Hamilton Spectator

Deaths 1889

 

 

January 7, 1889

 

WESTON - Mrs. Mary Weston, a very old resident of this city, died to-day at the Aged Women's Home. She was a member of James Street Baptist Church.

 

GRIFFIN - A funeral procession of nearly a mile in length followed the remains of the late Andrew Griffin to their last resting place at Rock Bay yesterday, showing the high regard in which the deceased was held by all classes with whom he came in contact. About twenty-five letter carriers in uniform marched beside the hearse and six of the old comrades of the deceased acted as pall bearers.

 

January 9, 1889

 

BENNETT - Died on Monday, January 7, Frederick Bennett, in the 62nd year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, -------, on Wednesday, January 9, at 3:45 p.m.

Frederick Bennett, for the past fifteen years messenger of the Bank of Hamilton, died yesterday after a short illness. The deceased was very well known among the business men of the city and highly esteemed by all with whom he came in contact. He was born in England in 1827, and before coming to this country, served in a British Cavalry Regiment and was also in the Royal Constabulary. He was on the Hamilton Police force for several years and left that position to become messenger of The Bank of Hamilton in 1876, The deceased leaves a wife and three children. He had been sick only about two weeks. The cause of death was the enlargement of an artery leading from the heart to the throat.

Mr. Bennett was well known in Masonic circles.  He was a member of Barton Lodge and a Royal Arch man, being first principal of the Dundas chapter. Among the business men of the city there is a general sentiment of regret expressed at the death of such a genial and faithful man.

 

MITCHELL - Died at San Francisco, on December 28, 1888, Alexander Mitchell, a--------. aged 53 years.

 

TALLMAN - Died in this city, on January 7, Edward Tallman, aged 6$ years. Funeral from his late residence, 131 Ferrie street, on Wednesday, at 3 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

Edward Tallman, who died on Monday, at 131 Ferrie street, was born at Lisburn, Antrim County, Ireland, on July 12, 1823. He enlisted in Her Majesty's Thirteenth (Prince Albert's Own) light infantry and served in the East Indies, Cape of Good Hope, Gibraltar, and the Crimea War during which he was wounded on September 7, 1855. He was discharged after nineteen years service and was granted a pension of one shilling a day. He was an old Orangeman, having joined the order in Ireland nineteen


years ago and was a highly esteemed member of L.O.L. 286. He was an employee of the Grand Trunk Railway and had been a resident of Hamilton for a number of years. The deceased will be buried this afternoon.

 

CLOSE Died in this city, on Tuesday, January 8, 1889, John Close, in the 68th year of his age. Funeral at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, from 169 King William street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CARSE Died at the city hospital, on January 8, John Carse, stone cutter, a native of Scotland, aged 67 years. Funeral from Chapman's emporium, Thursday, January 10, at 2 o'clock. Friends will please attend.

 

ROBINSON (Watford) John Robinson was killed yesterday afternoon in Brooke swamp while chopping. A lodged tree fell upon him where he was found some time afterward by his brother.

 

January 10, 1889

 

MYERS Died at Los Angeles, California, on Tuesday, January 8, 1889, Mary, beloved wife of J. W. Myers, formerly of this city.

 

MCLEOD Died in this city, at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. Tindill, corner of King and Wentworth streets, on January 8, William McLeod, in his ---  year.  Funeral on Thursday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

KEAN  (Orillia) A. L. Kean, while jumping off a train here yesterday, was thrown under the wheels and had both legs cut off.  He died at 1 o'clock this morning. Kean was a barrister by profession and was married.

 

MORRIEL (Orillia) Yesterday when the afternoon train from Midland drew into the station here, among the passengers who alighted were Charles Hebden.his brother, and a Frenchman named Philip Morriel. They made their way up town, Morriel stopping at the Oriental Hotel.  In the evening the Hebdens came around with the intention, according to their threats, of giving the Frenchman a thrashing, but were promptly expelled by the proprietor of the hotel. The train left at 9 o'clock, all being aboard and somewhat the worse of liquor. Arriving at Flesherton about fifteen miles north of here, their place of residence, they alighted. The train had hardly moved out when the Hebdens attacked Morriel, Charles knocking him down with a pair of skates he had strapped together. A man named Thomas Cartmall, who witnessed the affair, tried to interfere but was also knocked down, but only slightly hurt. The Hebdens kicked; Morriel's face and body almost to a jelly and left him for dead. In a few moments, however, he arose and walked to his boarding house about a quarter of a mile distant. He told them that the


Hebdens had been trying to kill him but they couldn't kill a Frenchman.  Dr. Hanly of Waubashene was immediately sent for, but arrived only a few minutes before he died, about four hours after he had been beaten. The Hebdens were arrested and brought to the Ryan House, Coldwater. An inquest is being held on the body of the deceased. The Hebdens bear a hard name here, Charles having lost an arm in the central prison while serving a term there. Morriel seemed to be a quiet fellow and had working on the farm of Mr. Scarrow. He leaves a brother and sister in Quebec who have been telegraphed for. It is rumoured that there is a woman at the botton of the affair.

 

MARKLE On Friday, January 4, Mrs. Elizabeth Markle, relict of the late Jacob Markle of Millgrove, died at the residence of her son-in-law, Richard Carey, of East Flamborough.  She was born in Prince Edward County on Christmas Day, 1800, and therefore had entered on the 89th year of her life.  Her father, the late Edward Ryckman, was a U.E. Loyalist who shortly after the revolutionary war settled on the shores of the Bay of Quinte where he remained until 1811 when he removed to West Flamborough and settled near what is now known as the Ryckman homestead. In 1821 she was married to Jacob Markle and shortly afterward removed to Zorra, Oxford county, where they remained some two years after which they returned and settled near the present village of Millgrove. In those early times there were no settlers back of this place, she and her husband being the second family to settle in the neighbourhood.  Here she remained until age and infirmity rendered it necessary for her to make her future home with her eldest daughter, Mrs. Richard Carey, where she remained until her death.  During her stay there she was made a welcome guest and every care and comfort which loving hands could bestow were freely and cheerfully given. All the members of the family now living were present at the last illness.

Having lived during the whole of the present century she was an eye-witness of many of the stirring events which have since become historical, notably those connected with the war of 1812-14 and the Mackenzie rebellion.  Possessed of a retentive memory and excellent powers of description she frequently entertained her friends with thrilling recitals of many of these incidents. Her reminiscences of early pioneer life with its accompanying hardships were in strong contrast with the comforts and luxuries of many of her descendants. She lived to see what was once an unbroken forest become the home of a thrifty and industrious people over whose destinies she wielded a great influence for good. Millgrove has lost her oldest inhabitant and the people showed the respect in which she was held by the concourse that assembled to pay her a last tribute of respect. Thus the ties that bind us to the race of hardy pioneers who first hewed out their homes in the forest are gradually being broken as we lay one after another of these aged people to rest.


January 11, 1889

 

NIXON Died in this city, on January 9, Catharine, beloved wife of John Nixon, aged 83 years. Funeral from her late residence, 187 James street north, on Friday, at 2 o'clock.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

TUFFORD Died in this city, on January 9, Harry Edward, only son of Lemuel and Katie Tufford, aged 1 year and 8 months. Funeral at 2 o'clock p.m., Friday, January 11, from 41 Bay street north. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

FILGIANO Died in Toronto, College avenue, on January 10, Miss E. A. Filgiano, sister of the late Dr. Filgiano, this city, Funeral from Grand Trunk Railway station on Saturday, at 1:45 p.m.

The late Miss E. A. Filgiano, whose death is announced as having taken place in Toronto early Thursday evening, will be much missed by a large circle of friends in this city where she spent the greater part of forty years of her life, her family coming here from Toronto about 1848. The deceased lady was a sister of the late Dr. Filgiano and took charge of her brother's young family upon the death of his wife twenty years ago. She was the first organist of St. Patrick's Church after its completion and only retired from that position because of rheumatic paralysis of the fingers., During most of the period mentioned Miss Filgiano has been engaged in teaching music.  She has been living in Toronto only since April last whither she removed with two of her nieces.  For a long time past the old lady has been in frail physical condition and suffered from heart affection which probably was the immediate cause of her death. The funeral will take place from the Grand Trunk Railway station on the arrival of the remains from Toronto at 1:45 o'clock

 

HEALY  (St. Catharines) Ex-Ald. Timothy Healy died at his residence on King street west on Wednesday night. He had been ailing for some time with heart trouble with dropsical complications, but was supposed to be convalescent. Last night he walked from his bedroom to the library about 10 o'clock and soon afterward his wife, hearing a noise, went in and found him lying dead on the floor, His death was instantaneous.

 

BROWN (St. Catharines) A coloured man named Brown while conversing with the elder of the B.M.E. church on Welland avenue this afternoon dropped dead on the sidewalk. The deceased was 90 years of age and was a comparatively vigorous man to the day of his death.

 

January 12, 1889

 

Simmons  (Wingham) A few days ago Mrs. R. P. Simmons, formerly of London, was taken down with a stroke of paralysis and on Wednesday, January 9, her husband was similarly stricken. Mrs.


Simmons died Wednesday evening and was buried to-day. While her funeral was in progress Mr. Simmons passed away. The old couple were well known in London, having lived there about thirty years.

 

TOTTEN (Halifax) David Totten, a septuagenarian farmer of East Mines, Folly Mountain, committed suicide by hanging. He took a rope and made one end of it fast to the upper part of a post. Then putting the other around his neck he lay down on the floor, using his utmost strength to obtain the necessary pressure on the windpipe. When found his face was only a few inches from the floor.

 

BOYLE  (Quebec) At St. Saveur de Quebec yesterday Mrs. Sophie Gagnon, aged 42, wife of George Boyle, of Bayard street, suicided by taking paris green. This was not the first attempt at suicide she had made. An inquest takes place to-day.

 

GIBSON  (Halifax) Gibson, proprietor of the sash factory at Freshwater, got his hand caught in a planing machine this evening and the member was completely severed. He was carried to his house nearby and two doctors summoned who administered chloroform to the sufferer. In a few minutes he expired. The family say that he died before the chloroform took effect while the doctors that he was under the influence. Gibson leaves a wife and family.

 

January 14, 1889

 

MEEGAN Died in this city, on January 13, Patrick Meegan, aged 73. Funeral on Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. from 119 Jackson street east. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

BOUGARNE  (Ottawa) Philias Bougarne suioided-last night by shooting himself with a revolver. A woman is supposed to be the cause of his trouble. He came here from Montreal on Thursday night and took a room at the Montreal House near the Canadian Pacific depot. In his room was found a letter expanatory of the tragedy but the coroner did not make the contents public.

 

BLAKELY (Trenton) On Wednesday night amid the tragic accessories of ice, storm, and darkness, at the very doorstep of safety, was enacted a drama of despair and death that resembles a tale of suffering upon the high seas. Between midnight and dawn cries from the bay had once or twice been heard above the tempest by people living on the Belleville road, but in the darkness and ice jam, a boat could not be launched. Early on Thursday morning when the storm had lulled, shouts brought Charles Bousall to the shore. He put out in a skiff and rowed to a mass of ice that had drifted near the land. Upon It he found two men. One lay dead near the centre of the mass. A circle around the body showed the track worn by the other to keep himself from perishing with cold. He had barely succeeded. The mouth of the dead man was open. He had died in the act of calling for help. Exposure


had killed him. The body was without boots, hat, or coat.

These two men were fishermen, father and son. Their name is Blakely. They had gone on Wednesday evening to their fish house a little building large enough for two men to stand crouched or lie curled about a fire within it. They seem to have had no fear that the storm would break up the ice, and when the jam struck their fish house, the old man was lying in the partially dressed state his body was found in. It took all his activity to save himself from being drowned and he was only able to leave the fish house by his son's help. Thus began the night of terrible suffering. Their clothes were saturated, the temperature freezing and the wind threatened to blow them into the water. Successive patches of ice went to pieces under them or drifted away from them as they approached the shore. At last the old man gave out and lay down. The son kept moving, but his father never got up again. He leaves a large family.

 

January 15, 1889

 

Haslin (Toronto) James Haslin, a builder's labourer and an old pensioner, aged 48 years, dropped dead this morning while Mixing mortar. Heart disease was the trouble.

 

BOUTILLIER (Halifax) Joshua Boutillier while cutting lumber in the woods at St. Margaret's Bay, was struck by a branch of a falling tree which pierced his body and caused instant death. He leaves a wife and one child.

 

TENSHOLME (St. John) Frank Tensholme, a young man of Milltown, N.B., skated into a hole and was drowned before assistance reached him. His body was recovered soon afterward.

 

CLEMENT  (Brantford) Ex-Mayor Joseph Clement, one of the oldest and most respected citizens, died this afternoon. Although nearly 90 years of age, he was as active as a young man and enjoyed excellent health. About 3 o'clock he was taken with a paralytic stroke and passed away at 5.

 

BECKETT  Samuel Beckett, brother of F. G. Beckett of the Beckett Engine Company and of Henry Beckett of W. H. Gillard & Co., died very suddenly at Arlington, NJ Mr. Beckett was formerly connected with the old Becket Engine Works and went to Arlington a number of years ago where he became president of a large foundry and engine works. Both his brothers left Saturday to attend the funeral.

 

CAREY At an early hour yesterday morning Edward Carey, one of the oldest inhabitants of Wentworth county, died at his residence near Millgrove in the 4th concession of West . Flamborough, aged 66 years. Death resulted from the amputation of his leg which was rendered necessary from a disease which originated in one of his toes and gradually spread upward in the limb. On Sunday


Drs. Miller, McMahon, and Anderson decided to amputate the leg at the thigh, but the aged sufferer was so debilitated by his previous illness that he died about four hours afterward. The deceased was born in West Flamborough about 1823 and was one of the patriarchs of the township.  He was a consistent Conservative and a prominent member of the Methodist church. A widow and six children survive him, Whitfield Carey, grocer of this city, being one of them. The funeral will take place to-day at 3 o'clock.

 

January 16, 1889

 

BURNS Died on January 15, at 14 Herkimer street, of diphtheria, Georgina Smart, wife of John M. Burns, aged 56 years.

The death of the late Mrs. J. M. Burns occurred under peculiarly distressing circumstances. Her son, Marsden, was taken ill with diphtheria. She nursed him with the loving care that only a mother can exercise. But she was herself stricken down with the dread disease and it was necessary to take the young man to the hospital. Mrs. Burns's condition rapidly grew worse and she died on Tuesday. The deceased lady will be deeply mourned by very many friends in Hamilton, for she had wide sympathies and was active in a great variety of religious and benevolent works.

 

McKiernan (Montreal) Charles McKiernan, proprietor of Joe Beef's canteen, and once a soldier in Her Majesty's services, but now known all over the work as "Joe Beef ", died here quite suddenly this evening. He came here with the imperial forces in 1864 and has for many years been one of the most noted characters in the city. His friends were as many as his enemies.

 

January 17, 1889

 

ROGERS Died at Calgary, NWT, on Tuesday, January 15, Lottie, beloved wife of Edwin B. Rogers, and daughter of Thomas Clarke, H.M. customs, Winnipeg, late customs collector, Dundas.

 

KENNEDY  (Toronto) Mrs. Kennedy, wife of Warring Kennedy, the well-known merchant and Methodist, died yesterday afternoon after a lingering illness.

 

WILSON (Toronto) Mrs. Stephen Wilson of 65 Scollard street yesterday upset a boiler full of hot water over her one-year-old girl. The little one died shortly afterward.

 

SMITH (Montreal) William Smith, an old soldier, was found dead in bed to-day.

 

MILLIGAN (Kingston) While skating near Milhaven, Herbert Milligan and another young man were drowned. Milligan broke through the ice while trying to rescue his companion.


January 18, 1889

 

RINGER Died in this city, on January 16, Arthur Ringer, aged 7 years and 5 months. Funeral from his parents' residence, 12 Barton street east, on Saturday, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

TSHANN Died in this city, on January 17, Antony Tshann, formerly of Baden, Germany, aged 56 years. The funeral will leave his late residence, 204 King street west, on Sunday, January 20, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

SHORTS (Newburgh) James, the eldest son of James Shorts of this place, was injured by a sleigh on Tuesday evening. His injuries resulted in his death this morning.

 

DAVIS  (Toronto) The funeral of William Davis, the late manager for Joe Murphy, the comedian, took place to-day. The managers of the two opera houses were among the pall bearers.

 

CHECKLEY (Toronto) A fatal accident which occurred in the neighbourhood of Downsview on Monday evening has just come to light. A young English immigrant named John Checkley, working for the Langham Farm diary company, fell from the top of a tree, fifty feet high and sustained injuries which resulted in his death in a few minutes.  He came from England only in April.

 

BECHER (London) The funeral of the late Henry Becher, Q.C. took place this afternoon from St. Paul's Cathedral to Woodland cemetery.  It was one of the largest seen in London for years. The funeral service was conducted by Bishop Baldwin and Rev. Mr. Hicks.

 

ENRIGHT Mrs. James Enright, aged 84 years, one of the oldest residents of Dundas, died last week. She is survived by four sons and four daughters.

 

January 19, 1889

 

SHOVLIN Died in this city, on January 17, Sarah Ann, beloved wife of Henry Shovlin, aged 27 years and 5 months, youngest daughter of the late Andrew and Barbara Fickley. Funeral will take place from her late residence, 86 Bold street, on Sunday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

COUTURE, (Shebrooke) A terrible accident occurred this morning  at the Albert

NOEL Copper Company's mines, Copetown, whereby Denis Couture and Joseph Noel, both married men, were killed in shaft No 2. They were endeavouring to thaw out a stick of dynamite which exploded, blowing both men to atoms. The


terrible accident has caused great excitement among the miners and quite unnerved them to so great an extent, indeed, that although the accident occurred at 2 o'clock, no work has since been done. The remains of the men were with difficulty found among the debris of the shaft. In fact, the head of Denis Couture has not yet been found.

 

WINCHESTER  (Toronto) A boy of 17, named William Winchester, by name, was drowned in the Don river this evening. He had been skating.

 

January 21, 1889

 

SUTTON - Died in this city, on January 20, Peter, eldest son of Philip and Ellen Sutton, in the 34th year of his age. Funeral from his parents' residence, 213 York street, on Tuesday morning, at 8:30.  Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

CARRIERE  (Ottawa) Mrs. C. H. Carriere, wife of the local manager of the Banque Nationale, was found dead in bed this morning. Heart disease is supposed to be the cause of her death.

 

SLOUGHS  (Quebec) Mrs. Major Sloughs, daughter of the late Commander Davison of the gulf ports steamship service, died suddenly at the residence of Alexander Brodie, wholesale flour merchant, while at a friendly party there last evening.

 

DAFOE  (Napanee) Albert Dafoe, a young man 20 years old, was drowned to-day in attempting to cross the bay.

 

BURTECH (St. Catharines) Louis Burtech, a young lad 14 years old, was drowned at 12 o'clock to-day while skating on the Sixteen Mile creek.

 

MCCOSKY  (St. Andrew's, N.B.) Early Sunday morning John McCosky, an old man, was found frozen to death near Millidgeville. It is believed he was overcome by liquor and lay down on the road and perished. He leaves two daughters who live at Millidgeville.

 

January 22, 1889

 

BOOTH Died at 54 Tisdale street, Hamilton, on January 20, in the 39th year of his age, Francis, youngest son of the late William Booth, Esq., of Walton Hall, Cheshire, and grandson of the late Rev. John Booth, rector of Lynn, Cheshire, England. The remains will be removed to St. Matthew's Church, Barton : street, Wednesday morning, where holy communion will be celebrated at 10 o'clock. Funeral service at 3 o'clock from the church to Burlington cemetery.

 


Huested Died on Sunday evening, Daniel Huested, in the 45th year of his age.  The funeral will take place from his late residence, 261 Macnab street north, Tuesday, January 22, at 3 o'clock. Friends of the family are invited to attend.

 

OTT (Port Colborne) A farmer named John Ott of Wainfleet living six miles west of here committed suicide yesterday by throwing himself before the engine of a passenger train. He leaves a widow and five children, grown up and in good circumstances. He was subject to spells of insanity.

 

January 23, 1889

 

SHEARER Died on Tuesday, January 22, at 117 Rebecca street, Charles Gustaves, eldest and beloved son of James and Isabella Shearer, aged 18 years and 2 months. Funeral will take place from above address, Thursday, January 24, at 3 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

 

CATHRA  (Owen Sound) Martin Cathra, farmer, an old and much respected resident of the township of Sydenham, fell down dead this morning in J. Wright & Son's feed store.  He came in with a load of grain and appeared to be in his usual good health. Heart disease is supposed to have been the cause of his death.

 

DESRIVIERES  (Ottawa) A. McGill DesRivieres, a wealthy gentleman, died here to-day.  He was a grandson of the late Peter McGill, founder of McGill College, Montreal.

 

BROWN At 6:45 yesterday morning the dead body of Jessie Brown, a prisoner confined in the county jail, was found in the cell occupied by her. The woman was arrested on Saturday, charged with the larceny of a sheet from Edwin Harris's lodging house on Bay street where she had been staying for several days and also for stealing a shawl and Jersey jacket from Hugh Daley. All day Sunday she complained about feeling unwell and wanted the constable on station duty to get her some laudanum. When she was arraigned before the police magistrate on Monday morning the prosecutor asked for an enlargement and she was remanded to jail until yesterday.  Her death necessitated the dismissal of the case when it was called. The unfortunate woman was in the jail before, about four years ago at which time she gave the name of Eliza Brown. Governor Ogilvie remembered the woman more particularly because she had a craving for laudanum.  When she was brought there Monday she said she was sick and wanted laudanum. The governor refused to give her any, but he telephoned to Dr. Rosebrugh, the jail surgeon, who prescribed an opiate for her. The prisoner appeared to be greatly excited and the matron, Miss Robinson, visited her frequently during the afternoon and evening. She repeatedly asked for laudanum and told the matron that she had been taking it for fourteen years. Miss Robinson locked the woman up in a cell, leaving Anne Johnston, another prisoner, in charge of her with instruct-


ions that she should visit her during the night. The Johnston woman saw the deceased about 12 o'clock and she was alive then. Shortly before 3 o'clock, Jane McCullough, who occupied the adjoining cell, heard the unfortunate woman crying for laudanum and threatening to hang herself before morning. After that she moaned several times and than all was quiet.  Dublin Jane afterwards fell asleep.  When she awoke she told Annie Johnston that she thought the woman was dead as she had not heard her moving about. The matron opened the cell about 6:45 and found her dead. She was lying on the bed with one foot on the floor and had a handkerchief tied tightly around her neck.  Her face was only slightly discoloured. The deceased was about 52 years old.

 

January 24, 1889

 

HENDERSON Died at 273 Catherine street north, this city, January 23, William Henderson, aged 66. Funeral Saturday at 3 p.m. from above address. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

The late William Henderson who died Wednesday at his residence, 273 Catherine street north, was born in county Monaghan, Ireland, in 1823. He came to Hamilton in 1849 and resided here continuously until his death.  He was at one time in the livery business and for the past 35 years has been a trusted employee in Walker's soap factory.  He was a staunch Conservative and a member of Knox church.  He was a member of the Hamilton Field Battery for 30 years.  He was an Orangeman and will be buried with Orange honours. A widow and one married son and three married daughters survive him.

 

BLACK Died in this city, this morning (January 24) suddenly at the Victoria Hotel, Charles E. S. Black, weights and measure department of the inland revenue. The funeral will leave the Victoria Hotel at 1:15 today for the Northern and Northwestern depot. Royal Arch Masons and Knights Templar are requested to attend.

 

LEGARE (Quebec) Monseigneur Legare, vicar-general of this archdiocese, died this morning at 4 o'clock of la grippe, complicated with inflammation of the lungs. He was a favourite with everyone, among his best friends being Protestants of all denominations.

 

HETHERINGTON (Quebec) Colin Hetherington, son of T. Hetherington, bread and biscuit manufacturer, died to-day from an aggravated attack of la grippe.

 

NERCAN  (Montreal) Rev. Abbe Andre Nercan, a priest of the order of St. Sulpice, died of pneumonia this morning. Abbe Nercan was born in 1814 at Barsac, France, and was ordained priest in 1840, and taught philosophy at Bordeaux until 1846 when he came to Montreal.  Here he filled several professional chairs in the


Montreal College of which he finally became director.  He was chaplain for the ladies of the Hotel Dieu and to the general hospital.

 

January 25, 1889

 

OMBOLT  (Halifax) Last evening at Sheet Harbour, Sydney W. Ombolt, 22 years old, was drowned accidentally while skating on a pond.

 

ENRIGHT Isabella Enright, a widow who lives at 328 James street north, died very suddenly yesterday morning. She lived alone and rented a portion of the house to Mrs. Mawn. The latter left home about 7 o'clock and Mrs. Enright was all right then. She had been troubled with a cold but was able to be about and attend to her work as usual.  Shortly after 9 o’clock Mrs. Carroll a neighbour went into the house to see Mrs. Enright and she found her dead. She was in bed and at first Mrs. Carroll thought she was sleeping. The cause of death is unknown. The deceased was about 57 years old, She was born in St. John, N.B. and had lived in Hamilton 30 years.  Her husband died many years ago.

 

January 26, 1889

Enright Died in this city, on January 25, Isabella, relict of the late Thomas Enright in the 57th year of her age. Funeral will take place from her late residence, No 328 James street north, on Saturday, January 26, at 2 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

January 28, 1889

 

Whyte Died in this city, on January 25, William George, only beloved son of Andrew and Mary Whyte.

Barr Died at the residence of her father, William Barr, 188 Main street east, his only daughter, Isabella Cross, this morning. Funeral on Monday, January 28, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

Shorts James Shorts of Sydenham, while coasting, received injuries which caused his death.

 

Albert  (Toronto) This morning Mary Anne Albert, a woman of 36 and daughter of Constable Albert who is serving a term in the penitentiary for shooting Yonge at Grenadier Pond some years ago, was putting hay into a trough which was from the loft to the horses's bin when she fell into the trough and was smothered. Her death was discovered only when the horse had eaten so much hay that her arm protruded.


RICHARDS  (Ottawa) Sir William Buell Richards died at his residence here this morning, aged 74.  He was Ex-Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.  Sir William retired from the bench several years ago.  He has been confined to his bed for several months past. The remains will probably be interred at Brockville.

 

LATHERN  (Halifax)  Dr. John S. Lathern, only son of Rev. Dr. J. Lathern, died suddenly last night of heart disease.

 

COUSIONS  (Halifax) While Charles Cousions was harnessing a team at Wilmot, Annapolis, the animals ran away and he was caught in the wheel and dragged a long distance. Both his legs were broken, his skull fractured, one ear nearly torn off, and he sustained other injuries about the head and body which caused death in short time.

 

January 29, 1889

 

HIPKINS Died in Rees County, Washington Territory, on January 15, Edward Hipkins, aged 56 years.

 

HARKNESS  (Owen Sound)  Joseph Harkness, the victim of Saturday's shooting affair at Allenford, is still alive but there are no hopes of his recovery. The Indian, Moon, was taken to the Walkerton Jail this morning.

Later: Joseph Harkness, the hostler, who was shot by the Indian, Moon, died this afternoon.

 

January 30, 1889

 

BUCHANAN Died in this city, at No 40 Bay street south, after a long and painful illness, Miss M. A. Buchanan, sister of J. G. and C. H. Buchanan, Times office. Funeral on Thursday, at 3:30 o'clock from 40 Bay street south. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

GIDDINS  (Niagara Falls) Samuel Giddins, the Grand Trunk Railway car repairer, who had his fingers crushed by a moving car track about two weeks ago and resisted having his middle finger amputated, died this morning. Last week mortification set in, extending into the arm, causing lockjaw last Friday, finally resulting as above. The deceased leaves a wife and family.

 

LARKIN  (Toronto)  Policeman Michael Larkin, No 123, an officer well and favourably known in the first division, committed suicide on his beat on Frederick street this morning at 7 o'clock. He had been on duty since a quarter to four in the morning and evidently waited for his time to be up, for almost exactly at 7 o'clock he stepped from the Sidewalk into a vacant lot near the newsboys' home, drew his revolver, placed it to the right side of his head, and blew his brains out. The body was removed to the police headquarters where neither officers nor friends


could assign any reason for the act, except recent illness. He was unmarried, but has two brothers in the street-car service.

 

LOOMIS  (Belleville) Dr. J. S. Loomis of Madoc died last night four hours after the amputation of his leg which was necessitated from an abscess of the groin. Deceased was clerk of the division court.

 

January 31, 1889

 

HALFORD Died in this city, on January 30, at 75 Jackson street east, Cora, daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Halford, aged 2 years, 7 months, and 6 days. Funeral private.

 

CLINE  (Dickenson's Landing) While Mike Cline, his son, and another gentleman named O'Neil were crossing from Sault Island to Dickenson's Landing and while attempting to round a point where the water was very swift, by some mismanagement of the sail, the boat swung round and struck a stone, sinking immediately, bow downward.  At this Mr. O'Neil jumped into the water and swam ashore.  Mr. Cline attempted to follow with a paddle in his hand, but was drowned.  It is supposed that his son clung to the boat and went to the bottom also.  Cline leaves a wife and two daughters.

 

February 1, 1889

 

CRONYN  (Strathroy) About 11 o'clock to-day the citizens were startled to learn that the Rev. Father Cronyn was found in his study by the housekeeper with a gunshot through the head and the gun lying by his side. He had been unwell for some time and only a few minutes before had been visited by his medical attendant. Whether the shooting was result of accident or suicide while labouring under a fit of temporary insanity is not known. Coroner Billington has charge of the body and an inquest will be held.

 

February 2, 1889

 

LAUT Died on February 1, at 45 Hess street north, Hamilton, James Clinton Laut, aged 5 years, 9 months, and 24 days, eldest son of James and Fanny Laut. Funeral from the above address on Saturday, February 2, at 2:30 p.m.

 

ZEALAND Died in this city, on February 1, at 140 Victoria avenue north, Florence Irene, daughter of Capt. William And" Sarah Zealand, aged 3 years, 10 months, and 8 days. Funeral Sunday, at 3 p m.  Friends cordially invited to attend.

 

PATTEN Died on February 1, in sure and certain hope, Salina Robinson Scott, wife of Mr. Rowland Patten, aged 40 years and 7 months. Funeral from 23 Pearl street south, at 3:30 p.m.

on Monday, February 4.


WILLIAMS  (Jordan) A sad accident occurred at this place in which a man named Thomas Williams of Port Dalhousie lost his life.  He with two other men was loading logs with horses when the chain in use broke. Williams fell to the ground and is supposed to have been struck in the neck by a link from the broken chain. His companions picked him up and found his neck broken. He was carried to the office of Dr. Dame but before reaching there life was extinct.

 

BARNHART  (Belleville) The body of an Indian named Hiram Barnhart was found beside the Grand Trunk track near Shannonville this morning.  He had evidently been killed during the night by a train.

 

February 4, 1889

 

KELLY Died at the House of Providence, Dundas, on February 2, Sister M. Stanislaus (Kelly) in her 30th year and the 13th of her religious life. Funeral Monday, February 4, at 9 o'clock to Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

 

GRIFFIN Died at Belleville, Thursday, January 24, in the 34th year of his age. Charles H. Griffin, formerly of the solicitor's office of the Great Western Railway here, latterly in the same department of the Grand Trunk at Belleville, and son of Mr. George D. Griffin.

