Funeral from his late residence, 76 Pearl street south, on Sunday, at 4 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

BURNISTON - Died in this city, on Friday, May 23, aged 1 year and 7 days, Harold, youngest son of E. and A. Burniston. Funeral at 4:30 Sunday afternoon, from 502 Bay street north. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

AINSBOROUGH - Died in this city, on the 23rd instant, John Henry Ainsborough, late colour-Sergeant of the Canadian Rifles, aged 52 years and 10 months. Funeral on Monday, from his late residence, 593 Catherine street north, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ALLAN - (Toronto) A sad shooting case occurred at 652 Younge street last night about six o'clock. John Allan, machinist, who occupies the house, had been shooting rats in the kitchen with a small rifle and after killing a rat, reloaded his rifle and stood it in the corner. He went into the shop, and while gone, Mary Allan, his seven-year-old child, picked up the rifle and pointed it at her two-year-old brother, James. The little girl accidentally pulled the trigger and the baby was shot in the head. The child died at 1:30 this morning.

 

CUMMINGS - (Peterborough) William Cummings, tax collector, and an old and respected resident of Peterborough, died suddenly this morning of heart trouble.

 

May 26,1890

 

HONEYCOMB - Died in this city, on May 24, John Honeycomb, a native of Cornwall, England, in the 85th year of his age. Funeral will leave the residence of his son-in-law, William Hancock, 37 Locomotive street, on Tuesday, May 27, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GAGNON - (St. John's, Que) The body of Romnald Gagnon, notary and lumber merchant of St. John's, missing since last Wednesday evening, was this afternoon found in the canal below the collector's office. His unaccountable absence yesterday caused a search of the surrounding country which being unsuccessful, his relatives this afternoon had the canal dragged with the above result.

 

May 27, 1890

 

JOHNSON, DOHERTY - (London) A very sad drowning accident happened at the city

waterworks dam, Springbank, about 2 o'clock this afternoon. As a result of the very heavy rain of


the last few days, the Thames has swollen very much, causing a swift current in the vicinity of the dam and making boating very dangerous. About noon a party of four engaged a boat from one of the city boathouses and rowed down to Springbank. It seems they were not acquainted with the dangerous character of the current near the dam and did not suspect anything wrong until they were well within its grasp, too late to avert their doom. The boat was swept over the dam, throwing its occupants into the water, two of whom, Adam Johnson, a clerk in R. J. Young & Co's drygoods store, and Miss Ida Doherty, a daughter of Thomas Doherty, until lately conductor on the Sarnia branch of the Grand Trunk Railway, sank to rise no more.

The other two, whose names cannot be ascertained at present, were more fortunate. When the boat upset, the gentleman managed to grasp it with ons hand and with the other hold on to his lady partner until they were rescued. The bodies of the unfortunate couple have not yet been recovered.

 

May 28, 1890

 

LITTLE - Died in this city, on May 27, at 98 Ashley street, Mary Ann, beloved wife of Matthew H. Little, aged 35 years. Funeral Thursday afternoon, at 3 o'clock to St. Thomas Church, Main street east, thence to Burlington cemetery, Friends will please accept this intimation.

When Matthew PI. Little of the Meridan Britannia Company went home to dinner yesterday, he found everything prepared as usual for the midday meal, but the meat was burning on the stove and Mrs. Little was not around anywhere. His youngest child was in the house and he asked where ita mother was and was told she had gone upstairs. He called up to her, but got no answer, and on going to the room, found Mrs. Little lying across the bed quite dead. The body was yet warm and the death had apparently occurred within ten or twenty minutes. The deceased had apparently been in the act of cleaning up the room when heart failure seized her and she staggered over to the bed and fell across it dead. Dr. A. Woolverton was immediately summoned but did not think that an inquest was necessary.

Mrs. Little was 35 years of age and leaved three children, the youngest being four years old.

 

FISHER - (Galt) Thomas B. Fisher, aged about forty years, a married man and a machinist by trade, was found in the dining room of his own house about eight o'clock last night, stabbed in the left breast over the heart. Dr. Wardlaw was summoned and found it impossible to save the man's life.

Death occurred at 10:30 p.m. An open pocket knife was discovered under the table and deceased's coat, vest, and shirt plainly showed the holes made by the deadly weapon. It is considered a case of suicide, although no reasons for such an act are known. The dead man leaves a widow and four children.


CLARICE - (Belleville) Willie Clarke, a seven-year-old son of T. S. Clarke of the Montreal Bank, died on Sunday night from concussion of the spine, produced by being shoved against a stone wall on the previous Wednesday.

 

May 29, 1890

 

BRADT - Died at Grimsby, on May 23, Nellie May, only daughter of Harry and Ellen Bradt, aged 2 years and 7 months.

 

TRUMPELLER - Died at her residence in Jacksonville, Florida, May 28, Sarah L., wife of D. W. Trumpeller, and sister of A. Zimmerman, of this city.

 

BRACKEN - Died of pleurisy, at his residence, 221 Victoria Avenue north, Hugh C. Bracken, of the Meridan Britannia Works, aged 46 years. Funeral to G.T.R. station at 1 p.m., Thursday. Interment in Taunton, Mass.

The many friends of H. C. Bracken will be deeply pained to hear of his sudden death. Mr. Bracken died at his residence, 221 Victoria avenue north, from pleurisy. He was in apparently good health on Monday last. Since the establishment of the Meridan Britannia Company in this city, Mr. Bracken has been identified with it, occupying the position of superintendent of the manufacturing department. He was beloved and respected by all who knew him. He was actively engaged in temperance work and was an esteemed officer of the Royal Templars of Temperance. He was a member of the Congregational Church of this city and identified himself with several benevolent societies. He leaves a widow but no children. The remains will be buried at Taunton, Massachusetts.

 

SHAW - (Toronto) The death is announced of Rev. Calvin Shaw, one of the best known and most earnest workers in the mission field of the Methodist Church of the Dominion. The reverend gentleman's health has been failing for nearly two years and in November last he was reluctantly compelled to abandon, for a time at any rate, active work in connection with the church. He was at that time pastor of the congregation at Norvar, Muskoka.

 

May 30, 1890

 

HARE - Died in Dundas, on Thursday, May 29, 1890, Eliza H. Hare, relict of Samuel Hare, in her 73rd year. Funeral will take place on Saturday afternoon, at 3 o'clock, from her late residence to the Dundas cemetery.

 

WALKER - A particularly sad case of suicide occurred yesterday at 99 John street north. William Walker, a very old resident of the city, while suffering from despondency, procured some 'rough on rats' and drank a quantity of the mixture about two o'clock in the afternoon. He lingered for nearly five hours and though everything possible was done for him, he died about seven o'clock.


The deceased had resided in Hamilton for thirty-eight years and was a well known contractor of the city at the time the Great Western Railway was being built. Later he kept a store at the corner of James and Barton streets, but met with business reverses and realized Shakespeare's pathetic description of Fortune's cruel whim:

It is still her use

To let the wretched man outlive his Wealth,

To view with hollow eye and wrinkled brow

An age of poverty.

Of late years he had lived in very straightened circumstances and the fact preyed upon his mind, especially as his health began to fail. He had several times spoken to the effect that he wished he could die, and at last determined to carry his purpose into execution. He was found by his wife shortly after taking the poison and told her he had done so. Drs. White and McCargan were called in and administered emetics, but it was too late and after lingering several hours, he died.

The deceased was 74 years of age. He leaves a widow and three sons and three daughters. One of the sons is George Walker, the well known baseball pitcher. Another is foreman of the stores department of the Grand Trunk at London. It is not likely that there will be an inquest.

 

May 31, 1890

 

WALKER - Died in this city, on May 29, William Walker, aged 74 years. Funeral from his late residence, 99 John street north, on Saturday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SPERA - Died at Saltfleet, at his late residence, Red Hill, on May 29, William Spera, Sr., in the 72nd year of his age. Funeral will take place Sunday afternoon, at 1:30 o'clock to Bartonville cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DRISCOLL - (Campbellford) At 6 o'clock this evening, F. Driscoll,, grocer, was sitting in his store talking to Mrs. Driscoll and complained about a pain about the heart region and asked her if she could do something for it. She went upstairs to get some mustard, and at this moment the milkman drove by. Mr. Driscoll got the pitcher and started for the door when he fell headfirst on the doorstep, the pitcher breaking on the sidewalk and attracting outside attention. He was picked up immediately but only gasped three or four times and life was extinct. He was about 50 years of age and had been in his usual health.

 

EZZARD - (Toronto) A sad accident occurred here on the Canadian Pacific Railway about nine o'clock whereby George Ezzard, a driver of the Dominion Express Company lost his life. He arrived as usual Thursday night, but attempted to jump off the train while passing the south


platform on the way to get to the main line and fell under the wheels, the last truck passing over his body. Death was instantaneous. The deceased is unmarried and a resident of Toronto.

 

June 2, 1890

 

MCALISTER - Died in this city, on May 31, Jennie, infant daughter of William McAlister, aged 4 months. Funeral took place from 415 Cannon street east. Sunday, at 1 o'clock to Caledonia.

 

MCHARG - Died in this city, on Sunday evening, June 1, James McHarg, aged 71 years. Funeral at 4 p.m., on Tuesday, from 451 York street. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

James McHarg, of 451 York street, an old and respected resident of this city, died on Sunday. He was born in Scotland 71 years ago, coming to Canada about fifty-five years ago. He lived for a number of years in the eastern part of Canada and came to Hamilton in 1850. He was employed for many years by W. Holton, nurseryman. He was member of the Canadian Order of Oddfellows for thirty-five years. He was the father of seven children, only one of whom, John A. McHarg, station agent of the Grand Trunk at London, is living.

 

TRUMAN - Died on May 31, at 111 Victoria avenue north, Lillian Olive, youngest daughter of Charles and Nellie Truman, aged 1 year and 4 months. Funeral from the above address on Monday, June 2, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation without further notice.

 

HOUSE - Harman House, a well known farmer, while driving from Hamilton to his home near Alberton on Saturday night, was thrown from his wagon and killed by a team of colts he was driving. House left Richard O'Hara's place about 10:30 and started for home alone. Shortly after 11 o'clock his body was found about a mile and a half further on, opposite Daniel Shaver's place, this side of Alberton. The face was horribly crushed and it looked as if his head had been caught between the end of the bolster and the spokes of the wheel. The body was found by William Jones and Edward Daniel who brought it into Ancaster the same night and it was taken home yesterday morning. The colts went home all right and were put in the stable by the hired man. The deceased leaves a family

 

SIMMONS - (Longwood) George Simmons, a respectable farmer, committed suicide this morning about two miles north of here by cutting his throat with his jack knife. He had been suffering with la grippe for over three months and had been despondent for some time past. He leaves a widow and four children.


FLEURY - (Quebec) A girl named Fleury, aged 23, while carrying her master's dinner in the tannery, fell into a boiling water vat. The unfortunate girl was so scalded that her flesh fell off with her garment when the people tried to undress her.

 

BRYONS - (Kinmount) The body of the young man, R. J. Bryons, who was drowned here yesterday afternoon while out boating, was found late last night and was taken to Lindsay this morning.

 

KELLY - Richard Kelly, a retired farmer living about two miles outside of Ancaster, died very suddenly Friday night. He was taken sick on Thursday evening and died twenty-four hours afterward.

 

June 3, 1890

 

JACKSON - Died on June 2, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. C. E. Torrance, Jane Milburn, widow of the late William Jackson, of Durham, Grey county, Ontario. Funeral at Durham, on Wednesday, June 4.

 

HACKETT - Died in this city, on June 1, Richard Hackett, aged 60 years. Funeral from his late residence, 29 Barton street east, on Wednesday morning, at 8:30. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.

 

DUFF - Died at Willow Bank, Queenston, on May 31, Jessie Augusta Duff, fourth daughter of the late Alexander and Hannah O. Hamilton, and mother of W. A. H. Duff, barrister of this city. Funeral on Tuesday, June 3, at 3 p.m. to family burial ground.

 

VOLLAND - Died in this city, on June 2, Frank Volland, a native of Apolda, Sachsen-Weimar, Germany, in the 50th year of his age. Funeral will take place from his late residence, No 406 Cannon street east, on Wednesday, June 4, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HAYES - (Windsor) Brakeman Hayes who was killed to-day was one of the witnesses at the Benwell inquest. He was the witness who identified Burchell as the man who travelled west with Benwell and was probably the Crown's most important witness. (Editor’s note from Canadian Encyclopaedia; John Wilson Murray, police detective 31 years. In that period he solved hundreds of crimes, including the famous J. R. Birchall murder case).

 

June 4,1890

 

GIANELI - (Ottawa) An Italian named Vincenne Gianeli was deliberately murdered by another Italian who has escaped. A whole gang quarrelled during the afternoon and these two set out together for Dorion's hotel. On the way the unfortunate man was stabbed in the leg from behind, the femoral artery being severed.


WILSON (London) A sad drowning calamity occurred Friday last in the neighbourhood of Prospect Hill in Biddulph township whereby the 18-year-old son of Mrs. Wilson, a widow, lost his life. The young man had been attending St. Mary's high school and was returning here with two companions. They stopped and were fishing in Fish Creek when a proposal to go in for a bathe was agreed to.  It was somewhat deeper than usual, about nine feet being in the creek. Young Wilson got beyond his depth and as he could not swim, was drowned before any assistance could be procured. The body was recovered.

 

ROY - (Ottawa) Royal Roy, of Tetreauville, was killed on the Canadian Pacific track between Hull and Aylmer last night. He was walking along the track and it is believed tried to board the Aylmer train and slipped. When found he had terrible gashes on the head and his right leg was broken.

 

June 5, 1890

 

HOUGHTON - (Mitchell) A young man named George Houghton was killed yesterday afternoon on lot 2, concession 14, Logan, about 12 miles north from here while engaged at work logging with Edward Rumford. Houghton's wife who was on the ground where they were working was having a dispute with Rumford about the work when the husband interfered and Rumford struck him a blow on the head with a handspike, fracturing the skull badly. Rumford realizing what he had done came to town for a doctor. The doctor started for the spot and on arriving found Houghton dead, he having lived only a short time after the blow. Rumford has been living under the same roof with the Houghton family and is in some way related to it. Rumford has given himself up to the authorities. The inquest is now going on before Coroner Shaver of Stratford.

 

June 6, 1890

 

SEDDON - Died in this city, at 32 Catherine street north, on June 5, Harry Fenton, third and beloved son of James and Florella Ann Seddon, aged 3 years and 2 months. Funeral takes place on Friday, at 8:30 a.m. to St. Peter's church, Barton. Funeral private.

 

BIBLE - Died in this city, on June 4, at his residence, 54 Bay street south, Robert Bible, aged 84 years, native of Lismore, Ireland.

 

BOICE - Died on Wednesday, June 4, Mrs. Elizabeth Adams Larkin, relict of the late Mr. William Boice. Funeral from her late residence, 68 John street north, on Saturday, June 7, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends kindly accept notice.


June 7, 1890

 

PALMER - Died on the 6th instant, at 277 Main street west, William B. Palmer, aged 54 years. Funeral on Sunday next, at 4 o'clock. Friends please accept this notice.

 

DRAKER - A frightful accident occurred yesterday afternoon on the farm of Charles Sealey in Nelson township near Lake Medad, about four miles from Waterdown. Peter Draker was working a stumping machine. When he was drawing a stump, the chain broke and a link flew back with terrible force and struck him on the chest, inflicting a wound which resulted fatally. Dr. McGregor was summoned, but he arrived too late as the unfortunate man died shortly after the accident occurred. Draker was about 30 years old.

 

June 9, 1890

 

DEVINE - Died in this city, at 350 James street north, on Saturday, 7th instant, Mabel, youngest daughter of John and Janet Devine, aged 1 year, 3 months, and 2 days. Funeral at 3:30 p.m. to-day (Monday).

 

AMOS - Died on June 7, Jane, the relict of the late John Amos, Jr. Funeral Monday, June 9, at 3:30 p.m. from her late residence, No 279 John street north. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

HARPER - Died in Toronto, on June 6, William F. B. Harper, aged 41 years. Funeral took place from Pray & Son, undertakers, on Sunday, at 3 p.m.

 

CALDER - (St. Catharines) The steamer "St. Magnus" was wind bound at Lock 12, new canal, on Friday, and two young men, deck hands, took advantage of the steamer lying idle to go in bathing at sundown. They had been in the water but a few minutes when one of them, a young man named William Calder, is said to have taken cramps and sank before anyone could reach him. The body did not appear above the surface after the first appearance. Divers are at work seeking the body and if not found, the water will be drawn off the level on Sunday.

 

COWEN - (Belleville) Thomas Cowen, blacksmith, Tyendinaga, was yesterday about noon, found bleeding to death in his barn with a deep gash in his throat which had evidently been inflicted with a razor which lay near him. No cause can be assigned for the rash act. The unfortunate man died within a few minutes. He leaves a widow and six children.


June 10, 1890

 

PRINGLE - Died at Galt, on Saturday evening, June 7, of scarlet fever, Dorothy May, only and much beloved child of Arthur Dunbar and Alice N. Pringle, aged 1 year, 10 months, and 11 days. Funeral took place Sunday afternoon.

 

SCHECK - Died at 8 Davenport street, on June 7, Emma Caroline, second daughter of Louis S. and Amelia Scheck, in her 14th year. Funeral on Monday, June 9, at 4:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

WORK - Died in this city, on June 7, John Work, aged 58 years. Funeral from his late residence, 37 Magill street, Tuesday, June 10, at 2:30. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

BILLINGTON - Died at his late residence, Wentworth street south, on June 9, George T. Billington, aged 65 years. Funeral on Wednesday, at 3:30 p.m.

 

TUCKETT - Died in this city, on June 9, the beloved wife of George E. Tuckett, corner of King and Bay streets. Funeral Thursday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. George E. Tuckett died yesterday afternoon from a relapse of the grip. She suffered severely from the disease last winter, but recovered her usual health. About a week ago she contracted a cold which brought on a relapse of the insidious disease, and she never rallied from the second attack. Mrs. Tuckett was a native of Toronto, but had lived in Hamilton during the greater part of her life. She married Mr. Tuckett more than thirty years ago. Two sons and two daughters survive her. The daughters are: Mrs. R. Duggan, and Mrs. T. H. Lawry. George T. and Charles are the sons. The latter is attending school in England. The funeral will take place on Thursday from the family residence, corner of King and Bay streets.

 

LAWRENCE - (Marmora) Thomas Lawrence, Jr., committed suicide on Saturday night by taking strychnine. Cause unknown.

 

RODREAU - (Ottawa) Frank Rodreau, blacksmith, aged 40 years, dropped dead this afternoon while working in a shop on Clarence street. Heart disease is supposed to the cause of death.

 

CREGAN - (St. John, N.B.) Mrs. Ellen Cregan, widow, residing with a married daughter, was burned to death this morning. She was nearly 80 years old. There was no light or fire in her room and it is supposed that in some way the old woman set fire to her clothing.


June 12, 1890

 

SYMONS - Died at his late residence, 221 Mary street north, Samuel Symons, in his 73rd year, formerly of Cornwall, England. Funeral on Friday, June 13, at 3 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

 

TRUSCOTT - Died on June 11, at 100 East avenue north, John Stanley, youngest child of John F. and Kate Truscott, aged 11 months and 7 days. Funeral Thursday, June 12, at 3:30 p.m.

 

KING - (Hagersville) The evening express train from Hamilton on the G.T.R. ran over and killed an Indian named Joseph King about two miles and a half north of Hagersville. The body was almost cut in two. King was stretched across the rail evidently much intoxicated. It being about dusk, the engineer was unable to distinguish any object on the track until too late to prevent the accident. The body was brought to this place by the same train. An inquest will be held to-morrow at 9 a.m. before Coroner McDonald.

 

June 13, 1890

 

MCDONNELL - Died at her son's residence, 302 King street west, on June 12, Catherine Sandra McDonnell, relict of the late Dr. Thomas McDonnell, aged 86 years. Funeral Sunday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DONOHOE - Died in Bartonville, on June 11, Francis Donohoe, infant son of Thomas and Mary Donohoe, aged 1 year and 2 months. Funeral from 9 Gibson avenue, Bartonville, on Friday, at 1:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

SINON - Died on Wednesday June 11, at St. Joseph's Convent, Sister Anna Marie Sinon. Funeral on Friday at 9 a.m.

 

FERGUSON - (Alvinston) Archibald Ferguson, a farmer of the township of Mosa, who lived three miles east of here, was run over and killed on the St. Clair branch of the Michigan Central Railway this evening. The unfortunate man was standing on the track watching the train approach and made no effort to evade it. It is thought that he was insane.

 

CASTLE - (Toronto) Rev. Dr. Castle, formerly principal of the Baptist College in this city, died last evening in Philadelphia. He had been in ill health ever since his resignation two years ago. It is but two or three weeks since Principal McGregor of the same college died in New York.


June 14, 1890

 

O'BRIEN - Died in this city, on June 13, Michael O'Brien, aged 71 years. Funeral from his late residence, 157 Strachan street east, on Sunday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept the intimation.

 

BARRY - Died on June 13, Mary Ann, beloved wife of Martin Barry, and only daughter of the late Dennis McBride, aged 58 years.  Funeral from her husband's residence, 17 Strachan street east, on Monday, at 8:30 a.m. to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

June 16, 1890

 

ROBBINS - Died in this city, on Sunday, June 15, John Robbins, a native of London, England, aged 73 years and 5 months. The funeral will take place to-day (Monday) at 3:30 p.m. from 314 King street east. Friends and acquaintances are invited to accept this intimation.

 

MCCONVILLE - Died in this city, on the 15th instant, Alford McConville, late of London, in his 42nd year. Funeral from his late residence, 129 Barton street east, on Tuesday, 17th instant, at 3:30 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.

 

SMITH - (London) The extreme penalty of the law was executed upon Henry Smith this morning for the murder of his wife in a drunken frenzy, on February 18 last. The crime was committed in the evening in a small cottage on the west end of Regent street occupied by Smith and his wife, and the evidence on which the prisoner was condemned to death was purely circumstantial. The confession made by the prisoner was read at the gallows just before the execution by Rev. Mr. Hill, the rector of St. John's Episcopal church, who has attended Smith constantly since his arrest...

 

GRIMES - A small frame house on the heights west of the old Catholic cemetery was the scene of a tragedy last evening. It was the result of one of those rows complicated by whiskey and passion which occur every day and are liable to terminate either in a prosaic assault or a murder. The victim was an old coloured man named Joseph Grimes and his slayer is from all accounts another coloured man, a youth named Zachariah Shields who boarded at Grimes's house. The evidence as to the inflicting of the injury that resulted in the man's death is not very direct, the facts being rather peculiar.

Joseph Grimes, the dead man, lived in a small two-roomed frame cottage on the heights above the Dundas marsh, across Beasley's hollow from the old Catholic cemetery. He was about 80 years of age and made a living by collecting swill and ashes in the city. A woman named


Mrs. Hodges, a relative of his, kept house for him. About four months ago, Zachariah Shields came to Hamilton from St. Catharines. He is described as a youth of twenty, very black and ugly tempered. He was a cousin of Mrs. Hodges and he became a boarder at Grimes's house, having got work in one of the numerous brickyards in the west end. Latterly he did not pay his board and this originated the difficulty that led up to the tragedy. In company with a man named Holman he hired a boat from Bastien's yesterday afternoon and went for a row on the bay. Where he went is not known, but about eight o'clock the two men landed at the head of an inlet below Grimes's shanty and drew up the boat. Holman went home to eat supper and young Shields reported to Grimes's place also in need of refreshment.

He was intoxicated and acting ugly. Mrs. Hodges taxed him with not having paid for board and he got angry and assaulted her. Old Grimes was lying on the bed in an inner room with his shoes and coat off, and when he heard the quarrel he came out and they had a scrap which resulted in Grimes and Mrs. Hodges throwing Shields out. The woman then slipped out the back way and started for the city to get a warrant, leaving the old man alone in the house and Shields outside.

The evidence as to how the killing occurred is rather meagre and is based principally on the statements of persons who were at some distance.

It appears, however, that after being expelled from the house Shields flew into a frenzy of rage, picked up a small axe, smashed the window, and yelled that he would murder Grimes if he came outside. What Grimes said is unknown, but Shields told him to throw out his hat and subsequently other articles of clothing belonging to him. Meantime he danced around like a madman and threw the axe, a large stone, and a beer keg through the broken window. When the keg was thrown it evidently struck the old man, for people several hundred yards away who were watching the row heard Grimes give a loud cry. Then Shields went to the door and had a short parley with Grimes which resulted in his spare coat being handed out after which the young man started down the hill to his boat. Then Grimes came out and crept along the side of the house holding on to the wall and evidently badly hurt. When he got to the south-west corner of the house he could see down into the ravine. He yelled to the retreating lodger, "Are you going back to town?" Zach replied with an oath that he was not. "Well you had better get away from here " yelled Grimes. "You better shut up or I'll come back there and kill you", replied Shields with another curse.

Just as he said that, Grimes threw up his hands and fell on his back. Some children went over and found the man apparently dead and they informed John Honeysett, Robert Neal, J. Hampstock and William Small who went over and found that such was the case. The police were telephoned for, but in the meantime Constables Cameron and Tuck heard of the affaire and went over from the corner of King and Locke streets. They found the old man lying on his back between some barrels and the house, stone dead. There were no marks of violence on the body except a bruise on the hand, but blood was oozing from his nostrils. They carried him inside and laid the body on


the bed. It was then ten o'clock and the body had lain there on the ground for an hour and a half. Aided by the neighbours a search was at once instituted to find the homicide, but he had taken the boat and gone off. Dr. Philp, coroner, Chief McKinnon, Sergeant Pinch, and a squad of police arrived shortly after, but the doctor did not make a close examination of the body and consequently the exact cause of death could not be ascertained last night.

 

COLLIN - (Seaforth) The funeral of the late John Collin, editor of the Galt "Reformer", took place here to-day from his father's residence. There was a large attendance among whom were many from a distance. The funeral was conducted with Masonic honours.

 

June 17, 1890

 

HOPE - Died on June 16, 1890, at his residence, No 4 Sandyford Place, Duke street, in the 74th year of his age, Charles James Hope. Funeral at 3:30 on Tuesday. No flowers.

 

BALL - Died on Saturday June 7, at her residence, 5 Queen's Park, Toronto, Mary Eleanor, widow of the late Frederick A. Ball, aged 68 years.

 

FILDEN - (London) A fatal accident occurred at the corner of Carling and Richmond streets about 6:30 to-night by which E. Filden, a painter by trade, met an untimely death. He had hailed a Richmond street car, but instead of waiting until it came to a stop, he attempted to jump on the front platform but missed his footing and fell under the car, the front wheel of which passed over his body, instantly killing him.

 

ARNOLD - (Chatham) While Solon J. Arnold was unloading logs at Louisville near Chatham on Saturday afternoon, one of them slipped down the skids. Mr. Arnold jumped to escape, but was tripped and held down on the timber by the chain, the jerk on the latter at the same time causing another log to fall from the wagon and strike Mr. Arnold full on the back, killing him instantly. Deceased was 54 years of age and highly respected.

 

June 18, 1890

 

COPPLEY - Died in this city, on Monday, June 16, George H. Coppley in his 69th year. Funeral will take place from 126 Victoria avenue north, on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Funeral private.

 

CALDER - (Blyth) A very sad accident happened here this evening by which Donald Calder was almost instantly killed. Nobody knows how it happened exactly. He was seen going towards one of the hotel sheds in which his team was tied, and about five minutes afterward the team came out running away, and he was found a few minutes later lying unconscious with his skull fractured.

 

 


WILSON - (Ingersoll) John Wilson, brakeman, on the Canadian Pacific Railway, was run over last night while assisting in shunting a freight train. The train passed over his leg above the knee. The surgeon amputated his leg above the knee, but he died.

 

LOUZON - (Windsor) Last evening James Louzon who resides three miles east of here on the river front came to Windsor and proceeded to take a bath at the Michigan Central Railway slip dock. He walked out in the stream until he reached the channel bank which is perpendicular at that place when he went down and was drowned. The body vas recovered this morning.

 

WOODS - (Guelph) An old man named Thomas Woods was found dead last night in the rear of Bell & Co's lumber yard and about a quarter mile from his house. He had been in ill health for some time and it is supposed that he became exhausted and lay down and died.

 

June 19, 1890

 

HUTON - Died in this city, on June 18, of this residence, 155 Market street, Charles Huton, merchant tailor, aged 57 years. Funeral on Friday, at 3 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

Charles Huton, merchant tailor, died this morning after a long and painful illness. Deceased was born in Ireland and came here about forty years ago as a merchant tailor. He was highly respected. Paralysis of the windpipe was the cause of death. The deceased was about 57 years old. He was a consistent Conservative. He leaves a widow and six children. The funeral will take place from his late residence, 155 Market street on Friday.

 

WEBSTER - Died in this city, on June 17, Edmund Webster, aged 45 years. Funeral will take place from his late residence, 206 Victoria avenue north, on Thursday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

THOMPSON - Killed on June 17, William Thompson, only son of Mrs. Wellinger, aged 23 years. Funeral from 322 Hunter street west, Thursday, June 19, at 4:30 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

William Thompson, who was so terribly injured on Tuesday night under the wheels of a freight train, died at an early hour yesterday morning. He was conscious up to within a few minutes of his death and conversed intelligently with his mother and sister. It has not yet been decided whether an inquest will be held. This depends on the wishes of Thompson's family. The Grand Trunk officials have offered to do all in their power to facilitate an investigation into the cause of the accident.

 

 


WANLESS, ALTON, OLIVER, LOTT, MORIARITY - (Toronto) An accident happened on the Canadian Pacific Railway between  Claremont and Myrtle last night by which five residents of Toronto lost their lives. A washout was reported here on the road and a light engine was sent

  to repair the damage. There were on board: John Wanless, bridge inspector, of Parkdale; James Alton, engineer; F. Oliver, fireman; and Lott and Moriarity, section men. The engine, while running at a moderate rate of speed, came unexpectedly on a washout and without a moment's warning, the engine with its five victims plunged into the break caused by the flood.

They were all drowned. The evening and night trains to and from the east last night did not get through, but the regular train left Toronto at 8:40 this morning and will transfer passengers at the gap and receive and bring back those from the other side. The body of Mr. Wanless was found at 6 o'clock this morning. He leaves three children.

 

WILLIAMSON - (Quebec) The death is announced of Mrs. Samuel Williamson here at the ripe old age of 100 years and 5 months. She was a native of County Armagh, Ireland, and resided in this city for the last seventy years.

 

CAZENVANTS - (Comber) Christian Cazenvants, employed by Mr. Rounds, near Stony Point, was instantly killed by lightning during Tuesday's storm while seeking shelter beneath a tree. The affair is extremely sad as he was the sole support of his widowed mother who has a large family. He was about 18 years of age.

 

June 20, 1890

 

MORRIS - Died in the township of Barton, on June 19, Millie, youngest daughter of John Morris, boat builder, Wentworth street north, aged 1 year and 11 months. Funeral takes place Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

June 21, 1890

 

STEVEN - Died in New York, on June 20, Minnie E., widow of John H. Steven, formerly of Hamilton.

 

FLAHERTY - (Halifax) Last evening while setting lobster pots at Ketch Harbour, Henry Flaherty, aged about 60, was drowned by the upsetting of his boat. He had a boy with him named Kelly, an orphan whom he was bringing up. The latter was found on the beach this morning, insensible but alive. He had been washed ashore. Flaherty leaves a wife and several children.


DAVIS - (Belleville) The execution of Peter Edward Davis for the murder of William Emory in Marmora township on September 19 took place at 8 a.m. this morning...

 

DUBOIS - (Quebec) Murderer Dubois suffered the extreme penalty of the law at 8 o'clock this morning, The sun was bright and red, just a day to make Dubois regret his departure for the other world. In the courtyard of the Quebec District Jail the horrid scaffold stood waiting for its victim. At 7:50 Dubois supported by some of the jail guards and accompanied by the Methodist minister, Rev. Mr. Bland, made his appearance at the door. His face showed symptoms of insomnia and he slowly climbed the scaffold steps... On Rev. Mr. Bland giving the Amen to the Lord's Prayer, the hangman started the drop and Dubois fell into eternity...

 

LITTLE - (Moncton) Andrew Little and wife of Mechanics Settlement six miles from Algin Corner lost their lives by the lightning storm on Wednesday. Little was sick in bed when about 6 p.m. the house was struck and burst into flames. The neighbours who soon arrived were horrified by the spectacle that met their gaze through the windows. Little and his wife, the latter lying on the floor, had apparently been paralysed by the shock and could do nothing to save themselves while the rapid progress of the fire prevented those on the outside from rescuing them. The building was totally destroyed and the charred remains of husband and wife were found in the ashes.

 

BARBER - The funeral of the late Robert Barber took place yesterday at Georgetown. He was the last member of the family whose influence for many years was very wide and powerful in this part of the province. Mr. Barber was born in Ireland in 1819 and was the youngest of a family of five. When he was two years old, his father and mother with their children emigrated to Canada and settled at Niagara. When the four boys were old enough they went into woollen and paper mills at Crooks Hollow above Dundas which were the property of the father of the late Hon. Adam Crooks. The brothers learned the business and some time before 1850 went to Georgetown and set up a woollen mill, the business being carried on under the style of William Barber & Bros. The four brothers were William, James, Joseph, and the youngest, Robert.

Some little time after the mill at Georgetown was working, Robert went to Streetsville and started another woollen business. The mill was the property of William Barber & Bros., but the style of the firm was Barber Bros. Robert was followed to Streetsville by William and the two brothers built up an extensive business. In 1862, a big fire destroyed the mill, but such was the energy of the firm that eight months after the fire cloth was again being sent from the reconstructed mill. When the woollen business was removed to Streetsville, the mill at Georgetown was turned to making paper under the management of James, and is running yet for the well known Barber-Ellis Company of Toronto, its management being in the hands of John R., son of James.


In 1884 the affairs of the Streetsville mill firm became involved and the mill passed into other hands. Robert was a director of the People's Loan and Deposit Company and also a director of the Federal Life Insurance Company of Hamilton. He contested Peel twice for the Dominion parliament, and in 1878, as an N.P. candidate although he was a stout Liberal. He was a member of St. Andrew's Lodge, A.F. & A.M., Toronto, He is the last of a family of long livers whose ages at their deaths were: James, 69 years; William, 78; Joseph 72; Robert, 72; and Mrs. Franklin, 76. Robert Barber leaves a son and three daughters. The remains were taken by train to-day from Toronto where Mr. Barber died, to Georgetown. The services were conducted by Rev. W. G. Wallace and Rev. Septimus Jones. Deceased had been living in Toronto since July, 1889, and had been in feeble health since December.

 

June 23, 1890

 

RETTLES - Died in this city, on June 20, Annie Fallis, the beloved wife of Thomas Rettles, aged 65 years. Funeral took place from her late residence, 128 Robinson street, Sunday, at 3:30.

 

NIXON - Died in this city, on Friday, June 20, Elizabeth Marion Nixon, daughter of John Nixon, aged 5 years and 11 months. Funeral took place on Sunday, at 3 p.m., from Pray's undertaking establishment, King street west.