 

JOST Died at 159 King street west, Mary, beloved wife of Henry B. Jost, aged 35 years. Funeral from her late residence, on Tuesday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WILLISCROFT  (Paisley) About 1 o'clock this morning the frame dwelling house of a widow, Mrs. Williscroft, was completely gutted by fire. Mrs. Williscroft, aged about 70, escaped in her night clothes with two grown daughters and told her grandson, aged 11, to follow them down the stairs. He failed to do so and the fire spread so rapidly that no one dared to venture into the house. After the fire, his charred trunk was recovered and it will be buried to-morrow.

 

GILBERT John D. Gilbert, living near Essex Centre, met with a horrible death on Saturday.  He was engaged in hauling logs and had fixed a log hook on a log and started the team, when the hook slipped, striking him in the abdomen and cutting him open. Medical aid was summoned, but he died at 2 o'clock. His relatives live near St. Thomas.

 

February 5, 1889

 

YOUNG (Brockville) David Young, a painter by trade and working" here in Cossitt's Agricultural Works, was found near his home


in Perth on Sunday morning frozen to death. It is supposed that on reaching Smiths Falls and finding no connection for Perth, he started to walk the distance. He leaves a wife and four children.

 

February 6, 1889

 

DODSON Died in this city, on February 5, Hector Dodson, aged 62 years. Funeral from his late residence, 61 Colborne street, Thursday, February 7, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

BYRNE Died at her home, 81 Bay street north, Mrs. Mary Byrne, widow of the late Andrew W. Byrne, aged 68 years.  Funeral on Thursday morning from St. Mary's Cathedral. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BARRY Died in this city, on February 4, Mary, wife of the late Daniel Barry. Funeral will leave her late residence, 8 East avenue north, Thursday morning, at 8:30, thence to Caledonia. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

CORNELL Died at the Cold Springs, Ancaster, on January 24, of heart disease, Enoch Cornell, aged 61.

 

RIVALD  (Montreal) While Patrick Rivald was working on the sixth storey of a new building to-day he fell to the bottom flat with an axe in his hand. His chin was almost cut through by striking the axe and all the bones of his face were broken. He has died from his injuries.

 

February 7, 1889

 

WALLACE Died on Wednesday evening, February 6, at the residence of her father, Charles B. Snow, 17 Robert street, Harriet Rosena, beloved wife of John M. Wallace, St. Catharines, Ontario. Funeral on Friday, February 8, at 3 P.M. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

MORIN (Quebec) Coroner Belleau held an inquest this morning on the body of Delina Larouve, aged 51 years, widow of Noel Morin. The unfortunate woman was in the habit of working in houses of ill repute in the suburbs and was engaged at the house of Rose Reubert (DeCotiau) in Richmond street when a row arose about a stove. The deceased was knocked down by Rose and struck her left side on a window. She was admitted into the Hotel Dieu hospital where she died yesterday morning, A verdict of Manslaughter against Rose Reubert was returned who was arrested on a coroner's warrant and lodged in jail.


February 8, 1889

 

Read Died on February 6, at Burlington Plains, John F. Read. Funeral on Saturday, at 11 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend.

 

NAEGLE  (Montreal) Deputy Chief Naegle. died at 4:30 this morning. He has held the position of deputy chief for a great number of years and was universally respected and esteemed.

 

RENOUF (Montreal) Mrs. Renouf while reaching over the elevator in her residence on St. Catharine street lost her balance and fell to the bottom, a distance of thirty-five feet. She died in great agony some hours afterward.

 

ROBERT  (Montreal) A man named Stanislaus Robert was employed to watch six firepots in which coke was burning to dry the plaster on the walls of a new building. He fell asleep early this morning and was asphyxiated by the carbonic oxide from the burning coke. An inquest was held and a Verdict in accordance with the facts was returned.

 

February 9, 1889

 

FLAHAVEN Died in this city, on February 8, Sarah, wife of John Flahaven, in the 25th year of her age.

 

DUNN Died in this city, at 46 Augusta street, on Friday, February 8, Lillie E. Dunn, aged 26 years, wife of James H. Dunn. Funeral takes place on Saturday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

 

GAUTHIER (Montreal) The three-year-old child of Mr. Gauthier, Moreau street, was burned to death by her dress catching fire to-day while her mother was out gossiping with a neighbour.

 

HOOKEY (Halifax) Thomas Stark and James Rigby, respectively master and mate of the Schooner "Clara" have been found guilty by the supreme court at St. John's, Newfoundland, of having caused the death of Charles Hookey by ill treatment. Both were sentenced to five years' imprisonment with hard labour.

 

February 11, 1889

 

Buscombe Died in this city, at 71 Herkimer street, on February 10, Iva Vivenna, only child of Frederick and Lydia Buscombe, aged 4 months. Funeral to-morrow (Tuesday) at 3 J 30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LOTTRIDGE Died In Barton, on Saturday, February 9, Elizabeth Snider, relict of the late William Lottridge, in her 83rd year. Funeral on Monday, February 11, at 1:30 p.m., from the residence


of her son, John E. Lottridge. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

TOWNSEND Died on Sunday, February 10, after many years of affliction, Sarah, wife of John Townsend, of this city, in the 78th year of her age. Ever deservedly loved by him and all who knew her. Funeral private.

Mrs. Townsend, the wife of the venerable actor, John Townsend, died yesterday after a protracted illness. The deceased lady was a native of England, was married to Mr. Townsend in 1841, and accompanied him to Canada about twenty years ago.  She was a refined, cultured, and intelligent lady and a faithful and courageous helper to her husband through all the vicissitudes of his chequered life, calm and cheerful in the storm as well as the sunshine. Two or three-year ago Mrs. Townsend's mind became affected and since then Mr. Townsend has not had the benefit of her companionship,  Our venerable and venerated townsman, who is now quite alone in his old age, will have what consolation can be derived from the sympathy of many friends.

The funeral will take place on Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock from Chapman's undertaking establishment.

 

GLEASON (Montreal) While Mrs. Gleason was walking on Sherbrooke street she slipped and fell, striking her head on a coping stone. She was taken to the general hospital, but before she arrived there she was dead.

 

HOLDEN  (Montreal) A murder was perpetrated early this morning in the boarding house of Mrs. Ennis, 73 Jurals street. In the house boarded A Mr. McGrath and his wife, a highly educated lady who had negro blood in her veins;  a white man named Billy Holden and Mrs. Ennis's son aged about 20 years. It seems that young Ennis was in the habit of bringing a woman named Jeannie Roberts into the house which his mother objected to.  Holden became enamoured of the girl also and when ordered to get out of the

house told Mrs. Ennis to get rid of the ---  niggers. Mrs.

McGrath heard this remark and rushing up to them slapped his fdce Her husband came in between them and with a razor, it is supposed, out Holden's throat completely severingthe windpipe. McGrath escaped.  Gn the arrival of the police Holden was found in a pool of blood on the floor dead.

Jeannie Roberts, the girl implicated, is held as a witness. She is rather prepossessing. She said Holden was a generous fellow and had once pawned his shirt to buy her a drink. She loved both him and Ennis. She was in the house when the murder occurred but only heard the row.  She was not present. McGrath, who works at the Balmoral Hotel, had not been arrested at the latest advice.

McGrath, who murdered William Holden, with a razor, this morning was caught by Detective Carpenter this afternoon in a house at Lachine and brought to the city.


February 12, 1889

 

SHEPARD Died in this city, on February 10, at the residence of father-in-law, W. C. Southwell, 154 West avenue north, Mr. Herbert C. Shepard, aged 39 years. Funeral from the above address, on Wednesday, at 8:15 a.m., to the Grand Trunk station enroute to Buffalo.

Many citizens will be sorry to hear of the death of Herbert C. Shepard who for nearly eight years was treasurer of the Grand Opera House in this city and recently has been agent for A. & S. Nordheimer of Toronto.  Mr. Shepard was in excellent health until about ten days ago when he was attacked with pneumonia and despite the utmost that medical skill and careful nursing could do he died at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the residence of Mr. Southwell, 154 West avenue north, in this city.

The deceased was born near Buffalo on January 20, 1850. He entered the employ of A. & S. Nordheimer about twelve years ago and until 1885 was stationed in this city under the late Mr. Hemphill. Since that time he has been acting as general agent in Ontario. He was a young man of excellent business ability and by his pleasant manners and careful business methods made himself very popular with the public and invaluable to the firm he served so faithfully. He leaves a wife and one child.

 

PADDEN Died in this city, on February 10, Mary, beloved wife of Patrick Padden, in the 55th year of her age.  Funeral from her late residence, 22 Aurora street, on Tuesday morning, at 8:30 o'clock to St. Patrick's church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

 

ARTHUR Died in this city, on February 9, James Arthur, a native of County Fermanagh, Ireland, aged 63 years.  Funeral took place on Monday.

James Arthur who was formerly a brakeman died rather unexpectedly Saturday afternoon at his residence, 20 Mary street. He had been sick for a couple of months or so, but his illness was not considered serious. About 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon he was sitting in a rocking chair talking with a Mr. Anderson when he passed away. Mr. Anderson thought he had fallen asleep and not caring to disturb him he went away, and it was not for some time afterward that Mrs. Arthur discovered that her husband was dead. The deceased was very well known. He was born 63 years ago in Fermanagh, Ireland, and came to this country thirty-eight years ago, settling in Ancaster. He lived there for three years and then moved to Hamilton where he has since resided.  His death was caused by dropsy.

 

February 13, 1889

 

MCALISTER Died in this city, on Monday, February 11, Mary McAlister, wife of the late John McAlister of the state of New York, in the 89th year of her age. Funeral from the residence


of her son, A. D. Henry, 88 Ferguson avenue, on Thursday, February 14, at 9 a.m.

 

PERKINS Died very suddenly, on Tuesday, February 12, Charles Edwin Perkins, aged 20 years.  Funeral from the residence of his brother-in-law, C. W. Powell, 230 King street east, Thursday, February 14, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Charles Perkins, a strong and healthy young man about 22 years old, was found dead in bed at his boarding house, 165 King William street, yesterday morning.  Perkins was a brother-in-law of C. W. Powell, dealer in window shades, 230 King street east, and had worked with him for about six years.  He also lived with Mr. Powell until about ten days ago when he went to board with Mrs. McClure, 165 King William street. Monday he went to Toronto to attend the funeral of his uncle who died there a couple of days ago and returned on the 12:20 train.  There was a party going on at the boarding house when he got back, and he joined the festivities, dancing several times and playing a mouth-organ. Apparently he was in good health and enjoyed the party as healthy as any of those present.  He did not go to bed till 4 o'clock and occupied the same room with his younger brother, Harry Perkins. When the latter got up at 7 o'clock to go to work, he spoke to his brother who was all right then. About 11:30 Miss Stewart and Miss Frances McClure rapped several times on his bedroom door and receiving no response, they pushed open the door and were startled to find the young man lying on the bed with his face almost completely buried in the pillows.  He was dead.  His face was considerably discoloured and showed signs of suffocation.  It is not known, what was the cause of death, but Dr. Griffin who examined the body is of the opinion that the young man took a fit and was smothered.

Coroner Woolverton decided that it was not necessary to hold an inquest unless the parents desired it.

 

DEXTER,(Halifax) Arthur Dexter and Malverns Cole, two young men, were drowned in

COLE the Liverpool river yesterday by the upsetting of a canoe, a companion, named Willoughby Murray, was saved.

 

February 14, 1889

 

MINNES Died on February 13, Grace Patterson, only child of John and Janet Minnes, aged 11 months. Funeral from 126 Locke street north, Thursday, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BRADLEY Died in this city, on February 13, at the residence of her brother-in-law, Mr. William James, 242 Hughson street north, Emms Bradley, youngest daughter of the late John Bradley, of London, Ontario, aged 22 years and 6 months. Funeral will leave the above address on Friday morning at 9 a.m. to the G.T.R. station en route for London. Friends please accept this notice.


BOUCHARD (Quebec) News has just been received here from Rimouski that in one of the back parishes of the county of Rimouski a few nights since the house of a settler named Bouchard was burned and three of his children perished in the flames.

 

JAMES  (Sarnia) Last night John James who lives about half a mile from the town on the cemetery road was burned to death in his own house, the house being consumed.  James was a bachelor of about 55 years, was a cripple, and lived alone.

 

STRANGER  (Wyoming, Ont) A young lad, eight years of age, son of George Stranger of this village, was killed this afternoon by falling under a sleigh . loaded with wood on which he had jumped to have a ride.

 

GILBERT  (Montreal) Ebenezer E. Gilbert of the well-known firm of E. E. Gilbert & Sons, contractors and engine builders, has just died suddenly at the age of 64 years. He returned from a business trip to Ottawa and was met at the station by his coachman with his private sleigh.  On alighting from the train he complained of feeling a little faint but felt revived after partaking of a little brandy which he usually carried with him on a journey. He entered the sleigh and when it had reached the end of Victoria street on St. Catharine street, the coachman on looking back saw that his master was sitting with his head bowed down.  He spoke-to him but received no answer, and consequently the coachman drove to Dr. Howard's who came out and pronounced him dead.

 

HALTON Tuesday night Thomas Halton, a labourer who worked last winter  in the quarries at Beamsville was found dead near the track of the West Shore Railroad on the outskirts of Syracuse, N.Y. The right side of his head was badly bruised. It is not known whether he was murdered or killed on the railway. The body was identified by a labour card bearing the signature of William McCawly, Beamsville.

 

Stevenson  (Caledonia) It is our painful duty this week to record the death of Francis S. Stevenson of Dunnville which took place on Thursday morning last. Deceased received a paralytic stroke some months ago from the effects of which he never fully recovered although sufficiently to enable him to be around.  On Wednesday morning he received a second stroke from which he died on Thursday morning. Deceased held the position of county clerk of Haldimand for the past thirty years. He was much respected by all who knew him. He leaves a wife and family to mourn his loss.

 

GUERIN (Waterdown) The funeral of Daniel Guerin took place on Monday and was attended by a large number of sorrowing friends. Daniel was a promising young man apparently strong and healthy. Only a few months ago his younger brother died and at present another brother is very sick with a fever.


February 15, 1889

 

WADGE Died in this city, on February 13, Charles Wadge, aged 35 years. Funeral from his late residence, 104 Florence street, on Friday at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

WATT  (Windsor) Moses Watt was accidentally killed near Chatham yesterday. He and a number of companions were cutting logs on James Steen's farm. The tree he was felling broke a limb off a hickory tree which struck his temple in falling and killed him instantly. He was 37 years old and leaves a widow and three small children.

 

WHITE  (Toronto) Thomas White, plumber, aged 24, was suffocated by gas while in bed this morning. The gas in his boarding house is turned off at the metre every night at a certain hour. When it was turned off last night he lit his lamp, but neglected to close the jet in his room. This morning the gas was turned on for cooking purposes and his death resulted.

 

CARRUTHERS  (Kingston) John Carruthers, an ex-grocer worth half a million, died suddenly here this afternoon, aged 75. He has been in feeble health for some time, but was able to be about this morning.

 

February 18, 1889

 

OGILVIE Died in this city, on February 16, Jessie Lousila, daughter of James and Marion I. Ogilvie, aged 7 weeks and 2 days.  Funeral from parents' residence, Barton street, on Monday, February 18, at 3 p.m. Friends are requested to attend.

 

WARD Died in this city, on February 17, at her late residence, No 178 Rebecca street, Mrs. Margaret Ward, aged 84 years. Funeral Tuesday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

QUINTEL  (Montreal) Mrs. F. X. Quintel of Panet street, who died last week at the patriarchal age of 95 years, leaves an abnormally large family behind her. She was the mother of 14 children, and her extensive family embraces 118 grandchildren, 138 great-grandchildren, and 128 great-great-grandchildren.

 

RIBIDOUX (Montreal) Madame Ribidoux died suddenly last night. While passing St. Jean Baptiste Church the old lady fell unconscious and was carried into the presbytery where she expired in a few minutes later.

 

COCHRANE (St. John, N.B.) Saturday afternoon a man named Cochrane, belonging to Lutz Mountain, town of Moncton, attempted to cross the railway track near Petitcodiac station with a team


of horses and an empty sled when the express train was approaching the depot. The horses became unmanageable and the train dashed into them, killing the driver and his team.

 

February 19, 1889

 

THOMSON Died in this city, on February 17, Sarah Jane Macadam, daughter of William Macadam of Seneca, and the beloved wife of K. W. Thomson, in the 38th year of her age. Funeral will leave their residence, Concession street, on Tuesday at - p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BRYDGES  (Winnipeg)  C. J. Brydges died suddenly Saturday afternoon at 4:20 while paying his customary visit to the general hospital. He was sitting in a chair, only one other person being in the room when he fell over, and before medical aid arrived, although several doctors were in the building, he was dead. The cause of death was apoplexy of the brain. Mr. Brydges is well known throughout Canada, first as general manager of the Great Western at Hamilton, of the Grand Trunk at Montreal, then of a telegraph company, lastly as land commissioner of the Hudson Bay Company at Winnipeg. He was considered an executive head of first-class ability. Deceased was in his 63rd year.

 

DUBOIS  (Montreal) Joseph Dubois, stableman for Mr. St. Jean, livery stable proprietor, was found dead in bed this morning.

 

CURTIS  (Brantford)  David Curtis, a well known and highly respected citizen, died this morning.  Deceased was for many years collector of customs at this place and retired into private life about twelve years ago. He was a leading freemason for several years, was district deputy grand master of Wilson district and a member of the board of general purposes of the Grand Lodge. The funeral will take place on Wednesday with masonic honours.

 

JORDAN (Longford Mills) An Indian named Thomas Jordan was killed while walking on the railway track near here on Saturday night, being struck by the midnight train. The body was badly mutilated. He is supposed to have been intoxicated. His friends are not known here but are supposed to be in New Brunswick.

 

February 20, 1889

 

JAMES Died in this city, on February 19, Willie, youngest son of Thomas and Mary James, aged 6 years and 2 months. Funeral from his father's residence, 50 Magill street, Thursday, at 2 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

RYAN Died in this city, on February 19, in the 36th year of his age, Albert H. Ryan, a native of Guernsey, Channel Islands, son-in-law of John Clarke. Funeral from his late residence,


Young street east, on Thursday afternoon next, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HAWKINS  (Montreal) Francis Hawkins, an Englishman, 50 years of age, died here suddenly of syncope of the heart, brought on by excessive drinking.

 

February 21, 1889

 

SHEPARD Died at 169 York street, on Wednesday, February 20, 1889, Catherine Brooks Shepard, relict of the late Lyman Shepard of Buffalo, and mother of the late H. C. Shepard of Toronto, formerly of Hamilton, in the 65th year of her age. Funeral from the above address at 8:15 a.m. on Friday, February 21, to the G.T. railway station for interment in Buffalo.

Mrs. Catherine Shepard, mother of Herbert C. Shepard who died after a short illness on February 10, and relict of Lyman Shepard of Buffalo, N.Y., expired yesterday afternoon at the residence of Mrs. Malcolm, 169 York street. Mrs. Shepard was taken ill with pneumonia the same day that her son died and was so deeply affected by his death that her illness became very serious and her demise was daily expected. The deceased was 65 years old and was born near Buffalo.  She lived many years with her son in Hamilton and Buffalo. The remains will be taken to Buffalo for interment on Friday.

 

RAYMOND  (St. John) The body of Arthur W. Raymond who disappeared on February 5 from St, John was discovered this afternoon in the woods four miles from the city on Beaver Lake road hanging to the lower limb of a spruce tree. The deceased had tied a new clothes line around his neck, slipped it over the bough of the tree, and it is supposed jumped out. The feet were only two feet from the ground. He had clenched tightly in his right hand $480 in money.  On his person was found a gold watch and chain, envelopes, and a handkerchief.  He was formerly book-keeper with W. F. Nye, oil dealer, Bedford, Mass, and on account of mental depression had with his wife come on a short visit to his father, Thomas H. Raymond.

 

BEAUCHAMP  (Montreal) Mrs. Beauchamp died suddenly this morning while washing her nine-day-old infant.

 

February 22, 1889

 

WILLSON Died suddenly at his residence, Winona, on February 20, 1889, John W. Willson, Esq. in the 76th year of his age. Funeral at 2 p.m. on ---- from his late residence to Grimsby.

 

BARRUCH  (Thorold) Samuel Barruch, a butcher who lately moved to town from Attercliffe, left his house last evening to go to Marritton on business and not returning when expected his family started out in search of him. On returning after an unsuccessful


search they found his cap on the gate of the canal lock near his house and naturally came to the conclusion that he had fallen off the gate into the canal and was drowned.  One of his mittens was found on the ice this morning.  Men are grappling for the body but so far have not found it.  Mr. Barruch is the man who was beaten, drugged, and robbed of a large sum of money a few months ago on his return from the Thorold market.

 

Steeves  (St. John) Reuben Steeves, a lad, was found drowned in a well on the property of Robert Turner, a milkman, on the Sandy Point road.  He was getting water at the time and fell headlong into the well, striking his head against the Atones in the bottom where he remained until his friends discovered him.

 

February 23, 1889

 

BURGOYNE  (St. Catharines) Last evening the 18-month-old girl of W. B. Burgoyne, proprietor of the "Daily Star", in moving about the house came across a box of chlorate of potash lozenges from which the little girl ate a quantity. Soon afterward she became sick and although medical aid was promptly sent for and every remedy tried, she expired during the night.

 

ALLEN (Halifax) Albert Allen, a lumberman, was killed at Spencer's Island yesterday while cutting away the support of a brow of logs.  His son left with a load and on his return found the dead body of his father beneath the logs. Allen was 60 years old.

 

GOOGOS (Halifax) James Googos, a Micmac Indian about 30 years old, got off a train at James station, Antigonish county, while very drunk and lay down and perished from the cold.

 

February 25, 1889

 

DEGEAR Died in this city, at 24 Caroline street north, on February 23, Bruce Classen, twin son of Ransford and Carrie DeGear, aged 17 years 8 months.

 

YORRELL Died in this city, on February 23, John Theodore, infant son -of the late James Yorrell, Jr. Funeral on Monday at 2:30 o'clock from his grandfather's residence, Alexander Hunter, corner of Mary and Simcoe streets. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

RUSSELL (Brantford) J. R. Russell committed suicide at an early hour this morning by shooting himself in the right temple. Deceased was a school teacher by profession.  His mother died a year ago leaving him about $25000. A short time ago he purchased a bankrupt stock of groceries and started a business. No cause can be assigned for the rash act unless that his business was not meeting his expectations. He leaves a wife and two children to mourn his loss.


GRAHAM (Montreal) A man named James Graham took sick at the St. Leon Water Company's office and was removed to the general hospital where he expired immediately.

 

KELLY  (Ottawa) A horrible murder was committed, it is supposed early this morning. At 10:15 a.m. the police were notified that the body of Mrs. Kelly, a charwoman, aged 65, was discovered on the floor in the front room of Mrs. Cooper's at 268 Clarence street, Lower Town. The police hastened to the scene. Life had evidently been extinct for many hours. A deep wound was discovered on the back of her head and was evidently inflicted with a dull instrument. The wound is about four inches long and presents a very jagged appearance. Then the detectives made a further examination and in the next room found some stove wood covered with blood.  In the kitchen was found a tomahawk which although washed showed traces of blood.  Red stains were also found on the stairway but they had been partially scraped off. The house had a bad reputation. Mrs. Cooper, the keeper, and Mr. Rothwell, an old man employed in the patent office and also a man named Henricks and his wife who live opposite Cooper's were taken into custody. All the prisoners deny any knowledge of the affair, but they are believed to have been carousing with the deceased all night. Rothwell says he is innocent and that he left the house at 1 a.m. when Mrs. Kelly was alive.

 

February 26, 1889

 

LOGIE Died on Monday, February 11, at 67 Leamington Terrace, Edinburgh, Scotland, Mary Logie, daughter of Major Logie, 97th Regiment, late of Kingston, Ontario.

 

WILLIAMS  (Montreal) A servant named Elizabeth Williams, aged 26, was cooking at the stove this morning when her dress caught fire and before she could be rescued she was burned to death.

 

LEMAIRE  (Montreal) While Narcisse Lemaire was working in an excavation in a brickyard on Parthenay street this morning, the earth caved in and he was suffocated.

 

February 27, 1889

 

NEWMAN Died in West Flamborough, on February 26, Ralph, infant son of James and Isabel Newman, aged 10 months.  Funeral from their residence on Wednesday, February 27, at 2 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

BAYLARD Died at Orillia, on Sunday, February 17, Hattie Amelia, aged 13 years, fourth daughter of James and Sarah Baylard, 82½ Stinson street, Hamilton.

 

CLOYD Died on February 26, at his residence, near Waterdown,


after a lingering illness, William Cloyd. Funeral will take place from his late residence on Thursday, February 28, at 1 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

TREVITHICK  (London) This morning the trainmen of the Buffalo express reported having seen a semi-nude body lying beside the track near Glanworth. The body was afterward identified as being that of Edward Trevithick who was arrested yesterday by the Grand Trunk constable here on a train from the east in an insane condition. At the request of his friends he was given up to them about 6 o'clock. About 9 o'clock he suddenly sprang through his bedroom window carrying the sash with him.  He had on at that time his pants, socks, and underclothing only. He called at house some distance off and borrowed a hat, coat, and boots. This was the last seen of him until his dead body was found this morning.

 

February 28, 1889

 

YOUNG Died at 121 Bloor street, Toronto, on February 26, George Paxton Young, L.L.D., Professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy in University College, in the 71st year of his age. Funeral on Friday, March 1, from the university building, Toronto. Service in Convocation Hall at 2:30 p.m.

 

About 6 o'clock last night one of the most terrible catastrophes which have happened in Ontario for some years occurred just east of St. George station, two miles from Harrisburg. The St. Louis fast express composed of five cars left the track immediately after crossing the switch at St. George station and tore across the high bridge just east of the station at a terrific speed on the ties. The engine and two cars got over safely, but the first-class coach, parlour car, and dining car went through the bridge and were wrecked. A frightful wreck occurred, resulting in the death of nine people, many of them prominent Canadians, and the wounding of twenty-nine others. The following is the full and complete list of the killed:

FRANCOIS A. W., reeve of Woodstock and editor of the "Daily

Times"- leaves a widow and nine children.

PEERS John, councillor, Woodstock - leaves a widow and three children.

MCLEAN Mr., of the firm of McLean & Beach, plumbers, Detroit, Michigan.

MOORE, Miss Salvation Army captain, at Woodstock. Friends live in Brantford.

SWAN Dr., a leading physician in Woodstock.

BAINES E. R., London, stove department of Grand Trunk Railway.

WEMP W. M., immigration agent, London.

LEGGATT George, supposed to belong to Mitchell. A receipt was found in his pocket from Ford & Murphy of that place.

CRUMP Charles, coloured, Windsor, dining car employee.


March 1, 1889

 

FOSTER Died in this city, on Thursday, February 28, Mary Ann, beloved wife of George Foster, in the 64th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, 140 John street north, on Sunday, March 3, at 3 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend.

 

CALLINAN (Petrolia) A fire occurred at Marthaville last night at 10:30 completely destroying the house occupied by Mrs. Callinan, an elderly lady who resided alone. The remains of Mrs. Callinan were found burnt to a crisp.  It is supposed the fire originated from the explosion of a lamp.

 

MARNI  (Galt) Ferdinand Marni, aged about 19, employed in the Bank of Commerce as junior clerk, died very suddenly at the Imperial Hotel about 8 o'clock this morning.  He had been here only about six weeks, having prior to that time worked in the Bank of Commerce branches at Paris, Seaforth, and other places. Deceased attended the bachelors' ball last night and appeared in his usual health.  He went to bed at the hotel about 3 o'clock this morning, got up and dressed for work between 8 and 9 and was found dead by the chamber maid when she entered the room. Dr. Vardon was called and gave it as his opinion that death was caused by apoplexy.  Deceased has no relations in this country. His father, a wealthy Italian, and mother, a Scotch lady, reside in Scotland.

 

March 2, 1889

 

BEATTIE Died on Friday, March 1, John A. Beattie, in the 56th year of his age.  Funeral from his late residence, 31 Robinson street, between Bay and Park streets, at 2 o'clock sharp on Sunday afternoon.  Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.

 

BEATTY Died on Thursday, February 27, at Youngstown, Ohio, Margaret, widow of the late Thomas Beatty of this city, aged 78 years.

 

March 4, 1889

 

LANGLEY Died in this city, on March 2, Philip Langley, aged 72 years. Funeral took place on Sunday.

 

TROTMAN Died in this city, on Saturday, March 2, at the residence of his son, No 3 Florence street, David Trotman, late of Ancaster, in the 62nd year of his age. Funeral from above address, on Tuesday, at 2 p.m., to St. John's burial ground, Ancaster.


SUTHERLAND  (Ottawa) While a man named Sutherland was hoisting ice this afternoon, a large piece fell upon him and he was seriously injured. The general hospital ambulance was telephoned for,  but before it reached the institution he was dead.

 

DESLAURIERS  (Montreal) A little boy named Deslauriers fell into a well in the rear of his parents' residence at St. Louis de Milende yesterday and was drowned.

 

March 5, 1889

 

HYDE Dr. John Hyde, one of the oldest residents of Stratford, Is dead aged 70 years.

 

DIAMOND Miss Lillie Diamond of Belleville died suddenly yesterday of Heart disease, aged 16 years.

 

GILL Mrs. Edward Gill of Exeter, Ontario, committed suicide yesterday by hanging herself in her husband's barn. Insanity.

 

TENBROECK Miss Eliza Jane Tenbroeck of St. Catharines was found dead in her bed yesterday, having passed away during the night without the knowledge of anyone in the house. The deceased was 58 years of age.

 

March 6, 1889

 

KIRKPATRICK Died on March 5, at the Hamilton Asylum, Mrs. Castillana Kirkpatrick, relict of the late F. B. Kirkpatrick, barrister, formerly of this city. Funeral from Blachford's rooms to-day (Wednesday) at 3 o'clock.

 

CURRY  (Belleville) Thomas Curry, ex-deputy reeve of Tyendinaga, died very suddenly on Sunday night.  He was getting into his cutter on his way home from a visit to a friend when the horse suddenly started and he fell. Mr. Curry rose at once and in response to an inquiry said that he was not hurt, but the next moment he fell to the ground dead.

 

BADGEROW (Blackwater) A very sad and fatal accident took place on the Midland division of the Grand Trunk Railway about a mile and a half from Uxbridge at 7:15 this evening. On the arrival of the freight special at Uxbridge in charge of Conductor McCarthy of Lindsay, he missed one of the brakemen, and on going back found the dead body of Brakeman L. Badgerow on the rails one mile and a half east. The body was badly mangled. It is supposed that he fell between the cars while passing over the train on Approaching Uxbridge. The body was picked up and taken to Goodwood by the express train and was taken in charge by his father who lives there.  He leaves a wife and small family in Lindsay.


PERRIN  (Quebec) Marcil Perrin, formerly of Bale St. Paul, aged 88, died suddenly this morning.

 

CLENDENNING  (St. John) The body of John G. Clendenning, a young man who suddenly disappeared from Calais on January 1, last, was found washed ashore at the edge of St. Stephen this morning.

 

HAWKINS  (Cumminsville) Frederick J. Hawkins, second son of H. G. Hawkins, Bay City, for the last thirteen years has resided here with his uncle, George Houston.  On February 10, he was attacked with pleuro-pneumonia. Although he received the most careful nursing and best medical attention, he died after suffering eleven days.  His parents were sent for and had the sorrowful satisfaction of arriving six hours after his death.

 

MCKENZIE  (London) The death of George McKenzie, assistant storekeeper of the Grand Trunk, creates another vacancy in the department of which the late E. R. Baker was the head. The death of Mr. McKenzie took place at his home, 497 Queen's avenue at an early hour yesterday afternoon after an illness of about three weeks.  He was a married man but had no children. The deceased was for a number of years in the employ of the company at Hamilton, but came to this city soon after the amalgamation of the Great Western with the Grand Trunk, and has been here ever since.  He was a courteous and obliging gentleman and stood well in the estimation of the company while those who knew him held him in the highest respect. He was 52 years of age.

 

March 7, 1889

 

JOHNSTON Died in this city, on March 5, Robert Johnston, aged 70 years. Funeral from his late residence, 160 Victoria avenue north, on Thursday, March 7, at 2 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

NUGENT  Died in this city, on March 5, Patrick Nugent, aged 32 years. Funeral takes place from 348 John street north, on Thursday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BEAMER Died at his home at Winona, March 5, 1889, John Beamer, Esq., in the 85th year of his age. The funeral will take place from the family residence on Friday, March 8, at 1:30 o'clock p.m., thence to the Presbyterian Church, Grimsby. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

BAYNES  (Montreal) W. C. Baynes, a student of medicine in McGill medical college, died this afternoon under painful circumstances.  He was in the habit of taking chloral and mistook a little bottle containing liquor of strychnine for his medicine. He took about 2 grains this morning and died from the effects. Emetics were at once employed, and Drs. Roddick,


Stewart, Howard, Bell, and Sutherland were in attendance, but their efforts were useless. He was 24 years of age and came from Ottawa where his father is a wealthy dairy farmer.

 

March 8, 1889

 

Griffith Died in this city, on March 7, at her late residence, 78 East avenue south, Lucy E., wife of J. B. Griffith. Funeral on Saturday morning at 11 o'clock.

 

LECHAISE Thomas Lechaise, a cabman, died very suddenly at his residence, Wilson street, last night.

 

ELLIOTT  (Dundas) Mrs. Elliott died at Rochester on Friday, March 1, aged 75 years. She lived with her husband from 1853 in Woodstock until the time of his death in May, 1872. Since then she lived in Beverly with her brother-in-law, the late William Henderson and lately with Thomas S. Henderson.

 

March 9, 1889

 

FIELDS About 5 o'clock yesterday morning David Fields, a waiter at the Royal Hotel, and his wife, who live on Napier street, opposite the patrol station, were horrified when they woke up and discovered that their six-weeks-old baby was dead. The child slept in the same bed with them and the probability is that it was smothered during the night.  Coroner Philp examined the child and decided that an inquest was not necessary.

 

March 11, 1889

 

ROBINSON Died at 182 King street---. on-------- , ------ Robinson, ----------. Funeral on Monday, March 11, at 11:30 a.m.

 

MCLACHLIN Died at Oakville, on Thursday, March 7, Carl F. McLachlin, native of County Antrim, Ireland, in the --- year of his age.

 

Graham Ketchum Graham, ex-M.P.P. of West Hastings, died this morning at the residence of his son in Sidney, aged 60 years. Mr. Graham was elected to the legislature in 1867 and in 1871 by acclamation, but in 1875 he was defeated. He was one of the pioneers in the dairying industry.  A family of three sons and one daughter survive him. (Belleville)

 

March 12, 1889

 

LYNCH Died in this city on Sunday, March 10, ----- Lynch, in the 92nd year of her age. Funeral will take place from her late residence, 216 John street north, on Tuesday, March 11, at 2 o'clock p.m.


MITCHELL  (Rothsay) Mrs. Thomas Mitchell, while attending the Presbyterian tea meeting in this place this evening appeared in her usual health.  Suddenly she fell down apparently in a faint and expired a few minutes afterward.

 

MARSHALL (Watford) A fearful tragedy occurred last night after the service in the Methodist church on the second line of Warwick North.  Miss Sarah Marshall had just come out from the church accompanied by a friend of hers when Albert Wilson came up and asked if she would come home with him, and she answered "Not to-night".  He then drew a revolver saying "Take that" and fired, the bullet striking her in the head and killing her instantly.  He immediately made off in the excitement and set fire to a straw stack adjoining a barn nearby so as to draw off the attention from his tracks.  Numbers of people have been out in all directions but have failed to track him.

It appears that Wilson who shot and killed Miss Marshall last night after church had been wishing to keep company with her, but that she had never appreciated his company and that after frequent attempts to accompany her which were always unsuccessful, he became exasperated and threatened that she would keep company with no one else unless she did with him, but nothing much was thought of this at the time as Wilson was a quiet and industrious fellow.  It appears that he had purchased the revolver with which he did the deed in Watford about a month ago, and as he had made the threat it is supposed that it was with that intent that it was procured. Miss Marshall was a young woman respected and esteemed by all who knew her. As soon as Wilson fired the shot he made off, but was followed by one of the party for a considerable distance, but Wilson turned on him and threatened to shoot him too.  So far he has evaded arrest but a party answering to his description was seen making his way westward this afternoon for the American frontier, but it is thought he will not be able to cross over, as all ports are closely watched and large numbers are out in search for him. A coroner's jury has been empanelled and is now taking evidence in the case.

 

ANDERSON  (Ottawa) Mrs. C. E. Anderson, who died this morning, was connected with the old historical families, being a niece of the late Commodore Jesse Elliott, USN, and grand-daughter of the late Commodore J. D. Bouchette, R.N.

 

DAVIS  (St. John) This evening George Davis, 35 years old, committed suicide by taking poison. He and his brother carried on a general country store business in Bloomfield, King's County, and failed a short time ago, to which failure it is said his death is attributed.

 

VIAL  (Quebec) Rev. W. S. Vial, missionary to the Anglican church at Montmerenci, and protestant chaplain of the Beaupre lunatic asylum, died last night at his residence, Grande Allee, from paralysis.


DE GASPÉ  (Quebec) Rev. Aubert De Gaspé died yesterday at Levis. He has left $50,000 or $60,000 to Levis college.

 

ANDERSON  (Camilla, Ont)  Diphtheria has been very bad in the neighbourhood of Mono Centre and Relessey. There have been over thirty-five cases in the past three months. The Mono Centre school has been closed for two months.  Quite a number of deaths have occurred.  Irwin Anderson buried two of his family, a . boy aged 16, on Friday last, and a girl aged 26, on Sunday. Two more of the family have the disease.

 

March 13, 1889

 

MCDONALD Died in this city, at No 177 York street, on March 12, Reginald Fairweather, infant son of Alexander and Bessie McDonald, aged 6 months.  Funeral on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DAVIS Died in this city, on March 12, Jonathan Davis, youngest son of the late Jonathan Davis of Saltfleet. Funeral from his late residence, No 194 Main street east, on Friday, March 11, at 3 o'clock p.m.

Jonathan Davis, secretary of the board of directors of the central fair and licence inspector for South Wentworth, died very suddenly between 10 and 11 o'clock yesterday morning at his residence, 191 Main street east.  Two or three days ago Mr. Davis complained to his physician, Dr. Wilson, of a numb sensation in his arm, but this symptom was not considered serious enough to warrant any alarm. Yesterday he complained about feeling unwell shortly after he had arisen and rapidly grew worse until between 9 and 10 o'clock.  Dr. Wilson was sent for, and on arriving, found Mr. Wilson in a critical condition. He died shortly after 10 o'clock. The cause of his death was heart disease.

Mr. Davis was about 55 years old.  He was born in the township of Saltfleet and lived there nearly all his life, for many years managing the old homestead farm. He was the youngest of the family, a family by the way which is Canadian as few Ontario families are, for Mr. Davis's father and grandfather were both residents of this country. James G. Davis and Samuel Davis of this city are his brothers, and there are three sisters, two of whom are married. The deceased gentleman operated the homestead farm until six or seven years ago when he sold out and moved into the city and lived here with his unmarried sister ever since. Mr. Davis never married.  When the Crooks act came into operation he was appointed licence inspector for South Wentworth and held that office until his death. For many years also he was the efficient secretary of the central fair board. A more scrupulous painstaking, and conscientious official than Mr. Davis proved to be would be impossible to name. He had many friends and deserved to have, for he was not only courteous to all, but his courtesy was of the quality which springs from kindness of heart. Mr. Davis was a gentleman by instinct. He will be mourned by many.


LAPINE  (Quebec)  Leo Lapine, coach builder, was found dead in bed this morning, aged 22.  He had been out in good health apparently, last evening.

 

BOWEN  (Halifax)  John Bowen, an old Dartmouth citizen, died last week, leaving a small estate.  His nephew, Pierce Bowen, expected to be remembered in his will, but when that document was opened, it was found the uncle had left all his property to his second wife who survives him.  Pierce Bowen, who lives in the city, rose early this morning, took his razor, and went to the basement where he cut his throat and bled to death. Another tenant heard him groan and summoned assistance but too late.  Bowen was once a well-off merchant, but met with reverses and came down in the world.  It is supposed he was suffering from despondency when he committed suicide, due partly to disappointed expectations.

 

March 14, 1889

 

HILL  (Halifax)  Capt. J. W. Hill, a well known and wealthy lumber and mill owner of Ship Harbour, died rather suddenly to-day at Musquodobois Harbour.  He had just returned from a trip to California and was a native of Maine.

 

FINLAYSON  (Paris) The sad intelligence was received here to-day by telegraph from Prince Albert, NWT, of the death of Donald and John Finlayson of this town and sons of the late Donald Finlayson.  It appears that they were overtaken by a severe blizzard and frozen to death. They were industrious farmers in that section and in good circumstances.

 

March 15. 1889

 

GILBERT Died at 18 Cherry street, on March 13, Mary, wife of Thomas Gilbert, in the 77th year of her age.  Funeral from the above address on Friday, March 15, at 4:45 p.m.

 

MCLINTOCK  (Wyoming, Ont) While a wedding was taking place last evening at the residence of John Paul, 2nd line of Plympton, Mrs. McLintock, wife of Kev. Mr. McLintock, of Maudamin Presbyterian church, went to one of the bedrooms to lay aside her wraps. A few moments later she was found lying on the floor dead. The cause of her death was apoplexy. She leaves four sons and five daughters.

 

March 16, 1889

 

FENTON Died on Thursday, March 14, at 51 Locomotive street, Ethel, second daughter of Martha and Robert Fenton, aged 4 years and 2 weeks. Funeral Sunday at 2:30 p.m.


DUNNING Died on March 14, at East Flamborough, Sarah Ann, beloved wife of Amos Dunning, aged 65 years and 6 months. Funeral on Sunday, at 2 o'clock, from her late residence to Burlington cemetery.

 

GARLAND Died on March 15, Louis Garland.  Funeral on Sunday, March 17, at 3:30 p.m. from No 12 Park street south.

Louis Garland, formerly a member of the firm of Garland & Rutherford, druggists, died in the Toronto Asylum yesterday afternoon. Two years ago Mr. Garland's health began to decline and symptoms of mental derangement soon developed.  Last June he went to England for his health, Mrs. Garland accompanying him. After remaining there for four months under treatment, he returned. The trip did not do him any good.  In fact he was worse than before he went away.  In November he was placed in the. asylum at Toronto, remaining there until his death. Mr. Garland was born in Yorkshire, England, about 46 years ago. He came to this country in his 25th year, settling in Peterborough. He remained there a few years, and then removed to Hamilton. He was in the employ of A. Hamilton & Co for a couple of years, and fifteen years ago he entered into partnership with Andrew Rutherford under the style of Garland & Rutherford. The partnership lasted until last year when Mr. Garland was compelled to retire on account of bad health.  He was of a quiet disposition and took little interest in public matters until a few years ago when he was elected school trustee and appointed chairman of the finance committee.  In 1880 he married a daughter of the late M. W. Brown, wharfinger, and the widow and one daughter survive him. The funeral will take place on Sunday afternoon.

 

KENNEDY  (Agincourt) While James Kennedy, an aged resident of this place, was driving a team of horses assisting to move a building on the premises of S. J. Pamerson, he missed his footing and before the building could be stopped, it had been drawn over his body, injuring him fatally on the head.  He was conveyed to his home, but expired a few minutes afterward. An inquest was thought unnecessary.

 

March 18, 1889

 

MCPHIE Died on Saturday, March 16, at 51 East avenue south, Lillian Mabel, youngest daughter of Donald McPhie, aged 4 years and 14 days. Funeral on Tuesday, at 2:30 p.m. from her father's residence.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SCHULTZ  (Odessa) Edward Schultz, about 45 years of age, married, was employed in Rothwell's shanty, Little Lake, one and a half miles southeast of Odessa, on Friday last, himself and one Heath, working together, felled an elm which lodged in an ash. The ash snapped, one of the top limbs skimming Schultz's face and breaking his shoulder. He died this morning of his injuries.


March 19, 1889

 

NIXON Died at Grimsby, on Monday, March 18, at his mother's residence, Allan F. Nixon, aged 27 years.  Funeral on Wednesday, March 20, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

March 20, 1889

 

MATHEWS Died in this city, after a long and painful illness, on March 18, at the residence of his sister, Mrs. J. J. Atkins, Lower Cathcart street, Robert H. Mathews, aged 23 years. He died in the triumph of faith.  Funeral from the above address on Wednesday, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

RASBERRY Died in the township of West Flamborough, on March 19, Jane Ann, wife of William Rasberry, aged 44 years, 7 months, and 5 days. Funeral will take place from her husband's residence, on Thursday, March 21, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend.

 

March 21, 1889

 

Karstein Died in this city, on March 19, Albert Karstein, in the 36th year of his age.  Funeral from 34 Little William street, on Thursday, at 2 o'clock.

 

POTTRUFF Died in this city, on March 19, Levi Pottruff, in the 36th year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, 7 Wood street east, on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Thursday night about eleven, Levi Pottruff of 7 Wood street east, died very suddenly of apoplexy or heart disease.  He had retired for the night, but feeling unwell got up to get a drink. He fell unconscious and before a doctor arrived was dead. The deceased was about 40 years of age and leaves a wife and several children.  He was employed as a clerk in Wm. McFaddin's grocery store and was very highly respected.

 

THROSBY (Montreal) Mrs. Throsby, whose husband is employed at McDougall's Mills, suicided this morning by cutting her throat while suffering from acute epileptic mania.

 

SPIERS  (Cooksville) This evening about 8:30 a lady who was driving along Dundas street observed a horse and rig in the ditch about one hundred yards from the public crossing east of Cooksville station.  On closer examination she found a man by the name of Robert Spiers lying under the rig dead. It is supposed the horse took fright from a passing train and ran away, killing him.


March 22, 1889

 

MAHONEY Died in this city, on Wednesday, March 20, Charles Mahoney, of inflammation.  Funeral will leave his late residence, 306 Macnab street north, at 9:30 a.m. Friday, for Freelton Catholic cemetery.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

March 23, 1889

 

CHRISTOPHER Died at her son's residence, 188 Wilson street, Mrs. Alice Christopher, in the 97th year of her age, relict of the late Thomas Christopher, of Chatham, Kent, England. Funeral on Sunday, March 24, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please attend.

An old lady died here yesterday who had lived for almost a century.  Her name was Mrs. Alice Christopher and she resided with her son, H. Christopher, 188 Wilson street. She was born in Chatham, Kent, England, in 1792. Her husband, Thomas Christopher died there over seventeen years ago. After his death Mrs. Christopher with her daughter and son came to Canada settling in Hamilton.  Miss Christopher was married to William Blake, butcher.  The deceased, notwithstanding her old age, was in good health until a month ago when she was taken sick. She retained consciousness until her death which was caused entirely by  old age.

 

FRASER Died in this city, on Friday morning, March 22, Ann Squair, relict of the late John Fraser, aged 63 years. Deceased was a native of Nairnshire, Scotland. Funeral from her late residence, 22 Stinson street, on Sunday, March 24, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Ann Fraser, who died at an early hour yesterday, was the widow of John Fraser, merchant tailor, who carried on business for many years .on John street. Mrs. Fraser was a native of Nairnshire, Scotland. She came to Canada with her husband thirty-two years ago, settling in Hamilton and living here ever since. The deceased lady was for many years a member of Central Presbyterian Church.  Her death was caused by paralysis which was brought on by an apoplectic stroke a fortnight ago. She is survived by four sons: Abner Fraser, accountant; George, book-keeper for Thomas Lawry & Son;  Robert, of A. Zimmerman & Co; and John of Charles Cockshutt & Co, Toronto.

 

PARTRIDGE  (Newbury) This afternoon about 3:35 shortly after the No 5 Grand Trunk Railway express had left Glencoe, a man was seen by the engineer walking on the track ahead of the train.

The engineer whistled, but he paid no attention, and before the train could be stopped, it struck him, throwing him to one side, killing him instantly.  The body was picked up by the train men and brought to Newbury.  On making inquiries it was found that he was a stone dresser by trade and his name was


John Partridge.  Nothing but an old knife was found on his person. He appeared to be about 40 years of age. His aged mother lives in Chatham.

 

MARTEAU  (Cornwall) A man named- Joseph Marteau, resident of River Beaudette, was killed by a western-bound Grand Trunk freight train about three miles east of here yesterday. The unfortunate man was on his way to Lancaster, walking on the track and did not hear the train approaching.

 

March 25, 1889

 

KLINGBELL Died in this city, on March 22, Christian F. Klingbell, a native of Germany, aged 53 years and 4 months.

 

COLLINS Died in this city, on Sunday morning, Hattie B. Collins, aged 24 years and 11 months. Funeral from her parents' residence, 38 Locomotive street on Tuesday, March 26, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

 

MITCHELL Died at East Hamilton, on March 24, Isabella Mitchell, relict of the late Alexander Mitchell, and mother of Edward Mitchell, in the 85th year of her age.  Funeral at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, March 26.

Mrs. Isabella Mitchell, relict of the late Alexander Mitchell, died yesterday at the ripe age of 85 years. Mrs. Mitchell had been ailing for two years, but the cause of her death was not any organic disease.  It was a gradual and gentle decline as the result of old age. The deceased lady was a native of Scotland and came to Canada with her husband and family in 1848.  For thirty years she had been a resident of this city. Of her six children, the only one living is Edward Mitchell, one of Hamilton's most esteemed citizens, and she survived her husband six years.  Mrs. Mitchell was for many years a member of Knox church, and was an admirable type of the devoted, high minded, and pious Christian lady.

 

COOK Died at 126 Hunter street west, William Cook, aged 62 years. Funeral on Monday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

William Cook, who for many years had been caretaker of the James Street Market and who lived at 126 Hunter street west, cut his throat at noon Saturday and died twenty minutes afterward. Mr. Cook was about 60 years old and was well known in Hamilton, having lived here for a number of years.  Since Christmas he has been ailing although he was well enough to be around and attend to his work at the market. The members of the family noticed that he was melancholy at times, but they were not alarmed and concluded that it was on account of his sickness.  He was around as usual Saturday morning but did not go to work. About noon he went into his bedroom, After he had been there for some time a member of the family went in and found him lying on his back on the floor with the blood gushing from a wound in his throat.


The carpet was covered with blood. The unfortunate man had cut his throat with a penknife, severing the jugular vein. He was still alive when his daughter went into the room. Dr. Storms was sent for, but when he arrived Cook had breathed his last.  During the time that Cook was in the employ of the city he performed his work satisfactorily and was well liked. He leaves a wife and large family.

Coroner Mackelcan examined the body Saturday afternoon. After questioning the members of the family he concluded that Cook was despondent on account of sickness and committed suicide. He did not think it was necessary to hold an inquest. The coroner said that it was a peculiar case, the wound in the throat being small but at a vital point.

 

HALLAIRE  (Montreal) While a man named Hallaire was coupling cars at Point St. Charles yesterday, he was caught between the cars and crushed to death.

 

GILLIES  (Ridgetown) Duncan Gillies, an old resident of this county, was struck by an eastbound Michigan Central Railway freight train here last night and instantly killed.  He has a son travelling for a Toronto wholesale house. The cause of the accident id not definitely known.

 

March 26, 1889

 

BASS Died at the family residence in Barton township, on March 24, Charles Edward, son of Charles and Eliza Bass, aged 1 year. Funeral takes place on Tuesday, March 26, at 2:30 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCCADDEN (London) George W. McCadden, formerly a clerk in D. S. Perrin & Co's establishment, and aged about 20,. committed suicide at his home on William street north Saturday night.  He had been ill for a year and at one time had an operation performed on him on account of an abscess in his stomach.  His health did not improve, however, and on Saturday in a fit of despondency he decided to end his troubles at once and forever. He went down to a drugstore and bought a packet of ‘rough on rats'. Taking it home he sprinkled it on a little cold cabbage and ate it. After tea, he took the balance of the package from his pocket and handing it to his mother, said, "Mother, I took some of that.  I'll soon be all right". His mother could hardly believe him at first, but he convinced her of the truth of his statement, and she then administered emetics, but without  success.  Later on medical aid was summoned, but arrived only a short time before the victim's death which occurred about midnight.

 

LANDRY  (Halifax) Brother James, a Trappist monk, while working in the shingle mill of the Antigonish monastery, had


an arm nearly severed at the elbow by a circular saw.  He died several hours later from haemorrhage and the shock.  In the world he was Paul Landry, son of Urbane Landry, of Afton.

 

WALSH (Stratford) A shocking accident occurred this morning at the crossing of Erie street and the Sarnia line of the Grand Trunk Railway. Thomas Walsh, 75 year of age, a farmer residing in the Gore of Downie, was on his way home, and while crossing the track was struck by a train from London, due here at 8:45. The horse was cut in two, the buggy smashed to pieces, and the same may be said of Walsh whose remains were found strewn along the track. The deceased was hard of hearing and it is supposed from that cause was unaware of the approach of the train.

 

MORTIMER  (Holland Landing) A sad accident happened this afternoon on the farm of William Mortimer.  His two children were playing in the barn and the little girl, aged about 4 years, fell into a cistern which was nearby and before assistance came the child was drowned.

 

March 27, 1889

 

WESTON Died in this city, on March 26, John Weston, in the 70th year of his age.  Funeral from 23 Lower Cathcart street on Thursday, March 28, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

LANGDON Died in Detroit, on March 25, Emily Langdon, in the 21st year of her age. Funeral will leave the residence of her uncle, Mr. Joseph Langdon, 74 Canada street, on Wednesday, March 27, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MACGREGOR Died at the Bank of British North America, Hamilton, on Tuesday, March 26, D. G. MacGregor, aged 39 years. Funeral at. 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 28.

 

GRAY Died in this city, on March 26, Richard Gray, in the 56th year of his age.  Funeral from his late residence, No 8 Locke street north, on Thursday, March 28. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

MARCHAND  (Montreal) George Marchand, aged 38, dropped dead to-day.

 

WADHAM (Toronto) T. H. Wadham, a carpenter, 40 years of age, was working at the dry goods store of Thomas Thompson & Son (Mammoth House) this afternoon.  His work took him near the elevator shaft and he was so engrossed in it that he did not notice the elevator, and as it came up his head was caught between the roof of the elevator and the ceiling and crushed


like a nutshell.  Death was instantaneous, the head being literally torn from the body and the brains bestrewing the floor.

 

MCGREGOR  (St. Stephen, N.B.) A terrible accident occurred at Lawrence station last evening which resulted in the death of Mrs. McGregor, wife of Rev. Mr. McGregor, Baptist minister of Buffalo, N.Y. and daughter of Levi Richardson of Lawrence Station.  Mrs. McGregor came home last fall to spend the winter with her parents and being  . troubled with sciatica had tried many remedies. The only one which gave any relief was kerosene and while applying that remedy too near the open stove her clothing caught fire, every thread of which was burned, leaving her body in a. frightful condition. Her sister in making every effort to extinguish the flames was severely burned about her hands and arms.  Mrs. McGregor leaves a family of five small children, the eldest being about 13 years of age.

 

HARVEY  (Guelph) A sensation was created in the city this week when a rumour spread that W. H. Harvey, book-keeper for J. W. Lyon and at one time accountant for E. R. C. Clarkson, Toronto, had been arrested for embezzling $4000 from Mr. Lyon. He was bailed out, Dr. Lett going his bail for $2000. About.4 o'clock this afternoon the sensation of the morning was magnified in an intense degree by another rumour that Harvey had shot his wife and two children. At present writing, the report is confirmed. His wife and two children were found dead in the house, their bodies still warm.  Harvey Jr’s whereabouts are unknown.

Later developments in the Harvey murder case throw no light on his motive for the crime.  He went to the central school about 11 o'clock this morning and took his daughter home.  It turns out that the amount he embezzled was only $400 and not $4000 as first reported. His son, J. W. Harvey, a lithographer in Toronto whose address is supposed to be 40 Colborne street, was notified and is expected here to-night. Harvey was superintendent of St. George's Church Sunday school. No trace of him had yet been found. The general opinion is that his body will be found in or near the city.

 

March 29, 1889

 

WAGNER Died at 22 Jackson street west, on March 27, Flora Mills, the dearly beloved wife of D. F. Wagner, aged 22 years and 24 days.  Her end is peace.  Funeral on Friday, at 3 p.m.

 

HOWARD  (Montreal) Dr. R. P. Howard, dean of the medical faculty of McGill University and one of the most distinguished medical men on this continent, died this morning.  Dr. Howard was born in Montreal in 1822, and was therefore 67 years of age. He was appointed professor of chemical medicine of McGill University in 1856, and on the death of Dr. Holmes in 1860, he succeeded to the chair of medicine which he has since held.


DONOHUE  (Kingston)  John Donohue, better known as "Clutch", died here this morning. He had been a convict in the penitentiary for some time, but last Friday was pardoned and released as death was imminent" from a blood disease that manifested itself in ulcerating sores all over his body.  He was sentenced at Welland in 1885 for larceny and receiving stolen money. He was healthy until recently when a blood disease began to develop, and about five weeks ago he was compelled to go to the prison hospital.  His wife was sent for and she remained with him until death. When the end was drawing near, the Minister of Justice gave him his release, and on Saturday he was removed from prison. As soon as the change was made Donohue brightened up and it was thought he would recover. Once he made a very strong effort to get upon his feet, but the effort was so exhausting that he speedily gave up the attempt.  He died quite penitent.  His remains will be removed to Fort Erie for burial.  Donohue for years kept a fine hotel at Fort Erie, Ontario, still conducted by his wife.  He was accused of having committed a robbery in the States and with the proceeds purchased the hotel business. The United States Express Co., on three different occasions, tried to recover the money or property, but Donohue defeated them every time.

 

BRADLEY  (Dundas) Mrs. Peter Bradley died in Dundas last week. She suffered great agony for several weeks, her disease being cancer of the stomach.  The remains were taken to Rochester, N.Y., for burial.

 

March 30, 1889

 

BARRETT Died in this city, on March 29, Mary Ann, infant daughter of Robert and Elizabeth Barrett, aged 9 months. Funeral Sunday from 100 Young street, at 2 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

MILNE Died on Friday, March 29, at his late residence, Wentworth street north, William Milne, aged 65 years. Funeral Tuesday, April 2, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

April 1, 1889

 

GARRICK Died at Victoria Terrave, Burlington, on March 29, Arthur Garrick, Sr., in the 70th year of his age. Funeral at 2 o'clock Monday, April 1, from his late residence, Burlington, Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

HOFFER Died on Sunday, March 31, Margaret Agnes, daughter of Frederick and Mary Hoffer, aged 2 months and 20 days. Funeral on Monday, from 249 James street north, at 3 p.m.

 

RAW Died on Sunday morning, March 31, Robert Raw, aged 78


years.  Funeral on Tuesday, April 2, at 2:30 p.m. from his late residence, 23 Bay street south.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SUMMERVILLE  (Toronto) Miss Summerville, a young woman of thirty, fell down on Yonge street near Elm street on Saturday evening, and being taken into an adjoining drugstore, expired within five minutes.

 

SEAMAN  (Kingston)  Last night a fatal accident happened on the Grand Trunk Railway between Lansdowne and Mallorytown. a young man named Seaman, who was night operator at Sharbot Lake, was on the train going east to spend Sunday.  To be nearer home, he jumped off the train which was going at a fast rate between the above named stations. A train was coming at the same time, east on the other track, and it appeared that he had stepped on the track a little distance ahead but had not sufficient time to pass over. The train knocked him down and passed over him, killing him instantly.  His body was horribly mutilated.

 

WARBURTON  (London) This morning a market gardener named G. H. Warburton went to a residence on Dundas street to deliver a bag of potatoes.  He carried the potatoes down into the cellar and stayed so long that the servant went to see what was the matter with him.  She found him lying dead in the bin where he had fallen on top of the potatoes.  A doctor was called in and pronounced the cause of death apoplexy.

 

LACKIE  (St. John) Robert Lackie, aged 64, of Salt Springs, King's County, was burned to death early this morning. He awoke and found the house in flames and saved his family and most of the effects.  He recollected some private papers and went into the death trap in spite of the remonstrances of the family and was never seen again alive. The charred trunk was found after the fire. The deceased was an old, respected, and rich man. The fire caught from the proverbial ash barrel.

 

WALTERS At Fredericton on Friday, a twelve-year-old daughter of Mr. Walters, took by mistake a dose of poison and died within a few hours. She was just recovering from an attack of typhoid fever.

 

SMITH  (Guelph) The remains of Tommy Smith who died recently in Detroit were brought up to Guelph yesterday for interment in charge of William S. Smith and David Martin who had gone over to Detroit to bring the body to Guelph. The funeral took place yesterday morning at 9 o'clock and was well attended. The deceased was a former resident of Guelph.


April 2, 1889

 

KIRKENDALE Died in this city, on April 1, May Louise Kirkendale, aged 7 years and 8 months. Funeral from the residence of Charles A. Burdon, 80 Main street west, on Wednesday, at 2 p.m.  Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

VONTASCHLER Died in this city, on the morning of April 1, Elizabeth Chaffnor VonTaschler,  aged 88 years, a native of Chinanacht canton, Argan, Switzerland. Funeral takes place from her daughter's residence, 281 Macnab street north, on Tuesday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

KEITH Died on April 1, at No 2 Crooks street, William Isaac, infant son of William and Mary Keith, aged 5 weeks. Funeral at 3:30 Wednesday afternoon. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

PICKERSGILL Died in this city, on April 1, Mary Ann, the daughter of James and Annie Pickersgill, aged 14 years and 6 months. Funeral will leave her parents' residence, 483 Emerald street north, at 2 o'clock Wednesday afternoon. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

MCKEE William McKee of Stony Creek died very suddenly of apoplexy Sunday morning.  He was in good health when he retired Saturday night.  About 3 o'clock in the morning his wife became alarmed at his heavy breathing and in a few minutes he was dead. He was 68 years old.

 

MCINTOSH Rev. Father Mcintosh, assistant of Chancellor Keough of St. Augustine's church, Dundas, died yesterday morning at the House of Providence. He was taken sick with inflammation of the lungs about a month ago and his death was daily expected, little hope being entertained of his recovery. He was about 23 years old and was born at Arthur, Ontario. He was ordained at Montreal last June. The remains will be taken to Arthur where the funeral will take place on Wednesday.