 

SOUTER - Died at Shanghai, on 23rd May, William M. Souter, of the China Inland Mission, second son of D. Souter, of this city, aged 27 years.

The Hamilton contingent of the staff of Rev. J. Hudson Taylor's inland mission to China, has been unfortunate. Two of the noble band have gone to their earned reward. A little while ago the "Spectator" chronicled the death of J. Hamilton Racey, and now comes news of the death of W. M. Souter which occurred at Shanghai on May 23. Mr. Souter went out with J. Hudson Taylor of the China inland mission in September, 1888. He had acquired a fair knowledge of the Chinese language during a residence at the mission house at Gan King and was on his way last November to commence active missionary work with his Canadian associates in the province of Kiang Si when he was seized by an attack of pleurisy from the effects of which he never recovered. He had competent medical aid and every kind attendance during his illness, but of no avail.

His death will be deeply regretted by many friends in this city. Previous to his departure for China, Mr. Souter had been for some time studying for the ministry of the Presbyterian Church and was highly recommended by the presbytery. The dead missionary was a son of David Souter of this city and a brother of Alexander M. Souter of the firm of Malcolm & Souter. He was only 27 years old, was a bright, studious, and earnest young man, and bade fair, had he lived, to become a foremost worker in the greatest of causes.

 

 


FRASER - (Halifax) D. William Fraser, a prominent New Glasgow physician, was found dead on a road outside that town this afternoon and his team was discovered a short distance away. An inquest developed the fact that he died from heart disease.

 

June 24, 1890

 

ALLINGHAM - Died on June 23, at his father's residence, Mountain Brow, Joseph, son of Robert and Elizabeth Ann Allingham, aged 13 years and 2 months. Funeral from above address to-day, Tuesday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

THOMSON - (Brantford) Donald Thomson, nephew of S. M. Thomson, merchant tailor of Brantford, and son of Alexander Thomson of West Bay City, Michigan, was drowned in the Grand River here this evening. He, with other companions, went into the river to bathe and in diving from some point unknown at present, did not appear again. His body was found about an hour afterward.

 

CLARKE - (Toronto) At noon to-day a sad drowning accident happened at Queen's Wharf, Henry Clarke, nine years of age, was leaning near the edge of the wharf a short distance west of the lighthouse catching minnows and reaching out too far, lost his balance and tumbled headfirst into the water. The body was recovered a very short time afterward by Capt. Taylor and Richard Hagan whose efforts to resuscitate him proved unsuccessful. The body was taken home in the patrol wagon.

 

HARVEY - (Goderich) George Harvey from Attwood, Ontario, and who has been attending the high school here, was accidentally drowned this evening at the mouth of the river while bathing. The deceased with others went in bathing. Harvey took cramps and before assistance could be rendered he sank. The body was recovered shortly afterward by Captain Buff's lifesaving crew.

 

June 25, 1890

 

SAUNDERS - Died at his late residence, No 371 Main street west, on June 24, Philip H, Saunders, aged 49 years. Funeral on Thursday at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CRAIG, QUICK - (Colchester, Ont.) A frightful and fatal accident occurred about 3 o'clock

 this afternoon at the farm of William Craig, two miles west of here, by the blowing up of a steam engine belonging to Thomas Quick while shelling corn, resulting in the death of George Craig, youngest son of William Craig, and fatally injuring Thomas Quick and Frank Bondy.


Frank Quick is most seriously injured, if not fatally, while several others are more or less injured.

Later: Thomas Quick is dead. Frank Quick is very low, recovery doubtful. Thomas Craig, Peter White, Frank Bondy, and Lindsay, engineer, seriously injured but it is not thought fatal. Dr. Bell, coroner, from Amherstburg, will hold an inquest in the morning. Low water in the boiler is supposed to be the cause of the accident.

 

JOHNSTON - (Florence) A young man named James Johnston was drowned last night while bathing in the river Sydenham, two miles from here. The body was recovered two hours later.

 

CREALEY - (Toronto) This evening Charley Crealey, aged ten, living on Hickson street, was drowned in the bay while bathing.

 

June 26, 1890

 

BEATTIE - Died at 716 Twenty-eight street, Chicago, Ill., on June 23, Samuel Beattie, aged 31 years. Funeral from 121 Victoria avenue north, Thursday, June 26, at 2:30 o'clock.

 

KENNEY - Died in this city, on June 24, Mary, only daughter of Thomas and Catharine Kenney, aged 5 years and 9 months. Funeral will leave her parents' residence, 82 Ferrie street east, on Thursday, June 26, at 3 p.m. Friends will please attend.

The charred body of what was once a bright little girl lies in a small coffin in the front room of the residence of Thomas Kenney, 82 Ferrie street east. The loving mother is almost heartbroken over the death of her favourite child. It was the old story of children playing with matches and coal oil. Kenney is a car inspector on the Grand Trunk. Tuesday night he went to work at 6:30 leaving his wife and children at home. About an hour later Mrs. Kenney went to spend the evening with Mrs. John Christie who lives on Catherine street north and took her daughter Mary, a bright child about six years old. The little girl was playing outside the house with Joseph Christie, a boy about her own age. The children wandered away from in front of the house and went to Ramsey's house on Ferrie street and played in one of the outhouses. The boy had a bunch of matches and some coal oil and was amusing himself by lighting the matches and throwing them down into the vault. In some way the little girl's dress caught fire, and not being able to quench the flames, she ran out on the street. She was enveloped in flames and her shrieks for help were pitiful. A painter who was working on a building nearly opposite Kenney's house ran to her assistance and in trying to put out the flames he burned his hands badly. The child's clothing continued to burn until Thomas Cerrigan threw a blanket on her and quenched the flames. By this time the girl was an awful sight. The clothing was completely burned off, her little face, hands, arms, and legs were horribly burned, and the skin peeling off in large flakes.


The little sufferer was carried into the house and several doctors were summoned. Dr. Olmsted was the first to arrive. He did what he could to ease the child, but her injuries were so horrible that there was little hope of saving her life. Dr. Shaw was also present. The little girl, suffering excruciating pain, lived until 11:45 when she died. She was burned all over and was a frightful sight.

Kenney was notified of his child's injuries about 8:30 and immediately left his work. He is greatly grieved over the horrible affair.

 

HUSTON - (Kingston) John Huston, son of Rev. Mr. Huston, was drowned this evening while in bathing.

 

ASHDOWN - (Toronto) Fred Ashdown, a young man of good position, went out with a number of young men on the yacht 'Myrtle" cruising off Ashbridge's bay this evening. Freddy went in swimming and was drowned before assistance could reach him.

 

SAUNDERS - Edward Saunders, residing in the rear of 408 Alice street, was found dead in bed to-day. His wife went out to look for work during the day and on returning she found her husband lying dead. A post mortem examination will take place to-morrow.

 

June 27, 1890

 

BINDER - (Humberstone) Albert Binder, aged 7 years, son of A. Binder, cooper, was drowned in the Welland canal at this place this afternoon, having lost his balance while fishing.

 

MCLELAN - (Halifax) The Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia, Archibald Woodbury McLelan, died this morning. His health has been failing for upwards of two years. He has been in public life for almost thirty years, representing Colchester county in the Nova Scotia parliament previous to Confederation. He had been a Liberal and anti-confederate up to 1869 when he and the late Mr. Howe separated from their friends and accepted the situation. Mr. McLelan had at one time extensive mercantile business in Colchester county and was supposed to be very wealthy. He has been Lieutenant-Governor for two years, resigning the position of finance minister of the dominion government to accept the same.

 

JOHNSON - ( Toronto) Robert Johnson, residing east of the Don and a teamster in the employ of the Davies Brewing Co., was drowned this afternoon in Ashbridge's bay. He was in a boat dragging for the body of young Ashdown, drowned on the previous evening, and just as the body was found, in grappling it, he overbalanced and fell into the water and was drowned.


FALUCHER - (Quebec) Sergeant Thorn of the Champlain Market police station was notified yesterday afternoon by the residents of Little Champlain street of a horrible stench in the vicinity of their dwellings and of their suspicion that somebody had died in a room of house No 62. The house is occupied by John O'Brien as a sailors' boarding house. When Sergeant Thorn pushed open the door of the room in question a ghastly spectacle was seen. Stretched out on the floor was the blackened corpse of an old man which in consequence of its advanced state of decomposition emitted a fearful stench. The body was terribly swollen and the eyes protruded from the blackened face. The coroner was notified and by his orders the body was removed to the morgue. The inquest will be held to-day. The body was identified as that of Joseph Falucher, an old man of 70 years, who formerly owned the house No 40 Little Champlain street which was recently sold by sheriff's sale for taxes.

 

LAFRANCE - (Quebec) The death is announced at St. Luce of a centenarian named Charles Benedict Lafrance and a veteran of 1812.

 

June 28, 1890

 

MANDERSON - (Glen Allan) John Manderson, an old man of this place, committed suicide by hanging himself this morning. He left his bed about five in the morning, told his wife he would go out to hoe in the garden while it was cold. He had been in poor health for some time and seemed low-spirited. No reason can be given why he put an end to himself and no suspicion rests on anyone.

 

MCNAUGHTON - (Toronto) A little girl of five years named McNaughton, living at 20 Lemmon avenue, was hanging on behind a street car to-day. The driver told her to get off and in so doing she fell on the track and a passing wagon went over her head, crushing it and killing her instantly. The child's mother witnessed the accident and gathered up the remains.

 

TERRY - (Toronto) It is reported that Edward Terry, a private in the 12th Regiment of Toronto, was drowned in the Niagara river to-day while bathing.

 

June 30, 1890

 

LOUDEN - Died on June 20, at his residence, Ballykilbey Castle, Nelson, William Louden, a native of Magarafelt, Ireland, aged 75 years and 11 months. Funeral took place last Sunday and was conducted by the Orangemen of Burlington.

 

IRVINE - Died in this city, on June 28, William Irvine, in his 35th year, a native of Stronsay, Orkney, Scotland, Funeral will take place from his late residence, No 118 Tisdale street, on Monday, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.


William Irvine who had his skull crushed by a pulley clock which fell when he was putting up a smokestack at Freeman's wood yard died at 1:30 Saturday afternoon. Coroner Woolverton will consult the crown attorney about holding an inquest.

 

MILLS - Died in this city, on Saturday, 28th instant, Eva Frances, infant daughter of Frederick W. Mills, aged 6 months and 15 days. Funeral from the residence of her grandparents, 282 King street west, at 4:30 p.m., Monday, 30th instant. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

PATTON - Died on Friday, June 27, 1890, at 6 o'clock p.m., Andrew J. Patton, deputy post office inspector for Manitoba and NWT, aged 52 years and 6 months. Funeral from his late residence, Rossholme, 89 Hannah street west, on Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

COX - Died in this city, on June 28, John Cox, coffee and spice manufacturer, a native of Somerset, England, aged 67 years. Funeral from his late residence, 26 Locke street south, on Monday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

His numerous friends will be grieved to hear of the death Saturday morning of John Cox, coffee and spice manufacturer of this city. Mr. Cox was a native of Somersetshire, England, and has resided in Hamilton for forty years. He was a good man and much respected by all who had the honour to know him. He was 67 years old and leaves behind him the memory of a good citizen. The funeral, in charge of the Masonic fraternity, will take place to-day at 3:30 from 26 Locke street south. The deceased gentleman leaves two; sons and three daughters. One married daughter lives at Honolulu, H.I. One daughter and one son live at Victoria, B.C., and one daughter and one son at home.

 

SMITH - Died in this city, on June 28, Sophia Parker, beloved wife of John Smith, aged 62 years. Funeral will leave her husband's residence, 143 West avenue north, on Monday, June 30, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

After two vain attempts to commit suicide, Mrs. Sophia Smith, wife of John Smith, made a final effort on Friday night and succeeded in killing herself. Smith is a bricklayer and lives in a small roughcast house, 143 West avenue north. His wife was about 64 years old and was the mother of three or four grown-up children. The circumstances of the affair are very distressing. The unfortunate woman was despondent and had a suicidal mania. She got an idea into her head that her husband and children were tired of her and that she was in the way. A couple of years ago she was in hospital for several months and after she recovered from her illness and was discharged from that institution she was melancholy. She frequently made threats to commit suicide and the husband was in constant fear that she would kill herself. When she was in this condition


every kindness was bestowed on her by the children, but she was always sad and unhappy. Last summer when she was all alone in the house, she got a tub and filling it with water, she put her head into it and held it there. She was almost dead when she was discovered and it was with difficulty that he was resuscitated.

The second attempt she made to take her life was on Sunday, June 5. During the morning she threatened to cut her throat and two razors which were in the bureau drawer were hidden so that she could not carry out her threat. In the afternoon when her son was in the yard she managed to find one of the razors and pulled it across her throat, inflicting an ugly wound which did not prove fatal. She was removed to the hospital, received kind treatment, and had almost recovered when she made the third attempt to end her life. She was in a top ward on the west end of the hospital which faces on the lawn.

The room is in the second storey and is about twenty feet from the grass. Owing to the excessive heat on Friday night, the windows were left open so that the patients could get the benefit of fresh air. About ten o'clock Mrs. Smith jumped out of bed being careful not to make any noise to alarm the patients, she jumped out of the window. She landed on the grass on her left side and broke her arm in three places, the most serious fracture being near the elbow joint. Three of her ribs were broken and penetrated the lungs. She also sustained internal injuries. A young man named Hollenrake who was sitting up with a patient heard the woman fall and immediately gave the alarm.

Mrs. Smith was carried into the hospital and Dr. Crosthwaite set the fractures and did all that could be done for the patient. She was quite conscious and said. "I intended to do it". Her husband and children sat up with her and tried to cheer her up, The poor woman lingered until 4:15 on Saturday morning when she died. She will be buried by her relatives this afternoon.

 

WILLCOCKS - Richard Willcocks, who was once a sergeant in the Union army, died yesterday morning at his home, 206 Picton street east. Mr. Willcocks had been ill for ten weeks. The cause of his illness was a mystery until a few days ago when a careful diagnosis of his case resulted in the discovery that he was suffering from a tumour on the brain. For a week before his death he was delirious and at times quite unconscious. He was a gardener and did ornamental gardening work for many city families.

Three daughters and one son, all grown up, survive him. Mr. Willcocks was a member of St. Luke's Church, and was connected with Acorn Lodge, Sons of England. His death is the first that has occurred among the members of Acorn Lodge although the lodge has been in existence about seven years.

 

O'BRIEN - (Halifax) A middle-aged farmer named O'Brien was killed by a train near Windsor to-day.


JOHNSTONE - (Delaware, Ont.) While the church bells were calling to service this morning, the news spread like wildfire that William Johnstone, a most promising young man, had been drowned while bathing in the river in the immediate vicinity of the village. In a few minutes the banks were thronged and T. W. Knowles and other expert swimmers were endeavouring to locate the body which they succeeded in accomplishing within about an hour after Johnstone had entered the water.

Drs. McLaren and Mitchell were both on the spot and used every effort to resuscitate. Life was pronounced extinct. Johnstone's companions state that he never rose to the surface. He called "Boys" once and sank in about fifteen feet of water, one of the most treacherous localities in the district. He could not swim.

 

MCMANN, CASSELMAN - (Brockville) A sad drowning accident occurred here this afternoon

about 5:30 o'clock which resulted in the death of two persons, Miss Mary McCann and William Casselman. It appears that there were four in the boat, Miss McCann, Miss Graham, of Caintown, and Mr. Casselman and Mr. Major of Brockville. Miss Graham and Mr. Major were rescued by other parties. The deceased are well known here.

 

July 1, 1890

 

WILLCOCKS - Died at his late residence, 205 Picton street east, on Sunday morning at 6 o'clock, Richard Willcocks, a native of Ashburton, Devonshire, England, aged 53 years. Funeral from his late residence, on Tuesday afternoon, at 2:30. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HOSKIN - (St. Catharines) Chester Hoskin of Niagara, aged 80 years, an inmate of the Industrial Home, was found dead on the ground below his window this morning. He retired as usual on Sunday night and the other inmates of his ward say that he was walking about the room at three o'clock. He appears to have gone to the window to get air and was seized with heart trouble to which he was subject and fell out. An inquest will probably not be necessary.

 

LIESMER - (Port Elgin) A sad drowning accident happened to-day in Saugeen river, about two miles from Port Elgin.  Two young ladies went into the river bathing, when one of them, Miss Sybilla Liesmer, aged 18, from Mildmay, got beyond her depth and was drowned.

 

ARPIR - (Montreal) Louis G. Arpir, a well-to-do shoe manufacturer, committed suicide this evening by taking. a large dose of sulphuric acid. Financial trouble, it is said, led to the rash act.


July 2, 1890

 

BIBLE - Died in this city, on July 1, Eliza, relict of the late Robert Bible, aged 73 years. Funeral from 275 Main street west, on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Bible, the widow of the late Robert Bible, died yesterday at her home, 275 Main street west. Her age was 73. Mr. Bible died only a few weeks ago at the aged of 74. Old age caused the death of both. They were natives of Lismore, Ireland, and came to Hamilton half a century ago. Two sons survive: George Bible, of Chicago, formerly paymaster of the Great Western Railway here, and Albert Bible, who is in New Zealand.

 

July 3, 1890

 

BROWN - (Ottawa) James Brown, who fell over Nepean Point cliff last night, is dead. He was on a drunk at the time.

 

ROBINSON - (Gravenhurst) William Brown, an insane person, strayed from Deblaquier's mills at Leg Lake early Monday morning. Yesterday afternoon he entered a field owned by Thomas Robinson, a farmer, and situated in the township of Morrison, four miles from this place. It was raining at the time. Brown stripped himself of all his clothing and walking into the house where old Charles Robinson was staying, asked Robinson to come out in the rain and wash himself. Robinson refused and an altercation ensued. The maniac seized an old gun and with the stock felled Robinson to the floor and after breaking the gun over the murdered man's head, cut some fearful gashes in his victim's side. He was about digging a place in the garden in which to place the body when a man came along and Mrs. Robinson who had escaped outside of the house, gave the alarm.

Chief constable Sloan of Gravenhurst was sent for and when he arrived search was made and the murderer was found lying in the grass, still naked. He made no resistance. He is now in jail here. An inquest will be held by the coroner to-day.

 

DAWSON - (Romney) A little girl named Dawson, twelve years of age, was killed here to-day on Brown's tramway. She jumped from a car while it was in motion and fell under it. The car which was loaded with logs passed over her body.

 

BOARD, HOSTETTER - (Gravenhurst) John Board, Jr., of the Clifton Falls house, Bala, Muskoka Lake, and Miss Hostetter, of Toronto, who were camping with friends at Bala, went out for a canoe ride on Moon river on Sunday afternoon, and while trying to land at the head of Moon river shoot, they were carried over the falls by the strong current and drowned. The bodies have not yet been recovered.


SMITH - (Toronto) Carelessness yesterday resulted in the death of John Smith, a deckhand on the steamer "Eurydice" plying between Toronto and Lake Island Park, Wilson, N.Y. When about six miles from Wilson, Smith was running along the railing on the side of the boat and fell overboard. Life belts and cork jackets were thrown to him, but in vain. The deceased was about twenty-one and just out from England.

 

LEAR - (Moncton) James Lear, of Halifax, traveller for Gordon, Mackay, & Co, Toronto, was found lying on the floor of his bedroom in the Commercial Hotel this afternoon, dying of apoplexy. He was raised to his bed and expired in a short time.

 

BUSH - (Lindsay) A young boy, about nine years of age, named Frank Bush, son of Francis Bush, of this town, was playing around Davies's mill to-day when his clothing in some way got caught in the shafting. The machinery was immediately stopped and the mangled body released, but nothing could be done, and the poor little fellow lingered in excruciating pain until death came to his relief.

 

FRANCIS - (Queenston) Ward Francis, a young English lad from the Boys' Home, Toronto, employed by C. C. Fisher, near Queenston, got beyond his depth while bathing in the Niagara river, and before assistance could be rendered was drowned. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

July 4, 1890

 

BICHLER - (Ottawa) Mabel Bichler, aged 14 years, was instantly killed this morning. She had just skipped out of her father's back door when a small rifle in the hands of a lad named Frank Leggat was discharged. The bullet hit the poor girl in the heart. An inquest will be held.

 

SCOTTNEY - (Halifax) The body of the missing Frances Scottney was found this afternoon wedged between two rocks on the shore of the North-west arm where it had been deposited by the waves.

 

RIVERS - (Belleville) Frank Rivers, a shantyman, was drowned at Ragged Falls near Bridgewater while breaking a jam.

 

SCRIMSHAW - (Belleville) The body of the stray child, Scrimshaw, was found in the bush near her parents' home in Rawdon. The child had evidently perished from hunger and exposure.

 

FEARMAN - We regret to hear of the death of Henry Fearman, the well known builder of Charles street, Hatton Garden. The sad event took place on Tuesday last, the deceased gentleman passing away at the ripe old age of 78. Mr. Fearman has been in business in Holborn for fifty-five years, having originally come from Norfolk. He had been an active and ardent worker in the local boards for many years. He held high positions in the vestry, and was a guardian of the poor and


an overseer of the parish. In those capacities as well as in private life, he gained by his upright and irreproachable life the esteem and respect of all who knew him. (from London Guardian, England)

Mr. Fearman was a brother of James Fearman of Oneida, and uncle of F. W. Fearman of this city.

 

July 5, 1890

 

WALSH - Died at Station Hotel, Stuart street, this city, on July 3, Catharine Walsh, daughter of William and Catharine Walsh, aged 27 years. Funeral will leave her parents' residence on Sunday, July 6, at 3 p.m.

 

HEWLETT - (St. John) An Englishman named John Hewlett, a lime burner, was drowned at the falls under the suspension bridge here this morning.

 

LICHMAN - (Halifax) Herman Edward Lichman, while bathing in Avon river between Windsor and Falmouth to-day, met his death by drowning.

 

July 7, 1890

 

EARLE - About 8:30 this morning Frank Hamilton found the dead body of Patrick Earle in the slip at the foot of James street. It was standing upright in the water, a short distance from the shore and near Mackay's wharf. With the assistance of Tom Crane he tried to get the body out of the water. The police were notified and Sergeant Prentice, Constables Campaign, Coulter, and Fenton went down in the patrol wagon and assisted them to bring the body on shore.

It will never be known how Earle came to be in the water, but the supposition is that he accidentally walked off Mackay's wharf some time during the night. There is not the slightest suspicion that he committed suicide.

The deceased was a widower about 70 years of age and lived with his son at 50 Guise street. He went out on Saturday evening and his son was not aware that he did not return home until he heard of the finding of the body. Earle was seen on John street, near Burlington street, by John Sullivan between ten and eleven o'clock on Saturday night. He was also in company with John Kelly. When Kelly left him he started to go home, but he never got there.

One strange feature of the affair is that when Sullivan saw the deceased he had a coat on. When the body was found in the water the coat was off and there was a handkerchief in the left hand. The police searched the house for the missing coat, but they could not find it. The body was removed to the morgue.

Coroner Woolverton was notified and decided that an inquest was not necessary.


SIMS - (Toronto) Thomas Sims, a member of the Army and Navy Veterans’ Society, has died from the result of sunstroke on Dominion day.

 

HOWE - (Halifax) The widow of the distinguished Hon. James Howe died at Dartmouth to-day aged 84 years. She was the daughter of Captain John McNabb and was born in the barracks at St. John's, Newfoundland, where her father was the commander of the British troops.

 

July 8, 1890

 

DOCKINGS - Died in this city, on July 6, Alli, infant daughter of John and Emma Dockings, aged 8 months and 13 days. Funeral on Tuesday, at 2:30 p.m., from the parents' residence, 306 King street east. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HARRIS - Died in this city, on July 6, John Mills Simmons Harris, in the 82nd year of his age. Funeral from the residence of his son-in-law, William Gilmore, 238 Main street east, on Tuesday, at 2 p.m. to Bartonville cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

LYNCH-STAUNTON - Died in this city, on July 7, Eloise Naomi, wife of George Lynch-Staunton. Funeral from No 17 Homewood avenue at 9 a.m. on Wednesday, 9th instant, to St. Mary's cathedral, thence to the Catholic cemetery.

 

BRENNAN - Died in this city, on July 7, at his father's residence, 418 Main street east, Alfred John, fourth son of M. Brennan, aged 27 years and 11 months. Funeral Wednesday afternoon, at 2:30. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

His many friends in this city will be shocked to hear of the death of Alfred John Brennan, fourth son of M. Brennan. The young man had been managing the mills at Sundridge and Huntsville where he was seized with typhoid fever about six weeks ago. After suffering two weeks he was brought home, but the disease had taken such a hold upon his constitution that it was found impossible to rid him of it, and he died early this morning. He was nearly 28 years old, was a capital business man, and was his father's favourite son. He submitted unhesitatingly to the will of God and died with the word 'mother' on his lips. Mr. Brennan, Sr. was absent and will feel the death of his favourite son keenly when he learns of it.

 

O'DONNELL - (Parry Sound) William O'Donnell, a sailor from the schooner "L. W. Drake" was drowned here at noon on Saturday. He went in bathing with two other sailors belonging to the same vessel and it is stated by persons who were in the vicinity at the time that the two men kept pushing O'Donnell off the plank until he appeared exhausted and called to them to stop, but they went on with their pranks until the poor fellow, being unable to swim or save himself, sank to the


bottom. The men made no proper effort to save the life of the unfortunate man. They departed on the schooner very shortly afterward for Tonawanda in tow of the schooner "Araxes" leaving their names unknown. The harbours, in the locality were thoroughly dragged and the body was found some time afterward. An inquest was held in the evening and the jury returned a verdict of manslaughter against the two sailors whose names are unknown. Considerable indignation is felt here regarding the matter, both as to the action of the captain of the vessel in clearing out so soon after the affair and also as to the neglect of the authorities to detain the men or even to secure their names and addresses.

 

WILSON - (Montreal) A young Scotchman, three years from Aberdeen, named Wilson, fell from a Grand Trunk Railway train between Wales, Ontario, and Montreal and was killed.

 

HAWSON - (Norwood) During a severe thunder storm that passed over this locality this afternoon, George Hawson, a well known young farmer, was struck by lightning and instantly killed at his farm in Asphodel township, three miles from Norwood. He was working with a saw in a shed beside his barn and the lightning broke the saw and tore his shirt down his arm and his trousers off one leg, inflicting a severe wound. The deceased leaves a wife and four young children.

 

FORTNER - (London) Freddie Fortner, the youth who was so mysteriously shot at Woodland cemetery on the Queen's birthday has succumbed to the effects of the same. He was thought some three weeks since to have been thoroughly recovered from the shock, but on Thursday last was again taken seriously ill and died on Friday night. No additional light has been thrown on the identity of the person who fired the shot, but presumably it was done quite unintentionally.

 

JAQUES - (Ottawa) Alexander Jaques died at his residence on Gloucester street this afternoon shortly after 3 o'clock after a long and lingering illness. The old gentleman was probably better known than any other private individual in Canada. A printer by trade in youth, he worked in the leading Canadian newspaper offices before becoming a pressman for the Toronto "Mail". Mr. Jaques was a genuine sportsman in the truest sense of the term. He acted as advance agent for Barnum and Forepaugh in Canada at various periods and won a high reputation as a writer of current topics. "The Old Man" whose demise is generally regretted will be buried with Masonic honours. He was seventy years of age.

 

HAGAR - The house of Lewis L. Hagar, a wealthy Grimsby farmer, has been darkened by two tragedies within a year. Early last fall his little son, Roy, fell under the wheels of a heavily laden grain wagon and was crushed to death. Yesterday morning the lifeless body of another son,


Charles, a bright boy of ten years, was carried home. The lad was bathing in the lake off Ed Hunter's farm, about two miles west of the village, when he got beyond his depth and was drowned. Mr. Hunter got the body out of the water.

 

SMITH - (Toronto) A two-year-old son of Robert Smith, a brick layer, was so badly burned on Saturday afternoon that he died from his injuries on Sunday morning. In some manner the child secured a number of matches and while playing with them set the grass on boulevard on fire. In a moment his dress was on fire and the flames surrounded him, burning fiercely into the tender flesh.

 

July 9, 1890

 

THOMPSON - Died in this city, on the 8th instant, George S. Thompson, aged 63 years. Funeral from his late residence, 122 Florence street, Thursday, at 2:30. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

George S. Thompson was born in Hull, Yorkshire, England, in August, 1828, and has been a respected resident of Hamilton since 1854. He was an employee of John Garrett & Co for upwards of twenty-five years. He had been ailing for the past two years and was a great sufferer, but passed away quietly at 4:20 on Tuesday, July 8. He was an honoured member of Maple Leaf council, I.O.O.F., and Orange Lodge 286 for a number of years. He leaves a wife and grown-up family of four sons and three daughters.

 

MUNROE - (Uxbridge) The heaviest thunder storm ever known in this section prevailed this afternoon. Daniel Munroe, living in the eastern part of the town, was in the cellar with his wife churning when he was struck by lightning and instantly killed. He was a prosperous farmer. The lighting also struck the house of A. Spears, hardware merchant on the west side of the town, knocking down the chimney and tearing off the shingles and sheeting. It also set fire to the telephone office, but the fire was easily extinguished. The storm was accompanied by heavy rain and light hail and although it lasted only a short time it did considerable damage to crops.

 

DAVIDSON - Lightning also struck the barn of Joseph Watson in the township of Reach about five miles from Uxbridge, killing his hired man, Norman Davidson, and seriously injuring Davidson's brother who stood beside him, setting fire to and burning the building, together with eleven head of thoroughbred young cattle. The damage is about $4000 with no insurance.

 

KEMP - (Toronto) Alexander Kemp, a farmer residing in B concession of Scarborough, while working in his garden about noon yesterday fell to the ground and instantly expired. Heart disease is supposed to have been the cause of death. Mr. Kemp was about 55 years of age.

 

 


CANAVAN - (Toronto) The funeral of young Charlie Canavan, who was drowned at Buffalo on Saturday, took place this morning. Mr. Canavan returned to Buffalo by the steamer "Cibola" this afternoon to the bedside of Miss Canavan who was rendered dangerously ill by the shock attending the sad death of her brother.

 

ANDROS - (Barrie) Capt. E. B. Andros, an English gentleman living on the bay shore here, was drowned this afternoon. He was coming up the bay in a small sailboat when a squall struck the boat, upsetting and throwing him into the water. Parties on shore saw the accident and made every effort to rescue him but without avail. His body has not been recovered.

 

HARRISON - (Paris) Captain Harrison of the Salvation army was drowned here to-day while bathing.

 

KENT - (Ottawa) John Kent of the firm of Kent & St. Jaques, Russell House, died this afternoon, aged 56.

 

July 10, 1890

 

TURNER - Died at Belleville, on July 9, Murray Turner, son of the late John Turner of Hamilton, in his 34th year. Funeral on Friday, July 11, to Belleville cemetery.

 

BURNS - Died in this city, on July 9, Jane Burns, relict of the late John Burns, in her 67th year. The funeral will take place on Friday, at 2:30 p.m. from her late residence, 45 East avenue north. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

Mrs. Jane Burns, widow of the late John Burns, died at her home, 45 East Avenue north, last evening. She had been suffering for five or six years past from what was thought to be acute dyspepsia but which only recently was discovered to be cancer of the stomach. Her suffering was borne with heroic Christian fortitude and patience, and she retained her cheerfulness to the last. Mrs. Burns was born at Market Hill, county Armagh, Ireland, in 1824. Her husband was the late John Burns of the third brigade of Royal Artillery who got his discharge in Quebec in 1869 and came to Hamilton with his family to settle. He died in 1873. Mrs. Burns is survived by three sons: John, the Conservative candidate for Hamilton, in the provincial election of 1886, now employed in the customs department here; Robert, a citizen of Hamilton; and Abraham who is in the United States. Mrs. Burns was a member of St. Matthew's Church. The funeral will take place to-morrow at 2:30 p.m.

 

MANLEY - (Toronto) Capt. Fred Manley and Herbert Manley returned to Toronto this evening with the body of their father John W. Manley, who was drowned at Lewiston.


He had been missing since Monday afternoon and it is supposed he went to Lewiston on the Niagara boat and fell into the water while wandering about the dock there. Deceased was about 70 years old.

 

LEBLANC, COUSINEAU - (Ottawa) A raftsman named Leblanc, who was coming down on a raft from the Upper Ottawa, was drowned in the Calumet chute a little over a week ago. Another man named Cousineau, who lives at Gatineau Point, was accidentally drowned in the Kippewa river at the Racket chute about two weeks ago. Both men are unmarried and were between twenty and thirty years of age.

 

HULCHEY - (Toronto) William Hulchey, aged 13, was drowned in the Don to-day while bathing with several companions.

 

STARK - (Chatham) On Tuesday morning while John Stark, aged about 60, of the 7th concession of Chatham township, was driving a horse rake, the horses became frightened and ran away and dragged a considerable distance a portion of the machinery, striking him upon the upper part of his body. The horses were stopped, but Mr. Stark had received fatal injuries. He remained in an unconscious condition until this morning when he died. Mr. Stark was an old and very much respected member of the community and leaves a wife and grown up family.

 

July 11, 1890

 

WETHERALL - Died in this city, on July 8, at his mother's residence, 510 Hughson street north, Harry, youngest son of the late Joseph Lindsay Wetherall, of HMC, in the 23rd year of his age. Funeral on Friday afternoon, at 3:30. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

HANNAFORD - Killed on the Dundas Railway, on Thursday, July 10, Alfred, eldest son of Alfred Hannaford. Funeral will take place on Saturday, July 12, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

There was sorrow instead of joy at the James Street Baptist Church Sunday-school picnic held at Ainslie Park yesterday, owing to an accident which resulted in the death of one of the scholars. Shortly before noon Alfred Hannaford, the 16-year-old son of Alfred Hannaford, 230 Robinson street, left his work for the purpose of going to the picnic. In company with his brother Frank, he went to the corner of Queen and Herkimer streets intending to get on the Hamilton & Dundas train when it passed that spot. It was then about 12:45. The lads stood close to the track, but did not signal the driver to stop. So he concluded that they did not want to get on. Alfred Hannaford waved his hat to some of his companions who were on the train. He tried to get on the third car and in doing so slipped and was thrown under the wheels. The four wheels passed over his right side and crushed him so badly that he died almost immediately.


 When the train was stopped, the poor fellow was tenderly picked up and everything possible done for him, but the life was crushed out of him. His body was not cut except on the left side and the arm was crushed near the shoulder.

The dead boy was taken to his uncle's residence, 232 Robinson street. Mr. Hannaford, his wife, and the other children went to the park earlier in the day and they knew nothing about the sad occurrence until the arrival of the train. They were terribly shocked when they were told that Alfred had been killed. Much sympathy was expressed for them by the officers and teachers of the Sunday school...

 

July 12, 1890

 

LAFOND - (Montreal) A strange and terrible accident took place this morning whereby a little girl, the daughter of Zotique Lafond, lost her life. The child with her sister was sitting on the doorstep at her father's house smoking cigarettes when the clothes of the younger one took fire and she was so severely burned that she died about an hour afterward.