 

AMMOND (Montreal) To-day a French workman named Phileas P. Ammond, aged 50, was torn to pieces at P. Donnelly's sawmills on Craig street. He is a married man with a family living on Laganchatiere street. While oiling the machinery he unnecessarily crept through an opening through which the shaft passed and was caught and dashed to pieces.

 

GRANT  (Toronto) Mrs. Mary Ann Grant, widow of John Grant, one of William Lyon Mackenzie's followers and after the rebellion of 1837 sent as an exile to VanDiemen's Land, died in this city on Saturday. She was in her 75th year.

(Ed. Note, Van Diemen's Land was the name of the British crown colony and a name for the island of Tasmania).


LETSON  (Halifax) A boy named Letson died last evening from injuries said to be inflicted a week ago by a companion named Alexander Taylor who is said to have jumped on Letson's stomach during a quarrel.

 

POPE  (Ottawa)  Hon. John Henry Pope, minister of railways, passed away this afternoon at 5 o'clock after a long and painful illness. He has been suffering from general debility for a year past.

Mr. Pope was educated in Gompton high school and early in his life engaged in farming. He represented Compton in the Canada Assembly from 1857 till the union, and was elected in 1867, 1872, 1874, and 1878 for that constituency by acclamation to the Dominion parliament. He was re-elected in 1882 and in February, 1887. Mr. Pope became a member of the Privy Council of Canada and was minister of agriculture from October 1871 till November 1873 when he resigned with the government on the Pacific railway question. He was re-appointed minister of agriculture in 1878 and minister of railways and canals in September 1885. During the summer of 1880 he visited England in company with Sir John A. Macdonald and Sir Charles Tupper and took an active part in the negotiations that resulted in the Pacific Railway contract which was afterward ratified by the Canadian parliament. Mr. Pope was president of the International Railway of Maine and the Compton colonization society.

 

April 3, 1889

 

DOUGALL Died at Bishophurst, the residence of Mrs. Fuller, Hamilton, on April 2, 1889, Esther Dougall,  second daughter of the late John Dougall, Esq., Belleville, Ontario. Funeral from Bishophurst, Wednesday afternoon, at 4 o'clock.

 

SLAVIN (Belleville) The mystery attending the disappearance on December 1 of John Slavin, an old resident of the city, was solved to-day when his body was found floating in the bay at Ferry Point.

 

HUTT  (Meaford) A sad case of suicide occurred here last night, the victim being a young Englishman about 23 years of age, named Joseph Hutt, employed by the Meaford building and manufacturing company. He first tried to take his life by taking a dose of paris green, but evidently took too large a dose and threw it off. He next took to the river a short distance from his boarding house and jumped in. After dragging the river for some time this morning, the body was recovered. No cause is known for the rash act as he was a sober, industrious young man.

 

WILKS  (Toronto) Charles A. Wilks, a druggist from Beaverton, was in the city yesterday ostensibly making purchases for his business. In the evening he went to the house of some friends where his wife was staying, and making some pretext to get rid


of them committed suicide by taking poison. There will be an inquest.

 

April 4, 1889

 

ROBERTSON Died in this city, on April 3, John Grant Robertson, in his 52nd year.  Funeral from his sister's residence, 3 Liberty street, on Friday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

O'NEIL Died at Dundas, on April 3, at the family residence, King street, Catharine, infant daughter of John and Catharine O'Neil, aged 1 month and 22 days. Funeral takes place on Thursday, at 2 o'clock p.m., to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

OULCOTT  (Toronto) John Oulcott of Eglington, one of the best known of Canadian sportsmen and a splendid shot, died at his residence at a late hour this evening.

 

April 5, 1889

 

BUCK Died in Burlington, on April 3, Elizabeth Marlatt Buck, in her 59th year. Funeral on Saturday, April 6, from her late residence at 9:30 a.m.. Service in the Methodist church, Burlington at 10 a.m. The funeral procession will then proceed to Palermo cemetery, arriving there about 12:30. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

Washlin  (Montreal)  David Washlin broke through the ice on the Lachine canal last night and was drowned.

 

Chartre  (Quebec) The body of the man found yesterday in Toger's barn has been identified as Pierre Chartre, aged 32 years, joiner, of St. Ambroise de la Jeune Lorette. He left the house of his brother, Jean Chartre, of this city on Tuesday, March 5, to come to town where he arrived quite sober but was not heard from since. Three empty liquor bottles and his boots were found yesterday in the bay.  Dr. Lavoie made a post mortem examination this morning, The left lung, heart, stomach, and a portion of the bowels and left kidney were eaten by rats.

 

April 6, 1889

 

RYCKMAN Died at Thorold, on April 3, Phillipa Williams, beloved wife of the late David Ryckman. Funeral on Friday, April 5, from her late residence, to the St. Catharines cemetery, at 2 o'clock p.m.

 

DURPHY Died on Friday morning, April 5, Jeremiah Durphy, aged 45 years. Funeral on Sunday afternoon, at 3 o'clock from his


late residence, 126 Wood street east. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

On Monday afternoon, Jeremiah Durphy, 126 Wood street, fell from the roof of the Hendrie's stable, Market street, and sustained severe injury. His leg was broken in two places and his head was damaged to such an extent that congestion of the brain ensued. In the evening he became unconscious and remained in that condition until death ensued, at 4:30 yesterday morning. He leaves a widow and one child.

 

SWORD (Quebec) Andrew Sword, aged 44, late colour-sergeant of the 78th Highlanders, and later messenger of the Merchants’ Bank, died suddenly at 2 o'clock this afternoon. He had been complaining for six weeks past but heart disease completed the work to-day. He was district deputy grand master in the Masonic craft.

 

FORSYTH  (Omemee) A young man namce Forsyth while chopping in a wood about five miles from the village was struck on the head by a falling limb, causing death shortly afterward.

 

April 8, 1889

 

DUGGAN Died in this city, on April 5, Mary Duggan, relict of the late Martin Duggan, aged 62 years. Funeral took place on Sunday.

 

MILLIGAN Died in this city, on April 6, William, infant son of William and Frances Milligan, aged 8 months. Funeral from 9 Florence street, Monday afternoon, at 4 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

 

STRONGMAN Died at his residence, on April 7, 76 Hunter atreet east, William Strongman, last Surviving son of the late James Strongman, Esq., aged 58 years and 4 months. The funeral will move from his late residence to-morrow (Tuesday), April 9, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are cordially invited to accept this notice.

P.C William Strongman, one of the oldest members of the Hamilton police force, died at 8 o'clock on Sunday morning after an illness of only three days. He was in excellent health up to Thursday morning when he was taken ill with inflammation of the bowels. He grew rapidly worse and was given up by the doctors on Saturday night. He leaves a widow and two adopted children. The deceased was a faithful and efficient officer and had an enviable record during his long term of service. He was appointed in April, 1865, when Ald. Carruthers was chief of police and subsequently served under Nicoll, Davis, Henry, Logan, McMenemy, Stewart and the present chief.  Next to Peter Ferres who was appointed in October, 1853, he was the oldest member of the force. Strongman was born in England in 1837 and came to this country when quite young, his father settling in Barton township.


EAGER Died on April 7, Jessie Gladys, only child of Morley P. and Nellie Eager, aged 2 months and 8 days. Funeral from No 8 Peter street, at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday, April 9. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

CROTTY  (Montreal) Mrs. Crotty was found lying very ill in a gallery at the rear of her residence yesterday. She was carried into the house, but the woman never recovered. Apoplexy is said to be the cause of death.

 

BULLY (Windsor) Frank Bully, of Woodslee, aged 21, was struck by a block of wood Thursday and injured so badly that he died the following morning.

 

CARPENTER  (Halifax) W. C. Carpenter of Oxford committed suicide last night by taking a heavy dose of laudanum. The cause is unknown.

 

April 9, 1889

 

BAKER Died in this city, on April 7, Sarah, beloved wife of Stephen Baker, aged 72 years. Funeral from her husband's residence, 127 Rebecca street, on Tuesday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

TRUMAN Died on Saturday, April 6, at 8:30 p.m., Reginald, son of Fred and Maud Truman. Funeral took place on Sunday, April 7, from his parents' residence, 111 east avenue north.

 

Fogwell Died on April 8, Alice, daughter of the late W. H. Fogwell, aged 9 years and 6 months. Funeral from her mother's residence, Robinson street west, on Tuesday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WALSH (Trenton) Rev. E. J. Walsh, parish priest, died this morning after ten days' illness. His death is a great shock to the community as he was beloved by all. Right Rev. Bishop Cleary, Mgr. Farrely, and several priests were at his bedside at his death. The funeral will take place on Wednesday at 10 o'clock in the Church of St. Peter where the deceased laboured so successfully during the past seven years.

 

April 10, 1889

 

LAMBERT Died on Monday, April 8, at her son's residence, Brush Bridge, North Barton, Mary Ann Lambert, aged 60 years. Funeral at 2 o'clock on Wednesday afternoon. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SMITH Died at Hamilton, on April 8, Thomas McHenry, only son of Mable Osborne and William Smith, M.A., of the post office department, Ottawa. Funeral from the residence of his grand


father, Thomas Smith, 74 Caroline street north, on Wednesday, April 10, at 3 p.m. Friends are invited to attend.

 

BELLING Died in this city, on April 9, James Belling, in the 56th year of his age. Funeral at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday, from 181 Cannon street east. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

MITCHELL Died on April 9, at 84 John street north, Andrew Mitchell, aged 62 years, late of Rymal. Funeral on Friday, at 12 o'clock from the above address to St. George's, Rymal. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

Hauskins  (Elfrida) At Trinity church last Sunday morning at 11 o'clock the friends and relatives of J. Hauskins gathered together to see him conveyed to his last resting place. There was a large attendance and Rev. E. B. Stevenson delivered an excellent discourse, consoling the bereft on the great loss which they had to sustain. The deceased had been a resident of the township of Glanford for eight or ten years and was about 36 years of age.

 

WRIGHT (Toronto) A boy of 9, Charles Wright by name, was this afternoon playing with two companions on some logs in the bay near the Credit Valley Railway freight sheds. Just as he started for home he fell between the logs and was drowned.

 

JOHNSON  (Windsor) P. Johnson, a coloured man, about 60 years of age, whose family resides in Windsor was found dead in Sandwich East, six miles back of Windsor. The decomposed state of the corpse showed that death had taken place several days ago. The body was brought to Windsor. An inquest will be held.

 

April 11, 1889

 

MACDONALD Died in this city, on April 9, John Macdonald, cabman, a native of the county of Wicklow, Ireland, in the 43rd year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 44 Hughson street north, on Thursday, April 11, at 2:30. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BATE  (Ottawa)  C. T. Bate dropped dead in the Russell House to-night at 11:30.  It seems that the deceased came into the hotel from the street about 10:50 and went immediately to the dining room where he partook of a slight luncheon, his usual custom when coming in of a night. He then went upstairs to W. F. Alloway's room on the first floor to have a chat. Mr. Alloway was a particular friend of his and with Mrs. Alloway was leaving for Winnipeg by the midnight train. He was sitting talking in an armchair when he suddenly fell back and was to all sppearance stone dead.  Mrs. Alloway immediately rushed down stairs to give the alarm and Doctors Roome, M.P., Senator


Sullivan, and Bergin, M.P., were soon in attendance.  Dr. Church was at once summoned and they pronounced him dead. Deceased was a wealthy retired wholesale merchant and was Mayor of the city in 1884, succeeding C. H. Macintosh.  He was in perfect health and aged about 62.  He was separated for many years from his wife whom he married in St. Catharines and who is now living in Toronto.

 

BLAIS  (Montreal) The body found in the canal to-day proved to be that of Pierre Blais, a navigator, aged 60, who disappeared about the end of November. When last seen the unfortunate man was around Cantin's dock and it is supposed that he fell into the canal, as it was then getting dark. Blais was formerly a well-to-do merchant of Quebec, but failed in his business and went down ever since and was obliged to take work at the wharf last summer.

 

April 13, 1889

 

WRIGHT  (Montreal)  Joseph Wright, who was run down by a Canadian Pacifice Railway engine near Hochelaga two days ago, died late last night without recovering consciousness.

 

CREIGHTON  (Quebec) Walter L. Creighton, lately appointed manager of the Montreal Bank here, died suddenly at his residence at Mount Pleasant to-day at noon, it is supposed from an overdose of laudanum. The deceased was said to have suffered from some ailment of the head and used the physic as an alleviation.  He has not been in full possession of his office since his arrival. He had lately returned from a tour through Florida on account of his health.

 

April 15, 1889

 

WICKHAM Died in this city, on April 12, Ellen, youngest child of William and Mary Wickham, aged 10 months.

 

HARPER Died in this city, on April 13, William Harper, a native of Yorkshire, England, in the 64th year of his age. Funeral will take place from his late residence, 156 Market street, on Tuesday, April 16, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintnaces will please accept this intimation.

William Harper, one of the oldest and most generally respected of the Grand Trunk Railway employees in Hamilton, died on Saturday night after a short but serious illness. About ten days ago he was returning from a meeting of the Loyal Commercial lodge, C.O.O.F., when he was seized with pneumonia and from that time he gradually but surely succumbed to the disease. Mr. Harper was a native of Yorkshire, England, where he was born 64 years ago. He came to Canada in 1853 and had been in the employ of the Great Western and Grand Trunk Railway companies for twenty-four years. When the Grand Trunk shops removed to Stratford recently, Mr. Harper left the company's service rather


than leave Hamilton. He was a faithful member of the James Street Baptist church and in his life he practically exemplified the tenets of his religions faith. He is survived by his wife and three sons: George, compositor in the office of the "Hamilton Evening, Times";  James, of the Hamilton post office department; and William, night foreman of the "Spectator" newsroom. The funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon from 156 Market street.

 

YORKE  (Toronto)  Lionel Yorke, builder and contractor, died suddenly at his residence in this city last night from fatty degeneration of heart.  He was a native of Wisbeach, England, and came to America in 1859. After a year spent in the southern states, he came to Peterborough and remained therefor ten years. In 1870 he established himself in Toronto and since that time has erected more churches and large public buildings in Toronto than any other contractor.  His last great work was on the new parliament building.

 

KEATING  (Quebec) Annie Keating, aged 21 years, daughter of John Keating, died suddenly at the Palais yesterday. The family are destitute and came here lately from Labrador and lived in an attic over the Windsor Hotel.

 

POPE  (Quebec)  Col. Pope of the English regulars died this morning. His elder brother died in office as mayor of the city, and his young brother, Richard Pope, is clerk of the crown in chancery in Ottawa.  Col. Pope was for many years town major of this garrison until the imperial military regime here ended. He had the honour, while acting as adjutant in the Gibraltar garrison, of putting the Duke of Cambridge through his drill as an officer of the army, a fact the commander-in-chief of the British army recalled with pleasure in the last visit of Col. pope to England 6n which occasion he received his last promotion.

 

MACDONALD (Kingston) Mrs. Martin Macdonald was found in the graveyard dead at the head of Clergy street.  It was reported that a murder had been committed, but it was soon ascertained that she was simply the victim of alcoholism.  Coroner Irwin and the police officers arriving, her remains were conveyed to her late home nearby.  Her face, lying at a lower level than the body, was blackened and bloody. The unfortunate woman was enceinte. She had been on a carouse since Wednesday. She leaves seven children, the youngest one being three years of age. When she left home on Wednesday, she had $30, her husband's pension. There was no money in her clothes when they were searched to-day. She was seen last evening alone in the graveyard. Coroner Irwin decided that an inquest was unnecessary.

 

April 16, 1889

 

WHITE Died on April 15, Carrie M. White, third daughter of


the late W. C. White, in the 23rd year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, No 10 Burlington street east, Hamilton, on Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

 

O'SHAUGHNESSY Died in this city, on April 14, William O'Shaughnessy, aged 70 years, a native of Limerick, Ireland. Funeral from 177 Wilson street on Tuesday, April 16, at 8:30 o'clock a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

AITKEN Entered into rest at Tottenham, on April 14, Hannah Marilla Aitken, aged 57,.widow of the late William Wallace Aitken.  Funeral on Wednesday, April 17, from St. Thomas church, Hamilton, at 4 o'clock.

 

FOSTER Died in Chicago, on April 10, Mrs. Ellen Foster, widow of Thomas Foster, deceased, of this city.

The death occurred in Chicago, April 10, of Mrs. Ellen Foster, a late resident of Hamilton.  Deceased was a native of Carlisle, Cumberland, England.  She came to Canada with her husband, Andrew; Wells, who died shortly after, leaving her with five small children, four sons and one daughter, who all survive her, two sons in Hamilton and one in Manitoba. The youngest son and the only daughter reside in Chicago. She was interred in Graceland cemetery, Chicago, on April 12. All through an illness of a year and a half, she bore herself with great fortitude and always tried to be cheerful although she was a great sufferer.

 

MOORE  (Jarvis)  Charles Moore, a prosperous farmer, was fatally burned in his bed this morning near Nanticoke. When discovered he was badly burned about the chest and head, and died soon after. The cause of the fire has not been ascertained.

 

MCLEOD  (Kincardine) Yesterday morning Margaret McLeod, a middle-aged woman, living with her son in a small dwelling on the commons on the south side of the river, was found lying on the floor dead.  Her son, about 18 years of age, was asleep in another room and was awakened by Edwin Bateman and Kenneth Matheson who discovered the body, and it appeared to be the first he was aware of the matter. An inquest was held to-day before Coroner Martyn. Although foul play was at first suspected, it would seem that Margaret McLeod, her son, and a young man had been drinking on Saturday night, that they all became drunk, the men falling asleep and the woman falling off her chair was suffocated.

 

PEDEN (Ottawa) W. Peden., an old and well known railroader, died on Saturday night at Chalk River where he was agent for the Canadian Pacific Railway.  He was a brother of A. O. Peden, auditor of the Canadian Pacific Railway of this city. Superintendent Spencer will run a special from Ottawa to-morrow at 11 o'clock to Almonte where the funeral is to take place at

3 o'clock.


April 17, 1889

 

WILSON Died at her late residence, Victoria street, Woodstock, on Sunday, April 14, 1889, Annie H., beloved wife of Hiram Wilson,  and a daughter of John Mcintosh, formerly of Hamilton.

 

CAVE  (Windsor) Charles Cave, late engineer of the Canadian Pacific Railway, whose body was found recently in the canal at Sault Ste. Marie, having a gold watch, $293, and some papers in his pocket, was formerly a well known resident of Windsor and Essex Centre, in which latter town he was a hotel keeper. It is supposed that his body was in the canal all winter, and the jury returned a verdict of "accidentally drowned". The deceased left a widow and family in Windsor.

 

April 18, 1889

 

STARK Died at 149 King street west, on April 17, Caroline E., wife of W. G. Stark, M.D. Burial at 2 p.m., Friday, April 19, to Dundas cemetery.

Mrs. Caroline E. Stark, wife of Dr. Stark, died at her late residence about 9 a.m. yesterday after a long illness. The deceased was a daughter of the late T. H. Towers of St. Catharines.  She was 46 years of age and leaves no children. The funeral will take place from 149 King street west to the cemetery at Dundas on Friday afternoon.

 

SYMMES (Barrie) J. G. Symmes, a painter, fell from a building last evening, a distance of about fifteen feet, head downward, and received very serious injuries which resulted in his death this afternoon. The deceased was a very active young man. He belonged to the town police and was an officer in the 35th Battalion, serving with the York-Simcoe battalion in the North West.

 

April 19, 1889

 

ALEXANDER Died on April 18, at her late residence, 153 John street south, Isabella Buchan, relict of the late A. Alexander, in her 77th year.  Funeral to take place on Sunday at 4 p.m.

Mrs. Isabella Alexander, widow of the late A. Alexander of this city, died at the family residence, 153 John Street south, in her 77th year. She was the mother of Professor W. J. Alexander who was recently appointed to the chair of English Literature in Toronto University.

 

MORTON Died on April 19, George Morton, Sr., in the 80th year of his age.  Funeral from his late residence, 59 Herkimer street, at 2:30 p.m., Sunday. Friends will please accept this intimation.


ALLISON Died on August 17, the wife of Thomas Allison, aged 30 years. The funeral will take place on Saturday, at 1 p.m. from her late residence, 131 Rebecca street. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

The death of Mrs. Thomas Allison on Wednesday evening at her residence, 131 Rebecca street, occurred under peculiarly melancholy circumstances.  Her husband, Thomas Allison, one of the best engineers in Ontario, went to Chatham, N.B., several weeks ago, having accepted a responsible position in the chemical pulp works at that place.  His wife was ailing from pleurisy when he left, but her illness was not considered serious and her mother was nursing her. About two weeks ago the old lady was suddenly taken ill with inflammation of the lungs and died. The death of her mother naturally shocked Mrs. Allison and in her weak state aggravated her disease.  Mr. Allison was telegraphed for and immediately started for home.  But he was too late. While he was on the way, his wife died, and he did not learn of his great loss until he arrived home. Mrs. Allison leaves three young children.

 

SAGER  (Dundas) Two old residents of Alberton died last week: Lane Abraham Sager, aged 79, and Edward Lane, aged 76.

 

CLARK  (Dundas) Miss Isabel Clark, fourth daughter of Mrs. John Clark of Ogilvie street, Dundas, died rather suddenly. She was 19 years of age. This is the fourth daughter Mrs. Clark has lost.

 

WOODS Robert Woods, of Copetown, who was badly injured by a fall in his barn last winter, died on Tuesday.

 

HILL When Ellan Hill was arraigned at the police court yesterday to answer to a charge of drunkenness, she was notified that her husband, James Hill, had died at the hospital Wednesday night. The magistrate did not have the heart to punish the unfortunate; so he discharged her. The woman had no idea that her husband was sick, he having been sentenced some time ago to sixty days in jail for drunkenness.  Last Tuesday he was taken sick with inflammation of the lungs and was transferred to the hospital where he died Wednesday night.  Mrs. Hill was helplessly drunk when arrested and had a baby in her arms.  She went into a house on Robert street, but would not leave until Constable Griggs assisted her out. Hill was an old pensioner. He and his wife frequently got drunk and ended up having a disgraceful row. They used to live In the locality known as the "Devil's half acre" at the foot of Caroline street. The woman did not appear to be much affected when she heard of her husband's death.

 

VANNETTE  (Port Hope) A fearful accident has occurred at Jackson.'s sawmill in Kendall. A young man, about 25, named James Vannette, while removing a slab, was thrown against the saw and one of his arms cut off and thrown several feet out of the mill. One of his legs was also cut off and the body cut


in two.  Death was instantaneous.

 

MONDIA  (Niagara Falls) A very distressing accident occurred at 9 o'clock this morning in connection with the rebuilding of the new suspension carriage and foot bridge at the falls whereby an Italian employee named Carmine Mondia lost his life. The unfortunate man who was at work on the Canadian portion of the structure was carrying out a box of bolts to the riveters. He stepped on the end of one of the iron needle beams about the centre of the river when his foot slipped and down went the poor fellow a distance of 190 feet, turning two complete somersaults  in the descent and striking the water feet first. It was a few seconds before the body reappeared on the surface of the water.  When it did, blood was plainly seen coming from different parts of it.  Some of those present who witnessed the terrible fall claim that after he rose to the surface he made an attempt to swim, but was seemingly so exhausted that he was carried down out of sight in one of the eddies near where he struck the water.  His clothes were plainly seen torn in shreds by the terrific force with which his body struck the water.  F. Lablonde who was in a rowboat at the 'Maid of the Mist' landing was signalled by the unfortunate man's fellow workers on the bridge, but before Lablonde could reach the body with his boat, it had sunk not to rise again until it passed through the whirlpool rapids, and no doubt will be found at the whirlpool in due time.  The poor fellow was employed in the construction of the bridge which was blown down by the cyclone on January 13 last.  He also worked on the railway suspension bridge when the woodwork of that structure was replaced with iron four years ago.  He arrived in the neighbourhood from Salerno, Italy, where all his relatives reside about six years ago.  He was 25 years of age and was looked upon as a steady, industrious, and careful young man.

 

April 20, 1889

 

SPRINGER Died at his late residence, Burlington, on April 19, D. R. Springer, in the 20th year of his age. Funeral on Monday, April 22, at 2 p.m.

 

PHILP Died in this city, on April 18, Elizabeth, beloved wife of Joseph Philp. Funeral on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m., from her late residence, 15 Barton street east.  Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

WAUGH Died in this city, on April 18, Mrs. John Waugh, relict of the late John Waugh, aged 87 years. Funeral from her late residence, Bay street north, on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m.

The widow of the late John Waugh, builder, died on Thursday at 78 Bay street north.  She had reached the age of 87 years, more that fifty of which were passed in Hamilton, A daughter and four sons survive her.


BIRELY Died on April 19, Lewis Denick Birely, Sr., in the 89th year of his age.  Funeral will take place from 57 Charles street, on Monday, April 22, at 3 p.m.

L. D. Birely, an old and highly esteemed citizen, died at his residence, 57 Charles street, yesterday morning.  He was born in Chambersburg, Pa., on January 20, 1801, and was consequently in his 89th year when he died.  He came to this country in 1822 and settled in the township of Saltfleet, near Stony Creek, where he engaged in the business of farming and milling until 1853.  In 1826 he married Miss Elizabeth Gage, daughter of the late James Gage of Stony Creek who still survives him after 65 years of a remarkably happy married life.  In 1853 Mr. Birely removed to this city, engaging actively in business for a number of years. For a long time, however, he has been living quite retired.  He participated in the exciting scenes of the rebellion of 1836 and 1837, rendering great service to the government, although sympathizing with William Lyon Mackenzie to the extent of legitimate agitation for reform.  He was a lifelong Reformer and devotedly attached to that side of politics. In religion he was a faithful and consistent member of the Methodist church from early life, always giving liberally of his means for the promotion of its various enterprises, while his home was a favourite resort of the early Methodist preachers. Besides his aged widow, there remains of his family, two daughters and two sons; Mrs. D. B. Galbraith, Mrs. R. R. Waddell and L. D. Birely, Jr, of this city, and James Birely of Oshkosh, Wisconsin.

 

ROBERTS  Died at Canyon City, Colorado, on April 18, 1889, Richard, youngest son of Capt. John Roberts, late staff officer of pensioners, Hamilton, and brother of William Roberts, Canadian Bank of Commerce.

The many friends of Richard Roberts, formerly a clerk in the Bank of Commerce here, will regret to hear of his death which occurred at Canyon City, Colorado, on April 18. Mr. Richards was the son of Capt. John Roberts, formerly staff officer of pensioners, and a brother of William Roberts, manager of the Bank of Commerce.  The deceased was for several years a clerk in the Bank of Commerce but had to resign on account of ill health, and went out west two years ago.  For the past eighteen months he resided at Canyon city, but the disease with which he was affected, consumption, had taken too firm a hold upon him to be cured by the balmy air and resinous breath of the pines, and he succumbed on Thursday at the age of 29. The young man was well known and very popular among his friends here. The funeral will take place at Canyon city where some of his friends reside.

 

ROGERS Died at his late residence, Little Wellington street, township of Barton, on April 19, Henry Rogers, aged 66 years. Funeral to-morrow (Sunday) at 10 a.m.  Interment at Millgrove.


April 22, 1889

 

HAMILTON Died at his family residence, Willowbank, Queenston, on April 20, A. Hamilton, son of the late Alexander Hamilton, in the 59th year of his age.  Funeral with Masonic honours to the family burying ground on Monday, April 22, at 3 p.m.

 

STEWART Died at the residence of his parents, 47 Queen street south, John Richard, dearly beloved son of William and Hannah Stewart, aged 9 years and 5 months.  Funeral on Monday at 3 o'clock.

 

DEMERS  (Montreal) A two-year-old child of William Demers, grocer, of St. Antoine street, fell into a tub of boiling water yesterday and was scalded to death.

 

WILLIS  (Montreal) Robert Willis of the firm of Willis & Co. of this city died to-day.

 

DUKE  (Montreal) A young girl, 15 years of age, named Malvina Duke, has died of injuries received by falling downstairs.

 

PAQUETTE  (Windsor) A five-year-old daughter of John Paquette, a Sandwich East farmer, was choked to death yesterday.

 

April 23, 1889

 

HOMEL  (Montreal) Annie Homel, aged 50 years, died suddenly at her residence 6n Beaudry street.

 

MCLELLAN (Halifax)  John McLellan of Springville, Pictou, went alone to the river on Saturday to start a jam of logs. His hand pikepole was found near the place and later his body was recovered from the water. His sister was shot in Chicago by a jealous lover some weeks ago.  He leaves a wife and family.

 

April 24, 1889

 

GAINSFORD (Prescott) One of the most disastrous fires that ever visited the town occurred last night in which a lady named Miss Kate Gainsford lost her life. The fire which started about 8 o'clock originated in the Gainsford property on King street and is supposed to have been caused by the explosion of a lamp.  Nothing was known or observed in the way of fire until it burst forth in a volume of flame from the roof when it rapidly made headway and soon enveloped the adjoining building used by Mr. McGrory as a bakery, taking in the dwelling houses in the rear. A handsome brick building to the right of the fire was barely saved. Everything was done by the citizens to save Miss Gainsford, but she could not be discovered in time. The fire started again this morning but was speedily extinguished. The loss is about $15,000.


April 25, 1889

 

BENNER Died in this city, on April 24, Richard Benner, aged 71 years.  Funeral from 6 Main street east, on Friday, April 26, at 3 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

DION  (Quebec) A farmer named Isie Dion of St. Antoine de Tilley dropped dead this morning.

 

THIBODEAU  (Quebec) The body of the unknown man found on the beach at the Island of Orleans is supposed to be that of Thibodeau, late foreman of the Canadian paper company's mills at Madington Falls where he was drowned sixteen days ago.

 

LAVINE  (Montreal) A young man named Joseph Lavine was found dead in bed to-day.  Apoplexy was the cause of death.

 

TUTTLE  (Belleville) Miss Ellen Tuttle, aged 16, daughter of John Tuttle, Hungerford, took ill yesterday and died within an hour.

 

Schofield (Halifax)  John Schofield of Beach Hill, about three miles from Kentville, and his child were killed by lightning on Sunday night.  Schofield and his family were preparing to retire for the night when they were startled by a sudden crash as though the house had fallen. Immediately following this a buzzing sound went through the room and Schofield was knocked senseless.  Just then the whole side of the house fell in, one of the beams falling on a twelve-year-old child and injuring it to such an extent that it died a short time afterward.  Monday morning some neighbours happened to pass Schofield's home and noticed its delapidated appearance. On entering the building, a shocking sight was presented. Schofield was lying stretched upon the floor of the front room with his mouth cut and a black streak extending from his mouth to his knees, which indicated the course the electric fluid had taken.  Immediately beneath the dead man was a hole in the floor where the current had gone through the ground beneath. The sight presented a most ghastly one.  Schofield's eyes were protruding from the sockets, his tongue was burned, and his whole body was coloured purple.  His little child was lying close beside him with the head crushed in by the falling timber. In one corner of the room Mrs. Schofield and her three children were huddled together almost scared out of their senses. They were removed to a house in the vicinity.

 

April 26, 1889

 

KENT  Died E. R. Kent in his 61st year.  Deeply lamented. Funeral from his late residence, 4 Liberty street, at 2:30 p.m. on Saturday. Friends will please accept this notice.


MIDLAND Died on April 25, Mrs. Fanny Midland, in her 81st year. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, R. C. Jones, 79 Catherine street south, on Sunday, April 28, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BICKFORD Died at Dundas, on Wednesday, April 24, at 9:50 p.m. Henry Bickford, aged 47 years. Funeral will leave the late residence of the deceased, Main street, Dundas, on Friday, April 26, at 4 p.m.

Henry Bickford, mayor of Dundas, died Wenesday evening. He was taken sick about April 15 with erysipelas of the face and head and latterly it turned to congestion of the lungs. He died at 9:50.  Mr. Bickford was elected mayor of Dundas after having served a term as reeve in January, 1888. He was elected by acclamation last January.  In 1886 he was nominated by the Liberal-Conservatives to contest North Wentworth for the local house, but was compelled to retire from the fight on account of the press of business.  He was a member of the school board for six or seven years.  He was a member of the Masonic order and occupied at various times high offices in the gift of the brethren.  He was a faithful and conscientious member of St. James church, always ready to do all in his power for the interest of the church.

The following sketch of his life is from the "Canadian Manufacturer". Henry Bickford of the firm of Messrs S. Lennard, Sons, & Bickford, proprietors of the Dundas Knitting Mills, Dundas, Ontario, was born in the city of London, England, March 2, 1843, and at an early age was taken by his parents to the town of Newton-Abbott in the county of Devon where, he received his scholastic preparation for life under the tuition of the Rev. John N. Lightfoot, M.A., the present rector of Moreton, Hampstead, in that county. Having tried farming for some time he thought to improve his fortunes by removing to London, but not being satisfied with intermural life, determined to visit the Great Lakes region of Canada and sailed for this country in 1867.

Arriving in Canada, Mr. Bickford soon found employment as a ‘white-winged angel of commerce' and for a couple of years was a commercial traveller for a large wholesale grocery concern in Toronto. In 1869 he became book-keeper and manager for the firm of N & E. Rooney, of Toronto, where he continued until the dissolution of that concern in 1877. At this time a fine business opportunity was presented to him by the town of Dundas, Ontario, and to that place he went to become a partner in the firm of S. Lennard, and Sons, now so familiarly

known to the wholesale dry goods trade of the whole Dominion as S. Lennard, Sons, and Bickford, probably the oldest and largest manufacturers of hosiery in Canada, the firm being the patentee of what is known to the trade as "Elysia" seamless hosiery.

By his education and Natural instincts, Mr. Bickford is a gentleman well fitted to perform any and all civic and social duties that may devolve upon him, his experience in successfully-conducting a large and important manufacturing industry and his


natural force of character making him a most valuable citizen. For years a member of the Canadian Manufacturers Association his presence at all the important meetings thereof is signalled by his expression of strong common sense arguments and reasoning and a comprehensive grasp of such important questions as may be presented. He is a member of the executive of the association and a member of the textile fabrics section of the association Tariff committee.

 

BARRETT  (Rymal) Mrs. Barrett died at her residence in Saltfleet on Thursday last.  She was taken sick about three weeks ago and her death was daily expected.  She was born in Ireland in the year 1816 and came to Canada about fifty years ago. The deceased was a faithful member of the Church of England. The funeral took place on Sunday and was attended by a large number of relatives and friends.

 

BELAND  (Richmond, Que) A man named Napoleon Beland, employed in the new Rockland slate quarry, met with an accident on Tuesday afternoon which has resulted fatally.

 

JONES (Cobourg) The funeral of the late Rev. Richard Jones took place this afternoon. The deceased was for more than sixty years a minister of the Methodist church. An impressive service was held in the church, conducted by Rev. J. B. Clarkson, M.A. Rev. Dr. Potts of Toronto delivered the address and a sketch of the life of the deceased was read by Rev. Dr. Burwash.

 

April 27, 1889

 

JARRIOTT Died in this city, on April 26, William Jarriott, aged 87, a native of Cambridgeshire, England. Funeral from his late residence, No 360 York street, on Sunday, April 28, at 4 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

CHARON  (Montreal) A young man named Napoleon Charon, aged 26 years, was drowned in the canal last evening.

 

April 29, 1889

 

RIGSBY Died on Sunday, April 28, after a lingering illness borne with Christian fortitude, John Rigsby, in his 77th year. Funeral from the family residence, No 133 King William street, on Tuesday at 3 p.m.  The remains will be taken to Wesley Church where a service will be held at 3:30. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MCLEOD (Winnipeg) Brief details of a most horrible murder and suicide came from High Bluff, a small village halfway between Portage la Prairie and Winnipeg. A farmer named McLeod last night killed one of his motherless children and wounded another


unto death and then ended his miserable life by cutting his own throat. McLeod lived about two miles from High Bluff on what is known as the Bock road. He was last seen about dusk last evening. To-day just after dinner a neighbour named Lotta, happening to call at the house, found McLeod lying prone on the floor with his throat cut from ear to ear.  Horrified beyond comprehension, Lotta searched through the house and on entering a bedroom off the kitchen, discovered the lifeless remains of McLeod's eight-year-old daughter with a deep gash inflicted by an axe on the head, and dying. The body of the son on whose head were no fewer than four great cuts inflicted with the same instrument, was also found. The wounds are so serious it is improbable that the unfortunate lad can recover from the effects The knife with which McLeod cut his own throat was found in the cellar from where were tracks of blood leading to near where his body lay and close at hand was the blood-smeared axe, The terrible crime which has shocked the neighbourhood is universally attributed to the despondency of McLeod owing to his financial difficulties.  His wife died two years ago.

 

FLETCHER  (Collingwood) A clear case of suicide was reported here yesterday afternoon. A man, well known in town and also in Barrie, named Bob Fletcher, was found hanging from a tree in a small bush a few miles from town. A week ago to-day some boys saw the man from a distance and supposed that he was standing upright. Yesterday it was discovered that the man was actually dead. He had tied the line which he used for the purpose of taking his life with to a low branch of the tree and then climbed the tree and put the line over another limb and let himself drop, and when found yesterday, decomposition had set in and the body presented a most horrible spectacle, his eyes protruding out of his head. The coroner of Nottawasaga township has been notified,  but as yet no action had been taken to remove the body and the man still hangs to the tree. Temporary insanity is supposed to be the cause.

 

PRESTON  (Montreal) Fannie Preston, aged 45, who took carbolic acid and was found ill in St. Patrick's church yesterday morning, died to-day.

 

GROUAX (Montreal) A man named Grouax died from heart disease while coming out of church to-day.

 

LAPIERRE (Montreal) Thomas Lapierre died suddenly yesterday from cerebral apoplexy brought on by the excessive use of intoxicating liquors.

 

MALONE  (Halifax) A fourteen-year-old son of Michael Malone of Upper Wood's Harbour died yesterday from the effects of an axe wound in the foot. An artery was severed and the loss of blood was so great that the boy could not rally.


ROSS  (Halifax) A young man named Hiram Ross, aged 25 years, belonging to Milford, fell between two cars of a freight train while coupling at Londonderry on Thursday morning. His right arm was taken off close to the shoulder from the effects of which he died this morning.

 

April 30, 1889

 

HOWARD Died at his late residence, Burlington, on April 29, Charles Howard, formerly of Hamilton, aged 67 years. Funeral from Brant Villa, Burlington, to Burlington cemetery, Hamilton, on ---  at 1 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Charles Howard, who was for thirty years a clerk in the Hamilton postoffice and retired about fourteen years ago, died at his residence in Burlington yesterday, aged 67.

 

May 1, 1889

 

SCOTT Died in this city, on Monday, April 29, Elizabeth, infant daughter of Michael and Mary Scott, aged 8 days. Funeral from her parents' residence, Uo 31 Guise street, on Tuesday, April 30, at 2:30 p.m.

 

MCCARTHY  (Ottawa) Colour-Sergeant McCarthy of the Governor-General's foot guards died here this morning of consumption, aged 24.  He will be buried on Thursday with military honours as he was a member of the Ottawa sharpshooters and participated in the fight at Cut Knife Hill.

 

FAALS  (Montreal)  Joseph Faals, a well known fisherman of Isle Perrot, was drowned at midnight last night. He was crossing from St. Anne to Isle Perrot when he missed his way in the darkness and the canoe gettingupset, he was carried away into the rapids below.  The body has not yet been recovered.

 

May 2, 1889

 

LAIRD (Montreal) A man named Broabric Laird, aged 37, died suddenly at St. Cunegonde of cerebral apoplexy to-day.

 

May 3, 1889

 

AYERS Died in this city, on May 1, Mary, beloved wife of W. Ayers, aged 43 years. Funeral from her late residence, 179 Emerald street north, on Friday, May 3, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

LEYDEN died on May 2, at 20 Barton street east, Theresa Catherine, daughter of Charles and Margaret Theresa Leyden, aged 6 years and 5 months. Funeral on Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock.


May 4, 1889

 

LITTLE Mr. Thomas Little, late of Roxburghshire, Scotland, died at his late residence, Waterdown, on Thursday, May 2, at the good old age of 78 years.  He came to this country with Major Glasgow and others in the summer of 1832 and settled in East Flamborough and remained there until death ended his sufferings.  Mr. Little had suffered much for several years. Funeral on Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock from his late residence, Waterdown.

 

REHDER Died in Toronto, on May 2, Irene Gertrude, infant daughter of Chris and Mary Rehder, aged 1 year and 4 months. Funeral from her grandfather's residence, 145 King William street, on Saturday at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SWAYZE  Died on May 3, Andrew A, Swayze,  of Bartonville, in the 62nd year of his age.  Funeral on Sunday at 12 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

FRANEY Died on Friday, May 3, Katie, youngest daughter of F. P. and Sarah Franey, aged 3 years, 1 month, and 18 days. Funeral from her parents' residence, King street east, corner of Burlington, on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

May 6, 1889

 

TREMLETT Died in this city, on Sunday, May 5, Elizabeth Ann, beloved wife of John Tremlett, in the 49th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, 219 James street north, on Tuesday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

STUART Died in Montreal, on May 3, Mary Jean Hamilton, wife of the late Andrew Stuart, and eldest daughter of the late Peter Hunter Hamilton.  Funeral to private burying ground, Dundurn, on arrival of train from Montreal on Monday morning. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Andrew Stuart who died in Montreal on Friday was a member of the historical and pioneer family of Hamilton. Her maiden name was Mary Jean Hamilton and she was the eldest daughter of Peter Hunter Hamilton, one of the pioneers of this district. She was born in the old homestead, the present residence of William Hendrie, in 1826.  Her early life was spent in this city and she married the late Andrew Stuart, for many years an officer in Her Majesty's Customs, and who was a brother-in-law of Sir Allan MacNab.  Of Peter Hunter Hamilton's seven children, there are now but four surviving: George, who lives in Madoc, Ontario; Harry, an official of the Canadian Pacific Railway; Mrs. Hammond, of Toronto; and Mrs. Draper, of


California. Mrs. Stuart's husband died several years ago . She is survived by five sons and a daughter. The sons are; Andrew and Philip H. who live here; John H., manager of the Cayuga branch of the Bank of Hamilton; Oakey and Coursol, who are out west.  The daughter is Mrs. Harth of Montreal. For the past two or three years the deceased lady had been living with her son, John H. Stuart, in Cayuga and went to Montreal only two weeks ago for the sake of her health.  Mrs. Stuart was a good woman as well as a lady of culture and refinement, and her death will be deeply mourned by a large circle of friends in Hamilton.

 

KERBYSON  (Toronto) Charles Kerbyson, a market gardener living east of the Don river, was struck by a train and instantly killed on Saturday evening while driving over the Grand Trunk track at Logan's crossing.

 

MCGRATH  (London)  Mrs. E. McGrath was found dead in her residence last night. When found she was lying face downward upon the floor. The cause was heart disease.  She leaves a husband and two small children.

 

May 7, 1889

 

MURRAY Died in this city, on May 5, after a short illness, Thomas Murray, aged 34 years. Funeral from his late residence, No 79 West avenue north, at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, May 7. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

 

LAHINE  (St. Vincent de Paul Que.) About eleven o'clock on Saturday night, Louis Lahine, a convict serving three years' sentence in the penitentiary here for larceny, committed suicide by hanging himself in his cell with his handkerchief. For some days past the prisoner has shown signs of insanity and was under treatment by Dr. Gaudett.  Coroner Jones of Montreal was immediately notified and an inquest was held to-day when a verdict of suicide while in a fit of mental aberration was returned.

 

BASIL (Montreal) A man named Gedon Basil, aged 45 years, fell dead in his grocery store to-day.

 

SUSARD (Montreal) Mrs. Susard, the woman who was seriously burned at a house off Moreau street on Saturday through the upsetting of a coal oil lamp, died at Notre Dame hospital to-day.

 

O'BRIEN (Montreal) Maurice O'Brien was arrested for drunkenness on Thursday.  He paid his fine, and on Friday night was again arrested for intoxication. Being penniless, he was sent to jail and died there.

 

WATSON  (Ottawa)  The remains of Mrs. T. Charles Watson, the talented actress and elocutionist, who died in New York on


Saturday, have reached here for interment. Scores of friends called to-day to have a last look at the deceased. Floral tributes were numerous. The funeral takes place this afternoon to Beachwood cemetery.  The pall bearers will be as follows: Sir Adolphe Caron, Sir Fred Middleton, Sanator Clemow, A. P. Bradly, C. H. O'Meara, C. H. Macintosh, and James Isbester.

 

HENRY  (Ottawa) A sad catastrophe occurred last night at the Little Rapids near Buckingham by which Thomas Henry who kept a store nearby lost his life.  He got into a canoe, whether alone or not is not known, for the purpose of examining the effect produced on the water by the dam erected by the government.  The canoe was upset by the violence of the current and he was drowned.  The body has not been recovered.

 

LINDABERRY The funeral of Miss Electa May Lindaberry of Beamsville took place on Sunday afternoon and the cortege was the largest ever seen in that village. Miss Lindaberry was a popular young lady, 19 years of age, and esteemed by a large circle of acquaintances.  On Thursday she underwent a dangerous surgical operation, fully conscious of the almost hopeless chance of her life being saved, but she decided to take the risk. Chloroform was administered and the operation was conducted as skilfully as possible, but she never regained consciousness. Before the final preparations for the operation were made, she Requested that in case it proved fatal, the pallbearers at her funeral should ride on black horses. Her wishes were carried out and young men of the village acted in the capacity of bearers on horseback.

 

LEMAY  (Quebec) Moise Lemay, 55 years of age, a labourer who was injured some days ago while on the way down from Stromault with a batteau load of deals, has died in the marine hospital from his injuries.  Some of the deals fell on the unfortunate man.

 

LYNCH (Belleville) P. H. Lynch, a former teacher in the common and separate schools, was found dead in bed this morning from old age.  Deceased was born in Listowel, County Kerry, Ireland, and was in his 72nd year. He was much respected. A family of ten survive him.

 

JEFFRY,  (Midland) Three of the bodies of the Midland men drowned at Flat Point

LITTLE  were recovered to-day; namely Henry H. Jeffry, Robert Little, and

ANDERSON  James P. Anderson. The body of the fourth, Albert Meredith, has not yet MEREDITH been found. The bodies of Jeffry and Anderson were found near one another and that of Little was found some 300 feet away from them. From the appearance of the bodies, they died from exposure to the cold of Thursday last after clinging to their capsized boat, trying to make the Point. They managed to get their coats off and from all appearances made a terrible struggle for their lives.


STUART The remains of the late Mrs. Stuart arrived here yesterday morning from Montreal and were interred in the cemetery of the Holy Sepulchre.  It had been intended to have the burial at Dundurn, but this arrangement was abandoned at the last moment.

 

May 8, 1889

 

URQUHART Died in this city, on May 7, John, eldest son of the late John Urquhart, in the 21st year of his age.  Funeral will leave his mother's residence, 87 Muirray street east, on Wednesday, May 8, at 2 o'clock p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CORRIDI Died on April 28, at Toronto, Portia Corridi, aged 44 years, sister of P. Corridi of that city, late of Hamilton.

 

BAROLET  (Montreal)  Mrs. Bartolet, an old lady residing in Lafontaine street, died suddenly to-day.  She was quite well yesterday, but while making homemade soap, some of the lye entered her eye and she suffered intense pain until this morning when she died.

 

DUFERREN  (Montreal) The two-year-old daughter of J. Duferren who was run over be a baker's wagon on Saturday died from her injuries.

 

MUTCHMORE  (Kingston) Saturday afternoon while the steamer "Rideau Belle" was passing Brewer's cut, Rideau canal, a woman by the name of Mrs. Mutchmore jumped overboard and was drowned. She was not missed until the locks were reached where she was to have been put off.  When the boat arrived at Brewer's Mills search was made for her, but she could not be found, and it was thought she might have got off unseen at Washburn, but a telegram failed to get any tidings of her there. A search was instituted and the body was found in the water a short distance below Washburn locks.

 

MCCONNELL  (Dunnville) A party of young men who had been drinking started to cross the Grand River in a rowboat. When about 200 yards from the island, the boat upset. All were saved except a young man named William McConnell who had gone down before aid arrived.  The body has not yet been recovered.

 

May 9, 1889

 

ALLEN Died on Wednesday, May 8, Patrick Allen, a native of County Wexford, Ireland in the 69th year of his age. Funeral at 8:30 a.m. from his late residence, No 75 Catherine street north. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.


NASH George Nash,  carpenter, who was severely injured last Saturday while working at a buzz saw in E. & C. Gurney Co's . works, died yesterday afternoon.

 

CHITTENDEN Died suddenly at his office, on Wednesday afternoon, May 8, Dr. Curtis S. Chittenden, aged 64 years. Funeral from the residence, 69 Bay street south, at 3 p.m., on Saturday. Friends are requested to attend, but omit sending flowers.

The many friends of Dr. C. S. Chittenden, dentist, will be shocked to hear of his sudden death which occurred yesterday afternoon in his office on King street east about 5 o'clock. The deceased had not been well for some time and his physicians knew he was suffering from heart disease though he was not made aware of it. A short time ago he was advised to take a rest for three weeks and did so, and only returned again to active practice about a fortnight ago, since when he had been apparently in good health.  He was feeling well and looking well yesterday, but during the afternoon complained to his student, Fred B. Ross, of feeling tired and lay down on the lounge in his private office, requesting not to be disturbed for a while. About ten minutes after, it became necessary for Mr. Ross to consult him. and on going into the room, he found the doctor lying on the sofa unconscious. The book he had been reading lay open upon his breast and his spectacles were still over his eyes, but the face was rapidly becoming discoloured and he was breathing stertorously.  Mr. Ross became alarmed and summoned Miss Frances Hodgins, another student, and together they laid the doctor on the floor,  opened his collar and vest, and Miss Hodgins applied such simple remedies as were within reach while Mr. Ross hurried out, summoned Andrew Rutherford, druggist, and telephoned for Dr. Miller and Dr. Malloch. The former arrived ten minutes after, but pronounced life extinct, and gave it as his opinion that the cause of death was the rupture of a blood vessel in the heart.  It is thought that the doctor died five minutes after being discovered.

Mrs. Chittenden and Miss Chittenden were immediately informed of the doctor's death and were naturally deeply affected by the awful tidings.  John W. Chittenden, his son, was out yachting and did not hear the news until late in the evening when he called at Mr. Rutherford's drugstore.

Mr. Chittenden was born at Burlington, Vermont, in 1825. He belonged to one of the oldest families of New England, the descendants of one of the earliest Puritan settlers. He came to Hamilton in 1849 after having graduated in the New York college of dental surgery.  Since that time he was an honoured and deeply respected resident of the city. His genial manner and cheerful kindly disposition made him a favourite with all classes of the community, and his high intellectual qualities and cultured taste rendered him a delightful companion. His high professional standing was recognized by the dentists of the province who during several successive years elected him president of the royal college of dental surgery of Ontario.


He also held the position of examiner in chemistry and various other branches of study and generally took a great interest in the school,  He was for many years one of the most active members of the Hamilton Association and held the position of president of the biological section.

Nowhere more than in the musical circles will the deceased gentleman be missed.  Himself an amateur of unusual ability he took a lively interest in the education of the musical taste of the people and was foremost in musical enterprises of all descriptions that had that in view during the past thirty years; in fact he was looked upon as the Nestor of the musical progress which has given the city an enviable reputation in the Dominion. As far back as 1860 during the occasion of the Prince of Wales's visit he took a prominent part in the production of Haydn's 'Seasons' which was successfully performed by a large chorus and orchestra conducted by Carl Adams of Buffalo,  In 1863, he was one of the soloists at the performance of 'The Creation' under the auspices of the Rifle Brigade band.  In 1860 the Cecelia Glee Club was started with Dr. Chittenden as president and from that time to the day of his death his efforts in the direction of the musical development of the community were unremitting. In 1882 when the philharmonic society was formed, he was one of the moving spirits in the enterprise, and the society showed its appreciation of him by electing his president in 1887, the year of the great jubilee concerts.

The deceased leaves a widow, two sons, and two daughters. Miss Katie Chittenden inherited her father's musical talents and is now organist in one of the most important churches in New York.  John W. Chittenden, the eldest son, is studying for the profession of dental surgeon.

 

GAUTHIER  (Montreal) An old lady named Margaret Gauthier, aged 70 years, was burned to death at Boucherville on Monday. Some matches in a pocket set fire to her clothing.

 

POWER  (Bowmanville) Wilson Power of Darlington, a retired farmer aged about 60 years, accidentally shot himself this morning.  He went out about 2 a.m. to shoot a dog when the gun was in some way discharged, the contents entering below the jaw, carrying away one side of the face. The deceased was highly respected and well known, having lived here all his life.

 

May 10, 1889

 

WILSON Mrs. Thomas Wilson, wife of Thomas Wilson, treasurer of Dundas, died very suddenly Wednesday night.  Mr. Wilson and his wife came to Hamilton early in the evening to visit James Mercer, contractor, 40 Ferguson avenue.  Shortly after arriving there Mrs. Wilson, who had previously enjoyed good health, was taken sick.  Her condition became serious and Dr. Wilson was summoned, but his skill could not save the lady who died about an hour after she was taken sick,  Death was caused by a stroke of apoplexy.  The body was taken to Dundas for burial.


CLARK A fortnight ago, Peleg Clark moved into Hamilton from Dundas with his family. He had secured a good position with the Canada Screw Co and had built a house on Wellington street. A few days after moving into the house he was seized with pneumonia, died last Monday and was buried on Wednesday. The pall bearers were: Thomas Bain, M.P., James Somervills, M.P., James Moore, George F. Burrows, W. Cowper and A. Pain.

 

HUNTLEY  (Hanover) Rufus Huntley, a farmer who formerly lived a short distance from this town, left the Queen's hotel to take the early train this morning for Michigan and was found dead on the sidewalk a short time afterward. He was taken into Mr. Messenger's house nearby and Coroner Landerken sent for who will hold an inquest. A large wound was found across the left cheek. How it was received is a mystery.

 

EVANS  (Buckingham) Rev. Mr. Evans of the Church of England, Buckingham, was drowned this morning at High Falls, twenty-five miles above here.  He was out for a sail in a bark canoe and getting into a strong current lost control and was swept over the falls which are over one hundred feet in height. Deceased was a native of England and had been in Canada only about nine months.

 

TREMBLAY  (Montreal) While a little eight-year-old lad named Willie Tremblay was playing on the wharf near Hochelaga, he fell into the river and was drowned.

 

BULDOC  (Quebec) Rev. Abbé Buldoc, proctor of the Cardinalate and Roman Catholic chaplain of Beauport asylum, died last night at the cardinal's palace.

 

CLYNE  (London) Mrs. William Clyne of Ridout street was washing yesterday and had the cistern uncovered. Her infant daughter was playing around at the time, and she remarked the danger, saying she would leave it open just long enough to get one more pail of water.  When she went to the cistern again she saw something like a rag in the water and stooping down she pulled out the dead body of the child which could not have been in the water more than five minutes.

 

BEAKY (Sherbrooke) Yesterday afternoon at the Ustia mines, Capellon, the roof of the of the buildings connected with the smelting works caved in. Thomas Beaky who was working at the burners, observing a disturbance, started to run, but in his excitement ran in the wrong direction so that the timbers of the roof fell upon him and crushed him, breaking one leg and injuring his head, resulting finally in his death.

 

May 11, 1889

 

Courteney Died at Waterdown, on May 10, at 9, Effie, aged 21 months, daughter of Dr. J. D. Courteney. Funeral private.


BRENNAN Accidentally killed at St. Ann's, on May 9, Peter Brennan, aged 24 years. Funeral will take place from his father's residence, 208 Hughson street north, to Holy Sepulchre cemetery on Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

About six o'clock yesterday morning Engineer Thomas Moore of the train, bound south on the Northern and North-Western division, saw the body of a man lying beside the track a short distance south of the new iron bridge which is being built over the river at St. Ann's, a flag station past Burlington. The body proved to be that of Peter Brennan, son of John Brennan, 208 Hughson street north in this city.  It was frightfully mangled, the neck arms and legs being broken. The remains were removed to the station at St. Ann's where they await the arrival of a coroner.

Young Brennan with several other young men from the city was working oh the new iron bridge which is being put in near St. Ann's station. How he came to be run over is a mystery and nobody appears to have been with him at the time. Several companions were with him the previous evening, but they separated to go to their boarding houses and knew no more regarding the unfortunate young man until they heard of his death.  It is thought that he was killed by a special freight which left here at 2 o'clock yesterday morning in charge of Conductor Wood and would have reached St. Ann's about 3:30.  This was the only train through between the time Brennan was last seen and the finding of the body.

The body was brought to the city last night and taken to the young man's home.

 

ARCAND  (Montreal) A farmer named Joseph Arcand of St. Remi committed suicide at St. Phillipe, Laprairie county, by hanging himself in a shed. The deceased was a middle-aged man and was lately married to Dame Veuve Cardinal of St. Remi. Arcand left St. Remi for Laprairie yesterday and on reaching St. Phillippe last night put up at the house of a friend.  He retired early but it is supposed that he quietly left the house during the night and proceeding to the shed hanged himself to a beam. When discovered this morning the body was quite cold.  Deceased was a well known and wealthy farmer and no cause is assigned for the rash act.

 

LUSSIER  (Montreal) George M. Lussier, butcher, was being threatened with prosecution for keeping a private stall without a licence.  He was also in financial difficulties and this so preyed on his mind that he tried to throw himself under a Canadian Pacific Railway train but was prevented through the vigilance of the railway officials.  He then went to the river and threw himself in and was drowned.  His body has not yet been recovered.

 

HISCOX Jimmie Hiscox, the boss chimney sweep died at the hospital early yesterday morning from inflammation of the lungs.


Hiscox had been dangerously ill for some time but it was not until a couple of days ago that he was removed to the hospital. He was quite a character in his way and was known by every small boy in town.  He was born in England about 45 years ago and lived in Hamilton for thirty-five years.  Some years ago he created a sensation by falling from the roof of the old Canada Life building on James street.  He was badly injured by the fall but he managed to pull through.  Jimmie was frequently before the police magistrate but his crimes were nothing more than drunkenness or assault.

 

COLE Early yesterday morning John Cole, an Englishman, living at the prisoners' rescue house, 63 Macnab street south, became despondent because he could not get work and took a dose of 'rough on rats'.  Cole is abaker and about 50 years old. He came out from England last May, remaining for a time in the States.  He came to Hamilton last January, but could not get work.  His money was all gone and having no friends he asked to be arrested and was sent to jail for sixty days on a charge of vagrancy.  Cole's conduct was so good there that when his sentence expired, Governor Ogilvie sent him to the rescue home where he lived offand on ever since.  He tried again to get work, but was unsuccessful.  In April he walked to London in search of employment but the same hard luck had followed him and he walked back again.  The man was so grateful and deserving that Mr. and Mrs. Danckert who had charge of the home, tried to cheer him up.  The poor fellow got $2 from one of the officials of the house and purchased a small stock of needles, pins, blacking, etc.  He went out peddling, but had poor success, the receipts  seldom exceeding 25 cents a day, and sometimes much less.  On Thursday he tramped all day and made 15 cents. He never drank and always handed his earnings over to Mrs. Danckert;. Yesterday morning at 7 o'clock Mrs. Danckert called him for breakfast. He replied, "All right.  I'm coming". He was in the bathroom at the time. About fifteen minutes later Mrs. Danckert went up to his room to see why he did not come down to breakfast and found him lying on the bed, moaning and groaning. He said he had taken 'rough on rats'. Drs. Macdonald and Malloch were summoned. The latter used a stomach pump which had the desired effect.  Cole took an overdose of the poison. He swallowed all that was in the box and threw the empty box out of the window. He was taken to the hospital in the patrol wagon and died shortly afterward.

The officials of the home were particularly kind to Cole, keeping him there without pay. A post mortem examination will be held at the hospital to-day.

 

May 13, 1889

 

GREEN Died in this city, at his late residence, No 47 Merrick street, Samuel L. Green, aged 54 years and 9 months. Funeral Monday at 2 p.m.  Interment at Waterdown. Friends will please accept this intimation.


STILWELL Died at his parents' residence, 295 King street east, on May 11, Robert Eugene, youngest son of C. F. and S. F. Stilwell.  Funeral private.

 

CHISHOLM Died on Sunday, May 12, Janet, relict of the late William Chisholm, and sister of D. McPhie.  Funeral from her late residence, 159 Market street, on Tuesday, at 2:30 o'clock, Friends are requested to attend.

 

PEMBERTON The first fatality since the boating season opened occurred on the bay Saturday afternoon.  Early in the morning Henry Pemberton who lives with John Kavanaugh, 142 Hess street north, and Wilbert Kaye, 99 Hess street north, two young Englishmen employed at the Hamilton Iron Forging Co's works, after getting through their work went to Bastien's and hired a row boat. They first rowed to Dundas and then to Bayview where they remained for a couple of hours.  On the way back to the city Kaye did the rowing while his companion sat in the back of the boat and steered.  When they were in the middle of the bay and about 200 yards from the railway wharf, Kaye stopped rowing and let the boat drift along and the young men fell asleep. The next thing Kaye knew the boat had capsized and he and Pemberton were in the water.  Kaye saved himself by getting hold of the upturned boat. When Pemberton came to the surface Kaye grabbed him and tried to get him over the boat, but his companion slipped from his grasp and was drowned. Kaye's cries for help were heard by Charles Wilson, 165 John street north, who was in a boat with his wife, his sister, and a baby. They were about 500 yards from the upturned boat and saw the young man's head above the surface of the water.  Mr. and Mrs. Wilson rowed as quickly as possible towards the spot. They told Kaye to hold on to the upturned boat and then they towed it to the railway wharf.  He was completely exhausted and the workmen who were there hurried him home. Mr. Wilson and several others rowed out to the spot where the boat upset, but could not find any trace of Pemberton's body. They found two coats and the drowned man's vest.  In the pocket of his vest was his watch which had stopped at 4:30. The accident did not occur till an hour later.  Neither of the young men could swim. Pemberton was about 24 years old and came from Lancashire, England, a year ago.  His married brother, James Pemberton, lives at 118 Queen street north.  A number of men were out looking for the body yesterday morning.  It was recoverd by Neil Robertson, Albert and John Colbrook, and Walter Iredale who had been grappling all morning.  It was found about 300 yards from the shore. The body was removed to the morgue.  Coroner Woolverton decided that an inquest was unnecessary.