 

KIMPTON - (St. Catharines) About 9 o'clock to-night a lad named Kimpton, about 15 years of age, was drowned while bathing in Lock 6, new canal. He was seized with cramps when a few feet from shore and sank before assistance could be rendered.

 

CHARRON - (Ottawa) About 3 o'clock a body was found floating from the stream of water which runs down from Hardman's mills into the Ottawa just below the Chaudiere falls. Upon examination by the mill hands, it was identified as the remains of young Charron who mysteriously disappeared one afternoon about two months ago while at work in Hardman's sawmill on the Hull side.

 

HAYDEN - (Toronto) J. H. Hayden, aged 89, residing in Toronto for forty-one years who was buried to-day, died on Wednesday at noon from nervous shock through taking carbolic acid in mistake for medicine.

 

JOBIN - (Quebec) Coroner Belleau has received instructions from the attorney-general to exhume the body of Marceline Jobin, an inmate of the Beauport asylum who died suddenly there some time since and was buried without an inquest, he having not been notified. The body will be exhumed this evening and the inquest held to-morrow.

 

July 14, 1890

 

OLMSTED - Died in this city, on Saturday,, the 12th instant, William Herbert Olmsted, youngest son of the late Samuel Nash Olmsted, aged 24 years. Funeral from his mother's residence, 29 Hess street south, on Tuesday, July 15, at 2 p.m.


JOYCE - Died in this city, on Sunday, July 13, Anna Maria, youngest daughter of Michael and Maria Joyce, aged 13 years. The funeral will take place at 3:30 p.m. to-day (Monday) from 193 King street west. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

LOCKHART - (Brighton) The jury empanelled to inquire into the death of Robert Lockhart has returned a verdict that death was caused by a blow delivered by Charles Gerow with a piece of oak scantling on the side of the head on June 26, 1890, at F. C. Miner's blacksmith shop.

 

July 15, 1890

 

COULTER - Died in this city, at the residence of his Sister, Mrs. Owen Lavelle, 135 Maria street, on the 14th instant, William Coulter, in the 57th year of his age. Funeral will leave 135 Maria street on Wednesday morning, the 15th instant, at 8:30 o'clock for St. Patrick's Church, and thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

 

SOMERVILLE - Died suddenly in this city at her parents' residence, Hannah street east, Ella Hogarth, infant daughter of William Somerville, Jr., aged 10 weeks and 4 days. Funeral private.

 

DOYLE - The funeral of the late Mrs. J. Doyle, sister of Rev. John J. Craven of this city, took place yesterday morning from St. Stephen's Church, Cayuga, where a solemn requiem mass was chanted. The celebrant of the mass was Rev. Father Bardon; deacon, Father Crennan; sub-deacon, Father O'Reilly; master of ceremonies, Father Haley. Among the priests present were Fathers Kelly and Madigan. Father McEvay preached a short but appropriate sermon from the text, "It is a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead that they may be loosed from their sins" .

It will be remembered by the friends of Father Craven that it is only a few weeks since he was called upon to witness the death of his mother. A large number of sympathizing friends went from Hamilton yesterday to be present at the funeral.

 

HONEY - (Montreal) John S. Honey, deputy prothonotary, died last night in the 78th year of his age. He had been a prominent and respected figure in legal circles for many years.

 

LAROCQUE - (Montreal) The flag on the city hall is half mast in respect for the memory of Francois Antoine Chartier Alfred Larocque, one of the leading French-Canadians of Montreal who has just died aged 72. He was a man of large fortune and of charitable disposition. He was at one time postmaster of Montreal and alderman. His daughter is the wife of Speaker Ouimet. He was, with the late Archbishop Bourque, one of the founders of the City & District Savings Bank, and was vice-president of that institution at the time of his death.

 

 


CAREFOOT (Collingwood) A young man named Harry Carefoot of this town went to the fishing ground at Squaw Island about a month ago to engage in the fish business. His mother, a widow, received a telegram this morning saying that her son had fallen overboard from a fishing skiff and was drowned. His body has not yet been recovered.

 

July 16, 1890

 

MOWAT - (St. Catharines) On Monday as the C. N. R. train which leaves the city at 9:15 was passing over the crossing at Merritton, a ten-year-old son of Rev. Mr. Mowat of that village received injuries which resulted in his death last evening. The presumption is that last evening, along with another little boy of his own age, he had put some pins on the track, and after the coaches which had the empty flat cars behind them had passed he was venturesome enough to try to remove the pins and was struck on the head by the axle of one of the flat cars and received injuries from which he died.

 

KEEGAN - The hot weather of yesterday tempted many people to seek coolness on the waters of Hamilton bay, and during the afternoon a very sad drowning accident was reported. A young moulder named John Keegan, 22 years of age, went out on one of Jutten's yachts with Ben Mulvale, A. O'Neil, George Dennison and George Henchey. While opposite Brown's wharf across the bay, about 1:40 p.m., Keegan's hat went overboard, and Henchey who had most of his clothes off jumped in after it. Keegan followed him, but when he plunged into the water he sank to the bottom and was not seen again. His companions stayed about the spot for some time but could see nothing of him, and finally came over and notified the police.

The deceased man was 22 years of age and unmarried. He worked at Williams & Co's foundry on Hughson street. His family live on Macaulay street.

Up to a late hour last evening a large number of boats were at the scene of the accident, grappling for the body, but it was not recovered.

 

July 17, 1890

 

KEEGAN - Drowned in Hamilton bay, on Tuesday afternoon, John Keegan, second son of William and Ann Keegan, aged 20.

 

SIMMONS - Died at her residence, 139 Markland street, July 16, Anna, widow of the late Martin Simmons, aged 74 years. Funeral Thursday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock.

 

FAIRBAIRN - Died in Buffalo, on July 15, Mrs. Robert Fairbairn, eldest daughter of James Fagan, formerly of this city.


MCCAWLEY - Died in this city, on July 15, at 161 Wilson street, William T. McCawley, in his 26th year. Funeral Thursday morning at 8:30 o'clock.

Many will learn with regret of the death of William McCawley which took place yesterday at his late residence, Wilson street. Mr. McCawley held a civil service position in the post-office department in this city and earned the reputation of being a trustworthy and intelligent official. He contracted the prevailing grip in January and resumed his duties too soon, He took a relapse which turned to consumption and caused his death.

 

PROVAN - Died at St. Paul, Minn, on July 15, Daisy, only child of David and Fanny Provan, aged 5 years. Funeral from the residence of Mrs. Provan's brother, A. Cross, 277 John street north, on Friday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

JAGOE - Died at his residence, 24 Stinson street, John J. Jagoe, a native of Dunmanway, county of Cork, Ireland, youngest son of the late Capt. J. Jagoe, of Her Majesty's 32nd Regiment. Funeral will leave his late residence, on Saturday, July 19, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ROSE - (Toronto) Rev. Dr. Samuel Rose, one of the leading figures in the Methodist Church for the last half century, died this morning at the age of 86, after a long illness.

 

PRATT - (St. Catharines) Robert Pratt was killed while felling timber on the Misener farm between Welland and Port Robinson at 8 o'clock Tuesday morning.

 

CAMPBELL - (Toronto) The funeral of James Campbell took place to-day from the residence of J. Herbert Mason to the necropolis.

 

GRAHAM - (Toronto) The remains of the late John Graham were interred in St. James cemetery this afternoon, the funeral being largely attended by members of the Orange Order and others. Rev. J. P. Lewis conducted the services and Mayor Clarke read the Orange funeral service.

 

July 18, 1890

 

KEEGAN - Drowned in Hamilton bay, on Tuesday afternoon, John Keegan, second son of William and Ann Keegan, aged 20 years. Funeral will leave his parents' residence, 152 Macaulay street east, on Friday, July 18, at 8:30 a.m. to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

JAMIESON - Died at 14 Jones street, on July 17, Patrick Jamieson.in his 91st year. Funeral Friday at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

 


WILLIAMS - Walter Williams, 22 years of age, son of John Williams, a farmer on the lake shore near Winona, was drowned on Wednesday, and the only surviving son of the Hagar family of Grimsby was gallantly rescued from a singular fate by William Barnes, son of Thomas Barnes of East Hamilton.

The three young men found a flat-bottomed scow and during the evening they launched it for a paddle on the lake. When about two hundred yards out from the shore, Walter Williams tried to strike a match and the scow being very cranky, gave a lurch and upset. Williams was a good swimmer and struck out for shore which he had almost reached when he suddenly sank. The body was found shortly after in six or eight feet of water quite close to the shore. It is surmised that the sudden plunge into the cool water of the lake produced cramp.

Meanwhile young Barnes got hold of Herbert Hagar who could not swim and succeeded in placing him on the end of the scow. Barnes then got at the other end and by swimming and shoving the boat before him, succeeded eventually in reaching shore. Mr. Hagar, the father of the boy, came up from Grimsby on Wednesday and thanked young Barnes for saving the boy's' life. Herbert Hagar is his only surviving boy. One son was killed by a wagon and another was drowned about a week ago while bathing in the lake near Grimsby as reported at the time.

Young Barnes and a son of R. R. Morgan are camping on the lake shore near Winona.

 

July 19, 1890

 

LEMIEUX - (Ottawa) Joseph E. Lemieux, a clerk in the Agricultural Department, was drowned in the Ottawa river to-day. He went gathering driftwood. His hat was picked up soon afterward. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

SEYMOUR - (Quebec) The body of the late Gen. Seymour arrived here early yesterday morning by the Quebec Central Railway and having been met by the relatives of the deceased, was immediately removed to the Mount Hermon cemetery.

 

July 21, 1890

 

HANLON - Died in this city, at the residence, 23 Hess street north, on the 20th instant, Jane, beloved wife of Patrick Hanlon, aged 68 years and 7 months.

 

CARROLL - Died at 232 Bold street, on July 18, Ethel May, infant daughter of Matthew and Maggie Carroll, aged 13 months. Funeral on Monday afternoon, at 4 o'clock.


CRAWFORD - Died on July 19, at 201 Robinson street, William, only son of the late W. G. Crawford, in his 31st year. Funeral on Monday, July 21, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

WALTON - Died in this city, July 19, infant son of Nelson and Robina Walton, aged 4 months. Funeral Monday, July 21, at 10 a.m. from his parents' residence, 37 Oxford street. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

FORSTER - Died in this city, at the residence of his father, William Forster, 26 Liberty street, on July 19, Harry C. Forster, in the 22nd year of his age. Funeral on Monday, July 21, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

WEAVER - Died at his father's residence, No 66 Hess street north, on July 19, Orton Weaver, aged 21 years. Funeral Monday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ROWE - (Toronto) William Rowe, better known as "Paddy Rats ", died yesterday of consumption after six months' illness. He was one of the most notorious of tough characters of Toronto. Rev. John Pearson attended his death bed.

 

July 23, 1890

 

BILTON - Died in this city, on July 22, Mrs. H. W. Bilton, aged 50 years. Funeral will leave her son's residence, 83 Wilson street, on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

ROBERTSHAW - (Woodstock) John Robertshaw, a well known citizen of Woodstock, about 10 o'clock last night swallowed a spoonful of arsenic, evidently with the intention of ending his life. He refused to have a doctor and lay vomiting and suffering until about three o'clock this morning when Dr. Odium was called in. The doctor worked hard to save the man's life, but without success. Robertshaw died this evening. Domestic troubles and financial difficulty are said to be the causes of the deed.

 

CANTWELL - (Ottawa) Joseph Cantwell, aged 11, was drowned last evening while bathing with several companions near the Chaudiere falls.

 

DEMPSEY - (Windsor) George E. Dempsey, a coloured man, committed suicide by jumping off the ferry "Victoria" last evening while the boat was on her trip from Detroit to Windsor. He was 27 years old and leaves a widow and two small children.

 

GOUVERNEAU - (Ottawa) Jean Gouverneau, aged 20 years of this city, was drowned to-day while fishing at McLauren's bay, twelve miles from here.


July 22, 1890

 

HANLON - (St. John) A lad named Hugh Hanlon was drowned this morning while bathing off Barrack Point. Two companions made efforts to save him but without avail. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

ENRIGHT - (Toronto) Michael Enright, aged 19, brother of Conrad Enright the well known oarsman who was entered to row at Lachine next month, was drowned this evening at six o'clock in the Don river near the mouth. He was in a shell and it is supposed that the boat upset, and his feet being tangled in the straps of the boat, he was unable to right it or swim, and was drowned.

 

July 25, 1890

 

RODDY - (Omemee) John Roddy, a 12-year-old son of Samuel Roddy, Peirs Mills, was kicked to death to-day by a horse which he was leading from pasture.

 

BOISVERT - (Quebec) The body found at St. Nicholas on Sunday has been identified as that of Amede Boisvert, aged 28 years, of Becancour, who was drowned while crossing the St. Lawrence at Three Rivers on March 18 last. Coroner Belleau held an inquest when a verdict of 'found drowned' was returned.

 

HAY - (Toronto) Robert Hay, ex-M.P. for Toronto, died to-day at 2:30 p.m. after a short illness. Deceased was in his 84th year and was long a prominent citizen of Toronto. He was a Conservative and was elected first in 1878 and retired in 1887.

 

OLIVER - (Halifax) News has just reached St. John's Nfld. of a fearful crime committed at Big Brook, Stag Bay, on the 4th of May last. The details of the horrible tragedy are: At Big Brook lived a man named Thomas Oliver with his wife and five children. On Sunday he told his son that he saw some partridges across the river and that he had better go out and hunt for them, and if they were not there, he could go further on. Oliver then took off his shirt and gave it to the lad saying it was better than the one he had on. He also sent his wife and daughter in the same direction to pick wild tea. Oliver then took his Bible and lay down on the bed. Before leaving, his wife took her infant of six months and placed it on the bed to sleep along with her husband. When on the ice about half way across the brook she heard the report of a gun and looking around saw the dogs running from the door, but no doubt thinking that nothing was wrong, she continued her journey. After she and her daughter has gathered all the tea required, they returned home. Here the poor mother and daughter beheld a sickening sight. On the floor was the baby she had left peacefully sleeping with its father. There seemed to be little life in it, but on taking it up,


she discovered that the little head was battered almost to pieces. The next sight that met her horrified gaze was the body of her daughter, a girl 11 years old, in a sitting position on the floor with her head fearfully mangled, in fact literally beaten to pieces, while across her legs lay a boy, aged 6 years, with his head almost split open, but still alive and moaning. The poor fellow lived till sunset. She next discovered the body of her husband stretched on the floor behind the door with a gun grasped in both hands in the grip of death. A bullet hole through the head, and one eye in ghastly horror hanging on the cheek told the tale of his death.

The distracted mother after waiting till the boy died, ran to Seal Cove Point, a distance of three miles, where her nearest neighbours, a family named Coves, lived and told her awful story. They buried the victims near the house in which the crime was committed, placing the gun on the murderer's coffin. The children were killed with an axe.

 

July 26, 1890

 

WILLIAMS - Died at St. Anns, Nelson township, on July 24, Stephen Williams, aged 87 years. Funeral from the residence of his son, Stephen Williams, Barton, on Saturday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

CARLE - Died suddenly at West Flamborough, on July 24, Mary Agnes, beloved wife of Peter Carle, aged 46 years. Funeral from her late residence, 172 James street north, on Sunday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Mary A. Carle, wife of Peter Carle, 172 James street north, died very unexpectedly Thursday evening. She had been troubled with consumption and went on a visit to her mother-in-law in West Flamborough, Her illness was not considered serious. During the night after she retired, she took a fit of coughing and died in a few minutes. The body was brought here for burial.

 

LOCKHART - (Stratford) During a thunderstorm at noon to-day Miss Aggie Lockhart, daughter of George Lockhart, living two miles north of this place, was instantly killed by lightning while berry picking.

 

July 28, 1890

 

NEWANS - Died at 615 King street east, Thomas, son of C. M. and Amelia Minnie Newans, aged 3 months and 3 days. Funeral took place on Sunday at 2:30 o'clock.

 

LITTLE - Died at 19 Victoria avenue south, on Saturday, July 26, Harvard Graeme, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Little, aged 3 months and 7 days. Funeral private.


BOSWELL - Died at 134 East avenue north, G. A. Boswell, aged 38 years. Funeral on Tuesday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ROWLAND - Edward Rowland, a prisoner who was serving a sentence of ninety days in the county jail, died shortly after midnight Friday night. He was a familiar figure at the police court and was in jail for the twenty-eighth time. He was a well educated man and was ruined by whiskey. When he was brought before the magistrate he used to talk quite eloquently for his liberty. His glib tongue frequently got him out of trouble as the magistrate took pity on the old fellow. He was an expert penman and used to write his name to convince the constable that he was not drunk. When he got hard up for money to buy whiskey, he used to steal small articles and dispose of them at some pawnshop. He was convicted of drunkenness oftener than for any other offence.

Rowland was 70 years old. He was a little man, very peculiar looking, having only one eye. No matter what happened to him he was always happy and used to delight in telling funny stories. The last time he was before the magistrate he was sentenced to ninety days in jail for being drunk. On Friday he appeared to be in good health. One of the turnkeys told him that the price of whiskey had been raised in Toronto. "Well", said he, "we will have to do like they did in Maine shortly after the war. When whiskey went up they used to take turns in going to Nova Scotia for whiskey. You would go over and get a drink one day and let me smell your breath when you got back and I would go over the next day and let him have a smell when I returned". Governor Ogilvie saw Rowland at 7 o'clock.

When the turnkeys were going their rounds at 11 o'clock, they found the old man very ill. Everything possible was done for him, but he died an hour afterward.

An inquest was held at noon on Saturday before coroner Woolverton and a jury. Six of the jurors were prisoners. Evidence was given by the jail surgeon, the turnkeys and Governor Ogilvie. The verdict was that Rowland died from heart failure.

 

SHEWAN - (Listowel) A most horrifying accident on Saturday last caused the painful and terrible death of Mrs. William Shewan, an old Mornington pioneer. Mr. and Mrs. Shewan, an aged couple, were living alone about two miles and a half down the boundary on a farm lately purchased by James Beaton, brother of the deceased. By some unknown means the barn situated not far from the dwelling house took fire between two and three o'clock on Saturday afternoon and the flames spread rapidly.

When the alarm was given, Shewan succeeded in releasing and removing a horse and attempted to untie the cow. Not succeeding he went to the house for a knife to cut the rope. Meanwhile Mrs. Shewan got the animal loose and out as far as the door. Frightened by the flames which were blazing about the door, the cow could not be got past and the old lady unfortunately in her


excitement, not realizing her great danger, stayed too long and when she rushed through the blazing door, her clothing was a mass of flames. Her horrified husband was unable to free her at once from her burning clothes and only subdued the fatal fire by drenching her with water. Her head and body were terribly burned and it is probable that the hot air and smoke breathed in the burning building injured her internally. She lingered from about 3 o'clock suffering awful agony until death came to her relief about noon on Sunday. She remained conscious until 3 o'clock on Sunday morning when her condition was recognized as completely hopeless and an opiate administered to deaden the pain.

She was a lady held in highest respect and her terrible death created a universally deep feeling of sympathy for her suffering. The deceased Mrs. Ann Shewan was the third child of Peter Beaton of Peterhead, Aberdeenshire, Scotland where she was born in the year 1817, being thus in her 74th year at the time of her death. She was married to William Shewan in Peterhead in 1840, and came to Canada with her husband in 1846, settling first in the township of Pickering where they remained a few years. They came to the township of Mornington early in the fifties and have lived in this neighbourhood ever since.

They have had but one child born to them, it dying in infancy. Of her father's family of six, but two are living, James Beaton of Listowel and an older sister in Scotland. Her remains were followed to the old cemetery by a long procession of neighbours. Her death is one of the saddest which have occurred in this community.

 

TOBIN - (Campbellford) Yesterday afternoon a boy named Dennis Tobin, aged nine years, was on a boom in the river. His mother, standing on shore, saw him and called him to come away, and in trying to do so, his foot caught a pin in the boom. He lost his balance and fell in, and was drowned in full view of his mother who rushed out to go after him but was held back by neighbours.

 

WHITE - (St. Catharines) A little boy named Taylor of Detroit, about eight years of age, visiting at his grandfather's near Barnsdale, below St. Catharines, was playing with a little girl, the nine-year-old daughter of W. J. White, an employee in the axe factory, and became possessed of a loaded gun which in some manner went off, the charge taking effect in the girl's neck, causing her death almost instantly. The little fellow became so frightened at the result of his act that he ran away and as yet has not turned up.

The little boy, Ed Taylor, who accidentally shot Maudie White was after two hours' search found by the neighbours hiding in the top of an apple tree. It appears several children were on a patch picking berries and playing about when little Eddie got an old gun. He was pulling at the trigger and cried out, "Maudie White, take care of you'll get hurt". Just then the gun discharged blowing little Maudie's head almost off.


BRETT - (Belleville) William Brett, an old resident of Foxboro, was struck and instantly killed by a train on the Grand Trunk junction near that place yesterday afternoon. Deceased who was about 70 year of age was very deaf and failed to hear the whistle which vas blown.

 

MCGRATH - (Arnprior)  Joseph N. McGrath, a wandering tailor hailing from the vicinity of Toronto, was drowned in the Madawaska river at this place last night. He had been in town but a week and was under the influence of liquor when he fell into the water. The body was recovered about an hour afterward.

 

THOMPSON - (Niagara Falls) Dr. A. Thompson who came here on Wednesday last with his wife and opened a drugstore at Lundy's block dropped off his chair in the rear of the store where he had been sitting talking with his wife about 5 o'clock and expired in a few minutes. Heart disease was the cause of death. The deceased was 50 years of age and had hardly finished fitting up his store. The doctor was formerly located in the village of Middleport, Brant county, Ontario.

 

July 29, 1890

 

JOY - Died at her residence, Holy Sepulchre cemetery farm, on July 27, Kate, eldest daughter of Edward Joy, G.T.R.;, in the 21st year of her age. Interment at 4 o'clock p.m. on Tuesday. Friends will please accept this intimation. Those wishing to attend can go and return by steamer "Maggie Mason".

 

CHURCH - Died at 110 Cathcart street, on July 28, Arthur Alexander, son of Alexander and Susan Church, aged 6 months and 21 days. Funeral takes place Tuesday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

EVANS - (Strathroy) About 9 o'clock this morning a most frightful accident happened to a little boy in Buttler's knitting mills, Victoria street. The unfortunate lad was Bruce, a seven-year-old boy of John H. Evans. The little fellow wandered into the mill with his companion, Mr. Buttler's boy, and noticing some wool hanging on a cotton picker in motion, began pulling it out. It is thought the sharp hooks on the teeth of the cylinder caught his sleeve while reaching forward, and drew him in. The arm was mangled and torn to pieces as far up as the shoulder, his breast near the heart was badly cut, and his side torn open as that the entrails were exposed. Dr. A. Thomson, who was summoned, amputated the arm and dressed the wounds, but pronounced the boy beyond recovery. He died about 2 o'clock this afternoon and will be buried at 4 o'clock to-morrow.

 

HOLMES - (Windsor) John Holmes, butcher, aged 49 years, died yesterday in Windsor lock-up where he had been placed Saturday night on complaint that he was insane. When arrested at


J. Montague's residence, Holmes was in a bedroom where two children were asleep and imagining he was in the slaughter house, was rolling up his sleeves preparatory to killing the children whom he imagined were calves or sheep.

 

July 30, 1890

 

MCMASTER  - Died at Colorado Springs, on Tuesday, July 29, William, eldest son of John McMaster, of Aylmer, formerly of Hamilton, in the 28th year of his age.

 

GODCHAUD - Died in this city, on July 28, at the residence of her son-in-law, S. B. Roos, 187 King street east, Mrs. Samuel Godchaud of Baltimore, Md. Funeral takes place from above address, on Wednesday, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

LONGPRÉ - (Montreal) A. B. Longpré, prothonotary of the superior court, died to-night rather suddenly aged 48.

 

O'BRIEN - (St. Catharines) Con O'Brien, who attempted to commit suicide a few days ago by taking laudanum who was saved by the doctor, suicided in jail last night by hanging. Deceased was 66 years of age and leaves a wife and seven children.

 

FRASER - (Halifax) A man named Archie Fraser was struck by a rake on one of the slopes of the Stellarton mines yesterday and almost instantly killed.

 

August 2, 1890

 

KINGDON - Died in this city, on July 31, at 214 Main street east, Wary, Beloved wife of James Kingdon, aged 54 years. Funeral will take place from the above address on Saturday, August 2, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

LENZ - Died in Bartonville, on July 31, George W. Lenz, son of George and Lucy Lenz, aged 5 years and 5 months.

 

NELLIGAN - Died in this city, on August 1, Margaret Nelligan, widow of the late Capt. John Nelligan, in the 66th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, 387 Hughson street north, at 8:30 Monday morning.

The death is recorded of Mrs. Margaret Nelligan, widow of the late Capt John Nelligan, who peacefully passed away last evening in the 66th year of her age. The deceased lady was stricken with paralysis four years ago and had been confined to her bed from that time till her demise. Mrs. Nelligan came from Tallow, county Waterford, to Hamilton in 1843, having previously resided in Kingston for three years. Two sons, Michael D., carriage maker, and John, leader of the opera house orchestra, and one daughter survive the old lady.


Mrs. Nelligan has been a devoted adherent of St. Mary's Cathedral during the years mentioned and the funeral will take place from that church on Monday morning at 8:30 o'clock.

 

REESOR, ANDERSON - (Niagara) Two ladies were drowned yesterday in the river at  Youngstown, N.Y. Mrs. Reesor, her sister, Miss Anderson, and Mr. Reesor went bathing and the two ladies got beyond their depth and lost their lives. Mr. Reesor is a school teacher near Woodstock, Ontario. They were visiting Mr. Reesor's father at Youngstown.

 

FOOTE - (Montreal) Samuel B. Foote, proprietor and editor of the "Shareholder", died last evening at his residence on Metcalfe street.

 

BETHUNE - (Gravenhurst) A. O. Bethune, who has been running a steamer called the "Dewdrop" on the Muskoka road for many years, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor while in bed this morning. He was addicted to drink.

 

BAUGHMAN - (Lakefield) Rev. F. W. Baughman of Bowmanville was drowned at Stoney Lake while bathing this morning. His body was recovered in about two hours. The body was taken to Bowmanville by train this evening.

 

August 4, 1890

 

CARROLL - (Windsor) An eleven-year-old boy named Carroll, living on Mercer street, was drowned last evening. He was watering a horse when the animal stumbled and threw him into the water. The boy could not swim.

 

TALLIENERE - (Windsor) Mrs Roderge Tallienere, wife of a resident of Tecumseh, is dead after having fasted for forty-three days.

 

LYNCH - (Hagersville) Yesterday at an early hour as Mrs. Lynch, wife of one of our leading merchants, together with her four little girls and her two sisters, the Misses Murphy of Cayuga, were driving into town from the last named place, the horse became frightened and shied to one side, tipping the carriage over into a deep ditch. The horse, finding himself unable to rise, began to kick. Mrs. Lynch and two of the little girls received several blows about the head. One little girl, Zita, aged three years, received a severe kick just over the left eye and died in a few minutes. The rest of the party, although badly shaken up, are in a fair way to recovery.

 

SHANAHAN - (Toronto) Rev. Father Shanahan, Roman Catholic priest of Merritton, died in Chicago yesterday. The funeral takes place at St. Paul's church on Monday morning.

 

BRADT - Another sad drowning accident occurred about 12 o'clock yesterday. Mal, or as he was


called, 'Slick' Bradt was employed as a ploughman by contractor Nicholson who has the contract for building the Grand Trunk spur line at the Beach. He went out bathing in the lake near Capt. Armstrong's hotel where he boarded with young Nicholson, son of his employer. Neither of them could swim. Bradt ventured out too far and when he found himself sinking he called to Nicholson for help. The latter was unable to swim and could not give his companion any help, but he threw a board, thinking that Bradt could save himself, but he could not reach it, and the unfortunate man was drowned before assistance could arrive. The young men were not more than twenty-five feet from the shore.

Capt. Armstrong went out into the lake and recovered the body. Bradt was about 27 years old and lived in St. Catharines. He was married, and his wife, being on a visit to her sister in Buffalo. Word was sent to his relatives in St. Catharines and It is likely that the body will be sent there.

Coroner Woolverton was notified and after hearing the circumstances, he decided that no inquest was necessary.

 

BUTLER - (Toronto) A young man, Thomas Butler, who was under treatment by Dr. Wallwin, died in his office this afternoon while being attended. Two other physicians were called in, but too late to save his life. An inquest will be held to-morrow.

 

August 5, 1890

 

GRANGER - Died at Burlington, on August 3, Edith G., only daughter of Harry and Caroline Granger, of 83 Caroline street north, Hamilton, in the 20th year of her age. Funeral from the residence of her grandfather, Jacob Cline, on Tuesday, August 5, at 2 p.m., to Greenwood cemetery, Burlington. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

JUSCKISCH - (Hanover) A young lad named Jusckisch, thirteen years of age, was drowned in the Saugeen river this afternoon while bathing.

 

HALLEE - (Quebec) A wealthy farmer named Francois Hallee of the parish of Notre Dame de Levis dropped dead just as he reached home from market on Saturday. The deputy-coroner held an inquest.

 

August 6, 1890

 

PETTIGREW - Died in east Hamilton, at the residence of her grandfather, Robert Hunter, Ida street, Marian, infant child of Robert C. and Fannie Pettigrew, aged 5 months. Funeral will leave her parents' residence, 80 Wellington street north, at 3 o'clock, on Wednesday, August 6. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.


DOWNS - Died at his late residence, 125 Steven street, on August 5, Daniel Downs, in the 65th year of his age. Funeral Wednesday, August 6, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

YULE - (Toronto) William Yule, 22 years of age, was drowned while bathing in the Don river near Todmorton, on Sunday afternoon. He was a labourer to Robert Davies, Thorncliffe Farm, and was not many months out from England.

 

BARRETT - (Halifax) A man named Barrett of Beaver Bank, who has been suffering with consumption for some time, took a walk to his barn situated some distance from the house and while there took a weak turn. No person being near at hand, he found a piece of paper and feebly wrote to his friends that he felt he was dying. He also wrote asking that he be buried at Sackville on the coming Sunday and made other requests in reference to himself. He was missed from the house and upon some members of the family going to the barn, they found him lifeless. In his hand he had the paper which he had written his last requests upon.

 

WEARTON - (Halifax) A girl named Wearton, walking from the river Hebert to her home at Joggins through the woods, took a pipe from her mouth and while it was still lighted placed it in one of her pockets which happened to contain several matches. The fire from the pipe ignited the matches and set her clothing on fire. She started on a run with her clothes on fire and her sister who was with her could not catch her till she dropped exhausted some three-quarters of a mile from their house. The sister extinguished the fire, getting her own hands badly burned in so doing. The run in the wind had fanned the flames and the girl was so badly burned that she died next day.

 

MCDUFF - (Montreal) A drunken man named Guerin entered a neighbour's house last night and attacked the wife of constable McDuff. She was prematurely confined as a result of the fright, and to-day both she and her child are dead. Guerin was arrested.

 

CAPRON - (Princeton) This afternoon Chauncey Capron of Paris left Henry Bros' brickyard with a load of brick. He called at a store in the village and purchased a lunch, then went on the 2nd concession of Blenheim where he was seen by B. Howe and T. C. Costin of Princeton. Returning again at 6 o'clock they saw his team standing still on the road, and on reaching it found him lying just behind the wagon. On examining him they found that life was extinct, the wagon having passed over his arm and chest, breaking the arm and crushing in several ribs. The body was removed to the undertaking establishment of J. H. Swartz of Princeton and will be taken care of by the Order of Foresters of which deceased was a member.


KIRCHNER - (Niagara Falls) A man thought to be Jacob Kirchner, cigar dealer of Brantford, Ontario, has it is supposed committed suicide here. His coat, vest, and Derby hat were found in Prospect Park this afternoon. A man wearing the coat asked for a drink at the park lunch houses yesterday afternoon, saying that he was broke, and being refused, said he was going over the falls. Memoranda of $300.44 worth of notes coming due were found in the pockets along with $163 in money.

 

August 7, 1890

 

BOULTBEE - Died at Waterdown rectory, on August 5, at 11 p.m., Rev. Arthur Boultbee. Funeral Friday at Waterdown church, at 10 a.m.

Rev. Arthur Boultbee, the rector of the Anglican church, Waterdown, died on Tuesday night. He was a brother of Mr. Boultbee, ex-MP.  He had not been long connected with the Waterdown church, having come from Cayuga.

 

METCALFE - Died on August 6, at 134 Locke street south, James Chittleburg, youngest son of George and Cecelia Metcalfe, aged 1 year and 6 months. Funeral from above address, on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

SAWYER - (Niagara Falls) Leonard Sawyer, the 14-year-old son of Leonard Sawyer of Suspension Bridge, was drowned while bathing in the river below the falls. In company with his brother, William, and another boy, he went in swimming at the old 'Maid of the Mist' landing. After remaining in the water some time, he became exhausted. His brother jumped into the water and caught him as he was sinking. They went down together once and were going down again, when to save his own life the older brother was compelled to release his hold. Immediately upon being released from his brother's grasp, the boy sank from sight.

 

CHEESEBORO - (Parkhill) Today while a special through freight in charge of Conductor Thompson from Stratford was moving at about twenty-five miles an hour, it struck a horse owned by W. R. Croul and was thrown from the track about four miles west of here. The fireman, named Cheeseboro of St. Thomas was killed. Engineer George Rowland who stood at his post miraculously escaped with slight injuries. The engine and eight cars are a total wreck. Two auxiliary trains are clearing away the wreck which will likely be finished by morning.

 

August 8, 1890

 

NEFF - Died in Barton, on the 7th instant, Mary, relict of the late Abraham Neff, aged 80 years. Funeral from the old homestead, Barton, on Sunday at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.


GAGNON - (Ottawa) Shortly after one o'clock to-day Joseph Gagnon, a hand on Gilmour's raft, fell overboard, was sucked under the raft, and rose no more. A large search party has been after his body without success.

 

YULE - (Prescott) a young man named George Yule, a brakeman, was killed near here to-day on the Canadian Pacific Railway, The deceased was struck in the back of the neck by the iron stringer of the bridge. Death was instantaneous. The deceased lived at Gananoque and was 26 years of age.

 

August 9, 1890

 

GRAHAM - Died in this city, on the 8th instant, Eveline E. Graham, widow of the late Samuel Graham. Funeral from her late residence, 181 Jackson street east, on Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.

 

ROUNDS - (Welland) Fred Rounds, a farmer, was killed near here to-day by his horses backing the binder on him, the seat having broken, throwing him off.

 

KENNEDY - (St. Catharines) At ten minutes past 12 o'clock a tailor named T. S. Kennedy who lives in Thorold deliberately jumped from the bridge crossing into the waste waterway in front of the Merritton cotton mills. He floated on the surface for about twenty yards and then disappeared. At this writing his body has not been recovered. Kennedy was probably under the influence of liquor at the time. He leaves a family in Thorold.