 

MORIN  (Chambord Station, Que.) A man named Pierre Morin of St. Jerome, aged 40 years, and a young boy aged ten years were drowned in the Metabetchouan harbour, five miles from this station last evening. The accident happened while they were going to set a net. There were four men and the boy in the


small boat. It was blowing hard and the water was very rough. The boat upset and threw the five occupants into the middle of the river which is pretty deep there. One of the men got into another boat to relieve them, but could save only the two men.

 

MATHEWS  (Ottawa) A brakeman named Andrew Mathews in the employ of the Prescott & Ottawa branch of the Canadian Pacific Railway was killed the other day near Osgoode station a short distance from here.  Mathews was coupling cars of a freight train when the 'dog ' gave way and the brake recoiled, striking him to the earth.  The unfortunate man was picked up unconscious and removed to his home here where he died in a few hours.

 

LYNCH (Toronto) James Lynch, the old pensioner who attempted suicide by cutting his throat last Thursday, has since died at the hospital.

 

O'REILLY (Toronto) Mrs. Dr. O'Reilly, wife of the inspector of prisons and asylums for Ontario, died this morning after a six-weeks' illness.

 

PROULX (Montreal) A little lad named Proulx while playing on the banks of the canal to-night fell in and was drowned.

 

MEYERS  (Barrie) A young man named George Meyers was drowned this morning.  Meyers and two men named Price and Johnston were out rowing and when about a mile from shore they attempted to change places.  One of them stumbled, upsetting the boat. Price and Johnston clung to the boat and were rescued by parties who saw the accident, but Meyers was benumbed and after a hard struggle let go his hold and sank.

 

May 14, 1889

 

Pemberton Drowned in Hamilton Bay, on Saturday, May 11, Cobden Harry Pemberton, aged 23 years. Funeral from his brother's residence, 118 Queen street north, on Tuesday, at 2:30 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

BENNETT Died at Toronto, May 12, James Bennett. Funeral will take place from his  father-in-law's residence, John McD-----, 153 Hunter street east, Hamilton, Tuesday, May 14. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

BOYLE Died at her late residence, May 13, 1889, at 4:30 p.m., at 49 East Barton street, Elizabeth Boyle, relict of the late John Boyle, in her 63rd year. Funeral from her late residence on Thursday, May 16, at 8:30 a.m. to St. Mary's Cathedral. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

Guimond (Montreal) A seven-year-old boy named Azaire Guimond


while playing on the canal bank at St. Cunegonde fell in the water and was drowned.

 

GUIMOND (Montreal) The ten-year-old boy, Henri Guimond who was run over by a Grand Trunk train on May 8 and had his leg amputated died to-day.

 

MCNICHOL  (Toronto) The police have been investigating into the circumstances attending the death of Patrick McNichol, the ex-hotel keeper who died a day or two ago. A few days before his death McNichol figured in an unimportant bar-room fracas inwhich he received a blow, and out of these facts a morning paper to-day made some sensation and demanded the holding of an inquest. The police have come to the conclusion that there is no necessity for such.

 

MEEK  (Kingston) A corner's inquest was held at Madawaska in connection with the death of the late Henry Meek who was found dead on the Kingston & Pembroke track near this place. There is a suspicion that the deceased met with foul play as when he left a certain hotel he was only slightly under the influence of liquor and was in company with two men.  The inquest was adjourned in order to secure witnesses.

 

HOPKINS  (Halifax)  On Sunday morning Mrs. Hopkins left her home at Trenton, Pictou, to go for milk.  In her absence one of the children attempted to light a fire with kerosene, and on her return she found the house in flames and her youngest child, aged 2 years, was roasted alive in the building.

 

May 15, 1889

 

BARNARD Died in this city, on May 13, Isabella G. Barnard, infant daughter of David and Hannah Barnard, aged 11 months. Funeral from 49 Peter street, on Wednesday, at 12 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

PURROTT Died at 99 Hannah street west, on Tuesday, May 14, Martha Matilda, daughter of George and the late Annie Marria Purrott, aged 11 years and 2 months and 18 days.  Funeral from the above address on Thursday, at 4 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice. Her end was peace.

 

SHIELD  (Montreal) The body found in the canal on Sunday has been identified as that of Henry Douglas Shield who has been missing from his home since April 28.

 

May 16, 1889

 

TENEYCK Died in this city, on Wednesday, May 15, Merritt Harris, infant son of-----and-----TenEyck. The funeral


will leave the parents’  residence, — King William street, at 3 o'clock this (Thursday) afternoon. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

May 17, 1889

 

Bechard  (Buxton) At 9:30 last night the Michigan Central Railroad express struck Jacob Bechard while driving across the track one mile east of Buxton station.  Conductor Hannan found the body about one hour after the accident.  The body of the man was carried 250 feet, while the body of the horse was carried about 300 feet. The buggy was demolished, pieces of it being found nearly two miles from where the accident happened. The coroner's jury brought in a verdict of accidental death,  attaching no blame to the railroad company.  The deceased is well connected and has a brother a doctor at Stony Point, He was about 28 years of age and was agent for the Patterson Manufacturing Company, Woodstock.

 

GERVAIS (Ottawa)  News has just been received here of a sad  drowning

PELLETIER  accident which occurred at St. Ann's, the day before yesterday whereby two young men from Hull, named Gervais and Pelletier,lost their lives while loading a barge. At the place where the barge was anchored there was a strong current and for some reason the barge lurched a little, precipitating Pelletier into the water. His partner plunged to his rescue, but both were swept away and drowned in view of their fellow-workers. The two unfortunate men had only been married about a year and were brothers-in-law. Their remains have not been recovered yet.

 

DUGGAN  (Dundas) Michael Duggan, one of the oldest residents of Dundas, died last Saturday, aged 78 years.

 

JOHNSON  (Dundas) A few days ago a little son ot Isaac Johnson of Sheffield fell on a stone while playing with a companion and received injuries from which he died on Sunday.

 

SIMMONS  (Belleville) Alwilda Simmons, aged ten, was drowned at Tweed last night. The child's parents live in that village.

 

May 18, 1889

 

COPELAND Died at his late residence, 264 Wellington street north, on May 17, George Seaton Copeland, aged 32 years. Funeral on Saturday at 3: 30 p.m.

 

CARR (Belleville) Martha Carr, daughter of George Carr. Thurlow,  who was betrayed and gave birth to a child, died at the hospital at Kingston yesterday.


PEACOCK  (Port Hope) About 6 o'clock to-night a fatal accident occurred at Beamish's plaster mill, Cavan street. Robert Peacock, a farmer living in the township of Hope, near Canton, was there with a team for a load of land plaster, and while getting on the wagon to start home, the horses, a spirited team, started before he got fairly seated, throwing him off in front of the heavily loaded vehicle, the forewheel of which passed over his chest.  He died almost instantly. Deceased was 63 years of age and leaves two sons grown-up and one married daughter to mourn his untimely end.

 

May 20, 1889

 

FITZGERALD Died in this city, on May 19, Elizabeth Frances, youngest daughter of Lawrence and Catherine Fitzgerald, aged 1 year and 8 months.  Funeral will leave her parents' residence, 14 Picton street west, at 3 o'clock this (Monday) afternoon.

 

MAGEE Died on Sunday at 110 Mary street, this city, Henry Magee, aged 42.

 

CUNNINGHAM  (Ameliasburg) At about 5 o'clock last evening Major J. R. Cunningham, while crossing Roblin Lake in a small sailboat, was in the forepart of the boat arranging the sails when he was thrown overboard and drowned.  Up to the present time, his body has not been recovered though about fifty men have been engaged dragging the bottom of the lake since daylight.

 

LONG  (Wingham) While some boys were bathing this morning in the river, one of them, Arthur Long, a tinsmith, aged 19, took a cramp and was drowned before assistance could be called. He was got out five minutes after, but it was too late, as the boy was dead.

 

MILLIGAN  (Toronto) William Riordon, George Moore, and Frank Milligan, three boys between nine and twelve, were playing on the Don River banks Saturday afternoon when Milligan and Moore fell into the water.  Milligan, a bright lad of nine years, was drowned.

 

HANNA  (Ottawa) Miss Myrtle Hanna, aged ten years, was accidentally drowned in the Ottawa river here last night while playing on logs near Chaudiere.  She lately arrived here with her father from Oswego, N.Y. The body of the deceased has been recovered.

 

SHORT  (Quebec) The funeral of the late Major Short took place this morning. The body was taken from the citadel to the Anglican cathedral where the funeral service was read, and from there it was taken to the Montreal steamer for conveyance to Kingston where the interment is to be made. The streets along the whole route were lined with crowds of sympathetic citizens whose hushed and reverent demeanour showed the respect for the gallant dead.


MAY  (Toronto) W. H. May of Queen street west, a well known druggist, died on Saturday from the effects of blood poisoning. He had signs of a sore throat on Thursday evening and died on Saturday afternoon.

 

O'CONNOR  (Toronto) The wife of Patrick O'Connor who runs the Sherman House died to-night from the effects, it is supposed, of a beating administered by her husband several weeks ago. Some time before her death the deceased had sworn out a warrant for the arrest of her husband who had disappeared.

 

CAMOUSKY  (Kingston)  One day last week P. O. Camousky took his family out for a sail on a steamer.  Before going he procured a small phial of brandy in case of sickness. Little Kenneth, ten years old, took sick and was given a spoonful of the liquor which revived him. Yesterday morning about 7 o'clock he was found by his mother lying insensible on the floor and near him was the empty phial, the contents of which, about a gill of brandy(Ed. Note equal to a quarter of a pint), he had swallowed.  He had found the bottle in a small cupboard.  Medical aid was called in. A stomach pump was used, but notwithstanding that every effort was made to save his life, the little fellow died at five o'clock this morning after suffering terrible agony for nearly twenty-four hours.

 

WHEELER  (Ingersoll) Frank Wheeler, a young man about 30 years of age, committed suicide here to-day by cutting his throat. He was at one time an employee of the Evans Bros piano manufacturing company, but was discharged from this service about two weeks ago.  He had been up and about all morning and no particular difference was noticed in his actions. At noon a message was sent to his room to come to dinner when he was discovered lying dead on the floor in a pool of blood with his throat cut across, almost severing the head from the body. Coroner McKay was summoned, but he deemed an inquest unnecessary. Among his effects was found a letter from his mother at Kingston and another from a brother at Ottawa, who were at once communicated with by telegraph.

 

May 21, 1889

 

STIFF Died at Winnipeg, on May 17, James Stiff,  in the 53rd year of his age.

 

MOONEY  (Richmond, Que) A singular fatality has befallen the  family of the late

KELLY James Mooney of Ulverton.  It is not yet two years since the father was suddenly  taken from them.  On March 1 last Miss Kate Mooney dropped dead, supposed to be from heart disease, though she was apparently in good health up to the time of her death.  Her brother, James, who was married, died suddenly the morning of May 10. Although in poor health for some time, he had been at Lavenir the previous evening, a distance of about four miles, and remarked that he was feeling much better.  His aged mother was so prostrated at


this second shock that she died on May 13, and last evening Mrs. Kelly, the mother of the young widow, walked to the house of her daughter, half a mile distant, and died soon after reaching the house, a young daughter at home, on hearing the sad news of her mother's death, became  senseless and speechless and for several hours it was feared that she would not rally, but she is reported better this evening though still weak.

 

SMART  (Sundridge) Yesterday afternoon during a very serious thunderstorm, a son of Thomas Smart, about five years of age, of this place, was struck and instantly killed by lightning. The bolt came down the chimney near where the boy was standing and passed down into the cellar.  Mrs. Smart was also affected by the shock, but sustained no serious injuries.

 

REYNOLD  (Montreal) A young lad named Daniel Reynold was drowned while playing on the banks of the Lachine canal last night.

 

WALLECK  (Quebec) The public funeral of the late Staff-Sergeant Walleck of the Royal School of Gunnery took place at two o'clock in the afternoon from the citadel and was of an almost equal representative character as that of Major Short on Saturday. The body was borne on a gun carriage drawn by six horses, preceded by a firing party and the battery and hussar bands, and was followed after the riderless horse by a car containing a numerous collection of most beautiful floral souvenirs from the public authorities as well as from sympathizing friends, military and civil.  A numerous military representation, including Col. Montezambert, Major Wilson, Dr. Colin Sewell, and other officers turned out in force and with detachments of the Ninth Battalion and the Eighth Rifles, Garrison Artillery, and the Queen's Own Canadian Hussars, as well as Royal School cavalry, followed the remains;  also a large body of citizens, preceded by the mayor, premier of the province,  judges, members of the Dominion parliament, and provincial legislators and leading citizens being in attendance.  The procession left the citadel and proceeded along St. Ursula street to the Methodist church where a large congregation was assembled. Rev. Mr. Jolliffe read the burial service and Rev. Mr. Stobe and Rev. Prof. Weir took part in the subsequent proceedings. Rev. Mr. Clark pronounced the benediction. The body was born to Mount Hermon cemetery with the usual escort from the toll gate. At the cemetery a parting volley was fired.

 

MAGEE Many Spectator readers will learn with regret of the death of Henry Magee which occurred on Sunday afternoon. For many years the deceased was in the saddlery business on York street but a cold contracted two years ago developed a pulmonary trouble which compelled his retirement from business a few weeks since and resulted in his death as above stated. He was a man of the strictest integrity and a large number of friends will mourn his early taking off and sympathize with the widow and three children who survive him.


May 22, 1889

 

JAMIESON  (Tapleytown) Mrs. Jamieson, who has been ill and confined to her bed for nearly six months,  passed quietly away on Friday last and was buried on Monday.  A large number attended the funeral, especially the children for whom she had always a kind greeting, showing that she was loved and respected by all.

 

TWEEDLE  (Tapleytown)  On Thursday night, Anson, son of John Tweedle, died very suddenly of heart disease.  The funeral took place on Sunday, there being a very large attendance, so large in fact that the church was filled and many had to remain outside. Anson leaves many friends as he was loved wherever he was known.

 

MEAGHER  (Belleville) Michael Meagher,  who resided here for several years, died at Battle Creek, Michigan,  on Saturday, aged 70 years.  His remains were buried here to-day.

 

May 23, 1889

 

BAGHOTT  Died in this city, on May 22, Mrs. Hannah Baghott, relict of the late Captain Samuel Paul Baghott of the 13th Light Dragoons, aged 78 years.  Funeral from her son-in-law's residence, John W. Thompson,  53 Hess street north, Saturday, at 3:30 o'clock.  Friends will please accept thin intimation.

 

WISHART  Died on Wednesday, May 22,  James Wishart, aged 70 years, a native of Letham, Scotland.  Funeral to-day (Thursday) at 3:30 P.M. from 37 Park street north.

Late on the night of February 16, James Wishart, an elderly man who lived alone in a small house on Mountain avenue just beyond the southwestern limits of the city, was almost killed by two burglars. The men whose faces were blackened so as to completely disguise them knocked at the door of Mr. Wishart's house and awakening him, said they had an important telegram for him. Before he could open the front door he was confronted by a tall man who ordered him to step outside. The intruder was quickly joined by another man and the two desperadoes set upon the old man. Mr. Wishart picked up a small hatchet that lay on the floor near him and tried to defend himself, but he was speedily overpowered. His assailants dragged him out of the house, kicked him cruelly, banged his head against the frozen ground, and one of them, holding the hatchet over his head, swore that unless he gave them all the money he had in the house, they would take his life. Wishart swooned and when he recovered consciousness, he was lying alone in the snow. His assailants had gone back to the house and ransacked it. They found no money and there was nothing valuable to take; they departed empty-handed, leaving the old man to his fate. Mr. Wishart, though between sixty and seventy years of age, was a sturdy old


man,  He was a blacksmith and regularly worked at his trade in his shop near Brennen's planing mill and was troubled very little by illness of any kind up to the night of the assault. But since that terrible night he became a changed man. He suffered terribly from pains in the head and his nervous system had received a shock from which he never recovered.  He had few friends.  His most intimate friends were James Beardwell and Mrs. Beardwell of 33 Park street north where he visited occasionally.  Last Monday afternoon he called at the Beardwells and complained of the pains in his head which he said were unbearable.  On Beardwell's advice he consulted Dr. Ridley who gave him some medicine and he went home.  On Tuesday afternoon he appeared at the Beardwells door and lay down on a lounge, apparently suffering extreme pain.  Dr. Ridley was summoned and on his advice Mr. Wishart was put to bed.  He rapidly grew worse and became unconscious.  Dr. Ridley called again at night and at 1:30 yesterday morning, but Wishart was by this time beyond the reach of medical skill.  He died at 2:15 yesterday morning.  It is the doctor's opinion that his death was caused by the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain.

Wishart's assailants have never been discovered, but it is suspected that they are young men living in the neighbourhood whose cupidity(greed) was excited by rumours that the old man was a miser and had untold stores of gold concealed about the house.

Mr. Wishart was a widower, his wife having died many years ago. She was a sister of Mrs. John Greig of this city.  So far as is known Mr. Wishart had no blood relatives in this country but two of his sisters are living in England.  He had an adopted son who has been living in Rochester, N.Y., for some time. The deceased was a well-to-do man, but probably not nearly so wealthy as current rumour made him.  He owned two lots and the house he lived in.

 

SEARLES Drowned, George Searles, aged 31 years.  Funeral from Dwyer's undertaking establishment, Thursday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

About 9 o'clock yesterday morning Miss Florence Fletcher, grand-daughter of Mr. Hughes who kept the post office at the beach was near the water s edge on the bay side when she saw the body of a man floating near the shore.  She informed Mr. Hughes and he succeeded in dragging it to land. He also notified the city police, but as it was a county matter they referred the case to Mr. Blachford, undertaker, who sent a man out to bring in the"remains.  There were no visible means of identifying the body and the people down there did not care to handle it until a coroner saw it, especially as there were two ugly marks on the head which looked as if there had been foul play. A reporter had no scruples on that score and instituted as careful a search as the circumstances would permit, but found little left in the pockets to act as a clue. The body was that of a man about 45 years of age and had apparently not been in the water more that five or six days.  It is very well dressed and appears to be that of a respectable and


well-to-do man. probably a merchant or something of that sort. The head is very thinly covered with hair on the top and the face is beardless.  The upper lip has seldom been shaved, and the deceased probably never grew a beard. The face is full with rather heavy features. The body is about five feet eight inches and is attired in a gray coat and vest, striped pants, and shoes, a turned-down collar with a blue necktie. The coat was tightly buttoned across the chest.  On examining the pockets little could be discovered in them. A lady's card bearing the name of Lizzie Caldwell was in one pocket together with what looked like a small valentine, and a photograph of a good-looking lady and a little girl. The photograph is evidently an old one as the fashion of the dress is that of twenty years ago.  In the breast pocket of the coat was a fine linen handkerchief, but it had no initials on it. There is a handsome horseshoe breast pin, apparently, gold, in the tie.

Mr. Hughes stated that when the body was taken from the water the face was not discoloured at all and on the top of the head there was a bad contusion; also another on the back of the skull and they appeared to him to be the result of violent blows.  Otherwise the body was in excellent condition. After being in the air some time, the face became discoloured and blood oozed from the head as is usual in case of drowning.

The body was brought to the morgue yesterday afternoon. About 5:30 yesterday afternoon, T. Loney, 37 Young street, called at the hospital and identified the body as that of George Searles who had been employed in McPherson's shoe factory until last December.  Dr. Beemer then also recognized the body as that of a patient who had been discharged from the institution on April 15.  It appears that Searles got into a fight with a hackman last January and had his knee badly injured and was confined to the hospital for nearly three months.  On Friday, May 10, the deceased left Al Loney's house, intending to go to Buffalo and had then on his person a silver watch, a gold chain, and a ticket for Buffalo,  He was last seen about 9:30 that evening at McKeown's restaurant. The watch and chain are missing.

Dr. A. Woolverton opened an inquest on the death of Searles at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon at the city hospital. After the jury viewed the body, the inquest adjourned until Monday evening at 8 o'clock

Dr. Beemer said last night that he could not say whether the marks on the head were caused by a blow or not until a post mortem was held.

The funeral will take place at 3 o'clock from Dwyer's undertaking establishment, 24 James street north.

 

May 24, 1889

 

Hore Died at 29 Wilson street, on Thursday morning, John Hore, in the 66th year of his age. The body will be removed to the Church of St. Matthew, Barton street, on Saturday morning, where-holy communion will be celebrated at 10 o'clock. The burial


service will be conducted at 2 p.m. when the funeral will proceed to the family burying ground, Christ Church, West Flamborough.

John Hore, a brother of F. W. Hore, is dead in his 66th year.  The deceased gentleman was employed in his brother's factory, and about year ago was taken sick. After suffering twelve months, death released him, and he passed peacefully away. He was a native of England and won the esteem and respect of all who knew him.  Funeral, Saturday, at 2 o'clock

 

Fournier  (Montreal) A Frenchman named Joseph Fournier, 22 years of age, jumped from a train to-day and rolled into the middle of another track. At that moment the inward passenger train came along and ran over the poor fellow, killing him instantly. The unfortunate man is a native of Quebec.

 

May 25, 1889

 

MARTIN Died on Thursday, May 23, at her parents' residence, 56 Hannah street east, Adelaide Bond, eldest daughter of Charles H. and Mary Martin.  Funeral on Sunday, May 26, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DANIEL Died on May 24, at No 1 Park street north, Arthur Freeman, infant son of Frederick and Sarah Agnes Daniel. Funeral will leave the above address at 2 p.m., Saturday, May 25.

 

ADDISON  (Toronto)  Charles Addison, coloured, was drowned in the bay about 11 o'clock this evening. He was accompanying one of the crew of the schooner "Elizabeth" down to his boat and fell into the water, his comrade being unable to rescue him. The body was not recovered.

 

May 27, 1889

 

BEVIS Died suddenly at St. Thomas,  on May 23, William Bevis, cabinet maker, formerly of Hamilton, aged 79 years. Father of William Bevis, Jr., Mrs. William Urry of Hamilton, and Mrs. James Marshall of London.

 

STEVENSON Died at his late residence, No 82 Duke street, west of Locke, on Sunday, May 26, James Stevenson, in the 75th year of his age.  Funeral to-morrow (Tuesday) at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SWEET Died at her late residence, No 65 Wilson street, on Sunday, May 26. Susan Sweet, aged 27 years. Funeral to-morrow (Tuesday) at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


HANCOCK Died in this city, on May 25, Oliver S. Hancock, aged 41 years.  Funeral from his late residence, No 110 King street west, to-morrow (Tuesday) at 3:30 p.m.  Friends will please accept this intimation.

Oliver S. Hancock, the well known rifleman, died yesterday at the early age of forty-one.  He was a member of St. John's lodge, No 40, A.F. & A.M., and Oak Leaf lodge, No 159, I.O.O.F. He was treasurer of the latter lodge for eleven years.  He was better known as a skilful member of the Victoria rifle club and was over at Wimbledon the year before last.  He was a colour sergeant in the 13th Battalion. The deceased leaves a widow and three children.

 

Morris Died at her father's residence, 26 Wellington street north, Nellie Morris, aged 21 years, daughter of Thomas Morris, flour ; dealer  Funeral at 4 o'clock on Tuesday afternoon. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LAMONTAGNE  (Montreal) Mrs. Lamontagne died suddenly while driving in a cab.

 

THESSEREAU  (Montreal) F. X. Thessereau, builder and contractor, aged 71, of Lachine, was killed by a Grand Trunk train at Blue Bonnets last night.

 

GALARNEAU (Montreal) P. M. Galarneau, of the firm of Galarneau & Co., wholesale drygoods merchants, died here to-day at the age of 77.

 

MACDOUGALL  (Montreal) The death of James Macdougall, the well known miller, is announced at the age of 71 years.

 

VALEE (Montreal) A little two-and-a-half year old girl named Valee while playing on St. Charles Baromme street fell just as a street car was coming down the street. She was run over and her leg cut off at the thigh.  She died in a few minutes.

 

LADERVILLE  (Montreal) While a young man named Oscar Laderville was giving instructions in surgery before a crowd of students in a street car with an open knife in his hand he bared his leg and made a cut which unfortunately opened an artery and before the bleeding could be stopped he expired.

 

Blunkard  (Elora) George Blunkard, a retired farmer of the tenth concession of Peel, but latterly residing here with his daughter, Mrs. John Shikney, was drowned in the Grand River here last night.  He went out after tea and it is thought he wandered down a side street to the river, accidentally walked over the bank into deep water, and was drowned.  His body has been recovered.

 

Golna  (Parry Sound) Charles Golna, aged about 12 years, son of John Golna, collector of customs, is supposed to have fallen from the Mill Lake dam some time yesterday afternoon. Parties of citizens were searching for him all night without success.


May 28, 1889

 

FREEBORNE  Died on May 26, at  'The Pines', Burlington, Eliza, beloved wife of Thomas Freeborne.  Funeral Wednesday morning at 10:30 to Hamilton cemetery by carriages.

 

MURISON Died on Monday night, May 27, George Murison, aged 69 years. The funeral will take place from his late residence, corner of Queen and Herkimer streets, on Wednesday, at 3 o'clock.

 

CARDINAL  (Montreal) A middle-aged French Canadian named Cardinal, while getting out of a street car on Wellington street on Saturday night, was knocked down by a horse and cart belonging to Monteith, a milkman of Verdun, and seriously injured.  At the general hospital his case was pronounced hopeless. Several ribs were broken,  spine hurt, and severe injury done to his head. He had received a fearful blow on the forehead from the horse's hoof as well as internal injuries.  He remained conscious till morning yesterday. Now death has ended his sufferings. At the inquest a verdict of accidental death was returned.

 

GRAY  (Quebec) George Gray, cook and steward of the schooner "Lord Stanley", while going on board about midnight, fell between the ship and the wharf and was drowned.  The deceased was 36 years of age and a native of Dundee, Scotland.

 

May 29, 1889

 

O'NEILL Died on May 27, at St. Joseph's Convent, this city, Sister M. Anastasia O'Neill, in the 56th year of her age and 36th of her religious life. Funeral from the convent chapel on Wednesday at 9 a.m.

 

JOYCE  (Quebec)  Patrick Joyce, a labourer, dropped dead in his house on Little Champlain street, at noon to-day, aged 60 years.

 

CAINS  (Montreal)  In connection with the accident at St. Henri station on the Grand Trunk Railway this morning, it appears that the man, John Cains, attempted to board a freight train then proceeding from Point St. Charles to this city. He missed his footing, fell upon the tracks, and the wheels passed over him. He was dreadfully mutilated, his arms and legs being almost smashed to a pulp.  The hour being so early, it was some time before an ambulance was on hand and the poor creature had to be laid on the platform in the rain, a terrible spectacle. He was removed to Notre Dame hospital where he died this afternoon. Cains was a married man about 50 years of age.

 

May 30, 1889

 

FARRAR Died in this city, on May 28, William Farrar, aged 23.


Funeral on Thursday,  30th, from Mr. David Mahoney's residence, 117 Cherry street, at 3:30 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

EVANS Died on May 29, Michael T. Evans, contractor. Funeral from the house, 85 George street, on Friday, at 3 o'clock.

 

DAVIS Died at No 124 Main street east, this city, on Wednesday, May 29, Elizabeth Rebecca, daughter of Archibald Davis. Funeral on Friday at 3 o'clock. Friends are invited to attend.

Miss Elizabeth Rebecca Davis, a most estimable young lady, daughter of Archibald Davis, 124 Main street east, died yesterday. The deceased was a teacher in the public schools and got leave of absence some time ago on account of illness.

 

FOSTER  (Halifax) Esekial Foster, who has been living with his son at North Kingston, was found dead in a small brook which runs through the meadow.  It is supposed that he attempted to cross and stumbled,  striking his head on a stone which probably stunned him and rendered him unable to get out.

 

ROSS  (Ottawa)  Colin H. Ross, of Chatham, Ontario, was found dead in a bathroom in the Russell House to-night.  He was dressed.  It is supposed that he died early in the morning as he was seen entering the bathroom about 9 o'clock to-day. He leaves a family residing in Chatham.  No inquest will be held.

 

May 31, 1889

 

MERCER Died on May 30, at No 40 Ferguson avenue, Ann, beloved wife of James Mercer.  Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation. Funeral will leave above address at half past two o'clock on Saturday, June 1, to Dundas cemetery.

 

SWEENEY Died on Thursday, May 30, Sarsfield M. Sweeney, 113 bay street north, aged 23 years.

 

LAFRANCE  (Montreal) A tragic and as yet unexplained suicide took place in the  city to-day. Adele LaFrance, a young woman, 22 years of age, had been engaged for some time past as a general servant in the saloon kept by P. A. Elliott at the corner of Aylmer and Mayor streets, and her character had been without reproach.  She seemed most attentive to her religious duties.  She was a Roman Catholic and this morning attended Ascension day services at St. Patrick's Church. The unfortunate girl seems to have kept her own company throughout, and immediately after service returned home and locked herself in her bed room.  In a few minutes the loud report of a firearm was heard and on the inmates'  rushing upstairs and bursting the door open, they found that the unhappy girl , for some reason unexplained, had shot herself just under the left breast. She was still alive but groaning in agony, though she was unable to speak.  In her


hand she grasped a six-chambered revolver of heavy calibre, fully loaded, but only one bullet had been discharged. The ambulance of the general hospital was telephoned for and promptly arrived on the spot, though the doctor who accompanied it was unable to relieve the sufferings of the unfortunate suicide. With all dispatch she was taken tc the hospital and at once put to bed, but despite the unremitting attention of the medical staff she died an hour later without being able to speak or offer any explanation of her act. An inquest will be held to-morrow.

 

June 1, 1889

 

DUFFY Died in this city, on May 31, at No 44 Hunter street east, Madeline, infant daughter of Frank L. and Martha Duffy, aged 11 months.  Funeral Sunday at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation

 

RINGER Died in this city, on May 31, Catherine, daughter of Ephraim and Mary Ringer, aged 14 years.  Funeral from 12 Barton street east, Sunday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

DOUSE Died on Thursday, May 30, William Douse, aged 20 years. Funeral will leave his late residence, Caroline street near Stuart street, on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m.  Friends will please accept this notice.

 

LEYDEN Died on Friday, May 31, Margaret Theresa, the beloved wife of Charles Leyden, aged 33 years and 2 months. Funeral to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon from 20 Barton street east. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

Few men are called upon to endure such a rapid succession of bereavements as had  fallen to the lot of Charles Leyden, one of the representatives of the separate school board on the public library.  Only a few months ago he lost one of his children to death.  Last month another of his children, a bright little girl of six years, died, and yesterday a heavier blow fell upon him in the death of his wife. Mrs. Leyden had been ill with intermittent fever for two weeks and the fever resulted in paralysis of the brain which caused her death. The deceased lady was a native of Hamilton, a daughter of Peter and Mary Cummerford. She was educated here and was widely known and well liked.  The funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family residence, 20 Barton street east.

 

PLANTE  (Montreal) A boy named Plante was drowned in Cote St. Louis quarries to-day.

 

LEDDY  (Ottawa)  James Leddy, aged eight, was burned  to a crisp to-day.  His parents left him at home, locking the door when they took their departure. Attempts to rescue the boy proved fruitless.  The origin of the fire is a mystery.


BAGNALL  (Halifax) At Gabarna, last evening, firs. Samuel Bagnall, widow, about 78 years of age, committed sucide by cutting her throat from ear to ear with a razor.