 

August 11, 1890

 

MORRIS - Died at the residence of Thomas Forwood, Toronto, on August 10, Ada Morris, eldest daughter of Lewis Morris of this city, aged 25 years. Funeral from her parents' residence, King street east of Burlington street, to-morrow (Tuesday) at 3:30 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

 

August 12, 1890

 

BROWN - Died in this city, on August 10, at her late residence, 130 Ferguson avenue, Rachael, beloved wife of William J. Brown, aged 36 years. Funeral on Tuesday, August 12, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

TWEEDLE - Died at Stony Creek, on Monday, the 13th instant, Deborah Maria Tweedle, widow of the late Bernard Tweedle, in the 80th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence to Kerr's church, Caistor, at 10:30 on Wednesday, the 13th instant.

Mrs. Deborah Tweedle, who died yesterday, was born near Tapleytown on June 5, 1811. Her maiden name was Deborah Maria Soules, and in 1841, she married Bernard Tweedle.


She was the mother of eight children, seven of whom survive her: John Tweedle, Caistor; Archibald Tweedle, Flamborough; Joseph Tweedle, Saltfleet; Benjamin Tweedle, Beamsville; Mrs. E. F. Saydor, Mrs. W. Cable, and Mrs. N. Reid. Mrs. Tweedle was a member of the Methodist church for fifty years.

 

JARVIS - Died in this city, at 465 York street, Jane, only daughter, of John Henry and Annie Jarvis, aged 4 months and 1 day. Funeral on Tuesday, August 12, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

HAMBURG - (Toronto) James Hamburg, a bricklayer who boarded at 154 Spadina avenue, died suddenly of heart disease in the Benedict billiard hall on Yonge street at noon to-day. He had been playing pool for about half an hour when he suddenly fell forward on his face. His friends picked him up and sent for a couple of doctors, but life was extinct. Hamburg recently returned from British Columbia and has been out of work for some time.

 

WOODALL - (Toronto) H. W. Woodall, an employee of Ralph, Smith, & Co, died at his residence, 125 Mutual street, on Saturday of heart disease. He spent the day with his family at Howard Park and on returning complained of being unwell. A doctor was sent for but half an hour after complaining, Woodall passed away.

 

CAMPBELL - (Montreal) Mrs. Campbell, a lady from Hocock, a small place near Montreal, committed suicide at the new Protestant hospital for the insane. Mrs. Campbell, who was suffering from a mild form of suicidal mania, by some means succeeded in getting possession of some carbolic acid and took a large dose which proved fatal.

 

O'REILLY - Died at his residence, 'The Willows' on Monday, August 11, Miles O'Reilly, Q.C., Master of the Supreme Court, and formerly Judge of the district of Gore, in the 85th year of his age. Funeral private.

One of Hamilton's oldest and most venerable citizens in the person of Judge O'Reilly, passed away from this life at half past three o'clock yesterday morning in the 85th year of his age. Deceased had been confined to bed for several weeks, but was not suffering from any specific disease - a natural decay of the vital powers gradually leading up to dissolution. J. R. O'Reilly, master-in-chancery, son of Judge O'Reilly saw on Saturday that the end approached and sent for the absent members of the family and they were present at the bedside of deceased on Sunday.

Judge O'Reilly's death severs another link of the chain which binds the present of Hamilton to its past. How much of the growth and advancement of the city in wealth, population, and importance he has witnessed may be realized from the fact that his residence here has covered a period of sixty years, he first lived in a house on King street, the site of which is now occupied by


A. Murray & Co's drygoods house and the garden attached extended to Rebecca street. There was only one other house on the block in those days. At that time a row of natural forest trees extended along the centre of King street where umbrageous shelter from the hot sun's rays under trees of more recent growth is now occupied in Gore Park. In 1832 Mr. O'Reilly bought the house on Catherine street south known as 'The Willows' from John Randall, a schoolmaster whom police magistrate Cahill succeeded in pedagogic duties, and occupied it at the time of his death. In that house ex-mayor J. E. O'Reilly was born.

The late Judge Miles O'Reilly was born at Stamford, near Niagara Falls, on May 18, 1806. Shortly afterward his parents moved to the township of Nelson. Subsequently they moved to a farm on the banks of the Twelve-Mile creek near St. Ann's station on the Northern and Northwestern Railway. Deceased received the greater portion of his education at the Niagara grammar school. After passing the examinations at Osgoode Hall in 1822, he entered upon study of the law in the office of the late John Breakenridge in the old town of Niagara. His fellow student was the late Justice Burns. Upon the death of Mr. Breakenridge in 1828, Mr. O'Reilly went to Toronto (then Little York) and finished his law studies in the office of Baldwin & Bros, the senior member of the firm being the late Robert Baldwin.

He was called to the Bar in Trinity term, 1830, and removed to Hamilton where through his sound knowledge of law and his natural brilliancy, he soon secured an extensive practice. He was one of Sir Allan MacNab's 'men of Gore' who quenched the insurrectionary flame at Montgomer's tavern near Toronto. Hamilton was the centre of great excitement at that time and Mr. O'Reilly was one of the first to shoulder his musket and go forth to the battle against William Lyon Mackenzie's rebel forces. Shortly after the close of the rebellion Mr. O'Reilly was retained to defend unassisted 106 of the rebels who had been captured and were to be tried for treason before the late Chief Justice Macaulay.

The prisoners were confined in the old jail and court house which stood on the same site as does the present court house in Prince's Square. The counsel for the Crown were the late Chief Justice Draper and the late Sir Allan Napier MacNab. Though public feelings were highly strained at the time and though the prosecution was conducted with marked ability, the remarkable fact remains that not one of the whole number was convicted of the highest offence. The trial lasted for two months and during that time some remarkable scenes were witnessed in the court house. The learned judge at the close paid Mr. O'Reilly an elaborate compliment on the ability and zeal with which he had conducted the case.

On February 7, Mr. O'Reilly was appointed judge of the district court of the district of Gore, then embracing Wentworth, Halton, and Brant, and portions of Waterloo, Wellington, and Haldimand. In 1853 he resigned that office and returned to practice in the courts, taking charge for a short time of the legal department of the Great Western Railway company whose affairs were then considerably embarrassed. Mr. O'Reilly was instrumental in bringing the affairs of the company


 back to a prosperous and satisfactory condition. Mr. O'Reilly was the oldest barrister in Ontario and the oldest Queen's Counsel (excepting Sir John A. Macdonald). He was elevated to the bench in 1837 as a judge of the Gore District, succeeding the late Judge Taylor and was consequently the oldest judge in the Dominion. He held a commission as colonel of Militia and has been Master-in-Chancery for nineteen years. Mr. O'Reilly's family consists of Major O'Reilly, ex-mayor of Hamilton, also a master of the supreme count of Hamilton; the late Dr. O'Reilly, of Paris; Mrs. S. E. Gregory, of Hamilton; and Mrs. Macadam (deceased), late wife of P. H. Macadam, civil engineer, late of India. Mrs. O'Reilly is the second daughter of the late James Racey, formerly of Mount Pleasant, Brant county.

Mr. O'Reilly made an excellent judge. His quick and accurate insight, his command of legal principles, and his wide information endued him with the highest capacity for judicial administration. Among those who studied with Mr. O'Reilly were the late S. B. Freeman, barrister; Judge Davis; and Judge Woods, of Chatham.

At Trinity term, 1880, when deceased had arrived at the 50th anniversary of his call to the Bar, he was presented with a handsome service of plate and an address signed by the members of the Bar of Wentworth county. The presentation was made in Hamilton court house.

Judge O'Reilly was an indefatigable worker in the years preceding the encroachment of old age, it being a common practice with him to take his papers home with him and sit up until two or three o'clock in the morning in his study, poring over them. He early made a reputation for himself as a special pleader which none of his compeers could surpass.

Both of Judge O'Reilly's grandfathers were U.E. loyalists who fled from the United States at the close of the American revolution. During the war they fought on Britain's side and lost all their earthly possessions.

 

August 13, 1890

 

FORSTER - Died at the residence of his grandfather, Thomas Blair, Glenelg, Ontario, on August 11, George Forster, aged 28 years. Funeral from the residence of his mother, 174 West avenue north, on Wednesday, August 13, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LANGELL - (Halifax) David Langell, son of George Langell, was crushed to death at the River John this morning while unloading spars in Mackenzie's shipyard.

 

WILKINSON - (Windsor) Capt. William Wilkinson, one of Windsor's oldest and most respected residents, died early last evening at his residence on Bruce street. The captain was 97 years of age last Sunday. He was attacked with paralysis of the throat and as nourishment was impossible,


he soon succumbed to the disease. Captain Wilkinson was forty-five years in the British army, fought in the Peninsular war, and assisted in the downfall of Napoleon at Waterloo. He was also a Mason for forty years and was a Knight Templar. His remains will be buried at Sandwich on Thursday. The funeral will be conducted under the auspices of the Masons.

 

PRUDHOMME - (Windsor) Francis Prudhomme who cut his throat in Windsor on Saturday died last night at the Hotel Dieu. It is probable that no inquest will be held as Prudhomme made an ante mortem statement that he committed suicide. Mrs. Prudhomme says that their home was a happy one and that her husband's death was brought on by despondency caused by lack of employment.

 

August 14, 1890

 

SULLIVAN - A telegram was received yesterday conveying the intelligence that Patrick Sullivan, aged 19, was killed in a railway accident in Pennsylvania. He was on his way home to visit the family who reside at 39 Tiffany street, this city. The young man's father, Patrick Sullivan, left yesterday to bring home the body.

 

BELL - Shortly after midnight last night a human life was extinguished in the waters of the canal at the beach. Hundreds of people crowded the piers working in the darkness to be taken home by train or steamer. The Macassa was taking on her last load for the city and there was naturally a movement of the crowd in the direction of the boat. All at once there was a splash in the water of the canal at the ferry slip and the. cry was raised that somebody had fallen into the canal. Many eyes peered into the darkness and many a heart stood still at the sickening thought that a human being was drowned in the dark a few feet away.

The fact was that two men were struggling in the water. One of them J. Wright, was pulled out by W. Malvory, not much the worse for his ducking. The other man had sunk before assistance could reach him, but Mr. Blackstone of the yacht "Oriole" dived and brought him to the surface and he was quickly taken ashore. Dr. Cuthbertson of Toronto was on hand and worked hard to restore life to the inanimate body but his efforts were fruitless. The poor fellow was dead.

Constables Knox and Walsh took charge of the body. In the pockets of the clothing were found a card of the Hamilton Moulders' Union 26, bearing the name of W. Bell; a receipt for $1.75, dues from Red Cross Lodge, E. of P.; and $1.00 in cash. The name on the union card was the name of the dead man, William Bell. He was a moulder and worked in Gurney's foundry. He was about 28 years of age, unmarried, and lived with his parents and several brothers and sisters at 26 Cannon street west.There was a rope stretched across the wharf and it is supposed that he tripped


 over it in hurrying to catch the steamer and fell into the water while endeavouring to recover his balance.

A brother of the dead man drove down to the beach at 2 o'clock this morning to claim the body.

 

SUTHERLAND - Halifax) Henry Sutherland, aged 60 years, fell from the roof of his barn at Oxford this morning and was killed.

 

August 15, 1890

 

BELL - Drowned at Hamilton Beach, on August 13, William Bell, aged 25 years. Funeral from his father's residence, 26 Cannon street west, on Sunday afternoon, at 4 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

EDWORTHY - Died at her late residence, 35 Park street south, Mary, the beloved wife of Lewis Edworthy. Funeral will take place on Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock to Christ Church Cathedral, thence to Christ Church, Bullock's Corners. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SINCLAIR - (Toronto) John Sinclair, aged 62, died suddenly of heart disease this morning. He was a Scotchman, well known, had lived in Toronto for fifty years, and was formerly very active in politics. He was a Reformer.

 

KERSLAKE - (Toronto) Miss Kerslake, music teacher of Bowmanville, who was visiting friends in West Toronto Junction, became suddenly ill while being driven from Toronto yesterday. She became unconscious before she could reach the house of her friend and never rallied. Death was caused by the bursting of a blood vessel.

 

DALZIEL - (Toronto) Walter Dalziel of Vaughan township died to-day. He was in his 87th year and was a lifelong Reformer, having taken part in the Mackenzie rebellion.

 

MURPHY - (Brampton) This morning as the quarrymen were moving a very heavy stone with a steam derrick at Chisholm's quarry, the engineer started the engine rather suddenly, which broke one of the heavy wire cables that hold the derrick upright. The breaking of the guy wire let the heavy structure fall, instantly killing a man named Murphy and breaking the back of a horse. Murphy's companion saved himself by dropping by the side of a heavy block of stone upon which they were working.

 

YOUNG - (Leamington) While chopping to-day about three miles from here, John Young was struck and instantly killed by a part of a tree which split as it fell. He is 37 years of age and leaves a wife and four children.


CALDER - On Wednesday afternoon, John Calder,.Jr., a Glanford farmer, fell from a load of grain and the wheels of the wagon passed over his body, crushing in the ribs. He died almost instantly. The deceased was a son of John Calder of Ancaster, vas 35 years old, and unmarried.

 

August 16, 1890

 

CROTTY - Died in this city, on August 14, James Howard, infant son of P. J. and Ellen Crotty, aged 6 weeks and 4 days. Funeral will take place from his parents' residence, 381 Mary street north, on Saturday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ADERHOLZ - A fatal accident occurred at one o'clock yesterday at Tuckett & Sons new factory on Queen street, north of York. Henry Aderholz, a labourer, had got back from dinner and climbed up to the fourth storey to resume work. He had ,just reached the top when his foot slipped on a loose board and he fell. There was nothing intervening to break the fall and the unfortunate man shot downward until he reached the ground, seventy feet below. He was instantly killed, his skull being fractured. The police patrol wagon happened to be nearby attending a fire. It was summoned immediately and the mangled body was conveyed in it to 64 Locomotive street where Aderholz had resided. He was 35 years old and had a wife and family.

 

NESBITT - (Hepworth) While hunting in the woods to-day a young man named Ernest Nesbitt in attempting to pull his gun through a thicket caused the piece to be discharged. The bullet passed through his thigh, severing the main artery. He bled to death, living only ten minutes after the accident.

 

HANNAH - (Port Robinson) The four-year-old son of William Hannah, a farmer residing about two miles east of this place, was drowned in a well about six o'clock last night. The parents became alarmed at the non-appearance of the child and search was made in the river, but not finding any trace there, the well was examined and the lifeless body of the little fellow discovered.

 

BALLENTINE - A very sad case of suicide occurred on John street south this morning. Mrs. Ballentine, wife of Adam Ballentine, the well known grocer at the corner of John and Augusta streets, while suffering from mental aberration jumped off the roof and was instantly killed. The unfortunate lady had been suffering mentally for some months but was not in such a condition as to make detention necessary. In fact none of her friends had any idea that she was likely to harbour any such purpose as suicide.

About two months ago it was first noticed that her mind was affected. One morning she kissed the children good-bye and walked off down to the beach, but was found by her friends and


brought home. Mr. Ballentine sent her to Ingersoll to see if the change would do her good and she remained about three weeks, returning a week ago. Since then she had seemed fairly well and everything possible was done for her. The doctors recommended plenty of fresh air and she went, out driving a great deal.

Yesterday morning about four o'clock Mr. Ballentine was awakened by the crying of the baby and could not find his wife. He got up and looked through the house and found her in the bathroom. She came in and quieted the child and Mr. Ballentine fell asleep again. About an hour afterward he was awakened again by the child's cries and this time could not find Mrs. .Ballentine anywhere. After searching through the house he looked out in the yard, and was horrified to find her lying on a wooden walk at the hack door. Her skull was crushed and he at once knew she was dead though the body was quite warm. He summoned assistance and the body was carried into the house. The skull was crushed over the temple, the neck was broken and one arm fractured.

It was at first thought that she had jumped out the third storey window from a vacant room, the window of which was widely open, but the fact that a large cobweb stretched unbroken across the opening soon dispelled the idea. A ladder from another upper window leads to a trapdoor in the roof which is flat and it was no doubt by that means she reached the roof and jumped off, alighting on her head. Death must have been instantaneous. The distance is over forty feet.

Mr. Ballentine was naturally in a terrible state about the affair. He has the sincere sympathy of all his friends in the awful occurrence. He thinks the deceased had never been strong since she suffered from a particularly severe attack of grippe last winter. She was 35 years of age and leaves five children, all but the youngest of whom are at present in Muskoka. She was a most estimable lady and highly respected.

 

August 18, 1890

 

MURPHY - Died in Toronto, on Saturday, August 16, Caroline J., wife of L. J. Murphy of Chicago, formerly of Hamilton. Funeral takes place on Monday on the arrival of the 1:55 train from Toronto.

 

BARRY - Died in this city, at 59 Oxford street, on Sunday morning, August 17, Arthur Innes, infant son of James Barry, aged 6 months and 6 days. Funeral on Monday afternoon, at 3:30. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LAUZON - (Montreal) A man named Lauzon was killed in the yard at Bonaventure station between twelve and one o'clock to-day. He was under the train examining axles when a sudden start was made, the wheels passing over him and severing his head and one leg.


August 19, 1890

 

WICKHAM - Died in this city, on August 17, John Wickham, a native of the county Wexford, Ireland, in the 60th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 154 Macaulay street east, on Tuesday August 19, at 8:30 a.m. to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CONRAD - (Windsor)  Yesterday, Chief Baines and Officer Nash found the remains of a man apparently about 40 years of age floating in the river near the Michigan Central depot. He was dressed in a dark-coloured suit of clothes with a green shirt. In his pocket were found his citizenship papers taken out at Oswego, N.Y., and from them ascertained his name as Herman Conrad. The body was taken to the undertaking establishment. It is probable the deceased man was a sailor.

 

ZIMMERMAN - (Windsor) Elijah J. Zimmerman, a barber, employed at the Davenport hotel, committed suicide early this morning by taking four ounces of laudanum. He was a single man and has relations in Springfield, Ohio. On the body was found an insurance policy for $2000, and 71.50 in money. Written on a sheet of paper was the following, "I an tired of life and to enjoy myself seems impossible".

 

DANTETUIL - (Ottawa) The body of Elzar Dantetuil, one of the chief clerks of the patent branch of the Agricultural Department, was found in the canal to-day. A small sum of money and marks of violence were found on him. He has been missing since Friday.

 

August 20, 1890

 

NICHOLS - (Halifax) About 9:30 this morning a number of the regular mining corps of the Royal Engineers left the lumber yard in their boat, accompanied by one of the government steam launches, and anchored off McNabb's Island when Corporal Nichols went down in his diving suit in about one hundred feet of water, after an anchor to which a chain was to be attached. After he had been down some time, those above observed that there was something wrong as they could get no signal or reply from him. It was supposed that the line became entangled in the cable which lies just about this spot, or the life line was severed, or he was overcome by pressure of air, but the first-mentioned cause is thought to be the most likely. The launch was at once sent to the dock yard for another diving suit. This was got as soon as possible and in the meantime those on the miners' boat-kept pumping sir to the man below. After six hours the lifeless body of Nichols was taken from the water. He was 27 years old, recently married, and one of the most expert miners in the engineers.


August 21, 1890

 

FRASER - Died in this city, on August 19, at his son's residence, 62 Peter street, William W. Fraser, aged 66 years, a native of Connaught, Ireland. Funeral from the above address on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m., to Burlington cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

WALSH - Died on August 20, the infant son of Billiard Walsh. The funeral will take place this (Thursday) afternoon, at 4 o'clock from 24 Wilson street.

 

SPITZFADEN - Died on Wednesday, the 20th instant, Marie Louise, infant daughter of Otto and Lena Spitzfaden, aged 7 weeks. Funeral on Friday. Private.

 

STONE - (Toronto) Henry Stone, the undertaker, died at his residence, 239 Yonge street, this evening in the 59th year of his age. He had been suffering from cancer in the head since February last.

 

RANDALL - (Toronto) a lad named William Randall, living at 25 Widmer street, eight years old, was drowned to-day from the waterworks wharf, foot of Peter street. He was playing at the water's edge and fell in.

 

August 22, 1890

 

LYONS - (Cobourg) At 4 o'clock this afternoon a report spread rapidly that a drowning accident had taken place at the mouth of the factory creek where it empties into the lake. It seems that Dennis Lyons with two of his sons, aged ten and twelve, were enjoying an afternoon's fishing, and having a satisfactory day's sport were returning, but when steering out of the mouth, the boat became unmanageable in the surf and was upset, precipitating the unfortunate occupants into the water. Mr. Lyons was seen struggling in the waves but soon disappeared from the sight of the only spectators of the heartrending scene, two little boys who were bathing in the creek.

The lifeboat was soon on hand, but could render no assistance as there was no sign of either the unfortunate man or his little boys. The beach was soon crowded with anxious men and women to render all assistance in their power, but the bodies had evidently been carried out by the current; hence there was little to be done on shore. This evening there were boats of all descriptions dragging and a staff of men with a seine working from the beach, but as yet the bodies have not been recovered.

 

ROBILLARD - (Montreal) A man named Robillard was drowned in the canal this morning.


August 23, 1890

 

DALLYN - Died on August 22, at the residence of her son, 184 Stinson street, Mary, beloved wife of Joseph E. Dallyn, aged 68 years. Funeral Sunday, August 24, at 3 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LAVIS - Edward Lavis, a well known pork dealer on the market, died rather suddenly yesterday afternoon at his home, 253 King William street. He had been ill for some weeks but was able to go out on Thursday. He leaves a widow, three sons and two daughters. He was 65 years of age and had been for over twenty-five years engaged on the market.

 

August 25, 1890

 

CARLISLE - Died in this city, on August 23, William Edward, only son of William and Mary Carlisle, aged 7 months and 26 days. Funeral will leaves parents' residence, 446 Mary street, on Monday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

COLLIER - Died on August 24, at the residence of her son-in-law, F. A. Filgiano, 257 Macnab street north, Mrs. Thomas Collier, relict of the late Thomas Collier of Dundas. Funeral on Wednesday morning at 8:30 a.m.

 

MOORE - (Ottawa) A telegram received by Hon Mr. Castigan, minister of inland revenue, announced the sudden death this morning of John W. Moore, inland revenue inspector for the New Brunswick division. Universal regret was expressed in the department here at the news; a telegram of condolence was sent to the deceased gentleman's family.

 

COLEPITT - (Halifax) The body of an Intercolonial brakeman named Colepitt was found on the railway track near Maccan station this morning with the entrails protruding from the stomach. He is supposed to have fallen off a train and been run over by the cars.

 

HASSETT - (Halifax) A lad named Hassett, son of James Hassett, of New Tuskett, was drowned while bathing in Mistake lake, eight miles from Digby, yesterday.

 

SEYMOUR - (Toronto) A young man named John Seymour was drowned in the bay Saturday afternoon. He was sailing with four companions near the eastern gap when the craft was capsized by a sudden squall. Seymour, being an expert swimmer, struck out for the shore, but sank twenty yards from it. His companions held on to the boat and were saved. Seymour's body was recovered to-day at noon not far from the scene of the accident.


COTE - (Ottawa) From Buckingham comes an awful story of cannibalism. Paul Cote, a French-Canadian miner, and Elisha Newton, a farmer, are neighbours living in a small settlement on the Du Luive river, about two days journey from Buckingham. The Cote family consists of the man, his wife, and their baby boy about a year old. Newton is the father of two boys who are deaf-mutes and of unsound mind. Occasionally the idiots exhibited signs of vicious disposition, but as their parents were averse to sending the unfortunates to an asylum, they were kept at home and being regarded as comparatively harmless, they were allowed the freedom of their neighbour's house which they visited frequently. Several days ago Mrs. Cote went berry picking, intending to return in a couple of hours, leaving her baby in charge of the deaf mutes. When the mother returned to the house the sight that met her gaze was simply indescribable.

The baby was fearfully torn, the cheeks had been literally eaten to the bone, and the flesh partly devoured from one side of the neck. The gory faces of the grinning idiots, still gloating over their prey, showed all too plainly that they had literally eaten the child alive, for it died a few moments after the mother discovered the fearful act.

 

HUGHES - (Picton) This forenoon a young man named Stanley Hughes, while working on a thrashing machine on the farm of Stephen Haight, two miles from Picton, had his leg badly mangled up to the thigh in the cylinder of the machine, and died in two hours.

 

BARWELL - (St. Catharines) A sad accident occurred at Forks road last Friday by which Frederick Barwell, a lad of fourteen years, second son of Capt. John Barwell, lost his life. The boy had been engaged by L. Travers to assist in binding oats, and while thus at work something went wrong with the reaping machine. One of the horses was unhitched and young Barwell mounted it and took the parts in need of repair to Gillan's shop, and when the mending was complete started on his return on horseback. He sat sideways on the horse, and when approaching the railway track near the field, the horse stumbled, throwing the boy who was caught by the feet in the harness. This frightened the animal which turned about and galloped back towards the shop with the boy's head and shoulders dragging on the ground. The horse had gone about eighty rods before being stopped and then the unfortunate lad was picked up dead. The parents are naturally very much distressed over the melancholy accident and have the heartfelt sympathy of the whole neighbourhood. The funeral took place on Sunday at the U.B. church, Rev. Mr. Showers officiating.

 

August 26, 1890

 

SAPENSTRY - (Toronto) At the inquest this evening on the remains of the man found in the lake near Victoria Park, the remains were identified by a former boarding-house mistress as those of Auguste Sapenstry, a Russian Pole, who had been living for some time at her house and was


known to have been hard up and to have been very dejected of late. He was a recent arrival, having come from the United States. The jury found a verdict of suicide by drowning during a fit of temporary insanity.

 

August 27, 1890

 

BUSCOMBE - Died at Calleo, Peru, in the month of July, Samuel Buscombe, moulder, eldest son of Samuel Buscombe, 80 Tisdale street, city.

 

NEW - Died on August 26, at 577 King street west, Grace Isabel, infant twin daughter of Edward and Hattie New, aged 9 weeks. Funeral on Wednesday, at 3 p.m.

 

WATSON - Died on August 25, Elizabeth R., wife of Andrew Watson, in her 49th year. Funeral from her husband's residence, 89 King William street, on Wednesday, at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

HAMILTON - (Kingston) John Hamilton, a pensioner, was drowned in two feet of water while returning to his home at the Grand Trunk Railway lower depot.

 

LANDERYON - (Kingston) Last night Hazel, youngest daughter of John C. Landeryon, fell off a bench about three feet high, sustaining internal injuries which resulted fatally during the night.

 

August 28, 1890

 

BINNY - Died at Cranley, Lanarkshire, Scotland, on August 11, Andrew Binny, 9 Hart street, Edinburgh, last surviving son of the late Graham Binny, W.S.

 

KILLAM (Halifax) Robert Killam, a carpenter, fell from a building at the Acadia Mines, Stellarton, last night, and was instantly killed. He leaves a wife and family.

 

WILCOX - A telegram announcing the death of H. C. Wilcox, president of the Meridan Britannia Co, was received yesterday afternoon. Mr. Wilcox died at his summer residence, at Cottage City, Mass., yesterday morning. For this reason the flags at the Meridan Britannia Go's factory in this city are flying half mast.

 

August 29, 1890

 

PARK - Died in this city, on Wednesday evening, William George, son of Halsey Park, aged 13 years. Funeral on Friday, August 29, at 2:30 p.m., from 175 King street east.


BUTLER - (St. Catharines) Mrs. John W. Butler is lying dead at her residence near the jail. She was taken ill on Wednesday night and a physician was summoned but arrived too late. Mrs. Butler died under circumstances which may lead to a coroner's inquest.

 

GOODHUE - (London) Another of London's prominent citizens passed away about ten o'clock this morning in the person of Charles Frederick Goodhue. Mr. Goodhue was 53 years of age at the time of his death, and was the second son of the Hon. George James Goodhue who settled in London in 1829 and was one of the most important and influential persons in the county of Middlesex. When a young man the deceased studied law with Hon. John Wilson and afterward practised the profession for a number of years.

He was twice married, his first wife being the daughter of the late Dr. Fraser of Montreal, and his second, who survives him, the daughter of the late John A. Wilcox of Brantford and widow of Edward D. Parks of London. By his former wife he leaves two children, one daughter and one son, both of whom are unmarried. Frederick Goodhue, who has been studying medicine in England, arrived home in time for his father's death.

 

KELSIE - (Guelph) James Kelsie, employed as porter in the Commercial hotel, who fell over the stair bannister from the top storey of hotel to the ground floor last night, died this morning.

 

COULLOMBE - (Quebec) A boy named Coullombe, aged fifteen, was accidentally shot and killed by his uncle in the parish of St. Victor de Tring yesterday.

 

August 30, 1890

 

WATERMAN - Died at Harper hospital, Detroit, on August 28, Thomas Waterman, formerly of this city, aged 23 years and 8 months. Funeral from his brother's residence, No 72 Park street south, on Saturday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

YOUNG - Died on Friday, August 29, Elizabeth A., the beloved wife of Thomas Young, in her 60th year. Funeral on Sunday at 3:30 p.m., from her late residence, corner of King William and Hughson streets.

 

ROBSON - (Galt) James Robson, excise officer here for the past ten or twelve years, died suddenly at his residence about midnight last night. Mr. Robson was 71 years of age.

 

MACKAY - (London Free Press)  Roderick Mackay, merchant tailor of Woodstock, died on Wednesday after a painful and hopeless struggle with a cancerous growth on the lower part of his jaw. He was born in the parish of Clyne, Sutherlandshire, Scotland, sixty-two years ago.


He learned his trade as tailor at home and worked at it in Edinburgh and Glasgow. He came to Canada in 1853, settling first in Hamilton. After staying there for three years he came to Woodstock and opened a tailoring establishment in partnership with James Innis at present of British Columbia under the firm name of Mackay & Innis. Mr. Mackay was a man admired by all who knew him. Quiet and unassuming in his nature, honourable in his business dealings, and generous in his impulses, he possessed many of the best qualities of true manhood. He had no enemies; most of his acquaintances were fast friends.

 

SLEE A curious and seemingly trifling accident on Thursday evening resulted in the death of a promising lad, son of William Slee, carpenter, 467 Ferguson avenue north. Shortly after six o'clock, the boy, Willie Slee, was playing with a neighbour's dog on the street and were running together across the street when the dog got in front of the boy and tripped him. He fell and struck his head, but was not apparently badly hurt. Shortly afterward, however, his boy friends observed Slee become stupid and sleepy. So they carried or dragged him into his father's house. He was laid on a bed, but soon recovered sufficiently to go into another room and have supper. There he complained of being drowsy and went to sleep from which he awoke and vomited considerably. Dr. Wallace was called in about nine o'clock and found the boy in a state of coma. Everything possible was done for him but he died in half an hour.

A post mortem examination was made and it was found that a blood vessel in the brain had been ruptured just over the left ear and a clot of blood about two-thirds the size of a man's hand had formed in the brain.

The deceased boy was nine years of age and a bright clever lad. He was a member of the Hamilton juvenile branch of Ancient Order of Foresters, and that body will attend the funeral this afternoon at three o'clock.

 

LENNOX - (Sarnia) About 3:30 this morning the Tunnel House, a boarding house and grocery owned by C. F. Dickson in the 6th ward, was destroyed by fire. The building and an annex attached were wholly burned. Alice Lennox, a married woman, aged about forty, who had not been living with her husband, was burned to death. She had been employed at the house.

 

September 1, 1890

 

WEAVER - Died at No 66 Hess street north, on August 30, Norma Weaver, daughter of Reid Weaver, aged 11 years. Funeral Monday at 2 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

VANWAGNER Died on August 31, of inflammation of the lungs, Eliza Jane, wife of P. F. VanWagner, aged 60 years. Funeral on Tuesday, September 2, at 3 p.m., from the family residence, Burlington Beach, to Burlington cemetery.


DITTY - Died at his mother's residence, No 108 Ashley street, on August 31, Walter Ditty, aged 21 years. Funeral on Wednesday, September 3, tit 3:30 p.m. Service at St. Matthew's church. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MCGREGOR - Died at her late residence, No 76 Victoria avenue south, on August 30, Phebe McGregor, relict of the late John McGregor, aged 78 years. Funeral on Tuesday, September 2, at 1 p.m. Interment at Nelson Presbyterian Church.

 

LEE - (Blenheim) The 18-month-old daughter of Richard Lee, who lives on the Barton farm half a mile from town, got hold of a bottle containing benzine and before the mother could prevent it, she drank the contents. Medical aid was summoned, but she lived only two hours.

 

FORSHAW - (Halifax) A lad named John Forshaw who works in a brewery fell out of a rowboat in Bedford Basin this afternoon while standing on a seat. A companion tried to get him out, but Forshaw told him not to mind, and started to swim to the shore only a few feet distant, but he had gone only a few strokes when he suddenly sank and was drowned.

 

WOLFE - (Essex Centre) The four-year-old son of Richard Wolfe, while playing with some companions about 6:30 this p.m., fell into an old well. Before he could be got out he was dead.

 

September 2, 1890

 

DALTON - Died on August 13, 1890, at the residence of her son-in-law, James S. Barwell, Lucy Clark, relict of the late John Dalton of Brantford, aged 84 years and 8 months, and sister of the late Joseph Clark of this city. Funeral from 91 Ray street south, Tuesday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

O'GRADY - Died in this city, on August 31, Mary O'Grady, in the 60th year of her age. Funeral will leave the residence of her nephew, Thomas O'Grady, 257 Wellington street north, on Tuesday morning, at 8:30. Friends will please attend.

 

HUNTER - Died at 27 Canada street, on September 1, Hattie, youngest daughter of George Canning, and beloved wife of George Hunter, aged 32 years. Funeral on Wednesday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BALE - Died suddenly in this city, on September 1, at her late residence, 77 John street north, Mrs. Ann Bale, a native of Barnstable, England, wife of Thomas Bale, Sr., aged 74 years and 7 months. Funeral on Thursday, at 2:30 p.m., from Wesley Church. Friends will please accept this intimation. No flowers.


FARQUHARSON - (Halifax) A dispatch from Charlottetown says that a fire yesterday destroyed the stables of Mr. Mcleod. Two valuable stallions were burned and R. Farquharson, who formerly lived in Halifax, received burns from which he died this morning.

 

TURNBULL - (Toronto) Walter Turnbull, aged 72, while digging in a privy pit to-day in his backyard at 29 Walton street, fell in and was suffocated.

 

MACKENZIE - (Kingston) William Mackenzie, a labourer in the employment of the contractors constructing the second track of the Grand Trunk, was killed on Saturday night. It is supposed that Mackenzie lay down on the track and was run over by the suburban Grand Trunk Railway train coming to the city about nine o'clock.

 

KLUZE - (Windsor) Julius Kluze, aged 35 years, was accidentally drowned yesterday while engaged with three other men in making repairs on the steamer "Ontario".

 

KELLY - (Quebec) The body of a woman named Kelly, aged about 45 years, and belonging to Quebec, was found on Saturday morning on the hill leading from St. Foy to St. Sauveur. An inquest will be held.

 

GROULX - (Quebec) Elvi Groulx, aged 68 years, a mason, was found dead this morning at his residence on the Beauport road. An inquest will be held.

 

ANGERS - (Quebec) A young man named J. E. Angers, engineer on board the lightship at St. Roches Desaulniers, accidentally met a watery grave on Saturday. The particulars of the sad affair have not yet been received, but it was supposed that he was going to church in a small boat when a squall coming on capsized his frail craft and he was drowned. He was married and leaves a wife at Levis.

 

HANSON - (Cobourg) Two boys named David Smith and Peter Hanson had a quarrel on Sunday afternoon and came to blows. Smith stabbed Hanson on the breast with a pocket knife. The wound which extended into the right lung proved fatal. Hanson died to-night. Smith is only about ten years of age and the deceased only two years his senior. Smith was arrested.

 

MURRAY - Another sad drowning accident occurred at the beach last night. In company with ten or twelve ladies and gentlemen, James Murray who travelled for R. Evans, seedsman, went to the beach in Beckett's steam launch. The early part of the evening was spent at the Ocean House, and about 11 o'clock Murray went in swimming off the piers on the bay side with Edward Young, a fellow employee. They had not been in the water long before Young discovered that his companion was in distress and he called for help. Young went to Murray's rescue and succeeded


in catching hold of him, but before help arrived he became exhausted and had to let go. Murray disappeared under the water and was drowned. Young was exhausted when he reached the piers.

Murray was a good swimmer and it is believed that he took a cramp. Captain Campbell and several others grappled for the body and got it on shore about midnight. The drowned man had been employed by Mr. Evans for about a year and was highly esteemed by that gentleman. His parents live in Ottawa, but he came here from Florida. He was between 27 and 28 years of age.

Murray boarded on Hess street. As he has no relatives here, Mr. Evans will take care of the body. Captain Campbell took charge of deceased's property.

 

September 3, 1890

 

ELLISON - Died on September 1, at the residence of his grand-parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Pomfret, 264 John street north, John Joseph Ellison, aged 11 months. Funeral will take place from above address, on Wednesday, September 3, at 3:30 p.m. Friends are kindly requested to accept this intimation.

 

SINNOTT - Died in this city, on September 1, Josephine Margaret, infant daughter of John and Kate Sinnott, aged 1 year. Funeral will leave the parents’ residence, 77 Lower Cathcart street, on Wednesday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

September 4, 1890

 

SEELIG - Died in this city, on September 3, Edna Katie, only child of the late George Seelig, aged 1 year and 5 months. Funeral on Thursday, at 2:30 p.m., from her grandfather's residence, 213 Young street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation

 

BRENNAN - Tuesday night John Brennan, 314 Hughson street north, received a telegram from New York conveying the sad news that his son, John Brennan, was dead. The telegram had been sent to another son of Brennan's in London, and was forwarded by him to Hamilton. Nothing was said about how he came to his death, whether he was killed or died from natural causes. The deceased worked for an electric light company and his parents fear that he was killed by the deadly wires, but of course they are not positive about it. Brennan was about 30 years of age. He was away from home for fourteen years and paid his parents a visit about a year ago. He went from here to New York. Brennan has telegraphed there for particulars.

In May 1889, Peter Brennan, another son of Mr. Brennan was killed in a railway accident near St. Anns. His father was drowned while working as a diver among the wreck of cars that went through the Desjardins bridge over thirty years ago.

 

 


MOORE - The venerable Grand Master of the Knights Templar, Colonel William James Bury McLeod Moore of Prescott, passed away suddenly on Monday night in his 82nd year, paralysis of the heart being ascribed as the cause. The deceased came to Canada in 1852 and was subsequently appointed by Lord Elgin, the Governor-General, to the command of the active militia of Ottawa. He was a graduate of Sandhurst military college and for forty years served as an officer in the 69th Regiment and saw service in many lands. The late Colonel became connected with the Masonic order at the age of seventeen and has been a most active member, and to him is due the success of the Knights Templar of Canada which he was instrumental in resurrecting in Kingston about twenty-six years ago.

 

BROWN - (St. Catharines) Advices came from Jordan this evening that the body of A. G. Brown of this city, who it is thought was drowned off the steamer " Lakeside" on Saturday, August 23, has been found on the lake shore near Jordan.

 

BUCKLEY - (Montreal) Aaron Buckley of Bowmanville, who was stopping at the Albion Hotel, blew out the gas in his bedroom last night and went to sleep. He was found this morning unconscious. He died at six o'clock to-night not having recovered consciousness.

 

September 5, 1890

 

BROWN - (Ottawa) A horrible fatality is reported from Cumberland township, Russell county. John Melville and John Brown, two farmers, went bear hunting at night. They mounted separate scaffolds erected for the double purpose of giving shelter and affording a place of retreat. In the night Melville heard a noise and observing a dark object, fired. The report was followed by human shrieks. The shot had taken effect in Brown, killing him instantly.

 

September 6, 1890

 

REID - Died at 49 Victoria avenue south, William Gilzen, second son of W. G. Reid, aged 7 years. Funeral Monday, September 8, at 3 o'clock p.m.

 

POINTER - Died at his residence, 76 West avenue south, on September 4, James E. Pointer, aged 54 years. Funeral on Sunday, September 7, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

The many friends of J. E. Pointer will be deeply pained to hear of his demise which occurred Tuesday night at his residence,_76 West avenue south. Mr. Pointer had been ill only about two weeks and up until the morning of his death no danger was apprehended of a fatal termination.


The deceased was born in Churchville, Peel county, on September 9, 1835, and was therefore in his 55th year, and has been a resident in Hamilton for the past fifteen years, during which time he has been confidential correspondent for Messrs Dun, Wiman, & Co. He was a prominent member of Centenary church and a most exemplary citizen in every way. Mr. Pointer was a most enthusiastic freemason and was at the time of his death worshipful master at the Lodge of Strict Observance. He was also a member of Murton Lodge of Perfection and the Hamilton chapter Rose Croix which bodies deeply mourn his sudden death. The funeral will take place from his late residence, No 76 West avenue south, on Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock under the auspices of the Masonic fraternity.

 

BROLEY - (Fergus) The remains of the late Rev. James Broley, pastor of the Methodist church, Fergus, who died suddenly at Palmerston on Tuesday of neuralgia of the heart, were interred here yesterday. There was a large attendance of ministers from the Presbyterian, Congregational, Baptist, and Episcopalian bodies. The Masonic body of which deceased was a member turned out in large numbers and preceded the hearse to the cemetery where he was buried with Masonic honours.

 

JAMIESON - (Farnham, Que) Stewart Jamieson and his sister, Nettle, were carried over the dam in the swollen river Yamaska near here to-day. Stewart was rescued unconscious, but Nettie was not seen after the boat was dashed to pieces on the rocks at the foot of the falls.

 

September 8, 1890

 

WADDELL - Died in Binbrook, on September 2, W. Waddell, Jr. Funeral took place on September 4.

 

REAZNOR - Died on the 6th instant, Charlotte Watkins Reaznor, wife of William B. Reaznor, of this city. Funeral will take place to-day from her husband's residence, corner of Main street east and Erie avenue, at 3 p.m., to Burlington cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ROBILLARD - (Penetang) Last Sunday, Eugene Robillard took a small basket in his hand and went a short distance out the track to pick blackberries. Not returning in the evening, his wife became anxious about his absence and caused a search to be initiated for him. On Monday morning he was found dead in a little creek that crosses the track about a mile out of town. There were a few berries in the basket and foot marks on the banks near the creek. It is evident that he had fallen down the incline into the water which was not more that eight inches deep at the place where he was found. The unfortunate man was subject to fits and several times he had come near losing his life before the fatality that overtook him. He was a man of apparently fine physique,


well formed and stalwart, but the terrible affliction had hung like a shadow over him for years. He leaves a widow and two children.

 

DAWSON (Quebec) John Dawson, an employee of the Grand Trunk Railway, was the victim of a fearful accident yesterday at Chaudiere Junction. He was engaged as night watchman and while walking on the track yesterday afternoon was knocked down by a train which had run in by a switch into a siding, unnoticed by him. The unfortunate man had both legs cut off by the train. He died soon after.

 

BLISS - (Ottawa) Mrs. Bliss, wife of Aldon Bliss, of the customs department, died very suddenly on the Empress at Buckingham whither she had gone on a trip.

The wife of Aldon Bliss of the customs department dropped dead at Thurso yesterday. Heart disease is supposed to the cause of death.

 

MARSHALL - Chief McKinnon received a letter yesterday afternoon stating that a young man supposed to be Thomas Marshall of this city had been killed by a train at Syracuse on Wednesday last. From the description contained in the letter, Thomas Marshall, tailor, 15 Concession street, identified the body as that of his son. He left yesterday to bring the remains home. The young man was 20 years of age and left here a week ago on a trip east.

 

O'NEIL - The oldest resident of Toronto, Patrick O'Neil, died on Friday afternoon at the residence of his son-in-law, Michael Donnelly, Commercial Hotel. Mr. O'Neil's age as recorded on the coffin plate was 108. The deceased had been a citizen of Toronto for over fifty years, but for twenty years previous to his death his mental and physical faculties were impaired.

 

BRADLEY - An unfortunate man lost his life by the caving in of a bank Saturday morning. John Bradley, who lived at 22 Stuart street, took the contract of coupling a pipe sewer from the main sewer on Locomotive street to James Wilson's International Hotel. He was assisted by George Beavis who boards at 31 Stuart street west. The sewer was finished only two months ago and the earth had never been properly packed; yet when the men commenced to dig the excavation they did not take the precaution to shore up the sides. They started work on Friday morning and at 11:30 on Saturday morning they had dug to a depth of ten or twelve feet and were ready to make the connection. Beavis was under the ground and he got Bradly, who was the boss, to go under and make the connection. Bradley had no sooner entered the hole than the earth above which was loose caved in and buried him, all except his legs. Beavis, who was in the excavation, and several other men went to his rescue. When they caught hold of his legs to pull him out, more sand fell and completely buried the unfortunate man. Beavis was buried up to his waist and had a narrow


escape. In a short time a large crowd gathered around the spot and although the men standing about were asked to assist in digging away the sand, they were timid about going into the excavation, and refused. Beavis, Constable Harris, and another man worked like beavers to save the poor fellow's life, but such a quantity of sand fell that they had no easy task, Until Constables Fenton, Cruikshank, and Hawthorne, and Chief McKinnon and Sergeants Prentice and McMahon arrived, the people crowded close to the bank and endangered the lives of the men digging there, but the chief made them stand back.

The accident occurred at 11:45, and it was not until an hour later that Bradley's body was seen. Beavis saw the man's foot protruding under the earth and when he tried to pull the body out, a quantity of sand caved in and buried it again. Beavis worked like a hero , never stopping to think his own life was in danger. The body was recovered at 12:50. The left foot was bent under the body and Bradley must have been lying face down when the bank caved in. He was dead. His mouth was open and his face was purple. Drs. Philp and Anderson were present, but they could not be of any assistance.

Bradley was a married man with a large family. He took many contracts in making connections with sewers. It is a wonder that the men did not notice that the earth was loose. On Friday night a quantity of sand caved in and the excavation was almost filled with water. There was no protection whatever in the sides. Bradley's body was taken to the morgue in the patrol wagon.

After consulting with Crown Attorney Crerar, Coroner Philp decided not to hold an inquest.

 

September 9, 1890

 

EDE - Died on Monday morning, September 8, at 116 Hess street north, William Edward, infant son of William and Jennie Ede, aged 3 months, 2 weeks and 6 days. Funeral at 2 p.m. Tuesday.

 

DECHENE - (Que. ) A young man named Pierre Dechene, aged 20, a son of F. M. Dechene, drygoods merchant of this city, was accidentally drowned yesterday afternoon while swimming at Lange Gardien.

 

KIRKDELL - (Richmond, Que) At Kinsey, near here, yesterday a young Englishman named William Kirkdell, in the employ of William Wentworth, was out walking, having a loaded gun with him, when he was overtaken by a party of young people in a wagon. He asked for a ride and got into the wagon, placing the gun by his side and taking a little girl on his knee. They began playing and he said, "Don't kick about or you may shoot yourself Just then the gun went off, the contents lodging under one of his ears. He died in a few minutes. It is supposed that the child had struck the hammer of the gun with her foot. Deceased was about 21, and has no relatives in this country.


GREENLEES, MCDOUGALL - (Wiarton) Last evening two young men of this place, M. Greenlees and M. McDougall, left Oxenden for Wiarton in a sailboat. They were last seen about the middle of the bay, heading south-east. Soon after, a squall came up. It is supposed their boat capsized, being ballasted with stone and she would sink immediately. Up to this time the bodies have not been recovered.

 

September 10, 1890

 

MARSHALL - Killed at Syracuse, on Wednesday, September 3, Thomas Marshall, second son of Thomas Marshall of this city, aged 23 years. Funeral took place at Syracuse, Monday, September 8.

 

LAPANEY - (Kingston) James Lapaney, in the employ of the contractors constructing the Grand Trunk second track, attempted to jump on a moving freight train near Rideau. He fell under the wheels and received injuries which caused his death. He belonged to Thorold.

 

LAWRIE - (Bowmanville) Mrs. John Lawrie, widow of the late John Lawrie, in the township of Darlington, dropped dead yesterday afternoon. She was in perfect health up to the time of the occurrence. Apoplexy is supposed to be the cause.

 

September 11, 1890

 

CAMPBELL - Died in this city, on Thursday morning, September 11, Jane Ann Kirk, wife of Colin Campbell, in her 32nd year. Funeral will leave the residence of her father, William Kirk, 96 Vine street, on Sunday, September 14, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CHERRIER - Died at St. Joseph's hospital, John street, September 10, Joseph R. Cherrier, in the 64th year of his age. Funeral on Friday morning, September 12, at 8:30, from the hospital to St. Mary's Cathedral. Friends will please accept this intimation. No flowers.

J. R. Cherrier died at St. Joseph's hospital yesterday afternoon at the age of 64. Mr. Cherrier was some years ago a prosperous grocer in Hamilton, but he met with business reverses. He was a brother of F. L. Cherrier of the city and of Rev. Father Cherrier.  He had dropsy.

 

BURNS - (Toronto) William Burns, a Canadian Pacific Railway labourer, about 45 years of age, was found dead in his bed at his boarding house, 68 Seaton street, this morning. Burns had been drinking heavily of late and his sudden death is attributed to that cause. The coroner was notified but did not consider an inquest necessary.

 

CROZIER - (Digby, N.S.) One of the saddest cases of death in the history of this town happened last night. Mrs. Crozier, a much respected and charitable lady who managed a summer boarding


house situated on Water street, had been ill the last few days and last evening was feeling quite well. The doctor in attendance prepared a prescription which was sent to H. P. Stark & Co to be filled. After being administered the patient became very violent and to the horror of those present it was discovered that the druggist had made a mistake and sent fifteen grains of strychnine instead. The poor woman died in great agony a few minutes after taking the deadly poison.

 

September 12, 1890

 

MILNE - John Milne died at 7 o'clock yesterday morning at the residence of his nephew, James Ferres, 200 Macnab street south. The deceased was 80 years old. He was born in Scotland. For many years he was a resident of Montreal, but during the past three or four years he made Hamilton his home. He was sick only eight days and died of old age. It was the wish of the deceased that a notice of his death should not be published until three weeks after It occurred.

 

MILLS - W. H. Mills died at his residence, corner of Main and Ray streets, yesterday morning after a lengthy illness. He was a son of the late James Mills and brother of the late Senator Mills. He was born in Hamilton on August 4, 1822, and became a lawyer, but after several years of practice, he abandoned the profession and devoted himself to the study of horticulture. He became a prominent member of the Fruit Growers' Association and was elected president in 1868, and subsequently became a delegate to the convention of American pomologists in Philadelphia. He was elected a life member of the American Pomologists Society and the American Association for the advancement of science.

The deceased leaves a widow, three daughters, Mrs. Symons, Mrs. Footner of New York, and Miss Mary Mills, and one son, Percy Mills. The funeral will take place this afternoon at 3 o'clock.

 

AUGER - (St. Hyacinthe) Mr. Auger of this place, while on his way to bring a doctor to his sick son and while crossing the Grand Trunk at Petit Rouge crossing, did not hear the Montreal express approaching, was struck by it, and instantly killed. The body was brought to the depot where an inquest will be held.

 

September 15, 1890

 

HERBOTH - Died on September 13, at the residence of his son-in-law, A. Brunke, 25 York street, Frederick Herboth, aged 83 years. Funeral on Monday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation

 

GROVES - Died in this city, on September 12, Martha Moy, beloved wife of James Groves, in the 25th year of her age. Funeral took place from her husband's residence, 194 West avenue north, on Sunday, at 3:30 p.m.

 

 


GAY - Died at his late residence, No 114 Hughson street south, on the Sabbath, 14th instant, Mr. James Gay, in his 87th year. Funeral on Tuesday at 3:30. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

James Gay, one of the oldest of Hamilton's citizens, died yesterday at his home, 114 Hughson street south. He had reached the great age of 87 years. Mr. Gay had been for many years an employee of the business office of the "Spectator" and was widely known and widely respected.

 

MCNAB - (Bradford)  Last night when driving a few miles north of here, Thomas McNab, a farm hand, fell from a buggy and broke his neck. Death resulted very soon after. Deceased was 61 years of age and is supposed to have been intoxicated.

 

OKE - (Exeter) James Oke, one of Exeter's most respected citizens, died suddenly about 1:30 a.m. of apoplexy, in his 51st year. He was one of the most extensive cattle dealers in Western Ontario, and was a member of the town council.

 

September 16, 1890

 

ROSE - (Petrolia) A. F. Rose, a merchant of this town, started out with a load of goods to deliver this morning and before getting very far complained of feeling sick. He got off the wagon and just as he entered the door of his store, dropped, and upon examination he was found to be dead.

 

HATFIELD  - (Halifax) John W. Hatfield went to sleep on the Intercolonial track near Springhill Junction on Saturday night and was run over by a train, injuring one leg so badly that it had to be amputated, and the man died two hours afterward. He belonged to Maccan and is supposed to have been drunk.

 

MILBORN - (Lindsay) John Milborn, contractor, aged 50 years, a highly respected and esteemed citizen of this town, committed suicide by drowning in the river at an early hour this morning, while temporarily insane.

 

September 17, 1890

 

MCMURTRIE - Died in this city, on September 16, Hilda Norens, infant daughter of David McMurtrie, aged 1 year and 25 days. Funeral this morning (private) from her father's residence, No 33 West avenue north.

 

WILKINSON - (Brantford) A report comes from Cainsville, three miles from here, that John Wilkinson, builder, dropped dead while at work in that town. He is supposed to be a member of Western Star Lodge, I.O.O.F., Brussels, Ontario. The Oddfellows are here looking after him. No particulars have been learned.

 

 


MCKAY - (Woodstock) Shortly after noon to-day, the dead body of a man was found in Bachburgess's farm near Woodstock which turns out to be a man by the name of David McKay, a carpenter from Paris. No marks of violence were found on the body and It is supposed that he must have been dead a couple of days.

 

September 18, 1890

 

HOMAN - (Halifax) While out shooting yesterday, Michael Homan of Dalhousie placed the butt of his gun against his body to examine the lock, when it unexpectedly discharged, and the kick of the weapon was so severe that it inflicted internal injuries. He was able to walk home, but expired shortly afterward.

 

September 19, 1890

 

HURLEY - Died at the residence of his grandfather, James Ford, 405 John street north, on Thursday, September 18, John, only son of the late John Hurley, aged 20 years and 5 months. Funeral takes place Saturday morning at 8:30 a.m. to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

John Hurley, grandson of Inspector Ford, died yesterday. The young man went to Cleveland two months ago and was taken sick there. He was brought home and died here. Typhoid fever was the cause.

 

THOMPSON - (Teeswater) This morning the two-year-old daughter of W. H. Thompson, lumber merchant, while playing around, fell head first into a tub of water at the back door. The mother, missing the child for a few minutes and going to look, discovered the child with its head under the water and its feet up. Life was quite extinct, death being caused by suffocation.

 

HARPER - (Ridgetown) a young man named Harper, in the employ of John W. Wilson, a farmer living in the outskirts of this town, was kicked in the groin by a horse yesterday. It was not thought serious at first, but the young man died at 11 o'clock to-day, complications having set in.

 

ANDREWS - (Belleville) George Andrews, an engineer an the Grand Trunk, died this morning from typhoid fever.

 

ROBERTSON - (Belleville) John Robertson of the Canadian customs, formerly of Madoc, died at Tacoma, Washington, yesterday.

 

September 20, 1890

 

PAMENTOR - Died at 127 Cannon street west, on September 19, John Montgomery, only son of


Charles Pamentor, aged 4 months and 14 days. The funeral will be held from the above address to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

September 22, 1890

 

LUCAS - Died at Trafalgar township, on September 20, by accident, David Lucas, in the 52nd year of his age. Funeral on Tuesday, at 2 o'clock from residence of the deceased. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

David Lucas, a most respected and widely known farmer of Garafraxa township, met with a violent death about seven o'clock on Saturday evening. Deceased lived close to the township line between Trafalgar and Nelson and was returning Saturday afternoon from Oakville where he had been with samples of his grain. When near the Twelve hill not far from Mr. Lucas's homestead, the team of colts which he was driving ran away and at the foot of the hill the wagon wheel broke, throwing him out on the roadway upon his head. He was found to be dead when picked up shortly afterward, the fall having produced concussion of the brain. Mr. Lucas was born in Trafalgar township and lived there all his life. A widow and three grown-up daughters mourn his loss. Deceased was a brother-in-law of J. H. Land of this city.

 

September 23, 1890

 

MCKENZIE - Died at 13 Locomotive street, on September 22, Agnes McKenzie, wife of the late Kenneth. McKenzie, in her 66th year. The funeral will take place from the above address on Wednesday, September 24, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

MULLINS - Died at his late residence, No 105 Park street north, on September 22, William Mullins, late of Cheltenham, England, in his 57th year. Funeral Wednesday, at 2 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

PEARCE - Died at Waterford, Ontario, on September 21, 1890, Irene, beloved wife of P. J. Pearce, in the 42nd year of her age.

 

RANDALL - (Toronto) Word has been received of the death in China of Robert Randall who left Toronto in February under the auspices of the China Inland Mission as a missionary. He died August 4 of intermittent fever.

 

KELLACHEY - (Toronto) Coroner Johnson this afternoon held an inquest on the body of John Kellachey who died at the hospital on Saturday evening from the effects of injuries caused by a wagon driven by W. J. Elliot, an employee of Clarke Bros, mineral water manufacturers,


being driven over him. The evidence showed the affair an accident and the jury returned a verdict of acquittal, at the same time insisting that gangs of men at work on the street in the manner in which deceased was engaged when he met his death should receive adequate protection. Deceased leaves thirteen children besides two who predeceased him in consequence of accidents similar to that which killed him.

 

RANGER - Jesse Ranger is the name of a man, 65 years old, who lived in a small house in Dundas near the Grand Trunk Railway station. His invalid wife and an unmarried son who works at Bertram's factory lived with him. The old man did not rise at his usual hour yesterday morning and when his wife went in to rouse him, she found him dead. A revolver lay half grasped in his nerveless hand. He had shot himself in the mouth some time during the night while lying in the bed. Nobody seems to know the reason of Ranger's desire to solve the grand mystery unless it was chronic melancholy. Dr. Ross, coroner, will hold an inquest to-day.

An inquest was opened on Monday afternoon in Dundas on the body of the suicide, Jesse Ranger. It was adjourned till Thursday. The first reports of the suicide were erroneous. The old man rose early Monday morning and got his son's breakfast. Mrs. Ranger went out after breakfast, and when she returned at 11 o'clock she found the body of her husband lying on the floor.

 

September 24, 1890

 

WILSON - Died in this city, on September 23, Bertha, beloved daughter of Charles and Jane Wilson, aged 4 months and 3 days. Funeral will take place from her parents' residence on Thursday at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

PINCH - Died at Stratford, Ontario, on September 22, Mary A. Lendon, wife of John Pinch, in her 37th year. Funeral Wednesday, September 24, from King Street Railway station on arrival of 11:45 train.

 

LAND, CLARK - (Tapleytown) The funeral services of Albert Land of Tweedside and of Benjamin Clark's young child took place on Saturday and Sunday, the 13th.and 14th respectively, both services being conducted by Rev. D. Ecker.

 

September 25, 1890

 

REID - Died at her late residence, No 76 Macaulay street west, on September 23, Mary, Beloved wife of William W. Reid, aged 28 years. Funeral on Thursday, September 25, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


ENGLAND - Died in this city, on September 24, Arthur England, aged 23 years and 7 months. Funeral from his parents' residence, 505 James street north, on Friday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SIMS  - (Kingston)  Dougald Sims, aged 39 years, of Little Metis, Quebec, was killed at the dry dock to-day. The arm of a derrick lifting a stone from a barge broke and in falling struck Sims on the temple, fracturing his skull, and killing him instantly. He had been with the Connelly's for seven years. A wife survives him.

 

September 26, 1890

 

BUDGE - Died in this city, on September 25, Mrs. Jane Budge, aged 67 years. Funeral will take place on Saturday, September 27, at 2 p.m. from her late residence, 139 Bay street north. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SMITH - Died at his parents' residence, little Wellington street, Barton, on September 25, William James, son of George and Mary Smith, aged 16 years and 6 months. Funeral on Saturday at 4 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

RANGER - Died at Dundas, on Monday, September 23, Jesse Ranger, aged 58 years. Funeral Friday morning at R. C. cemetery.

 

BANZIE - (Comber) A man named F. X. Banzie choked to death to-day. It appears that he had been on a protracted spree for some time and while in the act of eating his dinner a piece of meat lodged in his throat, and before medical aid could be summoned he choked.

 

September 27, 1890

 

RACEY - Died at the parsonage, Tuscarora, on Wednesday, September 24, in the 76th year of her age, Susan, third daughter of the late James Racey, Esq., of Bath, England, and sister to Mrs. O'Reilly, 'The Willows', Hamilton.

 

HUNTER - Died on September 26, at his parents' residence, James, youngest son of John and Isabella Hunter, aged 23 years and 6 months. Funeral will leave 17 Albert Road, Victoria avenue north, Sunday, at 3 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

HILL - A child about three months old died at 34 Guise street yesterday morning and the circumstances connected with its death were such that Coroner Woolverton decided to hold an inquest. The woman who lives in the house had three babies in charge. The one that died belonged to a couple named Hill, residing in the south-western portion of the city and was brought there on Sunday last. It was a very sickly infant and yesterday morning it became very ill.


The woman sent for father, but he said he could not leave the shop at the time. When he did arrive about ten o'clock, the child had been dead some time. It was very much emaciated when examined by the police.

 

FOX - (Ottawa) A few minutes after four o'clock this morning a fire broke out in a small tenement house on the north side of Willrod street occupied by John Fox. The fire was not a very extensive one, but unfortunately ended in the loss of human life. The body of Mrs. Fox was afterward discovered among the debris after the fire was extinguished, burnt almost beyond recognition. Mrs. Fox was the only person in the house at the time the fire broke out.

 

EBERSON - (Kingston) Dr. Eberson, dentist, who lived alone near Portland, went out fishing on Rideau lake and was afterward found drowned. The body was removed to Portland cemetery and interred. A few days ago it was learned that ghouls had resurrected the body, smashed the coffin, and cleared out. The authorities are ferreting out the dastards.

 

September 29, 1890

 

POWELL - Died at Hamilton, on the morning of September 28, Eleanor, widow of the late John Powell, registrar of the county of Lincoln, aged 79 years. Funeral to the 9:20 train, Wednesday morning, to St. Catharines. Interment at Niagara-on-the-Lake.

 

ANDERSON - Died at her parents' residence, 61 Smith avenue, on September 26, Aggie Jane, youngest daughter of John and Elena Anderson, aged 11 months. Funeral took place on Sunday at 2 p.m.

 

YALDON - Died in this city, on September 27, William Yaldon, aged 67 years. Funeral from his late residence, 260 Macnab street north, Monday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

LAING - Died in this city, on September 26, William T., fourth son of the late George Laing. Funeral from 79 Mary street, on Monday, September 29, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GIBSON - A terrible accident occurred at Glanford Station on the mountain Friday night. Among the passengers on the evening express going south was Joseph Gibson, a well known farmer, residing two miles south of Glanford Station. He was on his way home from visiting the fair. The southbound express crossed the express coming north at that station, and it is supposed that when Gibson got off the southbound train he stepped on the other track and was struck by the northbound train. Baggageman Charles Clark ran back with a lantern and found the man lying on the track. He was dreadfully mangled, the wheels having gone over the thigh near the body and also his right arm. He was carried into a shed nearby, but died in about fifteen minutes.


The crown attorney was notified but did not think an inquest necessary. Gibson was well-to-do and leaves a family. He was about 60 years of age.

 

September 30, 1890

 

CLARK - Died at noon, on the 29th instant, at the rectory, Ancaster, Gladys, youngest daughter of the Rev. W. H. Clark, aged 4 years and 1 month.

 

WOLLIUNG - Died on Sunday, September 28, Clemens Wolliung, aged 76 years. Funeral will leave his son's residence, No 12 Market Square, on Wednesday, October 1, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

RAE - (Kettleby) At Pottageville in the township of King on September 27, Isabella Rae, the seven-months' bride of James Rae, a respectable mechanic, committed suicide by shooting herself through the heart with a rifle while temporarily insane.

 

KENNEDY - (Kingston) Susan Kennedy, aged 45, died in the Kingston penitentiary from consumption and was buried in the penitentiary plot in the cemetery. She was convicted in October, 1879, of the murder of man of Griffintown near Montreal and was sentenced to be hanged December 5, 1879. The governor-general commuted the sentence, and in November of that year she was sent to the female ward in the institution here. She has been on a decline for a number of years.

 

October 1, 1890

 

ARMSTRONG - Died at 139 Market street, on September 30, Isaac Armstrong, aged 71 years, a native of Brampton, Cumberland, England. Funeral from his late residence, on Friday, October 3, at 3 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CRANE - (Toronto) Mrs. Samuel Crane, wife of a city coal merchant, dropped dead this morning.

 

BAYNE - (Halifax) Thomas Bayne, a wealthy retired merchant, died to-day aged 71 years. He leaves a fortune estimated as high as a quarter of a million.

 

SULLIVAN - (Welland) Eugene Sullivan, an old citizen, was killed to-day by a fall caused by the jerk of a cow he was leading.

 

October 2, 1890

 

MCSWEENEY - Died in Hamilton, on October 1, Morgan Terence McSweeney. Funeral from St. Joseph's hospital on Friday morning at 8:30 to St. Patrick's Church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will kindly accept this notice.


During the past few years there was not a better known figure in local politics that Morgan Terence McSweeney. He was a bright, eloquent, impetuous young Irishman of more than ordinary ability. His political opponents respected him for his sincerity and honesty of purpose, and his friends valued him for the whole-souled energy with which he threw himself into any work to be done. He was a leading spirit in the Knights of Labour movement In this city and acted as district secretary of the order, was president of the local branch of the Irish National League, a charter member of the Ancient Order of Hibernians and C.M.B.A., and a member of the separate school board. Everybody knew him as Terry McSweeney and all who knew him liked the bright young fellow, and will learn with regret of his death. He died last evening at St. Joseph's hospital of haemorrhage of the lungs after a lengthy illness. The deceased was only 30 years of age. He was born in London, England, and came to Canada when quite young to reside with his uncle who subsequently died and left him alone in the world. About a year ago Mr. McSweeney began to study for the Bar, but was forced to stop on account of ill health.

 

MCCANN - (Toronto) John McCann, aged 90, father of Very Rev. Dean McCann (R.C.) of Brockton, is dead.

 

MCMILLAN - (Cornwall) John McMillan, aged about 50, who was employed on the canal works, was struck this morning by the down express train and instantly killed. He was walking on the track on his way to work.

 

October 3, 1890

 

BUCKINGHAM - Died in this city, on October 2, at 280 Murray street east, Walter Clarence, infant son of William and Annie Buckingham, aged 10 weeks. Funeral takes place Friday morning at 11 o'clock to Carlisle cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

COSTIE - (Gentilly, Que) Rev. Father Costie was found dead this morning in his bed. Died of congestion of the lungs, caused by indignation.

 

DOSTATOR, PICHE, HEROUX - (Maskinoonge) While the wife of Dr. Dostator of that place was driving home last evening from a visit to her sick sister of Louisville, accompanied by Mrs. Piche, Miss Heroux, and two children each aged about five years and while crossing the railway track a short distance above Louisville, the carriage was struck by a Canadian Pacific freight train bound for Montreal. All three ladies were instantly killed. The two children escaped without a scratch. When the dead and mangled bodies of Mrs. Dostator and Mrs. Piche were picked up the children were found locked in their arms and complaining of being held too tight.


The bodies were brought to Louisville and the coroner at Three Rivers was notified and an inquest has been ordered to be held.

 

MILLER - (Clinton) A fatal accident occurred at the Huron Central Fair this morning. While the firemen's race was taking place, one of the Clinton firemen, John Miller, fell and was run over by the hose reel, receiving such injuries that he died a few minutes afterward. He was but a young man and leaves a wife and small family to mourn his untimely end.

 

October 4, 1890

 

HUTON - Died on October 3, Archie Huton, second son of the late Charles Huton, aged 21 years. Funeral from 155 Market street on Saturday, October 4, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

ESTABROOK - (St. John, N.B.) Amos Estabrook, aged 25, belonging to Sackville, fell out of a small boat while attempting to board the schooner "Glengariff" lying in the harbour last night, and was drowned.

 

KIRBY - (Sarnia) William Kirby, a man about 50 years of age, fell down a shaft at the tunnel this morning at four o'clock and died an hour afterward. The fall was sixty feet.

 

October 6, 1890

 

MORRISON - Died on October 4, Maria, widow of the late Reuben Morrison, aged 93 years. Funeral on Monday, at 1 p.m., from her late residence, Dundas Road, to Ancaster cemetery. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

There died on October 4, at her residence near Dundas, a very aged lady, Mrs. Maria Morrison, widow of Reuben Morrison who died in 1837. The lady was the oldest daughter and child of the late James Durand, Sr., formerly and for many years a resident of this part of the country and registrar of the counties of Wentworth and Halton. She was born in London, England, on September 10, 1798, and was consequently 92 years and 24 days old. She lived in this vicinity over eighty years and was the mother of eleven children, most of whom are still alive but scattered in many distant parts. This lady came to Canada in June, 1810, with her father from London and with her late brother, James Durand, Jr, and her sister, Harriet, the late Mrs. Peter Hamilton. She lived some years with her father and was married in 1816. She could tell all about the war of 1812. Hamilton was then farmland, or farms covered the present site of the city. Her father owned one hundred acres or more in the centre of the present city, covering all the great buildings in the centre. She went to school and trod the streets of old London when a girl from 1806 to 1810. Her voyage across the ocean with her father to Boston in a sailing vessel occupied


six weeks and the journey from Boston in a stage to Hamilton took over three weeks. How wonderful is the change! Then voyages were very dangerous. Her death leaves only one surviving member of her late father and that member is Charles Durand, barrister, of the city of Toronto.

 

MASON - (Prescott) A young man named C. W. Mason, who for the past year has been employed as bartender at the Bradley House, committed suicide yesterday afternoon by taking a dose of laudanum. He is about 29 years of age and has no friends or relatives in this vicinity.