 

DUNBAR  (Toronto) Katie Dunbar, aged 20, of Mildmay, Bruce county, waitress in McKombery's restaurant, died this evening from the effects of an abortion.  Her body was taken to the morgue and an inquest will be held.  The girl,  before dying, refused to give the name of the man who ruined her. A Mrs. Ellen Wright was arrested and locked up,  charged with being implicated, and the police are searching for a Mrs. Clarke who is also said to be concerned.

 

June 3, 1889

 

Dowswell Died in this city, at 153 Bay street north, on Friday May 31, the infant daughter of G. H. and Matilda Dowswell, aged 11 months.  Funeral took place on Sunday.

 

GRAHAM Died on May 5, at Lafayette, Indiana, Thomas E. Graham, youngest and dearly beloved son of Mrs. Graham of Waterford, and brother of Rev. Mrs. Wright, of Ancaster, and Mrs. R. E. Norman of Burlington, in the 38th year of his age.

 

EDWARDS Died in this city, on June 1, 1889, Susan F., relict of the late William Edwards, Esq., of Cambridge, England, late of Montreal.  Funeral on Monday, June 3, at 3:30 p.m. from her late residence, 122 James street north.  Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

KIEVELL Died on June 2, 1889, at the hospital, Wallace D. Kievell, aged 23 years. Funeral from his father's residence, No 35 Nelson avenue, on Tuesday, June 4, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

June 4, 1889

 

AINSLIE Died at 11 Cheeter street, Edinburgh, on May 12, Johanna, widow of Col. William K. Ainslie, CB., late 23rd Highlanders, and only daughter of the late Major-General Thomas Falls.

 

SERVICE Died at his late residence, 11 Clarence Square, Toronto,

Robert Service, formerly of Hamilton, in the 78th year of his age. Funeral from the G.T.R. station to Burlington cemetery, city, on Tuesday, on arrival of the train at 1:45 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HALL Died in this city, on June 2, Mary, relict of the late Robert G. Hall,  aged 47 years.  Funeral will leave her late residence, 66½ King William street, at 2:30 p.m., Tuesday. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.


COX Died in this city, on June 2, Thomas Cox, in the 30th year of his age.  Funeral leaves his late residence, 147 King William street, on Tuesday morning, at 8:30 for St. Patrick's church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HIRST Died in this city, on June 3, at No 35 Park street south, James Hirst, aged 64 years.  Funeral from the above address on Wednesday, June 5, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this-intimation.

 

WAUD Died at Toronto, on May 31, Brian Wilkes Waud, late of Manstone Hall, Leeds, Yorkshire, and a barrister of the Inner Temple, in the 53rd year of his age.

 

BAIRD Died at 54 Catherine street south, John Baird, late i on Monaghan, Ireland, aged 73 years, father of David and Charles C. Baird, and Mrs. Edward T. Richards, of this city. Funeral at 3:30 p.m. Wednesday.

 

TERROUX  (Montreal) Robert Terroux, for a number of years connected with the Banque du Peuple, died suddenly this morning at the deaf and dumb institute, St. Denis street.  He was entering the convent chapel to attend mass when he dropped dead.

 

NORMAND  (Montreal) Francois Normand,  of St. Jacques de Lackegan, has just died under very peculiar circumstances.  He was an old man of 74 who passed for very wealthy and was supposed to always keep a round sum of money at his house.  On May 14 last, during the night three masked men entered his house and brutally assaulted him and his servant with sandbags. Another person who slept in the house gave the alarm and the burglars fled. Normand died from the effects of the blows he received on Friday night.

 

DEBLOIS  (Quebec) Edouard Joseph Deblois died Saturday. The deceased was a brother-in-law of the late Governor Caron and brother of Senator Deblois.

 

LEMMON  (Kingston) Mrs. Lemmon, who has been during the last three weeks temporarily in the residence A. Gunn as cook, went to bed on Saturday night as usual, but as she did not put in an appearance on Sunday morning, her bedroom was opened and her corpse partly dressed was found lying on the floor near the bed. The room was full of gas. Investigation showed that when she turned off the gas she turned the cock around too far. The fact that she was half dressed indicates that she arose in the night and attempted to dress herself before leaving the room, but fell exhausted on the floor. Deceased was 59 years of age and leaves a son and daughter for whom she kept house. A coroner was called in but thought it was unnecessary to hold an inquest.


HARVEY  (Halifax) The wife of George Harvey, headmaster in the Halifax art school, left her home last evening and not returning in a reasonable time, search was made. At 3 o'clock this morning her gloves and parasol were found on the banks of a pond in Point Pleasant park and a little later her lifeless body was discovered in the water. She was subject to fits of melancholy and had committed suicide.

 

MCALINDON  (Metcalfe) At half past five this morning Miss McAlindon, a daughter of a respected lawyer, committed suicide by cutting her throat with a razor while in a state of temporary insanity.  She went into her brother's room and seized his razor which was lying on a stand, and before he could get to her she committed the fatal act, dying within ten minutes.

 

June 5, 1889

 

BROUGHTON Died at Openshaw, Eastwood, on Tuesday, June 4, Frederick Broughton, in the 65th year of his age. Funeral in Eastwood cemetery on Thursday, at 12:30 p.m.

 

BELIEFEUILLE  (Montreal) Lieutenant-Colonel de Beliefeuille, paymaster of the 5th and 6th military districts, died at Longeuil last night.  He was formerly an officer in the One Hundredth Regiment and also served in the French army at one time.

 

June 6, 1889

 

ROUSSEAUX Died in this city, on June 5, Joseph B. Rousseaux, in his 56th year.  Funeral from his late residence, 42 Vine street, on Friday, at 2 p.m., to Barton church. Friends will please accept this notice.

Joseph B. Rousseaux, one of the oldest residents of the city, died at his home, 42 Vine street, from a stroke of paralysis.  Mr. Rousseaux was 56 years of age and has acted as a night watchman for many years. He leaves a widow and two sons.  For a long time Mr. Rousseaux was confined to his home by reason of illness.

 

BROGAN  (Montreal) As P. Brogan was leaving his house to-day he suddenly took ill and expired in a few minutes.

 

HORNBOSTLE  (Guelph) Edward Hornbostle ot Guelph was run over by a freight train about a mile north of here at 3 o'clock this morning and instantly killed.

 

June 8, 1889

 

GOODSON The funeral of the late Mrs. Goodson will take place from the undertaking establishment of H. Pray & Co. at 12:30 to-morrow (Sunday) to Waterdown where service will be held in


the Methodist church prior to the interment.

 

CLARKE  (Halifax)  Noah Clarke of Newfoundland, a seaman on the schooner "Portia", was drowned yesterday while attempting with two others to attach a line to the steamer "Panther" which was in distress.

 

June 10, 1889

 

SCHAUER Died at Gronigan, Germany, on Wednesday, June 5, Isaac Schauer, father of Mrs. Herman Levy of this city and Messrs, E. and H. Schauer of Toronto, in the 86th year of his age.

 

HEAKES  (Toronto)  Samuel Heakes, an old Torontonian and father of S. R. Heakes, well known in labour circles, died to-day, aged seventy-five.

 

STONESS  (Kingston)  Last evening John Stoness of Kingston Mills went to inspect the dam, and as he did not return his friends became uneasy and the finding of the horse and buggy near the dam did not tend to allay their uneasiness. This morning his body was found in the sluice.  He must have slipped from the sloping rock which forms part of the work, and no help being at hand was drowned.

 

HOLLICAR  (St. Catharines)  John Hollicar, a cigar maker, aged about 35 years,  committed suicide at his father's house early this morning by cutting his throat with a cooper's drawing-knife. He had been drinking heavily.

 

June 11, 1889

 

KANS (Montreal) A'tailor named John Kans died suddenly to-day from haemorrhage of the brain.

 

June 12, 1889

 

FORWARD  (Montreal) The body found in the river yesterday is supposed to be that of Edward Forward of the steamship "Coban" who has been missing since June 1.

 

GILLESPIE (Ottawa) Willie Gillespie, aged eleven years, was drowned in the Ottawa river last night several miles above the city. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

June 13, 1889

 

BARKER Died in this city, on June 12, Elenor J. Barker, better known as Miss Wall, in her 68th year.  Funeral from the residence of Mr. William Hunter, 19 Wellington street south,


on Friday, at 2 p.m.  Friends will please attend.

 

LAMONTE  (Montreal)  Madame Lamonte, aged 23 years, died suddenly at her residence in the east end to-day.

 

VOSBURGH  (Montreal) News was received to-day of the drowning at Glenford, fifteen miles back of Port Neuf, of Newton Vosburgh, formerly a member of the Prince of Wales rifles. Mr. Vosburgh, who was only 35 years of age, was a son of John S. Vosburgh, of Vosburgh, Ontario, and a grandson of the late Dr. Barker, of the Kingston "Whig".  One brother, J. B. Vosburgh, is now a practising dentist in this city. A widow and five children are left.

 

SMITH  (Montreal)  The Salvation Army lost one of its most vigilant soldiers to-night at the temple.  Sergeant-Major Smith while pleading with a man about his soul just after the usual march and as the words, "God Bless you. Get saved" were uttered from his lips, he dropped dead.  The remains were taken to his home.

 

BROPHY  (Quebec) Edward Brophy, carter, died suddenly at his residence to-day.

 

June 14, 1889

 

GORDON Died at 32 Catherine street north, on June 13, Mary Anne, beloved wife of William Gordon, formerly of Armagh, Ireland, and mother of W. J. F. Gordon, Miss A. Gordon, and Mrs. C. J. Myles, all of this city.  Funeral on Friday at 2 o'clock.

 

NIMMO Died at Detroit, on June 12, Charles Bruce, eldest son of the late James Nimmo, Esq.,  of Paris, Ontario.

 

MCLEOD Died in this city, on Thursday, June 13, Margaret Spencer, the beloved wife of Oliver McLeod, aged 70 years. Funeral will take place from 26 Crooks street on Saturday, at 2 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

PAGE Thomas Page, who died at his home at Palermo on June 6, was born in the north riding of Yorkshire, England, and immigrated to Canada in 1832.  For a time he worked at his trade as carpenter in Hamilton. He took part in putting down the rebellion of 1837 after which he bought fifty acres of land in the township of Trafalgar, Halton county. Subsequently taking to himself a helpmate, he began to subdue the forest to make room for a house and the beautiful fields now to be seen there. The result of his marriage was five sons and one daughter. Two of his sons died when young, but there remained three to see him carried to his last resting place.  In 1854 he sold his fifty-acre farm and bought a larger one containing


one hundred acres within one mile of Palermo where he lived up to the time of his death.  In politics Mr. Page was a staunch Conservative and admired the wisdom of the Right Honourable Sir John A. Macdonald in guiding the ship of state for the last quarter of century.  He said that he never knew the Reformers to do anything great for the country.

 

COUITEL  (Montreal) The body found in the river to-day has been identified as that of Alexander Couitel who was crossing the river in a sleigh last February and never reached the other side.

 

VIBERT  (Paspebiac,  Que) A very sad drowning accident occurred near here this morning.  Philip Vibert who has lately shown signs of insanity was on board the steamship "Admiral" going west in care of friends.  It appears that unknown to the others he took the key of the stateroom door and watching a chance passed out quickly, closing the door behind him.  He locked the two men in.  It is supposed he rushed straight to the railing and threw himself over.  He was seen running along the passage but as that part of the deck was at that time almost deserted no one saw him go over. The alarm was given and the boat stopped.  It was too late.  There was no trace of him to be seen. The deceased leaves a wife and child, also an aged mother, to mourn his loss.

 

June 15, 1889

 

SHAVER Died in Ancaster, on June 14, William Shaver, in the 75th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, Ancaster,  on Sunday at 2 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

JUDD Died in this city, on June 14, James Penny Judd, in the 47th year of his age.  Funeral on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m., from his late residence, 95 Florence street. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

GELINAS  (Montreal) A distressing case of drowning is reported from Three Rivers where a Mrs. Gelinas and her two children have been lost by the swamping of a boat in River du Loup.

 

DALEY  (Halifax) Custa Daley, aged 18 years, son of John  Daley, and Harry McBride

MCBRIDE were drowned at Digby yesterday afternoon by the swamping of their sailboat. The  bodies have not been recovered.

 

BOYDEN  (Halifax) E. M. Robertson of St. John, N.B., and George Boyden of Worcester, Mass., went sailing in Hall's harbour yesterday. Their boat was capsized by a squall about a mile from that place. They got upon the bout and after much difficulty righted her, but as the water was very rough could not clear her of it. After being two hours in the water, Mr.


Boyden succumbed and died from exposure.  The boat was finally picked up by the schooner "Seabird" and Mr. Robertson was rescued from his perilous position after being four hours in the water.  He was landed at French Crossing, twenty miles from the scene of the accident, physically none the worse for the affair. Mr. Boyden's remains will be forwarded to Worcester for burial.

 

MCFARLANE  (Windsor) Andrew McFarlane, landlord of the Crawford hotel, died of heart disease at 8 o'clock this morning, leaving a wife but no children.

 

June 17, 1889

 

KELLY Died on June 15, Mrs. Frances Kelly, relict of the late Robert Kelly, aged 75 years.  Funeral will take place from the residence of Mr. S. McKay, 73 Main street east, Monday, at 10:30 a.m.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ADDISON  (Niagara)  John Addison, No 1 Company, 39th Battalion, Simcoe, was found dead this morning on the shore of the river above Paradise Grove.  He had left the camp on Saturday morning in a discontented state. He did not turn up during the day and a party was detailed to search for him. His remains were brought into town this forenoon by some of his comrades and placed in a room in the court house where they will remain until the coroner from Port Dalhousie arrives. It is feared that the poor fellow had committed suicide by drowning and that his body had washed ashore, as he was partly dressed.

 

FORD  (Brantford) A man named Ford, said to be a farmer about four miles north of Brantford, was run over by a train near Onondaga Saturday evening. It is supposed that he had been drinking and sat down on the rails near the station to wait for the train. He was not noticed until the train was so close that it could not be stopped and it ran over him, mangling him badly. He was put on the train and brought to Brantford but died before the train reached here.

 

RENAUD  (Montreal)  J. E. Renaud, for some time employed in the customs house, formerly a director of the Jacques Cartier bank and other financial corporations, died here to-day aged fo rty-four.

 

LAKE  (Prescott) While a ballast train was coming west about thirty miles east of here this afternoon on the Grand Trunk Railway, a brakeman named John Lake was in the act of tightening his brake when the chain broke and he was instantly precipitated beneath the train. Two ballast cars, the van, and the engine passed over the unfortunate man, severing both legs and one arm from the body and also taking away one side of the face. When found the remains were beyond recognition. Death ensued


instantly. Lake, who was 26 years of age,  leaves a wife and child, and  belongs to Brockville.

 

BURTON  (St. Catharines)  James H. Burton, who kept a blacksmith shop on Fifteen-Mile Creek near here was found dead at his house at 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon. The deceased was unmarried and lived entirely alone.  Heart disease is supposed to have been the cause of death.

 

June 18, 1889

 

ROBERTSON Died on June 16, at 23 Brock street, Margaret Elizabeth, daughter of A. M. and Jane Robertson,  aged 26 years. Funeral on Wednesday, June 19, at 2 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

COUTURE Died in this city, on June 17, Alexina, daughter of John and Artemis Couture, aged 13 years. Funeral from the parents' residence, 109 Bold street, on Wednesday morning, at 8 o'clock.  Friends will please accept this notice.

 

LANGLEY Died in this city, after a long and painful illness, Joseph Albert Langley, aged 12 years.  Funeral from his mother's residence, 28 Shaw street, Tuesday, at 2:30. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

ALANSON Died at Heauroaria, Muskoka, on June 17, Amy, third daughter of the late John Alanson.

 

CURTIS Died at his residence, Owen Sound, on June 15, Sidney S. Curtis, aged 65 years. Funeral from Grand Trunk depot, Hamilton, on Tuesday morning,  at 11 o'clock.  Friends will please accept this notice.

 

MORRIS Died on June 16, Tiny, the daughter of Isaac Morris, aged 6 months. Funeral will take place from her father's residence, 133 James street north, on Tuesday, June 18, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to be present.

 

WOODHOUSE Died in this city, on June 17, W. H. Woodhouse, late of the P.C.O. Rifle Brigade, aged 52 years. Funeral will take place from his late residence, 62 Smith avenue, on Wednesday, at 3:30 o'clock.  Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

PAMBRUM (Quebec) Arthur Pambrum. was sawing wood in his father's sawmill at Chinevile when a log struck him in the legs, upsetting and causing him to fall with his neck on a circular saw. The unfortunate man's head was severed from the body, and thrown a distance of twenty feet.

 

RICHARD (Montreal) A boy named Richard, aged 12 years, while going to draw water from the small canal at Lachine yesterday, fell from the plank which served as a bridge and was drowned.


June 19, 1889

 

MUNGER Died on Monday, June 17, David Munger, late of the P.CO. Rifle Brigade, in the 57th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, Garth street, on Wednesday, June 19, Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

David Munger, dairyman, of Garth street, delivered milk to hiscustomers on Monday morning as usual.  He went home and began to make arrangements to attend the Foresters' demonstration at Dundurn, he being a member of that order.  He was suddenly taken sick and died in about half an hour. The death is attributed to the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain.  Mr. Munger came to Hamilton with the P.C.O. Rifles. The funeral will take place to-day at 2 o'clock under the auspices of the Ancient Order of Foresters.

 

BRASS Died at Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, on Tuesday morning, June 18, 1889, Margaret Young Bews, relict of the late Peter Brass, of Stromness, Orkney, Scotland, in the 80th year of her age.  Funeral from her late residence,  50 Markland street, on Thursday, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

A year ago last March Mrs. Margaret Brass, 50 Markland street, fell and injured her right side.  She suffered from the effects of the fall for some time, but was afterward much improved in health and could walk about with the help of a stick. The improvement continued until Monday when she was seized with apoplexy. She remained unconscious until yesterday morning when she died.  The deceased lady who has lived in Hamilton thirty-five years leaves three sons and three daughters. She was a member of the Central Church. The funeral will take place on Thursday at 4 o'clock.

 

MACKAY  (Montreal) Thomas Mackay, aged 70, was injured by falling from the second floor of the Thompson Line sheds on Sunday and has died at the Notre Dame hospital from his injuries.

 

NOLAN (Montreal) A man named Charles Nolan died suddenly to-day of heart disease.

 

LAHAIR  (Ottawa)  Mrs. Lahair of Church street dropped dead at her home to-day. She was employed at the time in housework. Heart disease was the cause. She was about 50 years of age.

 

GRAY  (Quebec) The body found floating at Beaumont on Sunday last has proved to be that of George Gray, the mate of the tug "Lord Stanley".

 

RUSSELL  (Petrolia) T. A. Russell while engaged on top of an oil derrick this afternoon fell and received such injuries that he lived but a short time.


HUGHES  (Brougham) Robert Hughes, an employee of John Miller, met with a fatal accident yesterday by a rail falling on his head,  causing death in twelve hours.  The deceased was highly respected.

 

WILSON  (Manotick)  Last night about midnight while the inmates were asleep, the residence of Richard Wilson, Gloucester, took fire.  Mr. Wilson awoke to find that the fire covered the only means of escape.  His family consisted of his wife and five children.  After a desperate fight, Mr. Wilson succeeded in saving three children but his wife and the two young children were burned to death.  No doubt the mother lost her life in trying to save her children.  On the arrival of the neighbours Mr. Wilson was found some distance from the house, almost naked, badly burned, and quite delirious.  The house with its contents was consumed.

 

June 20, 1889

 

DUBOIS Joseph Dubois, aged seven years, was run over by a train, and killed at Point St. Charles last evening.

 

June 21, 1889

 

SKINNER Died at Bartonville, on June 20, George Skinner, blacksmith, aged 57 years.  Funeral from his late residence, on Sunday, at 2 p.m. for Burlington cemetery.

 

WEBSTER  (Montreal)  John Webster, proprietor of the Cambridge hotel, St. Lawrence street, who fell down the elevator shaft of the Temple building to-day, has died from his injuries and an inquest will be held.

 

ARCHAMBAULT  (Aylmer) a young man named John Archambault was drowned in the Ottawa river this morning at Breckenridge about five miles west of here.  It seems he started out intending to shove along the float wood he collected, and it is supposed took a fit and fell in.  He was 23 years of age and leaves a wife and one child.

 

CANN (Halifax)  John Cann, a farmer of Ohio, Yarmouth county, drowned himself in the lake near his house yesterday. He had been in town in the morning, drove home, changed his clothes, and telling his wife he would be home for an early dinner went out. He did not return and as the afternoon wore on his wife got the neighbours to search for him. No trace of him was found until this morning when he was found standing in the lake a short distance from the shore and a foot or two under the surface. He had apparently walked out backward from the shore till the water was over his head. In just the same spot his first wife drowned herself a year ago. Cann was about 55 years old and never showed amy signs of insanity or depression, and


was married to his second wife only a week ago.

 

HIGHE  (Orillia) While a brakeman named W. Highe, whose home is near Richmond Hill, was coupling cars here this morning, his right hip and part of his body were crushed between the drawheads. He lived about an hour and a half, and said no one but himself was to blame.

 

June 22, 1889

 

PYLE Died in this city, on June 20, David Pyle, in the 59th year of his age.  Funeral from his brother's residence, 44 Market street, on Sunday, at 4 p.m.  Friends anc acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

LOUOBS  (Montreal) Eddie Louobs, aged 16 years, while bathing at Verdun, was suddenly seen to disappear and before assistance could be given he was drowned.

 

JOHNSTON  (Montreal) A man named Johnston, while digging in the excavation for the street railway!s new workshops at Hochelaga, dropped dead to-day from heart disease.

 

LACROIX  (Montreal) F. Lacroix dropped dead suddenly at his residence to-day from cerebral congestion.

 

June 24, 1889

 

DUNNE Died in this city, on June 21, at 25 Guise street, John, eldest son of Stephen Dunne, aged 6 years and 4 months.

 

MCKEAND Died at West Cottage, Concession street, on June 21, Emily A., wife of J. C. McKeand, and daughter of J. M. Williams, registrar.

 

ECKHARDT Died suddenly at Leipsig, Germany, on Friday, June 21, August Eckhardt, aged 25, eldest son of Mrs. Archibald Coutts, of Hamilton, Ontario.

Mrs. Archibald Coutts, No 178 Napier street, while attending the evening services at St. Paul's church, yesterday, received a dispatch from Leipsig, Germany, telling her of the death of her son, August Eckhardt, who has been studying music at Leipsig for nearly two years. Rev. Dr. Laidlaw had just made reference to Mr. Eckhardt as one of the young men of the church who was abroad when the sad message was placed in his hands, requesting him to break the sorrowful tidings to the bereaved mother, which he did after the congregation had retired. Mr. Eckhardt was well known to many in the city as a most estimable young man. Thoroughly devoted to music, he gave promise of becoming a musician who would have done credit to Hamilton.


RENAUD, (Three Rivers) To-day while a batteau loaded with passengers was

HAMELON crossing the St. Maurice river at Grand Piles, a strong wind and current against BELLERIN  which the rowers were unable to make any headway drove the batteau downstream and over the falls at that place. One man leaped out of the batteau into a bark canoe which was towed behind and another clung to a rock and both were saved, but Joseph Renaud and his two children, George Hamelon, B. Bellerin, and Miss Bellerin were drowned. The bodies of Joseph Renaud and Miss Bellerin have been found but none of the others have been recovered. The cries of the terrified passengers were heartrending but no assistance was possible in those boiling waters.

 

O'BRIEN  (Montreal) Timothy O'Brien's hat was blown into the river St. Lawrence this afternoon.  He stripped off and plunged into the river to save it,  but the current was too strong and before his companions could render any assistance he was drowned.

 

BERTRAND  (Quebec) Two men named Bertrand and Lablonne were  drowned

LABLONNE  yesterday while fishing in the river at St. Henri by the upsetting of a canoe. Bertrand was the postmaster at Levis, and Lablonne was a commerical traveller for Gaineau & Sons of this city.

 

June 25, 1889

 

HILL Died at the residence of James G. Davis, 239 Main street east,  on June 23, Maria Hill, in the 45th year of her age. Funeral on Tuesday at 3 p.m.  Friends will please accept this notice.

 

MOONEY Died in this city, on June 24, James, second son of James Mooney, aged 9 years and 10 months.  Funeral from the family residence, 59 Pearl street south, Wednesday, at 4 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CONRAD  (Halifax) Hattie Conrad, aged 19, duaghter of Joseph Conrad, a farmer of Lawrencetown, suicided yesterday by shooting.

 

June 26, 1889

 

LYON Died in this city, on June 25, at her late residence, No 31 Railway street, Mrs. Isabella Lyon, aged 89 years. Funeral on Friday at 2 p.m.  Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MCCLOY (Clifton) About 9:30 this morning a man named McCloy, while under the influence of Liquor, purchased an ounce of paris green, took it to the hotel, and mixed it up and drank it. As soon as it was known what he had done, efforts were made to give him emetics but he resisted and the services of Chief Paisley were called in. He arrested the man and took him to


the council chamber where medical aid was summoned after which he was put in the lock-up.  About 3 o'clock he was found in a bad state.  He was brought into the council chamber and the doctor administered stimulants, but he quietly sank and died about 5 o'clock. While in the cell he had battered his head badly against the walls or bars.  He was a stranger here. His friends are supposed to live in Stratford.

 

LESSARD (Quebec)  Edward Lessard, captain of the tug steamer "Mersey" lying at Connolly's wharf, has been missing since last night and is supposed to have drowned.  His cap was found in the river this morning.  The pond has been dragged to-day for the body.  He was a married man with a family and hails from Berthier-en-Bas.

 

June 27, 1889

 

MORRIS Died in this city, on June 26, William Morris, a native of Prestign, Radnorshire, Wales, in the 70th year of his age. Funeral on Friday, from his late residence, 5 Florence street, at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

NIXON  (Mount Forest) This evening about 9:30 three young men named George Nixon, John McIntyre, and John Dickson, went for a row on the river in a boat that they had made themselves, and in some manner the boat upset and Nixon, who could not swim, was drowned before assistance could reach him.  The other two could swim and got out safely, but could not save their companion. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

REID  (Goderich)  William Reid, a young man working at the lumber docks, burst a blood vessel this afternoon and died in a few minutes after.  He came from Kincardine and been at work here only for two weeks. The remains will be taken to Kincardine.

 

CAIRNS  (Quebec) This morning an inmate at St. Bridget's asylum named John Cairns, 87 years of age. died suddenly.

 

June 28, 1889

 

LAWRY Died in this city, on Thursday, June 27, Judith Lawry, aged 62 years.  Funeral from her late residence, 152 Wellington street north, on Saturday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

LEVEGUE  (Ottawa) The body of a man named Lavegue was found in the Mattawa river on Saturday last about eleven miles from Callender station on the Canadian Pacific Railway. Strong pieces of leather like moccasion strings were wound tightly around his neck. Attached to these were his Suspenders with loops in the ends, appearing to have been tied around stones to sink the body in the water. An inquest held yesterday at


Callender when it was elicited that he had probably died from the effects of wounds received in a fight in a shanty half a mile from where the body was found two weeks ago with a man named Dolan, foreman of the shanty gang.  A verdict of manslaughter was brought in against Dolan by the coroner's jury, but Dolan's whereabouts are unknown.

 

KARN  (Beachville)  James Karn of Beachville was struck by lightning and instantly killed during the severe storm of to-day. He was returning from his farm about one mile from the village and had taken a short cut through Martin's bush where he was found two hours after the storm had passed, lying partly on his face at the roots of a tree that had been shattered by the lightning.  The bolt struck him on the temple and right side of his face, passing down over  the body which is badly discoloured.  The deceased was alone when the accident occurred and as he did not come home when expected some parties went in search of him and returned with the sad intelligence.  of his death.  Mr. Karn was an old resident, having been in the hotel business in Beachville for over twenty-five years and was much respected.

 

LEE  (Calgary) A fatal accident occurred yesterday at Richards & Williams ranch, south of here.  F. Yate Lee, a young Englishman, son of a London barrister, arrived here ten days ago to get practically acquainted with stock raising. Yesterday he went to herd a band of horses after dinner.  This was the last seen of him alive.  Not returning at six o'clock, parties went out in search of him when his lifeless body was found on the ground with a rope, forty feet long.  He had led his horse with the rope twisted around his left hand, and had been dragged a considerable distance, his neck and two ribs being broken, and his clothes being torn from his body and badly scratched. The body was brought to the barrack where Coroner Sheldon held an inquest. A verdict was returned that deceased came to his death by being dragged over the ground by his horse with a noose tied around his left hand.

 

RICKMAN,, (Stony Creek) Death has called away three persons from this village in

ANGLEMAN the same number of days. The first was Ida Rickman, a bright little

PENFOLD  grand-daughter of Mr. St. John. The second was Mrs. Angleman who

  has suffered greatly for some months, and on Monday, Mrs. Penfold passed away quietly.

 

June 29, 1889

 

NEW Died in Toronto, on Friday, June 28, Anne Maria (Ria) Wright, beloved wife of I. H. New. Funeral on Monday, July 1, at 3 p.m., from Spadina avenue.


July l, 1889

 

CHISWELL Died in this city,  on June 29, at his late residence, 125 Emerald street north, William Chiswell, aged 42 years. Funeral on Tuesday, at 3:30 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

WOODMAN Died on the 4th concession of Glanford, 15th lot, on Sunday, June 30, Mrs. Eli abeth Woodman, aged 80 years. Funeral on Tuesday, July 2, at 10 o'clock.  Friends and acquaintances invited to be present.

 

O'NEIL Died in this city suddenly on June 29, Thomas O'Neil, a native of the county Waterford, Ireland, in the 70th year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, corner of Dundurn and Tom streets,  on Tuesday, July 2, at 2 p.m. Friends will please attend.

On Saturday evening about 6 o'clock, Thomas O'Neil, aged 70 years, fell in the yard in rear of his house, corner of Dundurn and Tom streets, and died shortly after being carried into the house.  Heart disease was the cause of his death. The deceased leaves four sons and one daughter.

 

Symmers Died in this city,  on Sunday morning, June 30, William George,  infant son of James and Isabella Symmers, aged 3 months and 11 days.  Funeral from his father's residence, 41 Florence street, on Tuesday at 2 o'clock.

 

TAYLOR  (Toronto) A lad named Ross Taylor of 246 Forley avenue was seized with an epileptic fit while bathing at the island to-day.  He was taken out of the water but died two hours afterward.

 

DENNIS  (Brantford) Saturday afternoon a number of boys went in the river to swim at Eaglets Nest, a little below this place.  Isaac Dennis, aged 11, walked out in the water above his depth into the swift current. The current being too strong for him, he was carried down and drowned. A companion tried to rescue him, but was unable to reach him on account of the swift current.  The body has not yet been recovered.

 

July 3, 1889

 

DAVIS Died at 77 Czar street, Toronto, on Tuesday, July 2, Ella Farr Straw---, in her 25th year, wife of T. E. Davis, Esq. Interment on Wednesday, July 3, on arrival of the train from Toronto.  Friends please accept this intimation.

 

VODDEN Died in this city, on July 3, at No 8 Strong's block, Catherine street north, of diphtheria, John Vodden second son of Thomas and Ann Vodden, aged 5 years and 6 months. Funeral to-morrow (Thursday) at 11 a.m. Private.