 

DUGGAN - (Toronto) John Duggan, a labourer of Dufferin street, went out on Saturday evening for an hour, and on returning found his wife lying on the floor and a can of beer by her side and an infant in her arms, quite dead, apparently smothered to death. An inquest will be held.

 

October 7, 1890

 

TAYLOR - Died at her son's residence, No 9 Macnab street north, Ann, the beloved wife of Enoch Taylor, late of Dundas, aged 60 years and 8 months. Deeply regretted. Funeral at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

DAVIES - Died on October 5, Henry, infant son of W. Henry and Fannie Davies, aged 6 weeks and 6 days. Funeral from 379 Mary street. Tuesday, October 7,, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

FITZPATRICK - (Windsor) As the young daughter of Henry Fitzpatrick of Sandwich East was playing in a hayloft, she attempted to throw down some hay, when the fork fell out of her hand and struck her sister, sixteen months old, in the head, the tines piercing the brain and causing death almost instantly.

 

JOHNSTON - (St. Catharines) The four-year-old daughter of Joseph Johnston, Niagara street, was fatally burned on Saturday evening. The little girl's clothes became ignited by matches she was striking. She then ran out to her mother who was in the yard, uttering piercing screams. The mother succeeded tn extinguishing the flames, but the child died twenty-four hours afterward, suffering terrible agony during that time. Mrs. Johnston lost a child by falling downstairs two year ago, and a son by drowning about two months ago.

 

BEDFORD - (Halifax) James A. Bedford, a man 60 years old, died to-day from the effects of an accident last week when he fell down a fifteen foot embankment owing to a fence against which he was leaning giving way.


MCNAUGHTON - (Maxville) The large stone house situated six miles from here, owned by D. McNaughton, was destroyed by fire last night. Mrs. McNaughton, Sr., together with young Mrs. McNaughton and a baby escaped, but her husband, James, and a little girl about eight years old, perished in the flames.

 

MALONE - Mrs. Malone, wife of Martin Malone, barrister, died at 4 o'clock a.m. yesterday after a brief illness. The cause of her death was kidney disease, complicated with other troubles. The deceased was only 28 years of age and leaves a family of three children. She had been ill only a few days and her death was distressingly unexpected.

Mrs, Malone was a daughter of the late William Collier of Dundas who at one time kept the Elgin House there. She was a most amiable lady and highly esteemed and respected by all who had the pleasure of her acquaintance. The funeral will take place on Wednesday morning at 8:30 from Mr. Malone's residence, 290 John street north.

 

October 8, 1890

 

PETTIT - Died at her residence, Nelson, on October 5, 1890, Mary Elizabeth, wife of Andrew F. Pettit, in the 79th year of her age. Funeral on Wednesday, October 8, at 1:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ROBERTS - Died on Tuesday, October 7, 1890, Capt John Roberts, late of H.M. 24th Regiment, and late staff officer of pensions, Hamilton District, aged 80 years. Funeral (private) from his late residence, 129 Hannah street west, on Thursday, at 3 p.m.

Capt. John Roberts, late of H.M. 24th Regiment and staff officer of pensions for Hamilton district, died yesterday at his residence, 129 Hannah street west, in the 81st year of his age. Deceased had resided in Hamilton since 1859 and during three decades enjoyed the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens. Capt. Roberts was born in Limerick, Ireland, and when quite ,a young man entered the British army, being enrolled in the 24th Regiment. He was with his regiment in Canada at the time of the Mackenzie rebellion, 1837-38, and afterwards in India when it was stationed at Calcutta, Agra, and other points. After returning to Ireland, Capt. Roberts was sent to Canada in 1851 as staff officer of pensions for the Penetanguishene district with headquarters in Toronto. In 1859 Hamilton, which previous to that date, had been as outpost, was made headquarters for the Niagara peninsula and Penetanguishene districts and Captain Roberts transferred here. He retired from the position in 1882, and has since lived retired with his eldest daughter. He had charge of the colonial pension account for the Canadian government, but the duties of that position did not occupy much of his time. Deceased suffered from no special ailment and died simply of senile decay. Two sons and two daughters survive him: William Roberts, manager Bank of Commerce; Alfred, recently resident in the Northwest; Miss Roberts; and Mrs. E. D. Morris of Desoronto. The funeral will take place on Thursday afternoon.

 

 


DELEMOND - (Kingston) Joseph DeLemond walked off a wharf at Sealey's Bay in the darkness and was drowned.

 

GAGNON - (Quebec) A dispatch from St. Pierre du Sud says: The house, sheds, and barns belonging to Mathias Gagnon, situated a mile east of the station, were overturned in the river at 3 o'clock this morning by a landslide. A quarter of a mile of land on which stood the buildings rolled down into the river, blocking it completely with earth and debris. The family was composed of eleven members. Mrs. Gagnon was killed and her husband dangerously wounded. The nine children were saved. Some twenty years ago a similar accident in the neighbourhood occurred, causing much damage.

 

October 9, 1890

 

MITCHELL - Died at the residence of James Pemberton, 11 Melton street, off Queen street north, on October 8, Joseph Mitchell, aged 29 years, a member of Acorn Lodge, Sons of England. Funeral on Friday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

 

BARBER - (Gananoque) An accident occurred to-day on the farm of Mr. DeWitte, Hay Island, in the St. Lawrence river opposite the town, through which Thomas Barber, an Irishman, lost his life. He was engaged at work in connection with the threshing which was being done by a steam thresher. In trying to get into the mow of the barn, he slipped and fell. One leg entered the cylinder of the thresher and was torn in shreds in a fearful manner. When medical aid arrived at the island, Barber was beyond help, his condition being too low to admit of assistance. He died within two hours of the time he was injured.

 

BURNS - (St. John, N.B.) Annie Burns, a twelve-year-old coloured girl, died under peculiar circumstances last night. Early in the evening she called at the house of George McLeod, Orange street, and there was given a piece of goose by one of the kitchen girls which she ate. Going home, she complained of pains in the head and during the night took violent convulsions, dying in the morning. The body of the girl is swollen and the tongue protrudes in a terribly discoloured condition.

 

MCCREADY - (Montreal) James McCready, the well known boot and shoe manufacturer, died this morning aged 48 years. He was very wealthy. He leaves a fortune estimated at $500,000.

 

LONGMORE - (Simcoe) The eldest child of A. E. Longmore, a little girl of eleven years, fell from a bridge into Crystal Lake to-day and was drowned.


LUMSDEN - James Lumsden, the most scholarly of the inmates of the House of Refuge, died suddenly yesterday afternoon. Mr. Lumsden was one of the most accomplished linguists in Hamilton. He could converse fluently and read with ease in six languages. At one time he taught school in Port Dover. He was 66 years old and had been an inmate of the House of Refuge for seven years.

 

October 10, 1890

 

WIDGER - Died on Thursday, October 9, at 75 East avenue south, Helen A. Widger, daughter of the late James Widger. Funeral on Saturday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DOHERTY - (Toronto) R. G. Doherty was found dead in bed at 121 Bleecker street shortly after eight o'clock this morning. Heart disease was the trouble. The deceased was not more than 33 years of age and was formerly in business as a jeweller on Queen street west, but latterly had been employed as an advertising agent. He leaves a wife and three little children.

 

PASCO - (Halifax) William Pasco, a sailor belonging to HMS Bellerophon, fell over the wharf at H.M. dockyard in the dark last night and was drowned. The body was recovered ten minutes afterward.

 

MCGONIGLE - (Cumberland) Mary and Eliza, twelve and fourteen years old, daughters of James McGonigle, one and a half miles from the village who attended the village school, on Tuesday last started for home after school Tuesday evening and were last seen half a mile from home followed by a man, Narcisses Larocque who is now under arrest. The bodies had been outraged and strangled, and were found last night at ten o'clock by an exploring party of villagers.

Although the children did not reach home after school on Tuesday evening, their parents were not anxious about them as it being a wet stormy evening, they supposed that the children had remained in the village as they had done on previous occasions. On Wednesday morning the father went to work as usual, supposing the girls were at school, but when five o'clock came and the children did not appear, the anxious mother caused Mr. McGonigle to set out for the village where he found that his girls had not been at school that day, nor had they been seen since Tuesday evening. The residents of the village at once formed themselves, into parties to search the woods for the missing girls as it was learned that they were last seen half way home at five o'clock Tuesday evening. About ten o'clock last evening one of the parties came on the two bodies, cold and dead, lying on an unfrequented by-road, a short distance from the regular road. Their deranged clothing, their protruding tongues, and a dark circle on the neck of each were plain evidence that each of the girls had been outraged and then strangled to death.


The coroner was notified and an inquest is now going on. A warrant was issued for Narcisse Larocque who had been seen following the girls, and he has been arrested.

 

RUSSELL - (Wiarton) A young man named George Russell came from Port Elgin last week and went to work at Mar, about eight miles from here. Yesterday while helping to raise an old house with jacks, the props gave way and he was crushed to death. The body was taken home.

 

October 11, 1890

 

COLEMAN - (Lyn) A track man by the name of Coleman, who was working on the Grand Trunk Railway between Lyn and Mallorytown, did not notice the approach of the up express train this afternoon, and before he could get out of danger was struck by the engine and instantly killed.

 

October 13, 1890

 

EGAN - (Sarnia) James Egan, wheelman on the car boat "International", was drowned this morning at two o'clock as the boat was going into the slip at Point Edward. He fell off the boat.

 

October 14, 1890

 

LAPIERRE - (Ottawa) A sad event occurred at Hull yesterday. Mr. Lapierre and his relatives were engaged in celebrating the seventh anniversary of the birthday of his youngest child. The child playfully attempted to slide down the bannister, and fell, receiving injuries which resulted in his death a short time afterward.

 

PROCTOR - (Sarnia) Edward M. Proctor, registrar of deeds of the county of Lambton, died here this evening at the age of 71. He was born in England, had been in Canada since his boyhood, and had been registrar for a number of years.

 

October 15, 1890

 

BRETERNITZ - Died in this city, at 140 Napier street, on October 14, Annie, eldest daughter of Julius and Helma Breternitz, aged 24 years and 4 days. Funeral from her parents' residence, on Thursday,. October 16, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

MILLS - (Toronto) A young man's body was found on the street last night, and it is supposed that he committed suicide. He has been identified as Andrew Mills, a dry goods clerk employed up to a week ago by J. Bachrach. A letter was found on him addressed to Polly, saying she was one of


the only girls he loved. The girl referred to is employed in a Yonge Street dry goods store, and Lobban is the name of another girl whom he is alleged to have got into trouble with, which is supposed to have been the cause of his suicide.

 

October 17, 1890

 

BEITH - Drowned at Chicago, U.S., on October 6, John S. Beith, of Sarnia, Ontario.

 

THOMAS - (Toronto) Andrew Thomas, a well to-do contractor, left home Wednesday morning to go to a planing mill in North Toronto, somewhere beyond the Canadian Pacific Railway bridge, and it is supposed that while on the bridge, he was struck by a passing train or tripped on the ties and was precipitated into the ravine below the bridge, his body being found out there this morning.

 

SELLARS - (Kingston) The funeral of the late Robert Sellars, the oldest Freemason in Canada, having been made in 1820, took place this afternoon, and was attended by a large concourse of citizens and nearly all the members of the craft in Kingston. The funeral was under the direction of St. John's Lodge, and the masonic ceremony was conducted by W. M. Bro. J. Ross Robertson, grand master of the grand lodge of Canada.

 

COCHRANE - (Barrie) Monday morning David Cochrane, aged 70, of Midhurst, near here, left home immediately after breakfast to dig potatoes in a field. At noon he did not return when expected and a search was afterward instituted with the result that his remains were found in a fence corner with his throat cut so deeply that the head was almost severed from the body. He was an intelligent and well read man, and formerly lived at Copetown near Hamilton. There is no suspicion of foul play, but that the old man took his own life while labouring under temporary insanity. The affair caused a sensation in the neighbourhood.

 

ANDREWS - (Belleville) The attendance at the races this afternoon was large and the weather was favourable, but the afternoon sport was marred by a shocking accident. In the second heat of the running race, the mare 'Eulidea', owned by Pat McLaughlin of Kingston, after being injured in a breakaway by 'Chandos' broke her right leg and fell. The rider was thrown with such force that his skull was broken and the mare rolled on him. The boy breathed but for a few minutes. His name was James Andrews, his age was about sixteen, and he was the son of a widow who lives in Kingston. The mare had to be shot.

 

October 18, 1890

 

STROUD - Died in this city, on October 16, Frank, youngest son or George and Alice Stroud, aged 2 months and 17 days. Funeral will leave 426 Victoria avenue north, on Saturday, October 18, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

 


YOUNG - Died at the residence of her brother-in-law, Thomas Costello, at 95 Kelly street, on October 16, Alice Gertrude, fourth daughter of Daniel Young, aged 17 years and 9 months. Funeral on Sunday at 9:30 a.m. Interment at St. George's Church, Barton. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FISHER - Died at 31 Bold street, on Friday, October 17, Julia Lunn, widow of the late James Fisher, aged 86 years. Funeral from her late residence on Monday, October 20 at 3 o'clock.

 

MYERS - Drowned on Monday, October 13, while crossing the river at Rigund, Quebec, W. J. Myers, of 121 Macnab street north, aged 30 years and 7 months.

The sad news reached here yesterday that W. J. Myers of this city was drowned last Monday on the St. Lawrence river near the village of Rigund below Quebec. Myers took a job early this season as steward on a steamer called the "Bee", plying in the lower St. Lawrence. Last Monday he started to row from the boat to shore for the purpose of posting to his wife his season's earnings. He intended coming home for the winter in about a fortnight.

There was a high wind last Monday and the river was very rough. The last seen of Myers he was struggling in his little boat against the waves and was making little headway. He did not return to the boat, and upon inquiry it was discovered that he had not reached the shore. The boat was found on the river, capsized, so that there is no doubt that the poor fellow was drowned. His body has not been recovered. His widow lives at 121 Macnab street north with Miss Ortteein, dressmaker. Mrs. Myers has three small children and would be destitute were it not for the kindness of Miss Ortteein.

 

LEMAY - (Montreal) Amable Lemay was killed this morning by falling under his cart while carting sand from a barge.

 

TRUESDALE - (Port Dover) The corner's inquest on the poisoning case of Mrs. Truesdale terminated last evening, the jury returning a verdict of poisoning by strychnine administered by the hand of a person or persons unknown to the jury. John Truesdale, husband of the deceased, and her stepson are still under arrest.

 

October 16, 1890

 

DONOHOE - Died at No 10 Went worth street north, on October 14:, Alexander, infant son of Alexander and Annie Donohoe, aged 4 months. Funeral on Thursday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


ROSS - Died in this city, on Tuesday, October 14, John Ross, aged 69 years. Funeral from his late residence, No 81 Victoria avenue north, on Thursday, October 16, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CONWAY - (Montreal) Michael Conway, superintendent of the Lachine canal, dropped dead to-night.

 

LANGLOIS - (Laprairie, Que) News comes from St. Phillippe, a village distant about three miles, of a quarrel there last night between a young man named Lefebvre and a hired man in which Lefebvre shot his companion, one Langlois who died this morning at 5 o'clock. Lefebvre & the hired man are aged 15 and 18 years respectively. The coroner has gone from here to hold an inquest. It is said the gun was loaded with salt. Another account says that the shooting occurred at a dance.

 

ALLEN - (Windsor) When the Canadian Pacific freight train was leaving Windsor at 7 o'clock last evening and had reached a point about half a mile west of the Lake Erie and Detroit Railway crossing, the engineer saw the body of a man lying directly across one of the rails. Although he did everything possible to stop the train, the wheels of the engine passed over the body, cutting it in two. The remains were conveyed to the junction. From books and papers found in the pockets the coroner decided that the remains were those of Frank E. Allen, a timekeeper at Oulette mills at McGregor station.

 

October 20, 1890

 

SLATER - (Novar) Samuel Slater of Hamilton, manager of the Landed Banking and Loan Company, was accidentally shot this morning about seven o'clock by William McDonough of this place. Mr. Slater in company with some friends from Hamilton came up to Novar to spend the hunting season and had arranged with some parties here to be their guides. They had everything in readiness at their camp, twelve miles out, this morning when the sad accident took place. McDonough was testing the accuracy of Mr. Slater's gun on a target, and deceased was standing at some distance to one side when the ball grazed a small sapling, glanced , and struck Mr. Slater in the forehead, killing him instantly. The body is being conveyed in from the camp and it will be sent to Hamilton by first express.

 

October 21, 1890

 

SLATER - Died on the morning of October 18, in the township of Bethune, near Novar, Parry Sound district, Samuel Slater, Esq, aged 46 years, accidentally shot while on a hunting expedition. Funeral from his late residence, 71 Jackson street west, on Tuesday, at 3:30 p.m.


MASLIN - Died at Brooklyn, N.Y., October 18, Alice Maslin, widow of the late Samuel Maslin. Funeral on Tuesday, at 2 o'clock, from 40 Alanson street.

 

October 22, 1890

 

NICHOLSON - Killed accidentally, in this city, October 21, John Nicholson, contractor. Funeral will take place from his late residence, 48 Homewood avenue, on Thursday, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Contractor John Nicholson received such injuries in a collapsed sewer yesterday that he died shortly after he was taken out.

The sewer in which the fatal accident occurred was the one which is being constructed on Macaulay street to carry off the water whenever it rains, flooding the cellar in St. Luke's church. The sewer was begun nearly two weeks ago and is not far from completion. John Nicholson was the contractor for the work. He and three others were working at the sewer yesterday morning near St. Luke's rectory. They had removed the casing from the place where the pipe had been laid and were fixing it against the sides of the sewer where they were about to lay the pipe. When the accident occurred, the men had put the boards against the sides of the excavation but had not yet fixed the cross pieces in their places in order to brace the embankment. It was in this place that three men were and it was here that the bank caved in. The south wall of the excavation had been undermined by the treacherous quicksand which abounds in that locality and  about a dozen feet of it suddenly collapsed and filled up the excavation where the three men were. Mr. Nicholson was buried up to the neck.

One of the boards which had stood against the south wall was driven with great force against Mr. Nicholson's body so that it was broken like a sliver. Harry May and Stephen Murray were the men working with Mr. Nicholson in the sewer. May was buried up to the waist and was severely crushed though not, it is hoped, dangerously, He was got out without much difficulty and was driven to his home on Ferguson avenue. Murray was not hurt at all.

James Kelly was the fourth man employed in the work. He was working above ground at the time of the cave-in. He and Frank Smith, letter carrier E. Ralston, and one or two others who happened to be near the spot at the time went to work with a will and in about ten minutes they had extracted Mr. Nicholson. He was quite calm and collected when they were working around him, and though it evidently cost him a great deal of effort to speak, he several times directed their operations. They carried him into the rectory and laid him on a sofa. Rev. Mr. Massey did all that it was possible to do to make him comfortable. He seemed to suffer most from the difficulty of breathing. A little whiskey was administered and did him some good, but he refused to take any more when it was offered. “No", he gasped, "I want to keep my senses". He seemed to know that he could not recover, for when Frank Smith tried to cheer him by saying that his


injuries were not serious and he would be around again soon. He grew impatient and shook his head impatiently. Dr. Woolverton has been sent for and arrived soon after Mr. Nicholson was taken into the house, but the doctor could do little to relieve him. Soon after Dr. Woolverton left, Mr. Nicholson's face became discoloured and blood, mucous, and froth began to exude from his lips. Aid. Nicholson arrived and recognized that his brother had not long to live, hurried away for his wife. Mrs. Nicholson arrived just in time to see her husband die. He was conscious to the last.

The remains were conveyed to the family residence on Homewood avenue.

Mr. Nicholson used to own and manage a wood yard on York street with his brother, George. Latterly he had been taking contracts for constructing sidewalks and sewers. He was an unusually industrious man and was as honest and upright a citizen as walked the streets of Hamilton. Besides his wife, several small children all quite young, survive him.

Harry May is under Dr. Bingham's care. He is suffering intensely and the doctor fears he is injured internally. Dr. Woolverton was present when Mr. Nicholson died. The doctor thinks that his death resulted from the bursting of a blood vessel caused by the great pressure from without. None of the bones of the chest were broken.

No inquest will be held.

 

MACPHAIL - (Halifax) John Macphail, a county constable, was found dead on a road near Tangier last night with a slight bruise on the left ear. He is supposed to have died from heart disease and fallen out of his wagon.

 

October 23, 1890

 

THOMSON - Died on October 22, John Wilson Thomas, in his 48th year, a native of Tillisoutry, Scotland. Funeral from his late residence, 83 Hess street north, Thursday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CORKE - Died at Palmerston, Mass., on October 21, Frederick W. Corke, stepson of John Hughes, Hamilton Beach, aged 28 years. Funeral from the residence of his brother-in-law, F. A. Fletcher, No 112 Steven street, on Thursday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

TRANT - Died at St, Joseph's hospital, Guelph, on October 21, Sister M. Dominica Trant, in the 23rd year of her age and 7th of her religious life. Funeral from St. Joseph's convent, on Thursday morning, at 9 o'clock.

 

CREEK - (Stratford) A shocking accident happened about 6 o'clock this evening at the Downie street crossing of the Grand Trunk in this city. A man apparently about 70 years old was run over by the yard engine which was slowly backing out of a siding, completely severing the head from


the body. The body has been identified as that of William Creek, a farmer living near Milverton, a few miles north of here. The deceased was under the influence of liquor at the time.

 

PAGE - (Waterdown) Otway Page, the headmaster of the high school, he had gone to Ridgway on Saturday to attend the funeral of his mother.

 

October 24, 1890

 

BLACHFORD - Died at the residence of her daughter-in-law, Mrs. A. Blachford, Carlton street, Toronto, on October 23, Nancy Blachford, mother of the late John Blachford of this city, aged 89 years. Interment at Buffalo, N.Y., on Saturday afternoon.

 

BEATTY - (Campbellford) Mrs. Beatty, aged about 30, wife of James Beatty, cabinetmaker, committed suicide to-day by cutting her throat with a razor. Melancholia with suicidal tendency is the cause attributed, as she had been in an despondent mood for two or three weeks. An inquest is not deemed necessary.

 

October 25, 1890

 

SEWELL - Died in the city of Quebec, on October 24, in the 91st year of his age, the Rev. E. W. Sewell, M.A., second son of the late chief justice Sewell.

 

October 27, 1890

 

MACPHERSON - Died on October 26, 1890, Mary Russell, wife of T. H. Macpherson, and eldest daughter of the late John Ferrie. Funeral from 46 Herkimer street, on Tuesday, at 3 p.m. No flowers.

 

OLD - Died in this city, on October 26, Mabel Beatrice, youngest daughter of Thomas Old, aged 15 years. Funeral will leave her father's residence, 213 Young street, Monday, October 27, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

APPLEYARD - Died on October 24, at the residence of her son, at Esquesing, Susan Booth, relict of the late Thomas Appleyard of this city, in the 71st year of her age. Funeral on Monday from King Street station on arrival of the 11 a.m. train from the north. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

October 28, 1890

 

SMYE - Died on October 26, Freddie, son of Thomas A. and Amy Smye, aged 1 year and 7 months. Funeral on Tuesday at 2 o'clock from No 7 Harriet street to Burlington cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.


REARDON - Died in Ottawa, at his brother's residence, on Sunday, October 26, John Reardon, moulder, in the 57th year of his age. Funeral at 57 Cannon street west, Thursday, at 8:30 a.m.

 

CROFT - Died suddenly at St. Thomas, on October 18, John Croft, aged 45 years. Funeral from his late residence, 26 Margaret street, Tuesday, at 4 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice. (Editors note; not John Croft, see page 186)

 

GREIG - Died on October 26, at 44 Greig street, Elizabeth May, infant daughter of John and Isabella Greig, aged 4 months and 2 weeks. Funeral on Tuesday, at 2 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

DOUGLAS - (Toronto) The body of the man found in the bay this morning has been identified as that of Robert Douglas, stonemason, formerly of Kingston, lately living in Yorkville, a widower of fifty, and lately employed by J. H. Trotter who was a member of the coroner's jury this evening and identified him.

 

MCLEAN - (Halifax) Fred McLean, a brakeman, fell from a freight train at the Acadia mines Saturday night and the cars passed over his left leg severing it at the knee and injuring part of the limb horribly. He died two hours after the accident.

 

October 29, 1890

 

MCLEAN - (Owen Sound) This morning a young man, Peter McLean, was found dead in his bed at the Seldon House, having been asphyxiated with gas. He arrived last night by the steamer "Pacific" and registered his name only. He was on his way to Southampton.  According to his time-book found on him, he had been working at Harris Mills, Lake Linden.

 

FARRELL - (Blenheim) The body found in the Eau last night is that of W. J., Farrell, a young married man of Grimsby, Ontario. He with some friends came here two weeks ago to enjoy duck shooting. Yesterday morning young Farrell in company with Frank Warner went out in the Eau. About eight o'clock Farrell complained of being cold and decided to return to Warner's where he was staying. This was the last seen of him. It is supposed that his gun accidentally went off, making a hole in the side of the boat and letting the water come in, and that Farrell, losing his presence of mind, instead of trying to remedy the damage, took off his shoes evidently intending to gain the shore by swimming. The wind was against him and he must have become exhausted and perished. The young man's father arrived here to-day and will accompany the corpse to Grimsby to-morrow morning.

 

JONES - (Ottawa) The oldest resident of the city of Ottawa in the person of Mrs. Martha Jones passed away at 2 o'clock this morning in her 101st year. The deceased was the wife of the late


Thomas Jones of the Seventh Company of Royal Sappers and Miners. She was born in Monmouthshire, Wales, and immigrated to this country in 1829. She was quite hale and hearty up to last May when the weight of years fell upon her and began to render her very feeble.

 

LAWSON - (Ottawa) William Lawson, aged 65, dropped dead at Billings Bridge last night.

 

October 31, 1890

 

BELL - (Manilla, Ont) Yesterday while G. Bell, a pump maker, was working in the bottom of an old well, forty-one feet deep, a large quantity of earth fell in on him, smothering him.

 

MILLARD - (Freelton) Death unexpectedly visited the home of L. K. Millard of Freelton. His son, Freddie, went to bed on Saturday night as well as usual and on Saturday morning was found dead in bed. His funeral took place at 2 o'clock on Tuesday to the Carmel cemetery at which a very large number of the many friends of Mr. and Mrs. Millard attended thereby expressing their sympathy to them in their bereavement.

 

MCCORMACK - (Freelton) James McCormack of Mountsberg, formerly of this place, met with an accident on Saturday evening which resulted in his death on Monday morning. He was kicked in the stomach by a colt. Mr. McCormack was well liked by the people of the village as he was a sober, industrious man and always had a kind word for everyone.

 

MUNDLE, YOUNG - (St. John, N.B.) Several hundred people witnessed a peculiarly distressing accident which occurred here this afternoon. A young son of Frederick Mundle, a well known St. John merchant, fell over the railway wharf, and Frederick Young, a lad of seventeen, leaped in after him. The tide was running strong and there was a heavy sea. A number of mill hands left work and went to the rescue. A boat was launched, but was broken to pieces on the rocks. A life buoy was sent out to the drifting boys, but they could not reach it. After keeping Mundle up for about half an hour, Young and the other boy went to the bottom. A high wind prevailed to-day and there was a very heavy sea in the harbour.

 

November 1, 1890

 

DEMPSEY - Died in Allegheny City, on October 24, Annie, the beloved wife of L. B. Dempsey, aged — years.

 

COPPLEY - Died in this city, on October 31, Lottie H., daughter of S. and Iola Coppley, aged 19 months. Funeral from her father's residence, Nelson street, on Sunday afternoon at 2. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

 


KINSELLA - (London) A probably fatal accident occurred early this morning in the Canadian Pacific Railway yard here. As the 4:30 express from the west was running into the station, Patrick Kinsella, about 16 years of age, a call boy on the road, was walking down the track at the time, and meeting the express, stepped over on to another track to avoid it, not noticing the yard engine which was coming up behind him. He was knocked down by it and dragged for a considerable distance and terribly injured. One of his arms was cut off near the shoulder, his hip dislocated, and his head and body bruised. He was removed to the hospital in an ambulance where his death is expected momentarily.

Later: Patrick Kinsella has succumbed to the injuries received in the C.P.R. yards this morning.

 

LITTLEJOHN - (Toronto) A dispatch from Detroit, Michigan, says: that one of the passengers on the Grand Trunk train which arrived in this city on Wednesday morning was discovered to be ill and in an unconscious state. When the train pulled into the depot, the stranger was conveyed to the Detroit Sanitarium where he died yesterday afternoon. From papers found on his person, it was learned that his name was W. J. Littlejohn of Uxbridge, Ontario. He was on his way from St. Louis, Mo., to his home. Deceased was 35 years of age. The cause of death is not known. Physicians will make a post mortem examination.

 

BLOIS - (St. John, Que) Blois, the lunatic who is alleged to have escaped from the Michigan asylum and who was incarcerated in the jail here for murderous assaulting constable Lareau and Joseph Lagasse in Lacolle on Wednesday last, was this morning found dead, he having committed suicide during the night by twisting pieces of a sheet into a rope with which he suspended himself from an iron bar in the corridor.

 

VAIL - Intelligence was received here yesterday of the death of Albert S. Vail who was for upwards of a quarter of a century a valued citizen of Hamilton.  Mr. Vail died suddenly at his residence at Doylestown, Pa. Notwithstanding his advanced age (he was 75 years old) he was remarkably robust and active up to within a day or two of his death.

Mr. Vail was a Pennsylvanian by birth. Thirty years ago he came to Hamilton from New York and was employed in the clothing establishment of Sanford, McInnes, & Co. He was admitted as a partner when Mr. McInnes retired, the name of the firm being changed to Sanford, Vail & Bickley, and afterward to Sanford, Vail & Co. Mr. Vail was particularly popular among the German population of Hamilton, many of whom he brought here to work for the firm. He was half German himself, speaking that language as well as he did English. Mr. Vail's Hamilton residence was at 88 Hughson street south. When he retired from the firm of Sanford, Vail & Co three or four years ago he was suffering from asthma. While on a visit to his old home in


Pennsylvania, his complaint disappeared and he, concluding that his native air agreed with him better than any other, determined to spend the remainder of his days in Pennsylvania. For the past three years he was engaged in stock raising, having purchased farmland for that purpose near Doylestown.

Mr. Vail is survived by his wife and one daughter, Mrs. T. H. Pratt of this city. It is likely that Mrs. Vail will take up residence with her daughter.

The funeral will take place on Sunday. Alderman and Mrs. Pratt will attend it.

 

November 3, 1890

 

JACKSON - Died in this city, on November 2, 1890, Ethel, the only daughter of James H. and Ida Jackson, aged 1 year, 11 months, and 2 days. Funeral will take place from the parents' residence, 179 King street west, on Tuesday, November 4, at — p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MITCHELL - Died on Sunday, November 2, at 2 p.m., Isabella, the beloved wife of Thomas Mitchell, in the 52nd year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, corner Jackson and Queen streets on Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

DOUGLAS - Mrs. Harry Douglas who was struck by a locomotive at Burlington Junction some weeks ago died last Friday evening.

 

CROFT - John Croft who it was supposed died at St. Thomas, whose supposed remains were brought to Hamilton and buried, is not dead, but living. He is in London and has read with a considerable degree of interest the account of his sudden death, the identification of the body, its removal to Hamilton, and its burial... (see page 183)

 

YORK - At seven o'clock last night a coloured prisoner named Charles York died suddenly in the county jail. He had been sent down on Saturday for ninety days for vagrancy after a prolonged debauch that nearly terminated in the DTs. Dr. Woolverton decided to hold an inquest.

The inquest was held at noon to-day. Jailor Ogilvie, turnkey Sutherland, and two prisoners were the witnesses. It was shown that the prisoner was at divine service on Sunday afternoon, but was under needed treatment tending to tide him over the effects of the spree. Dr. Rosebrugh attributed his death to heart failure. No post mortem had been made, but the jury found the evidence sufficient and returned a verdict of death from natural causes. York had no friends in this vicinity.

 

FAULKNER - The funeral of the late George C. Faulkner took place yesterday from 189 Victoria avenue south. Notwithstanding the unpleasant weather, there was a large turnout of members of


Crescent Lodge 104, I.O.O.F. and Sceptre and Crown R. T. of T. being present... The deceased leaves a young widow and one child.

 

VINCENT - (Toronto) After a lingering illness Very Rev. Charles Vincent, V.G., C.S.B., died at five o'clock on Saturday afternoon at St. Michael's' college surrounded by the priests of the college and the nuns who have attended him as nurses during his illness. The disease which caused his death was cirrhosis of the liver, and while the deceased suffered great pain in the early stages of his sickness, his last hours were calm and painless. The dying prelate retained full possession of his mental faculties to the last.

The deceased was born in Vallons in the department of Ardeche, France, June 30, 1828. He pursued his studies with the Basilian fathers in the early stages at Aubenas, completing then at Annonay. After finishing his courses he joined the community and when they were asked by the Right Rev. Bishop de Charbonnet of Toronto for a man to start a college in his diocese, Father Vincent, then a young man, volunteered. The late Father Soulerin was superior with Father Flannery, now of St. Thomas, and the late Father Maloney as professors. Father Vincent was appointed prefect of study and continued in that position until some time after his ordination which took place on May 22, 1853.

He then became treasurer of the college. After Father Soulerin became superior-general of the Basilians and returned to France in that capacity, father Vincent assumed the superiorship of St. Michael's college which position he held for 21 years. In 1866 he was succeeded by Father Cushing of Assumption college, Sandwich, as superior. Father Vincent still retained his position as provincial of Basilians until last August when he was succeeded by Rev. Father Maryon, late novice muster of the Basilians of Plymouth, England.

Father Vincent was a man of clear practical judgment, mild and tender-hearted in his rule, with a wonderful power of winning the affection of those who had the happiness of being trained under him.

Last winter he had a severe attack of la grippe, aggravated by jaundice and pneumonia. For some days in the month of January last his life was despaired of, but medical skill and careful nursing prevailed, and he was able to resume his teaching of moral theology in the college. Last August his health began to show renewed signs of failure and a cold caught in September brought on a severe attack of Jaundice. He continued to linger with perfect consciousness until the end.

 

TOBIN - (Toronto) William Tobin, employed at Shannon's shingle factory, 458 Dufferin street, met with a terrible death on Saturday afternoon. He was engaged at work with a circular saw when he slipped and fell against the blade and in a few moments' time he was literally dismembered, the flying teeth having cut through his side and stomach, almost dividing the


trunk from the limbs. The ambulance was summoned, but the unfortunate man died before he could be removed to the hospital. He was 27 years of age and came from the neighbourhood of Bracebridge a short time ago.

 

MARSHALL - (Toronto) At half past seven o'clock yesterday morning while constable Steele was doing duty on Queen, west of Jarvis street, he found an old man lying weak and helpless on the boulevard. In reply to questions, the man stated that his name was George Marshall, 63 years of age, and that he resided at 108 Richmond street east. Steele carried him as far as the lane on Queen street when he begged to be taken to his house by the back way. The services of a civilian were secured, but just as the constable arrived at the back door of the house, the old man suddenly expired. Dr. Kane was called, and after an examination he gave it as his opinion that death resulted from heart disease. The deceased's wife stated that her husband had been drinking and had started out to buy whiskey, taking with him twenty-five cents, all the money they possessed.

 

November 4, 1890

 

EMORY - Died in this city, on November 3, Jennie Crosby, beloved wife of Dr. U. W. Emory, aged 34 years. Funeral from her husband's residence, No 38 Main street west, Thursday, November 6, at 10:15 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. C. W. Emory, a prominent worker in Temperance and other benevolent societies, died on Monday evening of Bright's disease. She was the daughter of D. P. Crosby of Burlington and wife of Dr. C. W. Emory, of Main street.

 

JOHNSON - Died on Monday, November 3, 1890, at 21 Young street, Hamilton, Maitland, son of George and Nellie Johnson, aged 12 years. Funeral private.

Matey Johnston, the only child of George W. Johnston, headmaster of the Ryerson school, died this morning from the effects of an injury he received several days ago. The boy fell while at play and fractured one of his legs in two places. His suffering was terrible, the injured limb became inflamed, and narcotics appeared to have no effect on the poor little fellow. The immediate cause of his death was lockjaw which set in yesterday.

 

November 5, 1890

 

NEIL - There died in Stony Creek last Saturday morning one of the oldest, best and most favourably known of the residents of the eastern part of the county of Wentworth. Levi Neil was born in Saltfleet 68 years ago last May and in the region surrounding his birthplace he spent his life, In whatever avocation he engaged, he possessed the esteem and confidence of those who


knew him whether as a farmer or an auctioneer, in which latter occupation he was better known. He was universally respected. For some months past Mr. Neil had suffered with diabetes and finally it was announced by his physician that he must succumb to the disease. Death was not unexpected, and it was met heroically. On Saturday morning Mr. Neil fell asleep. The respect in which the deceased was held by a very large circle of friends and acquaintances was amply testified by the very large concourse which attended the funeral from the family residence Monday afternoon.

At the house an impressive service was conducted by Rev. Mr. Hocky after which the remains were escorted to the M.E. Church, the members of the Masonic fraternity of which the deceased was a charter member having charge of the obsequies. At the church the Rev. Mr. Hocky preached an eloquent sermon appropriate to the occasion after the conclusion of which the cortege resumed its way to the Stony Creek cemetery and there in a beautiful spot shaded by weeping willows and amid scenery which he had often pleasurably surveyed in life, the mortal remains of Levi Neil were deposited in their last resting place.

The Masonic turnout was the largest and most creditable ever seen in the county, and the masonic emblems were numerous and tastefully arranged. The burial service of the craft was most imposing and beautifully conducted by W. Bro. P. M. Carpenter, assisted by Rt W. Bro. Hugh Murray, grand master; W. Bros. R. Dewar and Combs, and other members. The pallbearers were W. Bros. George Millen, M. Pettit, J. Davey, Colin Carpenter, W. H. Woodhouse, and John Mullen. The funeral procession was the largest seen in Stony Creek for years and was under the personal supervision of W. Bro. Jesse Chapman. The deceased gentleman leaves to mourn his loss, a widow, and six children; three daughters, Mrs. Abram Dean, Winona; Mrs. C. Jameson, Tapleytown; Mrs. W. Hendershott, Elfrida; and three sons, Dennis of Detroit, Ganet of Beamsville, and Murray, proprietor of the Acacia house, Stony Creek.

 

DESIMONCOURT - (Winnipeg) Harry DeSimoncourt, cousin of Count DeSimoncourt, and manager of his business here, died Sunday night on the prairie a few miles from town. He left that day, accompanied by his brother and an ox team for Stonewall, but was taken ill about five miles out. His brother tried to drive him back to the city, but the oxen got mired, and they started to walk, but in a few minutes Harry lay down, saying he could go no further. He was carefully wrapped up and Charles started for medical assistance. When he returned, Harry was dead, the cause being heart disease. No inquest vas deemed necessary.

 

BATTEL - (Winnipeg) The infant child of Mrs. Battel was strangled near Moose Jaw while playing with a mower. Her husband and eldest daughter were killed by lighting a few months ago and this was the only remaining child.


EVANS - (Winnipeg) John Evans of Rat Portage got his foot caught in a cog wheel of a saw mill on Saturday and the leg was crushed to the knee, rendering amputation necessary. He afterward died.

 

November 6, 1890

 

BRETERNITZ - Died in this city, November 6, Helma, beloved wife of Julius Breternitz, in her 45th year. Funeral Sunday, November 9, from her husband's residence, 140 Napier street, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

GRAHAM - Died at 69 Sheaffe street, on November 5, W. Graham, only son of James and Fannie Graham, aged 7 years. Funeral from parents' residence, Friday, November 7, at 9 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCCREADY - (Waterford) A tramp tailor named McCready, whose given name and age are not known, but the latter is supposed to be about 65 years, died at the residence of P. Redker in this place on Sunday morning after an illness of about a week. The deceased had worked for Mr. Redker several times during the past fifteen years and had also worked at Blenheim and other places in Kent and Essex counties during the past five or six years. He had a sister, we hear, residing in the neighbourhood of Hamilton some time ago, but whether she is still in that locality now is not known. The remains were interred in Greenwood cemetery on Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

 

November 7, 1890

 

CLARKE - Died on Thursday, November 6, Helen May Louise, youngest child of Alexander and Elizabeth Clarke, aged 1 year, 7 months, and 13 days. Funeral on Saturday, at 2 p.m., from parents' residence, 124 Emerald street north. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

KNIGHT - Died at the residence of her mother, 82 Tisdale street, Maud, youngest daughter of the late Patrick and Ellen Knight, aged 8 years and months. Funeral private.

 

HARRIS - Thanksgiving Day did not pass off without a fatality of some kind. William Harris, a young married man who lived with his mother, Mrs. James Judd, 127 Florence street, was drowned in the bay. Early in the morning he and William Meiler, 115 Florence street, went out duck shooting. There were a great many sportsmen out, the bay shore being dotted with hunters. Meiler and Harris were out in a rowboat and early in the day they were shooting in the neighbourhood of the beach. When they were rowing up the bay in the afternoon the boat struck a spile near the powder magazine wharf and was damaged. Just opposite Carroll's point, Harris


shot at a duck and the boat tipped over and commenced to fill with water. A heavy sea was running and Harris, seeing that it was impossible to right the boat, jumped out and tried to swim ashore. But the poor fellow failed and he was drowned before assistance arrived. Meiler clung to the boat. Fred McDonald, Lewis McDonald, a young man named Morris, and William McDonald were on the shore and seeing the boat upset, they immediately went to the young men's rescue. The water was so rough that they could not reach Harris on time to save him. Fred McDonald and Morris reached Meiler and brought him to shore where they worked some time to restore him, his body being numb from remaining so long in the water. It took several hours to bring him around. The water was so rough that no effort was made to recover Harris's body yesterday afternoon.

Harris worked at Carpenter's saw works, Market street. He was married about a year and a half ago.

 

DUPUISSE - (St. John, N.B.) Frank Dupuisse, aged 19, clerk in the I.C.B. office, Moncton, went shooting this morning with a companion. Near Canan station, twenty miles from Moncton, in the afternoon Dupuisse came out of the woods to the railway track and sat down on the rail, his companion being nearby in the woods. The young man, who had a flask of whiskey with him, is supposed to have gone to sleep. A train came along and killed him instantly.

 

November 8, 1890

 

GRIFFIN - Mrs. Solomon Griffin, an old resident of Waterdown, died last night. She was about 80 years of age.

 

HARRISON - W. H. C. Harrison, herbalist, of 103 York street, died this morning rather unexpectedly. He had been ill only two days. Heart disease was the cause. Mr. Harrison was 75 years old. He is survived by several sons and daughters, all married.

 

HALLOW - Harvey Hallow, a well known old coloured man, died last night after a brief illness at his home on Wentworth street. He was called 'Buddy' by the school children with whom he was a great favourite, his jolly laugh and perennial good humour making him an object of constant attention among the youngsters. He would generally drive along the street with a crowd of youngsters after him, taking off his hat to everybody with a 'Howdy boss'. The cause of the old man's death was a complication of disease resulting from grippe.

 

November 10, 1890

 

MORDEN - Died in this city, on November 8, John D. Morden, aged 74 years. Funeral to-day at 2:30 o'clock from his late residence,  No 29 Magill street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 


John D. Morden died about 12 o'clock on Saturday at his residence, after a long and protracted illness from cancer of the stomach. He gradually grew worse and his strength ebbed away until death came. His end was peaceful and surrounded by members of the family, he quietly sank to the sleep that knows no waking. He was born in 1816 in the township of West Flamborough where he lived with his parents, Thomas and Catherine Morden, they having been among the first settlers in that part of the country, until 1835 when he was happily married to Esther McLaughlin. In the same year they settled in the township of' East Flamborough, having to endure all the privations and hardships of pioneer life and do battle with all the difficulties of the forest. He was a strong man physically and possessed a good natural ability. His labours were blessed with much prosperity, leaving his family a competency. The richest fruitages he has left is his consistent life and blameless reputation.

About ten years ago he gave up farming and settled in this city, living a retired life. He was a prominent member of the Methodist church for over forty years, holding an official position in the church. In politics he was a lifelong Conservative, but had not the least trace of party bigotry, and was always ready to acknowledge a good point in his opponent. He was a humble man of an unpretentious and retiring disposition, never disposed to seek prominence in society or political life. Yet his upright manner and honourable conduct towards his fellows made him widely known and esteemed. He was a good man, a true friend, a devoted husband, and a kind and loving father, presenting before his family an exemplary Christian life.

As a neighbour he was considerate, kind, and obliging, and his death has left a wide breach to fill in the church and community. His memory will live long in the affectionate remembrance of all who had the pleasure of knowing him. He is survived by his wife and family of two sons and two daughters - ex-Aid. Morden, J. W. Morden, Mrs. J. J. Binkley, and Mrs. E. Pepper.

 

URQUHART - Died in this city, on November 9, Minnie Lotina May, eldest daughter of Mrs. Ellen Urquhart, aged 15 years, 5 months, and 15 days. Funeral from her mother's residence, 29 Murray street east, Tuesday, November 11, at 2 p.m. to Ancaster. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FURNIVAL - (Lacolle, Que) A sickening tragedy occurred this afternoon at Clarenceville, a small village three miles distant from this town. A man named Furnival, who has for some time past been known to be insane, while worked up in a frenzy by circumstances which transpired during the early part of the day, this afternoon rushed into the house and up to his bedroom where his wife was at work on some sewing, seized a razor, and with a bound reached her side, drew the razor across her throat, inflicting a large wound from which the blood gushed over the floor. After having committed this horrible act, he rushed out of the house and has not been captured.


It is thought that he has committed suicide in the surrounding woods. The woman had since died. No motive-other than that it was the work of a maniac can be imputed for the crime as it is understood that the family lived in perfect harmony.

 

HARRIS - The body of William Harris who was drowned on Thanksgiving Day was found this afternoon a short distance from Carroll's point. The body was brought across the bay in a steam launch and taken to Chapman's undertaking establishment.

 

WRIGHT - (Toronto) A shocking fatality occurred on the Grand Trunk Railway track between Georgetown and Acton at 3:30 o'clock yesterday morning in which brakeman J. Wright lost his life. The deceased left the Union station at 11 o'clock on Saturday night in charge of the front part of an empty freight train. He was seen by the stationmaster at Georgetown, standing on top of the first car next the engine. Passing Limestone station the engineer missed him and sent his fireman back to see if all was right. The fireman reported that he was missing and the train was stopped and backed up. Two miles west of Georgetown in the middle of the track was found his hat and lantern, and a mile further east the body was picked up in a terribly mangled condition. The deceased was 25 years of age and unmarried. He boarded at 355 Queen street west. The remains were brought back to Toronto last night and sent to the residence of Mrs. Brown, 45 Mercer street, a sister of the deceased.

 

GABE - (Elora) A man named William Gabe was found drowned in the Grand River here this afternoon. He was seen going towards his house about seven o'clock last night but did not reach it, and on searching to-day his body was found in the river above the carpet factory dam, not far from his house. The night was fearfully dark and he evidently mistook the way and walked over the bank into the river.

 

RAU - (Berlin) Louis Rau, a man well known in this town, died at his residence on the Wilmot road, from the effects of taking paris green about a week ago. He did not appear to know how he got the poison and was very anxious to have his medical attendant succeed in destroying the effects, which he did in a measure, but it was impossible, however to make a complete cure, and he lingered till yesterday when he died. Deceased was a man of strange combinations and powers. Ninety-nine out of a hundred would have died very poor, but in spite of all drawbacks he became quite wealthy, leaving an estate worth fully $20,000, we should think.

 

November 11, 1890

 

HARRIS - Drowned in Hamilton Bay, Thursday, November 6, John William Harris, aged 25 years. Funeral on Wednesday, November 12, at 2:30 p.m. from his late residence, 127 Florence street.


DEPEW - Died in this city, on November 11, Elizabeth Partridge, relict of the late George DePew, aged — years. Funeral will take place from her son-in-law's (George Carmichael) residence, 264 Hughson street north, on Thursday afternoon, at 1 o'clock to the Brick church, lake road, Barton. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WALSH - Died in New York city, Alice Theresa, daughter of John and the late Sophia Smith, and beloved wife of Robert Walsh, aged 38 years. Funeral from the residence of her mother-in-law, W. McComb, 21 Oak Avenue, on Saturday, at 3 p.m.

 

DAY - James E. Day died in Toronto yesterday. He was a native of London, England, and came to Canada forty years ago, settling first in Hamilton. He lived here for fifteen years and was for ten years secretary of the waterworks department. For the past quarter of a century Mr. Day lived in Toronto and was principal of Day's Commercial College. He leaves a wife, two daughters and one son.

 

ANDERSON - (Milton) Two orphan children named Allen and Oscar Anderson, aged seven and fifteen years, sons of the late William Anderson, living with their grandmother, Mrs. McColl, near Campbellville, while left alone in the house for a few minutes about noon to-day, undertook to load a rifle. Oscar was sitting on a chair holding the muzzle of the rifle against his breast and Allen put in a cartridge and while in this position, the shot was fired. The ball entered the breast, went through the body and the back of the chair, and out the door. Allen ran out of the house and gave the alarm, and when some neighbours arrived they found Oscar sitting in the chair quite dead. Coroner Freeman did not consider an inquest necessary.

 

November 12, 1890

 

CARLYLE - Died in this city, on November 10, at the residence of William Fulton, 153 York street, Mary Anne Carlyle, aged 16 years and 4 months. Funeral to-day (Wednesday) at 4 o'clock.

 

MCMULLEN, FORSYTH - Thomas McMullen, the man mentioned as having been  taken from the House of Refuge to the hospital in an unconscious condition last Friday, died there yesterday. Frank Forsyth, another inmate of the refuge, was taken to the hospital on Monday unconscious and died last night. Both deaths resulted from apoplexy.

 

BLACKBURN - (London) Josiah Blackburn, managing editor of the "London Free Press" who has been ailing for some time, died at 5 o'clock this afternoon at Hot Springs, Ark. He was born in London, England, in 1823 and received his education in the City of London School. He came to Canada in 1850 and having acquired a taste for literary and political work, he very naturally soon drifted into the newspaper business and the year following his arrival in the Dominion,


we find him associated with the "Paris Star" with which paper he was connected until 1852 when he purchased the interest in the "London Free Press" of which he assumed charge at the close of the year. He aided soon afterward in the Start of the "Ingersoll Chronicle" and for some time conducted both papers. He began issuing the "Daily Free Press" in 1855. At the time he was in accord with the Reform party of the day and at the general election of 1858 was one of the candidates of that party, but was defeated by the late Marcus Talbot. In 1859 a difference arose with his political friends, growing out of the attitude of the "Globe" with respect to an attack made in its columns on the motives of the judges in the decision they gave in the episode known as the 'Double Shuffle'. The course taken by Mr. Blackburn was hotly denounced and an attempt was made to dragoon him after the manner of those times. Shortly after, he adduced reasons why the Reformers should look to the late Hon. John Sandfield Macdonald as their leader, and in 1862 that highly honoured gentleman was called to office at Quebec and Mr. Blackburn was asked by the government to conduct the 'Mercury" in the interests of the ministry to which he agreed, availing himself of the valuable services of George Sheppard.

After the fall of the Sandfield Macdonald administration in 1864, a coalition of parties took place on the basis of confederation of the whole of the British North American provinces, finding the Hon. George Brown at the same cabinet with his ancient opponents. Sir John Macdonald and Sir George Cartier supported that movement and Mr. Blackburn remained firmly attached to these  ministers and the cause which they represented and thus declined with others to follow Mr. Brown when he retired from the ranks of the coalition government.

In 1872 Mr. Blackburn was requested to aid in the establishment of the Toronto "Mail" and remained connected with that paper for about fifteen months. In 1887 he was appointed one of the chief census officers and in 1884 was chosen as one of the committee to proceed to Washington to investigate the methods of public printing adopted there, reporting on the same. He has since confined his attention to the management of the "Free Press".

 

MCMULLEN - (Caledonia) On Wednesday last John McMullen, youngest son of Peter McMullen, died of consumption. The disease was brought on by a severe cold which he contracted several years ago and although he consulted the very best physicians and tried a change of climate, he gradually pined away. Mr. McMullen was only 22 years of age and for some years past has had care of the telegraph and express office. Requiem high mass was celebrated by Rev. Father O'Reilly, and the body was conveyed to the Roman Catholic cemetery. The large turnout at the funeral showed how much deceased was respected.

 

GRIFFIN - (Waterdown) Died at her home in Waterdown, the wife of Solomon Griffin, aged 78 years and 9 months. Her death took place on Saturday morning, November 8. She was born in the village of St. Anns, in Nelson township and when young was married to her now mourning


husband with whom she lived for nearly sixty-three years, the most of the time in and around Waterdown. Seven children were born to them, five of whom have gone on before. She was a member of the Methodist church for about sixty-three years. She had been ailing for nearly six weeks, but had somewhat recovered when she was stricken down suddenly again, and died in a few hours. She was very resigned and fully prepared for the change. Their home had always been open for their large circle of friends who will miss them sadly. The funeral took place on Monday and was largely attended, her grandchildren acting as pallbearers.

 

WALKER - (Millgrove) John Walker, one of the oldest residents here, died on Thursday last and on Saturday was buried at Carlisle.

 

November 13, 1890

 

FINKBEINER - Died at No 146 Market street, on November 12, John Wesley, son of the Rev. George Finkbeiner, aged 22 years and 3 months. Funeral Sunday at 2 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

November 14, 1890

 

BIRCHALL - (Woodstock) Canadian, justice has been vindicated and the murder of Frederick C. Benwell has been avenged. Reginald Birchall died by the hangman's rope in the jail yard this morning. He died quite game...

 

LOCKE - Died in this city, on November 14, W. J. Locke, aged 63. Funeral from his late residence, 162 Rebecca street, on Monday morning, at 9 o'clock, thence to St. Patrick's church and R. C. cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Last night William J. Locke, confidential clerk in Mayor McLellan's office, died rather unexpectedly from an affection of the heart. He was sick only a few days. He was 63 years of age and lived at 162 Rebecca street. The deceased was born in England and came here many years ago. He had worked for the mayor for the past eight years. He was highly esteemed by all who knew him, being upright and honest in all his dealings.

 

November 15, 1890

 

MCLNNES - Died at Nottingham, England, on November 13, Donald Mclnnes, Jr., second son of the late Hugh Mclnnes.

A cablegram from England was received here this morning briefly announcing the sad and startling news that Donald Mclnnes, the European buyer for Knox, Morgan & Co, wholesale drygoods merchants, had just died of pleurisy at the George Hotel, Nottingham. Mr. McInnes left


for England in company with Mr. Morgan on ------- to purchase goods for the spring ---- . About half the purchases had been made when Mr. Morgan left for home, Mr. McInnes remaining to complete ---- buying. He was to have sailed ----- on the "Majestic" last Wednesday. When the steamer sailed he was lying in the George Hotel in Nottingham, having been prostrated by a severe attack of pleurisy ten days ago. Fortunately his cousin, Miss Daisy McInnes of Toronto and H. C. Hammond, formerly the manager of the Bank of Hamilton, were visiting in Nottingham, and they were constant in their attendance at the bedside of the sufferer. Mr. Farmer of the Midlands Lace Company and other friends were also assiduous in their attentions and the best medical skill was procured. But neither skill nor watchful and loving care could save him.

The deceased was 27 years of age. He was the son of the late Hugh McInnes and nephew of the late Hon. Donald McInnes.

His mother, brother, and several sisters reside in Hamilton at 264 Park street south. Mr. McInnes was widely known as one of the most promising commercial men in Hamilton. He had been connected with the house of Knox, Morgan & Co for ten years. Possessed of a frank, cheery nature, Mr. McInnes was a general favourite with his acquaintances. Everybody liked him who knew him and the news of his untimely death has saddened many hearts to-day.

 

MEYER - Nicholas Meyer of Wilmot township, while driving to Phillipsburg, fell from his wagon and was run over and killed.

 

STAPLES - George Staples, a farmer of East Wawanosh township, suicided by shooting on Thursday evening. He was subject to fits of despondency owing to ill health. He placed the muzzle of the gun in his mouth and his ear was blown off.

 

November 17, 1890

 

UPFIELD - Died on Sunday, November 16, Jesse J. Upfield, a native of Lancaster, Ohio, aged 47 years. Funeral from his late residence, No 88 West avenue south, on Wednesday, November 19, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MCHAFFIE - Died at Rat Portage, Ontario, on November 7, George Henry McHaffie, son of Peter McHaffie, Dunedin, Ontario, aged 24 years.

 

November 18, 1890

 

MITCHELL - Died in this city, on November 17, Margaret Emily, beloved and only daughter of Frederick and Elizabeth Mitchell, aged 1 year, 4. months, and 17 days. Funeral will leave her parents' residence, 142 Breadalbane street, on Wednesday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


SMITH - Died on Tuesday morning, November 18, Ora Smith, widow of the late Archibald Smith, of Eramosa, aged 79 years. Funeral from the residence of her stepson, Dr. Smith, 313 Main street east, on Wednesday, November 19, at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Ora Smith, stepmother of Dr. Day Smith, came suddenly to her death last night through an accident. The old lady lived with her stepson and his family at their residence at the corner of Main street and Victoria avenue. Last evening she ate an unusually hearty supper and retired upstairs to her room between nine and ten o'clock. About ten o'clock Dr. and Mrs. Smith who were sitting downstairs heard her at her devotions. They went upstairs to their room a little before half past ten. Ten or fifteen minutes after they entered their room they heard a great crash on the staircase. Hurrying out they found old Mrs. Smith lying prostrate at the bottom of the staircase unconscious and breathing heavily and with difficulty. There was a deep gash in her forehead. The old lady never regained consciousness and died about two hours after the accident. It is supposed that Mrs. Smith left her room and went to the top of the staircase to see whether the rest of the family had gone upstairs, for although she often retired to her own room earlier than the others, she did not like to go to bed until the other members of the family were upstairs. It is believed that in stooping over the bannisters to see if there was a light in the sitting room she fell almost directly to the bottom of the steps, a straight fall of twelve, feet.

Mrs. Smith was in her 80th year. She was a native of Cumberland, England, and came to Canada about thirty-five years ago. Her only relatives by consanguinity in this continent are two nieces who live in Brooklyn, N.Y. For some years she resided with her stepson in the Northwest, but preferring to reside with Dr. Smith, she came here about a year ago and lived at the house ever since. Mrs. Smith was a member of St. John's Presbyterian Church and was a devoted Christian lady. For one of her extreme age she possessed extraordinary vitality and vigour and evidently had several more years of life before her but for the distressing accident which so suddenly terminated it.

 

DAWSON - (Toronto) T. C. Dawson, an employee of T. McDonald & Co., galvanized iron manufacturers, 69 Sherbourne street, died in the general hospital on Sunday. He had been drinking very heavily and was taken to the hospital suffering from an incipient attack of delirium tremens, and notwithstanding the efforts made to save him, he died. Dawson leaves a widow and a couple of children who live in England, but he had no relatives in Canada.

 

November 19, 1890

 

MCROBERT - Died in this city, on November 18, at No 36 Pearl street south, James McRobert, a native of Strathdon, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, in the 67th year of his age. Funeral at 2:30 Thursday, November 20, Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

 


HARRIS - Died on Tuesday, November 18, William H. Harris, a native of England, aged 58 years. Funeral from his son's residence, 10 Chatham street, on Thursday, November 20, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LARSEN - (Winnipeg) The body of a Dane named Johannes Larsen was found hanging by a strap and a piece of suspender to a telegraph pole at Hawk Lake yesterday. When found appearances indicated that he had been dead four or five hours. He had in his pocket a railway ticket from Winnipeg to Quebec, a steamboat ticket to Copenhagen via Liverpool, and about $16. Larsen arrived here last May and has been working near Medicine Hat. He left here on Sunday in apparent good health and it is supposed that having accidentally missed the train at Hawk Lake,  thought his tickets forfeited and becoming depressed, suicided.

 

POTTER - (Stratford) At the adjourned inquest into the death of John R. Potter whose body was found on Romeo street on September 2, the jury brought in a verdict to the effect: That John R. Potter, found dead in Stratford on September 2, 1890, came to his death by strangulation by some person or persons unknown.

 

November 20, 1890

 

ROWAN - John Rowan of 27 Bay street north died quite suddenly yesterday afternoon from the bursting of a blood vessel in the brain. He was taken ill on Saturday night and had been in bed, but no serious result was anticipated. Dr. McCabe saw him yesterday and he was doing well, but shortly after, delirium set in and he died in a short time. The deceased drove a beer wagon for Henry Kuntz. He leaves a wife and two children.

 

DETCHER - (Peterborough)  Mrs. Samuel Detcher, a well known character, met with an awful death at the Canadian Pacific station this morning. She was crossing the track on the George street crossing when she was struck by a freight train which was shunting. She was knocked down and her legs falling on the rail, the wheels passed over them. One leg was cut off and the other fearfully mangled from the ankle to the knee. The bleeding woman was taken to the freight shed and medical attendance was on the spot at once, but she died in less than an hour. Mrs. Detcher and her husband have lived here for many years. They kept a hotel some thirty years ago and were comfortably off, but drink and adversity reduced them to poverty, and they lived largely on Charity for many years. The old woman was lame and blind in one eye which probably led to the accident. An inquest will be held this evening.

 

DEVINE - (Hagersville) The sudden and unexpected death of Mrs. Devine on Monday caused a surprise to her many relatives and friends. She was in her usual good health on Sunday, but was


taken suddenly ill with inflammation of the bowels on Sunday night and died the following evening. The funeral will take place from her late residence and proceed to the Stage road for service and interment.

 

TAFT - (Cobourg) Yesterday the town was the scene of a suicide, the particulars of which are very sad. The victim of this voluntary taking away of life was a young man named W. A. Taft, aged 34 years. Some time ago he came to Cobourg to spend a few weeks with his brother, J. W. Taft, a respected young cutter, who resides at the corner of King and Walton streets. About eleven o'clock on Tuesday morning the unfortunate man left his brother's residence to take a walk, going down by the lake east of the town. He took some apples and a box of rat poison which he had previously put in his pocket, and cutting up the apples, spread the poison upon the pieces and ate them. Below the Kingston crossing, he crawled into a barn where he expected to die, but the poison did not take effect as quickly as he expected it would and he spent the hours of the afternoon in awful agony.

Finding that death was slow in coming to put an end to his existence, he began to repent of the act he had committed and decided to return to his brother's house. He was very weak and but for the aid of a man who gave him a ride from the crossing would never have reached the house alive. He got there about 6:30 in the evening and at once confessed what he had done. Dr. Douglas was immediately summoned. He found the man in a state of collapse. There was scarcely a flicker perceptible in his pulse. He remained sensible for about two hours when he died. Three years ago he left the mounted police to which he belonged. He has been in a bad state of health ever since and was in hospital repeatedly.  He imagined that he was affected with all kinds of disease. His mother lives in Rossmore, near Belleville.

 

November 21, 1890

 

MCWHIRTER - Died at the residence of Henry Malcolmson, No 397 Hughson street north, on November 20, Elizabeth McWhirter, relict of the late Hugh McWhirter, of Woodstock, aged 80 years. Funeral Saturday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

FORSYTH - Died in this city, on November 20, Lilian May, eldest daughter of Charles and Lillie Forsyth, aged 2 years and 1 month. Funeral will leave her parents' residence, Dundas road, on Saturday, November 22, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

SCOTT - (Woodstock) Eliza Scott was found dead in bed yesterday morning at the residence of her brother-in-law, John Hooper. Deceased was subject to epilepsy and this doubtless was the cause of death. Deceased was 35 years of age and her parents live in Brantford. Last spring she wandered away from home and was missing for several days.

 

 


November 22, 1890

 

WHIPPLE - Died at Holyoke, Mass., on Friday, November 21, Mr. E. S. Whipple, in the 74th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 111 Cannon street east, on Monday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WHOLEY - (Streetsville) An inquest was held by Coroner Heggie on the body of David Wholey, a boarder at Rutledge's, who died suddenly while in a fit of coughing. The post mortem examination showed that the immediate cause of death was the rupture of a blood vessel at the base of the brain, induced by a severe fit of coughing, and the jury brought in a verdict in accordance with this report.

 

JACOBS - (Orillia) Charley Jacobs of Rama, about the best known Indian in the district, attempted to cross over from Orillia to Rama while under the influence of liquor. It is supposed that he was upset, the lake being very rough. His body was washed up on the shore of Chief Island.

 

JOHNSON - (Windsor) The ten-year-old child of Sydney Johnson, Dougal street, was poisoned last evening by drinking oil of tansy which his mother had just taken from her trunk and laid on the table. The child died this morning.

 

SCRATCH - (Kingsville) A pipe wrench which was being used in screwing up the pipe in No 2 gas well slipped from the fastening and struck Nicholas Scratch across the abdomen, inflicting injuries from which he shortly afterward died.

 

SCHWETSER - (Linwood) Mrs. George Schwetser dropped dead while en route to the Lutheran church last evening. She was apparently in her usual health on leaving home.

 

DICKOUT - (Ingersoll) Mrs. J. D. Dickout was seized with an apoplectic stroke while milking at Bedford. She was carried into the house but lived only a few hours.

 

IRVINE - (Creemore)This morning three men were going to work to tuckpoint Mr. Casey's new block. As they got on the scaffold it gave way and they fell about twenty feet to the hard ground. Edward Irvine was instantly killed, Joseph Gaynor has his arm broken in two places, and William Eldridge's back was severely hurt. The three men are from Toronto and are married.

 

November 24, 1890

 

WAGSTAFF - George Wagstaff, an old resident of the city died yesterday at the hospital. He fought in the American civil war and received a pension of $8 a month last spring.


BRIGGS - Died at her late residence, No 1039 King street west, toll gate, Mary Ett, wife of Henry F. Briggs, aged 63 years. Funeral service at residence on Tuesday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Interment at Buffalo, N.Y., Wednesday.

 

SANDERS - (Winnipeg) A lad named Sanders was found dead in a neighbour's house near Deloraine with a bullet mark under his ear. He had apparently placed a revolver cartridge on the hot stove and its contents discharging, took effect on him.

 

FREEMAN - (Simcoe) John Bailey Freeman, M.P.P. for North Norfolk, died at his residence near here this morning at 5 o'clock of paralysis of the brain. He was in the 56th year of his age, having been born on the farm on which he died, in August 1835. He was one of the best known and popular of the supporters of the Mowat government, having represented North Norfolk since 1879, and for the past eight years served the Liberal party in the house in the capacity of whip. His funeral will take place on Tuesday at 2 p.m. to Oakwood cemetery, Simcoe.

 

ALISON - (Toronto) On Saturday night James Alison, the sixteen-year-old son of James Alison, the well known merchant tailor, 264 Yonge street, accidentally shot himself at the family residence, 52 Murray street. The boy was examining a revolver, evidently thinking its chambers to be empty. One cell, however, contained a cartridge and in snapping, the muzzle was unfortunately pointed towards the lad and the bullet was discharged into his head, causing death in a few minutes. The funeral will take place from 52 Murray street this afternoon at 3 o'clock.

 

November 25, 1890

 

MACARTNEY - Died in this city, on November 24, at her late residence, 72 Pearl street north, Mary Jane, beloved wife of Charles Macartney, aged 70 years. Funeral from above address on Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

HURD - Died in Barton, on November 24, Bridget, wife of Peter Hurd, in the 49th year of her age. Funeral on Wednesday at 10 a.m. to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

SMITH - (Teeswater) A fatal threshing machine accident occurred about five miles from here last evening. Thomas Smith, aged about 24 years, son of Bleakney Smith, was standing on the cap of the cylinder cleaning up as the threshing was about done, when the cup broke and let him into the cylinder. The poor fellow was dreadfully mangled and died four hours afterward.

 

WILLIAMS - James Miller Williams, registrar of the County of Wentworth, died this afternoon after a lingering and painful illness.

 


Coming to Hamilton, Mr. Williams established the carriage works which he conducted for so many years. He very soon began to take an active interest in public affairs, was a director of the Mutual Life Association of Canada and of the Victoria Mutual Fire Co of Hamilton. He served in the city council several years, and when the Ontario Legislature was created in 1867, he was chosen to represent the city in that body. He was re-elected in 1871 and 1875. On retiring from the legislature he was appointed registrar for the County of Wentworth and has since held that position. He was always active in promoting the interests of Hamilton. He laboured earnestly to secure the construction of the Wellington, Grey, and Bruce Railway and was a director of the Hamilton and Lake Erie Railway Company 5 He laboured earnestly and effectively to secure bonuses for the work. In other public affairs his time and ability were given for the public good.

Mr. Williams was in his 71st year. He came to Canada from the United States in his youth and lived here ever since, engaging in business as. a carriage manufacturer, oil refining and foundry man.

He is survived by his wife, three sons - C. J. Williams, J. M. Williams, Jr, and Henry Williams, all of Hamilton - and one daughter, Mrs. Beardmore of Toronto.

Mr. Williams died of a complication of diseases, principally pulmonary. He was confined to his bed for two months, but had been ailing for more than a year.

 

November 26, 1890

 

WALKER - Died suddenly of heart disease, at her husband's residence, Zimmerman, on November 23, Margaret, beloved wife of William Walker, aged 58 years, a native of Ireland.

 

HERALD - (Ancaster) Mr. Herald, an old resident of these parts, passed away at the residence of his brother-in-law, John Hoodly, in his 71st year.

 

November 27, 1890

 

WILLIAMS - Died on November 25, at his late residence, Mapleside, Hamilton, J. M. Williams, registrar, aged 72 years. Funeral on Thursday, at 3 p.m. No flowers. Friend and acquaintances kindly accept this intimation.

 

MCDOWELL - (London) A group of men were working at the Imperial Oil works this afternoon jacking up a large iron condenser weighing about three tons. Samuel McDowell went underneath to arrange something and while there the props at one end of the immense mass gave way. Even then there was enough room for his body between the ground and the condenser owing to the slant as one end remained upright, but a block of wood intervened and the head of the


unfortunate man was caught between this and the iron, crushing the skull and causing him to die without uttering a word. McDowell was a steady -hardworking man, living on William street, was about 35 years of age, and leaves a widow and five little ones behind.

 

November 29, 1890

 

CLENDENNING - (Welland) The old man, Clendenning, of Humberstone, a veteran of 1812, has drawn his last pension, death coming to his relief on Friday of last week. He was aged 97 years. Deceased lived in Stonebridge many years ago, but of late has occupied the old Basswood hotel premises. The remains were buried on Sunday.

 

FARR - (London) Fred Farr, a young married man, employed in the refinery yards in East London, fell from the front of a switching engine early this morning. Both his legs were cut off, and he died at 7:15 a.m. He had been married only one year, living at the Gore, and leaves a widow and a child a few months old.

 

December 1, 1890

 

BAIN - Died at his brother's residence, No 13 Spring street, on November 30, John W. Bain, aged 37 years. Funeral on Tuesday, December 2, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WILLIAMS - Died at 105 Park street north, on December 1, of diphtheria, Flora M. J. Williams, grand-daughter of Mrs. William Mulliss, aged 13 years and 10 months. Funeral private.

 

BRAITHWAITE - (Cobourg) Edward Braithwaite, son of Capt. George Braithwaite of Gore's Landing, when skating on Rice Lake near Close's Point, on Friday morning, broke through the ice, and after a desperate struggle to escape, drowned. A young man named McAllister, who witnessed the accident, went to the rescue and also broke through the ice in his efforts to save Braithwaite. McAllister succeeded in saving himself, but could do nothing to help his friend. Deceased was 20 years of age, was a former resident of Cobourg, and was very popular here.

 

December 2, 1890

 

HUNTER - Died in Barton township, December 1, Alexander, infant son of James Hunter. Funeral on Tuesday at 3 o'clock.

 

CHISHOLM - Died in this city, on December 1, 1890, Katie, youngest daughter of the late William Chisholm, aged 18 years. Funeral of Wednesday, December 3, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


MCKEAND - Died in this city on Monday evening, December 1, Emma McKeand, relict of the late James McKeand, in the 73rd year of her age. Funeral from 166 Hannah street west, on Wednesday, at 2:30 p.m.

 

FOLEY - (Toronto) Coroner Duncan and a jury last evening, commenced an inquest on the body of John Foley who was found dead at 149 Ontario street, and upon the doctors who made the post mortem examination reporting that serious injuries had been inflicted on the head of the deceased. It was decided to detain in custody a man named James Williams who keeps a hotel at the corner of Queen and William streets until to-morrow when further evidence will betaken. It is alleged that Foley was injured in a fight at Williams's hotel and that the injuries he there received caused his death.

 

December 3, 1890

 

HOOD - (Freelton) On Friday evening last, Mrs. John Hood of the 10th concession of East Flamborough quietly passed away after an illness of but a few days, and on Monday afternoon her remains were taken to the Presbyterian cemetery at Strabane for burial followed by a very large number of friends. The bereaved relatives have the sympathy of their friends in this vicinity.

 

December 4, 1890

 

GRIEVE - Died at Waterdown, on Wednesday, December 3, Ellen, relict of the late Walter Grieve, in her 82nd year. Funeral on Saturday, December 6, at 1 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCINNES - Died at Nottingham, England, on November 15, Donald McInnes, Jr. second son of the late Hugh McInnes. Funeral from the Church of the Ascension to-morrow at 3:30 p.m. (See page 196)

 

MASON - It was recently announced that Miss Maud B. Mason of this city had died suddenly at Chicago. The fact is that Miss Mason died by her own hand. The suicide occurred on Tuesday, November 25...

 

December 5, 1890

 

FIELDEN - Died in this city, at 133 Picton street east, on Thursday evening, December 4, Gracie, daughter of James Fielden, aged 13 years, 3 months, and 4 days. Funeral on Saturday, December 6, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


LEWIS - Died in this city, at 97 James street south, Frances, relict of the late William Lewis, aged 71 years. Funeral from above address, on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

RAMSAY - One of the oldest citizens of this part of Canada ended a long and useful life on Thursday in the township of Ancaster. Mary VanEvery was the daughter of a United Empire Loyalist who settled in West Flamborough immediately after the revolutionary war in the United States. Mary was born in what is now the village of West Flamborough in 1800, and she has lived in the township of Ancaster all her life. She distinctly remembers events connected with the war of 1812. West Flamborough was looked upon as a strategic point, and officers frequently came and went. She remembers Brant and Tecumseh very well. The latter with a number of his followers was encamped for some weeks in the rear of the VanEvery homestead. A few years later Mary married John W. Ramsay and lived on the Ramsay farm just north of Ancaster village for the greater part of her life. One of. her sons is John R. Ramsay, the poet. Of late Mrs. Ramsay has been living with her son-in-law, Mr. Smith, in the township of Ancaster and at his home she peacefully passed away in the 91st year of her age.

 

CUNNINGHAM - (Kingston) David Cunningham, a leading citizen and contractor, was killed to-day by a wheelbarrow falling from the third storey of the new wing of the penitentiary and striking him fairly on top of the head. He breathed for several hours and then died.

 

December 6, 1890

 

GRAHAM - Died in this city, at 44 Hannah street —st, on Friday evening, December 5, Jane Philip, wife of David Graham. Funeral on Monday, December 8, at 2 p.m. No flowers.

 

GILLESPIE - Died at 25 Emerald street south, on December 5, Elizabeth A. Gillespie, wife of George H. Gillespie. Funeral on Monday, December 8, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

December 8, 1890

 

SHEPHERD - Died at his residence, 166 East Avenue north, Sunday, December 7, Francis Shepherd, late of H.M. customs, in the 71st year of his age. Funeral on Tuesday, December 9, at 3:30 p.m. sharp. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CLINE - Died at 'The Homestead', near Appleby, on December 8, after a short illness, Mr. Jacob Cline, in the 91st year of his age. His end was peace. Funeral will take place on Wednesday, December 10, at 4 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

 


JOSS - (Winnipeg) A cablegram announces the death of James Joss of Winnipeg in London, He was a buyer for Stobart, Sons, & Co.

 

December 9, 1890

 

JACKSON - Died at Dundas, on December 8, Jennie, wife of John Jackson, aged 24 years. Funeral from her late residence, York street. Dundas, on Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

GREY - Died in this city, on December 8, at 69 Cannon street east, Eliza, the beloved wife of Walter J. Grey, in her 28th year. Funeral will take place from the above address on Thursday, December 11, at 8:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SUTTON - Died Emma Sutton, wife of R. T. Sutton, Esq., and daughter of E. Freeman of this city, at Mr. Sutton's residence, 12 North street, Toronto, at 10:30 last evening.

 

LANGFORD - (Ottawa) The little village of Carp, twenty miles from here, has been thrown into a tremendous state of excitement over what bears all the evidence of murder. Richard Langford, a respectable farmer who has lived alone on his farm, was around on his duties on Saturday , but yesterday morning he was missed by the neighbours. A search party was instituted and the poor fellow was found in his barn, lying in a corner with his skull broken.

Medical aid was summoned and the doctors found the unfortunate man still breathing but almost on the verge of death. He was conveyed to his own house where every attention was given him, but he never rallied sufficiently to give an intelligent account of his disaster. Dr. G. H. Groves of Carp was sent for and pronounced the case hopeless. His opinion proved to be correct as the old man died about three o'clock. On examination of the barn an iron rod, four feet long and an inch in diameter, was found near the body. One end of it was spattered with blood to which quantities of the old man's hair were frozen. It seems to be a clear case of murder.

 

STRICKLAND - (Galt) William E. Strickland, agent for the Dominion Express and Canadian Pacific Telegraph company, died last night about 6:30 o'clock of inflammation of the lungs. He was also a very successful auctioneer, having carried in the business since his father's death.

 

GEDDES - (Belleville) David Geddes of Saginaw, Michigan, who immigrated thither from Tyendenaga in 1861, met with a fatal accident a few days ago. He was in his barn using an adze . which glanced, inflicting so deep a out on his leg that he bled to death in a few minutes.


HENDERSON - Dr. James A. Henderson, master in chancery in Kingston, Ontario, died on Monday. He was the father of Mrs. Crawford, wife of Rev. E. A. Crawford of this city. Dr. Henderson was one of the foremost freemasons in Canada. He had been a grand master in the order and at the time of his death he was supreme grand master of the Templars.

 

December 10, 1890

 

DOUGLAS - Last Saturday Mrs. Mary Catharine Douglas, wife of Philip Douglas, engineer in Bertram's tool works, paid the common debt of humanity. She died of consumption at the early age of thirty-three. Mrs. Douglas was a remarkable woman. She had a mechanical skill which, united with an indomitable will and energy of character, might have made her famous if she had been born a man. She built with her own hands the house where she and her father lived, a plain but substantial roughcast house. She built a boat which could outsail any other craft in Dundas and often she would go out in her boat alone to shoot ducks, for she handled a gun with all the skill of a veteran sportsman. She built a carriage and a sleigh and she and her family used them both. She constructed a bass viol, one that could really be used. She made her husband's and children's boots as well as their clothing.

It was a common thing for her to take small contracts of a nature that are usually undertaken by men and she always executed them with thoroughness and promptness. There was a large elm tree near the creek on Mr. Bertram's property. One day Mrs. Douglas overheard Mr. Bertram say he wished he could rid of it as it was an obstruction. " How much do you want for the tree?" she asked. ''I'll give it to you if you remove it", replied Mr. Bertram, half jokingly. She took him at his word, procured a crosscut saw, sawed down the tree, and cut it up, and either used or sold the timber to advantage.

Mrs. Douglas was a thin angular woman, and somewhat masculine in appearance, but she is said to have been a thoroughly womanly woman excepting for her taste and capability for man's work. She was known to everybody in Dundas and was a favourite with the children who irreverently called her 'Yankee Jack'. She had several children and was a good mother to them. She was a member of the Salvation Army and was buried yesterday with great demonstrations by the Dundas corp. Mrs. Douglas was born near Hamilton and her mother still lives in the vicinity of Stony Creek.

 

BALDWIN - (Sarnia) Albert Baldwin, 25 years of age, was killed this afternoon at 3:30 o'clock while working at the tunnel approach on the Canadian side. Baldwin's death was caused by a large lump of dirt falling from the bank, striking him on the head and crushing him against a car. Deceased had been working at the tunnel only three weeks and belongs to Iroquois, Ontario, where his friends were notified immediately after the accident.


GOTT - James Gott, father of George Gott, collector of customs at Amherstburg, died yesterday. He was born in Ireland in 1802 and has lived in Amherst burg since 1838. Deceased was a freemason for sixty-one years.

 

THIBODO - Last evening Augustus Thibodo, one of the oldest Kingston citizens, died very suddenly, more that ninety years of age. In the rebellion days he sided with Lyon Mackenzie and was imprisoned several times.

 

DONNEN - (Toronto) A bricklayer named William James Donnen, 21 years of age, who resided with his parents at 4 Clinton Place, committed suicide there yesterday evening by taking a dose of carbolic acid. Dr. Miner of Spadina Avenue was called in, but too late to render any assistance. The deceased had been for several weeks out of work and had consequently been in a depressed state of mind, and had been drinking heavily.

 

MCRAE - (Halifax) A dispatch from Yarmouth to-night announced a fatal explosion in the government steamer "Newfield". She was down the western coast supplying lighthouses and when off Chebogue Point this afternoon, the powder magazine blew up with terrible force. Thomas McRae was instantly killed and several other men, including Capt. Guilford, were badly injured. The ship was seriously damaged, portions of her deck and side being blown out. Capt. Guilford headed for Yarmouth Sound and the wounded men were placed in the marine hospital on Bunker's Island where they are being attended by doctors from Yarmouth. The agent of the marine department here has telegraphic advice of the fact of the disaster, but no details. He is unable to state how much powder was in the magazine and did not know that the vessel had powder on board. Capt. Guilford was very capable and cautious officer and the officials here are at a loss to account for the cause of the accident. During the summer the "Newfield" was engaged in laying a new cable to St. Paul's Island and the cutting of a trench through the rock there required a great deal of blasting. It is supposed that a quantity of unused powder was left in the ship.

 

December 11, 1890

 

HAMMOND - Died in this city, on December 10, Bridget, relict of the late William Hammond, in her 74th year. Funeral will take place from her late residence, No 53 Stuart street east, on Saturday afternoon, at 2 o'clock, to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

LEAST - Died in this city, on December 11, Charles Least, in the 24th year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, No 4 Garth street, on Sunday, December 14, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


PETERS - (Windsor) Six weeks ago Oliver Peters, coloured, aged 35, came to the Crawford House as second cook. He slept in a frame building in rear of the hotel where there was no stove. Last night he took an iron pot, filled it with charcoal and bituminous coal, lighted a fire, and went to sleep. When the door was forced this morning, Peters was found dead. He was a member of Washington Unity of Oddfellows who will take charge of the body.

 

KANEALY - (Kingston) The body of Daniel Kanealy of Calabogie, who had been missing several days, was found by his brothers on the banks of a small creek. It is supposed that he had been following an otter track through some thick underbrush and had accidentally shot himself. The ball entered the eye and came out at the back of the head. His hat was found on a small tree, twelve feet from where the body lay. He leaves a wife and two children.

 

KENNEDY - (Smithville) One by one the old landmarks are being removed. In July Mrs. M. Kennedy, relict of the late Jacob Kennedy of Gainsboro, was taken sick with a paralytic stroke while staying with her youngest daughter, Mrs. J. B. Brant, of Smithville. All that could be done by kind and loving friends was done to relieve her sufferings, but she gradually grew weaker and passed away last Wednesday in the 75th year of her age. Her remains were placed in the vault in Smithville cemetery on the following Friday. A large number of relatives and friends were present at the funeral.

 

SMITH - William Smith, caretaker of the Ocean House, died this morning of diabetes. He was a gardener by trade and had been caretaker of the Ocean House for twelve years. He had been a resident of the beach for twenty years. He leaves a widow and four children. He was a member of Doric Lodge, A.F. & A.M., and of Gore Lodge, A.O.U.W., and will be buried with Masonic honours. The funeral procession will leave the Ocean House, Sunday, at 1 p.m., for the new cemetery at Burlington.

 

December 12, 1890

 

SNIDER - Died at Ingersoll, Thursday, December 11, 1890, Clare, infant daughter of Rev. G. W. and Mrs. Snider. Funeral from the residence of H. A. Martin, 132 Hughson street north, city, Saturday, at 3:30 p.m.  Friends will please accept this as an invitation.

 

BLANCHARD - (Sherbrooke, Que) William Wallace Blanchard was hanged here this morning for the murder of Charles A. Calkins on November 8, 1889. The drop fell at 9:06½ and at 9:30 the jail surgeon stepped forward and pronounced him dead. The execution was performed by Radcliffe who also hanged Birchall and the whole proceedings were without an unpleasant incident...


December 13, 1890

 

SMITH - Died at Burlington Beach, on December 11, William Smith, in the 53rd year of his age. Funeral from the Ocean House at 1 p.m. on Sunday, December 14. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

EVANS - (Almonte) John Evans, an old man who resided in the township of Denholmein,  Ottawa county, disappeared from home and after a lapse of two weeks his body was found in the midst of a thick bush lying on a heap of brushwood. One side of the face and a portion of one of his legs had been eaten away by muskrats. The deceased was subject to paralytic fits and died alone and unaided. It is alleged, however, that when turned over there was a cut across the throat, which would go to show that he may have committed suicide.

 

BAKER - (Mitchell) Thomas Baker and his son, a young man, went to the bush in Logan township to chop cordwood. A limb of a tree fell on the elder man, rendering him unable to walk home. The youth, about 20 years of age, was sent to get a sleigh to convey the injured man home. The boy started off as fast as he could run, but before reaching the house, he dropped dead. The young fellow was subject to heart disease and the excitement of the accident was too much for him. The wounded man had to remain in the woods until he recovered sufficiently to crawl home. On the way he discovered the dead body of his son.

 

WILKINSON - John A. Wilkinson, for many years prominent in Ontario political circles, died suddenly at his residence in Toronto yesterday morning.

 

December 15, 1890

 

NICHOLSON - Died on December 13, at 228 Robinson street, Alice Kate, infant daughter of Thomas and Alice R. Nicholson, aged 2 weeks and 3 days. Funeral this afternoon at 3:30 o'clock.

 

BLOWN - Died in this city, on December 14, at 70 Macaulay street east, Mary Ann, beloved wife of Isaac Blown, aged 52 years. Funeral will leave the above address at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, December 16. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HUNTER - A sensational story of suicide and attempted wholesale poisoning comes from Winona. On Saturday Sarah Hunter, a young girl employed by W. H. Smith, a farmer who lives about a mile west of that village, died from the effects of a dose of 'rough on rats', administered by herself, and before her death, she made the startling confession that she had tried to poison members of Mr. Smith's family.

Sarah Hunter was one of the many unfortunate orphans brought out here from England. She was an inmate of one of the local charitable homes, and about six months ago she obtained


employment with Farmer Smith. She was eleven or twelve years of age and was not a particularly bright or industrious girl. Mrs. Smith and the members of the family, pitying the girl, were exceedingly kind to her, but Sarah did not appreciate their kindness, and she displayed a very ugly disposition when she was reproved for misconduct. On Thursday night the family went out and left the girl alone in the house. When Mrs. Smith returned and discovered that Sarah had let the fire out, she gave her a scolding. The girl became despondent and on Friday she made up her mind to commit suicide and end her life which had never been happy, and took a dose of 'rough on rats'. For fear that some of the Smiths would discover what she had done, she remained in her room anxiously awaiting death. Mrs. Smith knew nothing about the girl's illness until three o'clock on Friday afternoon when the girl confessed to her what she had done.  Dr. Carr of Stony Creek was sent for and although he did all in his power to save the girl's life, she died at noon on Saturday.

While she was lying on her deathbed, the girl made a terrible confession that she had put part of a  teaspoonful of 'rough on rats' into the teakettle for the purpose of poisoning members of the family. This occurred about a week ago on Friday and the Smiths were dumbfounded when they heard the startling confession. All the members of the family but one child drank the tea made from the water taken from the kettle, and were taken sick with diarrhoea and cramps, but fortunately the girl did not put a sufficient quantity of the poison into the kettle to have a fatal effect and the Smiths recovered. They were, however, at a loss to account for their illness and they did not for a moment suspect that the servant girl was responsible for it. The girl was in terrible agony when she made the confession.

Dr. Carr had a consultation with Coroner Woolverton on Saturday about holding an inquest, but after being told the facts, he decided that an inquest was unnecessary. Mr. Smith had a box of 'rough on rats' in the house.

The unfortunate girl was buried Sunday afternoon.

 

O'LEARY - (Toronto) William John O'Leary, the sixteen-year-old son of John O'Leary, a stair builder of 181 William street, was fatally injured by a hoist at the new Board of Trade building on Saturday afternoon. While the elevator was descending he attempted to jump from it and was caught between the hoist and the floor. He died yesterday afternoon at five o'clock.

 

December 16, 1890

 

PASS - Died at 138 Elgin street, on December 15, Charles Thomas, second son of E. K. Pass, aged two months.

 

CRAWFORD - Died at his residence, 18 Bruce street, on Monday, December 15, Samuel Crawford, aged 73 years. Funeral on Thursday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

 


ROY - Mrs. Roy, the coloured woman who was so severely burned by the explosion of a lamp on Sunday night, died at the hospital at 2:30 this morning. The woman's body was frightfully burned and the doctor did not look for her recovery.

 

LEBLANC - (Ottawa) Louis Leblanc of Central street, Hull, a mill hand in the employ of J. H. Booth, was killed by a dynamite explosion in the mill at noon to-day. Leblanc was in the dynamite house at the time, and how the accident occurred will probably never be known. A big hole several feet round was blown clear through the six-inch floor of the new flume and the dynamite house and contents were scattered in all directions.

 

REEDMAN - A Calgary dispatch says: While riding down Stephen avenue, Constable Reedman's horse slipped down and the rider was thrown to the ground, striking headfirst. He was picked up and conveyed to the hospital where he did not recover consciousness, and died this afternoon.

 

HIGGINS - (Halifax) A shocking story comes from Charlottetown, P.E.I.  On Friday night an old couple named Higgins left that town during a snowstorm for their home, three miles distant. They took a short cut across the fields. The storm increased in violence with intense cold, and when within half a mile of their residence, they drove into a snow bank and were stuck there all night, exposed to the fury of the elements. On Sunday it moderated and though Higgins knew he was near home, he was so stupified and frozen that he was unable to extricate himself or the horse from the snow bank, and the aged couple remained there all Saturday and Saturday night with the thermometer down to zero. What they suffered from hunger, thirst and cold may be imagined. Their friends thought they had remained in town with relatives and made no search, but on Sunday the whole country round turned out and soon discovered the missing couple. Mrs. Higgins had her legs frozen solid up to the knees and died shortly after being discovered. Higgins's hands and feet were both frozen as hard as rocks and have been amputated. He is delirious and unable to tell the horrible story of his sufferings

 

BELL - On Saturday morning John Bell of Binbrook died at the good old age of eighty-one. For two years he had suffered from Bright's disease, but had been able to go about the farm until within a few days of his death. Mr. Bell was a native of Cumberland county, England. He immigrated to Canada in 1840, settled in Binbrook, and lived there for the following half century, respected by all his acquaintance as an upright and just man of sturdy English character. Mr. Bell was an Episcopalian and a .staunch Conservative. He is survived by three sons: Robert Bell who lives on the farm in Binbrook, William Bell who is in Michigan, and Rev. John Bell, an Episcopalian Clergyman in British Columbia. The funeral took place to-day.

 


 

December 17, 1890

 

PULVER - Died at his late residence, Main street east, Hamilton, on December 16, Clinton D. Pulver, aged 32 years. Funeral will leave the house to-morrow (Thursday) morning at 8 o'clock for the Stuart street G.T.R. station en route to Newark. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ROY - Died on December 16, at the City Hospital, Lizzie Roy, aged 23 years and 9 months. Funeral from her late residence, No 84 Gore street, Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

COOPER - (Clinton) W. H. Cooper, Jr, marble dealer of this place, and a familiar figure in political circles, was struck by a train on the L. H. & B. branch near Brucefield this morning and received such injuries as to cause his death in about two hours after being brought to town. Deceased had been in low spirits for some time past and is believed to have been troubling over money matters. Last evening he was thought to be in brighter spirits and conversed freely with his friends on different subjects, but complained of a severe pain in his head. Early this morning he arose, proceeded to the depot, and boarded the train for Brucefield where he alighted and then commenced to walk along the track. As the up train from London came along he was noticed by the driver who blew the whistle, and deceased moved off the track, but as the train came opposite him, he threw himself in front of the engine and received a terrible blow on the head besides severe internal injuries. The train in charge of conductor Walmsley at once stopped and picked him up, bringing him to Clinton where medical aid was at once called in, but too late to save his life.

 

December 18, 1890

 

AIKENS - (Alberton) Death has again visited the Aikens family, a second death within two months. James Aikens, a resident of this neighbourhood for upwards of forty years, died on Friday at the age of 56 years. The funeral took place on Sunday from his late residence to the American Presbyterian burying ground conducted by Rev. McLung. A large number of friends and relatives were present to pay their last respects to the departed, a man who was respected by all and had not an enemy in the world. The family have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire community. The funeral sermon will be preached here next Sunday.

 

KENT - (Hagersville) The death of Mrs. Catharine Kent of Walpole which took place on December 7, after a long and painful illness will be regretted by all who knew her. The funeral took place on Wednesday and proceeded to Caledonia for service and burial. She was 57 years of age and a member of the R. C. Church.


DAY - (Welland) Arthur Hoyt Day was executed in the jail yard here at 8 o'clock this morning for the murder of his wife, Deseriah, In July last.  He walked calmly to the scaffold, uttered a simple good-bye, and died an apparently easy death by strangulation...

 

December 19, 1890

 

LAMONTAGNE - (Sherbrooke) Remi Lamontagne, the murderer of Napoleon Michel, his brother-in-law, was hanged in the yard of the Sherbrooke jail at 9:27 this morning...

 

WEBB - (Sherbrooke) This morning's tragedy was a double one, for it involved the death of Sheriff Webb as well, a few minutes before nine, the sheriff arrived at the jail and was admitted to Jailer Read's private apartment. Ten minutes afterward messengers were running for Dr. Austin, but when he arrived the old sheriff was dead. Death was due to acute heart failure induced by excitement.

 

December 20, 1890

 

PARRY - Died in this city, on December 19, Jane Mc----. beloved wife of John Parry, aged 43 years. Funeral from City Hospital on Sunday, December 21, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MARKS - (London) George Marks who died on Friday was one of the oldest engineers on the south division of the G.T.R. having been employed on the line since 1856. He was a native of Gloucestershire, England, being born in 1824, and on coming to Canada entered the service of the Great Western Company. For five years he resided in Hamilton and the rest of his time in this city. He was highly esteemed by a large circle of friends who will deeply regret his demise. Mrs. Marks and five children survive. The deceased was a member of Division 68, B. of L. E. under whose auspices the funeral to-morrow will be held.

 

BELFRY - C. Belfry, dairyman, lives in East Flamborough and past the Desjardins canal. He had a bright little one, five years of age, named Elmer. Yesterday afternoon the boy was missed and could not be found anywhere about the premises. There is a well in the yard with a piece of loose planks over it. The cover was found to be removed and on looking into the well the dead body of the boy was discovered. It was apparent that he had been playing about the well and fallen in. No inquest will be held.

 

DESSAINT - (Quebec) Mr. Dessaint, M.P. for Kamouraska, who lost his life in the Thursday terrible railway disaster, will be buried with military honours. Nearly all the wounded passengers agree in saying that the train at the time the accident occurred was going at a high rate of speed. Rev. Mr. Gauvreau, a Levis priest, one of the passengers on the ill-fated train, remarked to a


friend that it was a shame to permit trains to go at such a rate of speed and that some accident would happen before long. The words were hardly spoken when the train jumped the track and rolled down the embankment.

 

December 22, 1890

 

BARKLEY - Died on December 21, at 140 Macnab street north, John, youngest son of Robert Barkley, aged 2 years and 5 months. Funeral takes place Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ROBERTSON - Died in this city, on December 21, Marjory, second daughter of Duncan and Eliza Robertson, aged 4 years and 4 months. Funeral from 25 Fast avenue north, on Tuesday, December 23, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MONTGOMERY - Died in this city, on December 21, at — West avenue north, Edith M., infant child of Edgar and Isabella Montgomery, aged 13 months. Funeral will take place from the above address, on Tuesday, December 23, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

December 23, 1890

 

MCCULLOUGH - Died in this city, at 211 Hughson street north, on December 21, John McCullough, aged — years. Funeral on Thursday., December 25, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MALLOCH - Died at 129 James street south, on December 22, Elizabeth Stewart, widow of the late George Malloch, judge of the united counties of Leeds and Grenville, aged 80 years. Funeral to Grand Trunk station at 3 p.m. on Thursday.

 

WELLS - Died in this city, on December 22, Mrs. Elizabeth Wells, aged 81 years. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, 41 Stuart street east, to Burlington cemetery, on Wednesday, at 2:30 p.m.

 

MARTIN - (Montreal) At an early hour this morning word was received from Point St. Charles that a well-known citizen had hanged himself and that there were some curious incidents attending the tragedy. For some years past Pierre Martin, aged sixty-six, and his wife lived with a son at the corner of St. Andrew and Albert streets. Martin had of late taken more than an ordinary interest in the different executions which have come off in Welland, Woodstock, and Sherbrooke. He is understood to have referred more than once to the manner in which Radcliffe performed his part in the sad jobs. Nothing was thought of this, however, and when the old man


was seen after dinner to make his way to the woodshed in the rear of the house, it was very far from the thoughts of the family and friends that Mr. Martin had decided to take his own life. A little while having elapsed, his son went out to see what was the matter, and on opening the door the horrified man gazed upon the lifeless body of Pierre Martin hanging to a beam, the old gentleman slowly swaying to and fro. The body was cut down at once and a doctor sent for, but this was in vain as life's spark had long since fled. As the old man's feet were not touching the floor, it is believed that he got upon a block of wood, adjusted the rope, and kicked the former away with his feet. Coroner Jones held an inquest this afternoon and the jury returned a verdict of death by strangulation while the deceased was labouring under an attack of mental aberration.

 

CARRY - Rev. Dr. Carry, of Port Perry, dropped dead on the street this afternoon. He was in his 67th year.

 

BEAULIEU - Brakeman Beaulieu is dead, making eight fatalities in connection with the wreck of the I.C.R. at St. Joseph's, Quebec.

 

HARRISON - (Milton) This morning a Canadian Pacific Railway freight train was shunting in the yard here. A farmer named Harrison who was standing on the track was knocked down and so seriously injured that he died before medical aid could reach him.

 

December 24, 1890

 

MURPHY - Died in this city, on December 24, Cassie, youngest daughter of M. Murphy, in her 14th year. Funeral will leave her father's residence, 91 Jackson street east, on Friday, at 8:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

STEWART - Died at the Royal Hotel, Hamilton, On Wednesday, December 24, 1890, James Stewart, iron founder, in the 80th year of his age. Funeral from the residence of William C. Stewart, corner Hunter and Macnab streets, on Friday next, December 26, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

James Stewart died at the Royal Hotel between midnight and morning. Since the paralytic stroke which prostrated him on Sunday, December 14, the venerable gentleman has been lying in a stupor with only occasional gleams of consciousness and unable to speak. He slowly and gently sank to death and passed away without a struggle while he was sleeping.

The career of Mr. Stewart is one that is good to read. His life was an honourable one and his character was of the sort of which honourable lives are made. Sturdy in heart, vigorous in mind, upright and fair in all his dealings with men, stainless in his private life, with a love for work, Mr. Stewart was one of those men who build strong and sure the foundations of flourishing


communities. He was also a kindly man, genial and cheerful in manner with always a pleasant word ready for his acquaintances, and possessed of a quaint, quiet Scotch humour which made him an agreeable companion. There are many who will sadly miss and will try to remember the round, ruddy, pleasant face and sturdy figure of the good old gentleman who has just passed to his long rest.

James Stewart was thoroughly Scotch, a good type of his race. He was born in Glasgow in 1811, but during his boyhood he lived in Edinburgh and received his education there. His father was an ironworker and was employed in the great works at Carron, near Falkirk. In 1830 young Stewart determined to push his fortune in the new world, sailed from Leith for Quebec, and the following sixty years he was a good Canadian citizen, the better because he was a good Scotchman. For some years he worked in the construction of the Carillon canal on the Ottawa river. In 1834 he came west on a prospecting tour and arrived in Hamilton. Not quite satisfied with the appearance of the place, the young pioneer went further, and in order to better see the country he walked from Hamilton to London. He visited several western towns, but at length came to the conclusion that Hamilton offered the best field for his energy, and settled here in 1835. For the next ten years he was employed in the foundry of McQuesten, Fisher & Co., being in charge of the pattern department.

In 1845 the firm of James Stewart A Co. was organized and began business as stove founders in a small way. Mr. Stewart had associated with him in the business Adam Cook, his brother-in-law, and Mr. Forbes. The business was shrewdly and energetically managed and steadily grew until it is now one of the most extensive in the Dominion. While yet a young man Mr. Stewart was married in eastern Canada to Miss Cook whose native place was Roxburghshire, Scotland. She died thirty-four years ago. Mr. Stewart never ceased to mourn for her. It was his custom to visit her grave in the cemetery on each anniversary of her death. Last Monday was the thirty-fourth anniversary, and it was noticed that Mr. Stewart was restless and somewhat disturbed in mind during his periods of consciousness. It is now thought that he was aware of the fact that it was the anniversary of his bereavement and wished to give some instruction relating to it.

Five of Mr. Stewart's sons and two daughters survive him. They are: John F., William C., Thomas C., Adam, and James Stewart; Mrs. Sorley of Montreal and Mrs. Archdale Wilson of this city. The first four sons are engaged in the business of James Stewart & Co, and James Stewart is a banker in Trenton. The business of the firm has of late years been chiefly managed by John F. Stewart, but the old gentleman up to the last took an active interest in it and remained in reality, as well in name, the head of the firm.

Mr. Stewart was a staunch Presbyterian. When he settled in the city he was a member of the old St. Andrew's church (now St. Paul's). Afterwards he attended Knox church and the Central church, but finally went back to his first love, and was a regular attendant at St. Paul's for several


 years past. In politics he was a Conservative. He was a great admirer of Sir John A. Macdonald and was fond of talking about the merits of that statesman. Mr. Stewart had for many years been identified with the Reform party, but his views changed during the period of the depression between 1875 and 1878. He never sought public honours at the hands of his fellow citizens, his public career being confined to only one year at the town council board. This was far back in the fifties before Hamilton was a city.

For twenty-three years Mr. Stewart has lived at the Royal Hotel, not that he preferred hotel to home life, but because he had a horror of being a source of trouble to anyone, even members of his own family, another proof of character.

The funeral has been set for Friday next at 2:30 p.m. from the residence of William G. Stewart, corner of Hunter and Macnab streets.

 

LAW - (Flamborough Centre) There died in this neighbourhood on Saturday, December 20, an old and respected resident. Mr. Law has been a resident here for quite a few years. He will be greatly missed by his many friends.

 

December 26, 1890

 

SIMPSON - (Amherstburg) On Christmas Eve , John Simpson, a coloured man, 21 years of age, stepson of James Holbert of this town, was shot through the head behind the school on the 2nd concession of Anderdon. He was attending a Christmas tree entertainment and had gone to the yard with other young men. While there, they were comparing revolvers and drinking together. An inquest was held here to-day by Coroner Bell, and the evidence was very conflicting. Walter Mann, son of Hartwell Mann of Anderdon; James Campbell, son of Alexander Campbell of Windsor; and David Holbert of this town, have been arrested, charged with the crime. They all deny that they did the shooting. Simpson was killed instantly, the ball passing through his head. His revolver was found in his pocket where he could not have had time to put it. No reason is assigned for the crime as the boys were on the best of terms. The general impression is that Mann did the shooting and that it was accidental, but this he denies. The inquest was adjourned until to-morrow (Friday) afternoon for more evidence and to allow the doctors to hold a post mortem. Simpson's family are in stringent circumstances and a handsome amount was subscribed to assist them.

 

December 27, 1890

 

HOLTON - Died at the residence of his father, John Holton, Sr., Waterdown Road, on Friday evening, Frederick Arthur, youngest son of John and Sarah Holton, aged 21 years, 3 months, and 2 days. Funeral will leave the above address at 2 p.m., Sunday, December . 28. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


LUNDY - (St. Catharines) Harry A. Lundy, son of W. S. Lundy of Crowland, died last Thursday from the effects of paris green supposed to have been administered by himself. The deceased young man was only 17 years of age at the time of his death. He was employed by a farmer about a mile east of Niagara Falls, N.Y., for whom he had worked about six months. No post mortem examination was held. No cause for such a rash act can be assigned. The boy appeared satisfied with his place, had a good home at Crowland, and considerable money coming to him. The remains were