Saunderson  (Toronto) Herbert Saunderson,  34 Manning avenue, who was severely injured by the collision of a wagon with the vehicle in which he was riding during the march of the procession on Dominion Day, died this afternoon.  Edward McNaughton who was driving the wagon has been arrested on a charge of murder.

 

GILLOW  (Toronto)  James Gillow, a married man, was drowned this morning through taking cramps while bathingat the island. He was only out three weeks from the old country.

 

CARLEY  (Montreal)  James Carley, a farmer living three miles from Urmstown, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a table knife.  He was suffering from insanity, and his wife was absent having a committal to the asylum made out.

 

TENIBATI  (Montreal)  Joseph Tenibati, for forty-three years chief of the Caughnawaga Indians, was buried at Caughnawaga yesterday.  The St. Joseph's and St. Jean Baptiste societies attended the funeral in a body.  The deceased had reacned the age of 84, and leaves a widow but no children.

 

COULOMBE (Montreal) Louis Coulotnbe, longshoreman, working on the wharf, was affected by a sunstroke to-dsy and died a few hours after being taken to the station.

 

SMITH  (Halifax)  Alliston Smith, president of the Nova Scotia sugar refinery and owner of large shipping interests, died suddenly to-day of heart disease.

 

July 4, 1889

 

KOELLA Died at Carlisle, on July 3, Regula, relict of the late August Koella, aged 63 years. Funeral will leave her late residence, Carlisle, for Burlington cemetery, Hamilton, on Friday morning, July 5, at 9 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

July 5, 1889

 

STEVENSON (Campbellford) This afternoon while bathing, a lad named Samuel Stevenson aged 14 years, was drowned.  With two or three others he attempted to swim out to a boom, but he failed to reach it, and the other boys could not render any assistance.  He was a son of James Stevenson of Hastings and was writing at the high school entrance examinations here. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

Sauvé  (Montreal) Yesterday afternoon a young man named Elzeard Sauvé went to. swim in the Lachine canal.  He had been in twice and on going in the third time was carried off by the current and disappeared from sight. The deceased was 28 years of age


and resided at Coteau Landing.  The body was recovered last night, and this morning Coroner Jones held an inquest, the jury finding a verdict of accidental drowning while bathing.

 

July 6, 1889

 

SAMMONS Died in this city, on July 5, Martin Sammons, in the 78th year of his age.  Funeral will leave his late residence, 116½ King street west, on Saturday, July 6, at 3 p.m. Friends will please attend.

 

WEBSTER Died at 53 Park street north, Hamilton, on July 5, of consumption, Charlotte Craig, second'daughter, of William Webster, aged 15 years, 7 months, and 5 days.  Funeral on Sunday to Burlington cemetery at 4 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances please attend without further notice.

 

MCQUARRIE  (Halifax) Allan McQuarrie, a young man, fell from an excursion steamer in Pictou harbour last evening and was drowned. He was a son of Rev. Allan McQuarrie, formerly of Kingston, Ontario. The body has not been recovered.

 

GILLIAM (Toronto) Edgar J. Gilliam, aged thirteen, was drowned this after while bathing in the bay. He had taken cramps.

 

GRAUB (Jordan) A man by the name of George Graub, living in this village, committed suicide by taking paris green. Before death, he remarked that had he known it was going to give him so much pain, he would not have taken it, but he expected he would fall over just like a potato bug. About a year ago Graub endeavoured to kill himself by getting on to the housetop and rolling from the roof. That time he succeeded only in slightly injuring himself.

 

MCGUIRE  (Sarnia) A boy named McGuire, aged about ten years, was this afternoon drowned in the river here while swimming. The body has been recovered.

 

July 8, 1889

 

JONES Died suddenly in Paris, on Saturday, at 9 a.m., William Chadwick Jones, proprietor of the "Star Transcript". The funeral will take place from his late residence, Grand River street, Paris, on Monday, July 8, at 3 p.m.

 

PROCTOR Died Normina Proctor, youngest daughter of James and Normina Proctor, on July 7, aged 3 months. Funeral from her father's residence, 138 Robert street east. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.


NORQUAY  (Winnipeg) Hon. John Norquay died suddenly this evening of fatty degeneration of the heart.  John Norquay, MLA for Kildonan, ex-premier of Manitoba, was a native Manitoban, born in St. Andrew's in that province, May 8, 1841. Mr. Norquay first came to the front after the troublesome times of 1869-70. His peculiar position as one in which both whites and half-breeds - he had a strain of Indian blood in his veins -could have confidence together with a forcible way of stating moderate views marked him out as a leader. He was made minister of public works after the settlement of the troubles in 1871. In 1872 he was an unsuccessful candidate in Marquette for the Commons.  In the Assembly he sat for High Bluff from 1870 to 1874, since which he represented St. Andrew's continuously till the last election, being three times returned by acclamation and twice by large majorities. At the last election he presented himself for Kildonan and was one of the Conservatives returned.  He resigned with his colleagues in 1871, but became provincial secretary the next year and resumed the public works office in 1876.  In 1878 he became premier, being the head of the Norquay-Royal government in which he held the treasurer's portfolio.  In 1888, owing mainly to complications resulting from the failure to build the line of railway from Winnipeg southward to the United States boundary to connect with a branch of the Northern Pacific,  Mr. Norquay resigned his place in the administration. Mr. Norquay owed his long continuance in power to a combination of talents, prominent among which was moderation, boldness tempered with judgment, eloquence, and a capacity for ceaseless work. After the downfall of his government in 1888, he never seemed to be the same man, and he suffered keenly from anxiety and worry, the prairie provinces being in a bad financial state at the time.

 

BYRD  (Halifax) The general store and dwelling of J. G. Byrd at East Chazzetticook was burned last night. His young daughter was burned to death. Another daughter jumped from a window with an infant in her arms and seriously injured besides being burned. Byrd and his wife were also badly burned before they could get out of the house. Byrd is an American.

 

CARON (Quebec) The twenty-year-old son of Antoine Caron, of St. Jean, Port Joli, was drowned in the river at Trois on Saturday morning while bathing.

 

HEALEY  (Sarnia) This morning about 7 o'clock Henry Healey, a man of dissipated habits, was found dead in the Lambton House stables. It is supposed that he fell from the upper loft, breaking his neck. He leaves a sister living in Fort Gratiot. Healy was about 30 years old.

 

MOREAU (Father Point, Que) Mr. Moreau, engineer of the ocean mail steamer "Contest" was drowned at 1 p.m. on Saturday by falling off the Rimouski pier. A boat was launched immediately but the man sank and when brought to the surface a few minutes


later, life was extinct. The deceased was about 45 years of age and of sober, industrious habits.  He leaves a wife and family.

 

PERREAULT  (Montreal) Amanda Perreault of Jacques Cartier street dropped dead this morning. An inquest will be held to-morrow.

 

RUSSELL (Warkworth) A boy about 15 years old named Russell, working with John Anderson near here, had his brains blown out this morning by the explosion of a gun while shooting crows.

 

July 9, 1889

 

CONNOR  (Goderich) There passed away in the village of Bayfield in the county of Huron this morning in the person of William Wellington Connor, one of the oldest pioneers in that section of the country. Born in Ireland, he came to this country when quite young.  He was one of the oldest Orangemen in Canada and an honourary member of the right worthy lodge of British North America.  He served in the 33rd Battalion active militia and retired with the rank of major.  Mr. Connor was in politics a strong Conservative. He was also a justice of the peace and the first reeve in Bayfield which office he held for many years.

 

MCFALL (Montreal) The funeral of the late Charles McFall whose body was recovered at Brockville will take place on Wednesday morning from his late residence, 114 St. Matthew street to Coteau Landing where the body will be interred.

 

BOURASSA (Montreal) A man supposed to be one Bourassa of St. Jean des Chaillons fell from the deck of the "Montreal" on her way to Quebec. The body was recovered at Sorel, badly mutilated by the paddle wheel.

 

BARRETTE  (Montreal) A fatal accident is reported from St. Bartholemy. Mrs. Moe Barrette was kindling her fire with coal oil when her dress caught fire and she was so severely burned that she died a few hours afterward. Her husband in trying to tear off his wife's garments burned his own hands, arms, and legs to such an extent that fears are entertained for his life.

 

MYETT (Halifax) A man named Joseph Myett and his young son were proceeding down Porter's lake Saturday afternoon in a boat loaded with wood. The craft which is supposed to have been top heavy capsized. The man was drowned but the boy clung to the boat was saved. The body has not yet been recovered, but parties are grappling for it. Myett was an old resident of Chezzelcook.

 

POITRAS  (Quebec) A woman named Poitras from Port Neuf en Bas died suddenly at a boarding house on Henderson street.


FOX A sad drowning accident occurred in the bay yesterday afternoon where John Fox, a tall, muscular, athletic-looking young man about 21 years old, who resided with his parents at 19 Florence street, met his death while bathing.  Fox used to work for the Hamilton Iron Forging company. Yesterday afternoon in company with his elder brother, William Fox, and William Dalton, he went down to have a swim, selecting a spot opposite Carey's ice house, a short distance east of Wentworth street. The water there is not very deep and the bathers can wade out for a considerable distance. There were three other young men in swimming when Fox and his companions went into the water.  They were not expert swimmers and did not venture out very far, contenting themselves with keeping where the water was not far above their heads.  Some boys were playing with an old rowboat and the bathers jumped into it and paddled out into the bay until they got about 350 years from the shore. Dalton did not get into the boat. The men were seated in the boat when a sudden jar upset it and the five of them were thrown into the water.  They all started to swim ashore, but the Fox brothers who were not good swimmers as the others fell behind and could not keep up the pace. William Fox had an awful time getting ashore and came near being drowned. He went down twice but bravely struggled on arriving in safety. His brother John either took cramps or became exhausted, for he was behind the other swimmers and was seen to disappear before any help could reach him. The men afterwards went out in a boat and searched for the body using grappling irons, and some of them dived, but they did not succeed in recovering it. William Fox was completely exhausted when he reached the shore.

 

July 10. 1889

 

FOX Drowned in Hamilton bay, on July 8, John Fox, aged 21 years. Funeral from the residence of his father, No 19 Florence street to-morrow, Wednesday, at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

James Smith of Bay street dived in the bay yesterday morning at 7 o'clock and recovered the body of John Fox, drowned on Monday. The body was taken to Blachford's undertaking establishment and embalmed, and it will be buried to-day at 4 p.m. from the residence of his father, 19 Florence street.

 

SCHNEIDER Died in this city, on July 8, Peter Schneider, aged 51 years and 6 days, a native of Basel, Switzerland. Funeral from his late residence, 14 George street, on Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

Peter Schneider died Monday night at his late residence, 14 George street, of spinal disease. He was a native of Basel, Switzerland, and has for many years been in the employ of Bowering & Pain. Deceased was well liked by his numerous friends for his kindly disposition and his straightforward manner. He leaves a wife and five children to mourn him.


HAMMOND Died in this city, on July 8, Harriet Hammond, beloved wife of Richard Hammond, aged 44 years. Funeral from her late residence, 81 Oak avenue, Wednesday, July 10, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

REED Died at Montreal, on the morning of July 7, Jemima Booker, beloved wife of Thomas D. Reed, M.D., and daughter of the late Rev. A. Booker, of Hamilton.

 

LINDSAY Died in this city, on Tuesday, July 9, Sebastian Lindsay, cigar maker, aged 27 years. Interment in Toronto.

 

SMITH (Toronto) Hugh McKay, who killed Charles Smith in the row in the Queen street bar-room last night, appeared at the police station this morning and was remanded to wait the result of the inquest on the body of the deceased.

 

HART  (Montreal) The wife of L. T. Hart dropped dead to-day as she was leaving her house. The coroner's verdict was death from natural causes.

 

GATES  (Montreal) Sidney Gates, an old man, entered the Protestant house of refuge to-day.  He had evidently been drinking and shortly after going in, he swallowed a quantity of carbolic acid.  He was taken to the Montreal general hospital and died a few hours after his admission.

 

CHOUINARD  (Quebec) Mrs. Chouinard, aged 95, died at her residence on St. Francis street last evening from the effects of an accident by falling down a gallery at the back of her house.

 

July 11, 1889

 

GIBSON Died at Beamsville, on July 10, James Gibson, a native of Peterhead, Scotland, aged 60 years and 5 months. Funeral at Beamsville on Thursday afternoon. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

ECKHARDT Died suddenly at Leipsig, Germany, on June 22, August Eckhardt, aged 25 years, 7 months, and 4 days. Funeral from his mother's residence, 178 Napier street, on Friday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend. The remains may be seen at Pray & Sons undertaking rooms till Friday at 11 o'clock.

 

REASTON Died in this city, on Wednesday, July 10, Maggie Reaston, wife of John Reaston, in the 30th year of her age. The funeral will leave her late residence, 20 Burton street, on Friday afternoon, at 3530 o'clock, to the family burying ground, Dundas. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.


WATT  (Palmerston) Alexander Watt, miller of this place, who had just returned from the meeting of the Millers' Association at Toronto, was run over by an engine to-night, the wheels cutting his left leg off at the hip. He lived only two hours after the accident.

 

REED  (Chesterville) William Reed, of Dunbar, Ontario,  five miles south of Chesterville, committed suicide this morning by cutting his throat with a razor. Deceased was a widower about 60 years of age and subject to fits. He leaves one daughter. No reason is given for the rash act.

 

LAWSON  (Toronto) Walter Lawson, a workman in Price's brickyard, was sunstruck yesterday afternoon while at work and taken to his house on Norfolk avenue. This morning he succumbed to the effects of the stroke. Other less serious cases of prostration from the severe heat are numerous.

 

KNOWLES  (Toronto)  Joseph Knowles, a Canadian Pacific Railway brakeman, was run over and killed at West Toronto Junction this morning.

 

CHARLES  (Ottawa) The body of a stranger named William Charles was found floating in the Rideau river here last night.  It is supposed to be a case of suicide.  No inquest will be held.

 

HIGGS  (Cornwall) Fred Higgs, an employee of the Cornwall Manufacturing Company, met a terrible death in that institution yesterday. Higgs was employed in manning a machine called the extractor when unnoticed by any of the employeese around him he fell into the basket of the machine which was making 1000 revolutions per minute. His right arm was torn out at the elbow, his collarbone broken, and his face and head badly cut. He lived for two hours after the accident but never regained consciousness.  Higgs became an employee of the company only two weeks ago. He was a native of London, England, unmarried, and 21 years of age. He bore an excellent character.

 

ENSLEY  (Bath) The body of a drowned man was found yesterday afternoon in the water near the lower end of Amherst Island which has been identifed as that of James Ensley of Picton. The body was so decomposed that it was buried at once on the island. The deceased left the village on the evening of Monday, June 24,  in a skiff for Indian Point, Prince Edward county, where he and his wife were camping. His boat was found the next morning on the shore of the island, and his body came ashore yesterday, six miles east of where the boat was found.

 

MAHONY The "Modjeska" carried immense crowds of people yesterday on every trip and made good time. Among those who went on her on the afternoon trip were Daniel Mahony, 13 Burlington street west, with his wife and seven-months-old child. The child had been very ill and thfa doctor advised the mother to


take it for a sail on the lake to see if it would have a beneficial effect on the little sufferer.  Some time after leaving Oakville, however, on the trip down, the child became worse. It was removed to Captain Irvine's cabin and everything possible was done for it by Dr. Bingham who happened to be on board, but it died. The parents were greatly bereaved, and the event cast a feeling of sadness over all on board. The steamer's flag was immediately placed at half-mast.  The body was brought back to the city on the evening trip.

 

July 12, 1889

 

DOMVILLE Died in this city, on Thursday, July 11, Frank, Infant son of Charles J. Domville, aged 2 months. Funeral on Saturday at 4 p.m. from 14 Colborne street. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

PEARSON Died in this city, on July 11, at 298 James street north, Harold Norman, infant son of John and Sarah Pearson, aged 8 weeks.  Funeral Saturday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BEAUPRE (Kingston) R. Beaupre, aged 10 years, was drowned while bathing at Wolfe Island.

 

BOIS  (Quebec) The illustrious Abbé Bois, curé of Maskinonge, to whose antiquarian and historical researches Shea and Parkman have been much indebted, died yesterday afternoon after a long and painful illness. He was a member of the Royal Society of Canada and is said to have left behind him a large quantity of precious manuscripts(Editors note nearly 4,300 volumes and 1,013 brochures) relating to Canadian history.

 

BERGERON (Kingston) The body found on the beach at Cape Rouge has been recognized as Augustin Bergeron, aged 59, a patient of the Beaupre asylum who deserted on the evening of June 23. A verdict of death from drowning was given.

 

JACKSON (Windsor) Sarah Jackson died at the residence of her youngest daughter, Martha Stewart, this morning.  Mrs. Jackson was credited with being the oldest woman in Windsor. She claimed to be 100 years old. She came to Windsor fifty-two years ago and her daughter is 62 years old.

 

BRUNSWELL  (Picton) The body found in the water at Desoronto on Tuesday is the body of Thomas Brunswell, a young man who has lived in or near Picton all his life. He left here Saturday night about 7 o'clock on the steamer "Quinte" with an excursion party for Belleville, expecting to return here on the same steamer some time during the night. One of the hands of the "Quinte" was talking to him after the steamer left Desoronto on her up trip and that is the last trace of him alive. Mr. Woodrow with whom he lived ten years went to Desoronto to-day


and identified pieces of the clothing and the watch case found on the body. The works to fit the case are in Brunswell's trunk in Mr. Woodrow's possession. The young man was sober, steady, and industrious, and it ia a mystery how he came to his death. Foul play is suspected.

 

July 13, 1889

 

FLOOD  (Toronto) A boy named Harry Flood was killed to-day in the subway by a street car.  He was thrown into a coal cart under the car when a wheel passed over him. The conductor and the driver of the car are under arrest.

 

ROHAN (Mitchell) About 9 o’clock this evening two young man, Thomas Roney and Daniel Rohan, aged about 20 years, employees of John Dawe, carriage builder, were upset out of a boat in the river. Neither could swim. Rohan was dead when rescued although every effort was made to bring him back to life. Roney, who was taken from the water first, is in a fair way for recovery.

 

LEPAGE  (Sherbrooke) This morning a man named Lepage, a labourer, of this city, was killed by the mixed train going east on the Grand Trunk Railway half a mile from the station. The train was rounding a curve when the driver saw the man on the track and whistled for him. The man looked behind and laughed, but did not attempt to move off. The driver had not the time enough to stop the train. Lepage was on the way to his work, having a wood saw, and in his pocket was a whiskey flask with which he had already made himself fully acquainted.

 

July 15, 1889

 

BRAUN Died at the hospital, on July 12, in the 32nd year of his age, Adam G. Braun, late of Walkerton, Ontario. Funeral from the residence of Rev. George Fihkbeiner, No 98 Market street, Monday morning, at 8 o'clock to G.T.R. Interment at Hanover, Ontario.

 

WARREN Died in this city, on July 13, Frances Berchman, third daughter of Patrick and Mary Warren, aged 21 years. Funeral from her parents' residence, 83 Strachan street east, on Monday at 8:30 o'clock a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

MCCARTNEY A serious aocident by which John McCartney of Hamilton, aged 65 years, will probably lose his life, occurred at 10:15 Saturday morning at the Grand Trunk crossing, Queen street east, Toronto. Although the gates were closed, he was within them, standing on. the track watching the suburban train which was coming in. This and the express cross at this point and McCartney was so engaged looking at the suburban train that he did not see the other approaching. The result was that he


was struck by the engine, knocked down, and terribly mangled. His shoulder, arm, and side were crushed, and he presented a sickening spectacle to those who saw the accident.  He was carried into a house nearby and Drs. Pickering and Stephenson summoned. They did what they could for him and ordered his removal to the hospital whither he was taken in the ambulance. Dr. O'Reilly says that several of his ribs were broken, that one of them has penetrated the lung, and he is so injured internally that his recovery is extremely doubtful. To the doctor McCartney said that he alone was to blame.

Later: McCartney died at the hospital late Saturday afternoon.

 

Hamel  (Windsor Mills, Que) A boy named Hamel was drowned while bathing yesterday evening.  He was swimming in the shallow part of the river and ventured too far and was carried away by the current. He called to his companions that he was drowning, but they were unable to help him. The body was recovered about 6 p.m.

Pouliot  (St. Charles Station, Que) About 3:15 this afternoon a farmer’s cart was struck by a freight train going east and one of the occupants, Jules Pouliot, was instantly killed. The other, F. Carriveau, escaped unhurt.

 

July 16, 1889

Mackie Died in this city, on July 15, Sarah, infant daughter of Robert and Sarah Mackie, aged 6 months. Funeral from the family residence, 20 Napier street, on Tuesday, July 16, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

Millman Died in this city, on July 14, Edith S. Belle, youngest daughter of James and Sarah Millman, aged 5 years, 6 months, and 6 days. Funeral from her parents' residence, No 31 Oak avenue, on Tuesday, July 16, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

Leslie Died in this city, on July 14, 8usan, beloved wife of Robert Leslie, in the 58th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, 3 Kelly street, on Wednesday, at 3:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

Henry Died at Winona, on July 15, Isaac Brock Henry, in the 77th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, on Wednesday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

Cartwright  (Toronto) James Foley of 83 Terauley street and James Cartwright, a boy of 15, stepped on a raft made of two doors which sank beneath their weight. The boy was drowned and the man rescued after sinking twice.


KEECH (Montreal) On the last voyage to Liverpool of the "Lake Huron" a passenger named Harry Keech committed suicide by jumping overboard.

 

YATES  (Belleville) A small boat in which were three quarrymen from Point Ann, upset on Saturday night near the point. Thomas Yates, of Toronto, aged 19, was drowned. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

July 17, 1889

 

YOUNG Died at 79 Wellington street north, on July 16, of Cholera infantum, Norman, infant son of Charles N. Young. Funeral from the above address at 2 o'clock Wednesday, July 17. Friends respectfully invited.

 

HARRIS The police authorities received a telegram from Port Hope yesterday stating that an old man had been killed on the Grand Trunk near that place, and a letter had been found on him from Smith, Farmer & Lyall, barristers, Hamilton, addressed to Mrs. Maivery Harris. Detective Reid started out to make inquiries and unearthed quite a story about the old man. The deceased was about 75 years of age and was a wealthy East Flamborough farmer residing at Waterdown where he owned a farm. He had been married several times and his last matrimonial venture netted him a comparatively youthful spouse of thirty-five summers who also had a son, ten years of age. Harris deeded his farm over to his wife and started a sort of temperance hotel on the townline in East Flamborough. About three weeks ago the wife left him and came here. She obtained employment in a James-Street hotel, and it is alleged that she sold the farm for $400 and a few days ago went to Buffalo. The old man came here and was in the old-men's home for a few days, but left there and probably was walking on the track when the train struck him. The detectives could find no person in the vicinity who cared to send for the body or have anything to do with the old man's remains.

 

June 18, 1889

 

GOERING Died on Wednesday morning, July 17, 1889, at her mother's residence, 54 West avenue south, Emma K., younger daughter of the late John W. Goering. Funeral Friday, July 19, 1889, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends will please omit flowers.

 

PETERS  (Windsor) Charles Peters, a single man, aged about 55 years, for many years past an employee of the Grand Trunk Railway, late last evening went to his boarding house after the other occupants of the house were asleep. For some reason unexplained he did not go upstairs to bed, but no one heard him to call out during the night. This morning he was discovered lying dead ©n the floor of the sitting room. Officer Nash was


called, and upon searching found $162 in the pockets of the dead man. Heart disease is supposed to have been the fatal cause, and no inquest is deemed necessary.

 

GAGNON (Quebec) The young son of Paul Gagnon at New Liverpool fell from the wharf yesterday and was found dead this morning in the river.

 

MCALPINE  (Chatsworth) Yesterday afternoon the eldest son of Rev. W. McAlpine of this place and aged about 23 was out shooting with some companions about three miles from here. He sat down on a board to rest and while in the act of shoving the rifle from him along the board it went off, the ball entering his body at about the sixth or seventh rib and taking a downward course, passed through the liver. Medical attendance was summoned, but the efforts were unavailing to save his life, as he died early this morning.

 

July 19, 1889

 

BRIDGEMAN (Toronto) James Bridgeman, a painter, working on a building in course of construction on Queen street west, died suddenly this afternoon while at work. Deceased was subject to fits.

 

JOBIN  (Quebec) A butcher named Jobin of this city was arrested at 2 o'clock this morning for being drunk, he being found lying asleep in the Champlain market place. He was subsequently brought before the recorder's court and sentenced to eight days in jail, but expired there during last night. An inquest will be held.

 

MCDONALD (Toronto) In the early hours of this morning a terrible affair happened at the asylum for the insane. Barker Potter, late of Whitby, for ten months an inmate, was seized with the inspiration that God desired him to kill the men sleeping on either side of him, he himself being Jesus Christ and the men representing the two thieves. With a piece of hoop iron that he had secreted in the room and sharpened for some such deed, he attacked the man on the left, Hector McDonald, a . harmless lunatic from Grey county who has been confined for fourteen years.  Potter inflicted several fearful gashes upon the victim's throat and then turned upon Charles Midge, another room fellow. The noise drew the attention of the night watchman who opened the door and was attacked by Potter who tried to strike him with a pail. Finally after help was obtained the madman was subdued. McDonald died a few minutes afterward from the effect of his wounds. Midge is not seriously hurt. An inquest was held this evening at which the jury returned a verdict to the effect that the deceased met his death from wounds inflicted on his neck by a fellow patient, no blame being attached to anyone.


CARNEY  (Toronto) A scaffold at the new Ross Avenue school collapsed about half past three this afternoon, precipitating four men to the ground, a distance of nearly thirty feet. One of the unfortunate men was killed outright. Alexander Carney, a bricklayer who boarded on Church street near Carlton, was buried in the debris and when extricated was almost dead from loss of blood, his jugular vein having been severed by a sharp corner of a piece of timber cutting it.  Of the injured men, Sam Garmand and John Cowdy were the worst hurt and they were removed to the hospital. A bricklayer's labourer, named Adam Cotter, sustained only slight injuries. He was able to be taken home. The accident occurred through the breaking of a cutlock. At a late hour this evening the injured men were progressing favourably.

 

July 20, 1889

 

COX  (Brantford) Fred Cox was in J. Y. Morton's hardware store this morning looking at some revolvers. Albert Lawrence, the clerk who was showing them, snapped a revolver to show that it worked all right and shot Cox in the left breast. Doctors were quickly on hand and after an examination ordered the ambulance carriage to take him to the hospital. Cox died a few minutes after reaching the hospital. Mr. Lawrence did not know that the revolver was loaded and feels bad over the matter. He was placed under arrest and liberated on bail. Later particulars of the unfortunate affair show that Cox went into Morton's store to exchange his old revolver which was loaded, for a new one. Lawrence selected a fine new revolver,. snapped it several times to see if it worked all right and gave it to Cox who handed Lawrence the old one, and he not supposing that Cox had handed him a loaded revolver, snapped it as he did the new one and at the first snap it went off. An inquest will be held to-night.

 

CARPENTER,  Within twenty-four hours two fatal accidents occurred

Morphy's-mother-in-law  within half a mile of each other near the quiet camp meeting town of Grimsby. On Thursday evening the mother-in-law of S. Morphy, land agent, opened the wrong door to Mr. Morphy's residence and fell headlong into the cellar. She was so badly injured that she died a couple of hours afterward.

Yesterday afternoon about three o'clock Mrs. M. A. Carpenter was driving over to the camp ground and just as she reached the turn of the road about a quarter of a mile from the park, the horse became unmanageable and ran away. Mrs. Carpenter was thrown out on her head and instantly killed. The deceased was a widow and leaves a son and a daughter.

 

July 22, 1889

 

CLARK Died at Portland, Oregon, on July 16, Beulah Howells,


wife of George Clark, and eldest daughter of the late Dr. Howells of this city. Funeral from the G.T. station to the cemetery on Monday, July 22, on arrival of the 1:50 train.

 

MCCOMBE Died at Toronto, Mrs. Isabella McCombe of this city, in her 41st year. Funeral from the residence of Mr. William Griffith, 119 James street south, Hamilton, at 8:30 a.m. to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

Duggan Died on Saturday afternoon, July 20, 1889, at her father's residence, 199 Park street north, Myra Irene, aged 4 months, only daughter of James E. Duggan. Funeral Monday, July 22, at 3:30. Friends respectfully invited.

 

Tirbutt  (Quebec) A young Englishman named Edward Tirbutt, who was removed from the steamship "Lake Superior" on Tuesday in a dying condition, died yesterday in the Jeffry Hale hospital. Deceased was on his way home to Nottingham, England, where his father resides. A cablegram has been received directing what to do, and accordingly he will be buried to-day.

Pardee  (Sarnia) Hon. T. B. Pardee, late commissioner of Crown Lands in the Ontario Legislature, died at his residence here at noon to-day. The funeral will take place on Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

 

July 23, 1889

 

FEATHERSTONE Died at his residence, Mill street, Waterdown, on July 21, William Feathestone, aged 84 years, deeply regretted. Funeral from his late residence on Tuesday, July 23, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

William Featherstone,one of the oldest pioneers of East Flamborough, was found dead in his bed Sunday morning at his son-in-law's residence, Mill street, Waterdown. He had been in good health up to the previous evening and was going about as usual. From the peaceful appearance of the features it was evident that the deceased had died while asleep, Mr. Featherstone was 84 years of age. He was a native of Durham, England, and came to this country half a century ago and settled on the sixth concession of East Flamborough. He was widely known and respected as a man whose integrity, sound principle, and honesty of purpose in all his dealings with his fellowmen were beyond question. He was also esteemed as a kind and considerate neighbour, an indulgent parent, and a truly loyal Canadian. The deceased leaves three sons and three daughters.

 

MACKELCAN Died on Sunday, July 21, Louise Adelaide, daughter of the late John Mackelcan, M.R.C.S. Funeral from 38 Catherine street north, on Wednesday, July 24 at 2 p.m.


PRIESTLAND Died at 42 Barton street west, Alice Priestland, youngest daughter of Harry and Emily Priestland, aged 1 year and a day. Funeral on Wednesday at 2 o'clock.

 

MORTARD (Quebec) A man named Mortard died suddenly yesterday at St. Basile.

 

HAREL (Montreal) Solemn requiem mass was celebrated in the temporary church adjoining the cathedral this morning over the body of the late Chancellor Telesphore Harel, D.D. Two hundred priests in snow white vestments representing the various dioceses assisted in the service at which his Grace Archbishop Fabre officiated with the immediate assistance of Grand Vicar Marechel, Monseigneur Moreau, bishop of St. Hyacinths and Abbé Bland, Three Rivers. Abbé Lesage of Chambly acted as deacon and Abbé Chevner as subdeacon, while Canon Leblanc and Abbe' Chevrefib occupied the place of deacon of honour. The body was buried in a plain coffin in the crypt of the cathedral.

 

DYSON (Guelph) Isaac Dyson, a prominent farmer in Guelph township and a director of the Guelph Fat Stock club, committed suicide this morning by hanging himself in his barn. The deceased moved to Manitoba in the spring, but returned dissatisfied and went back to his old farm. Disappointment in his move to Manitoba and financial difficulties are supposed to have been the causes which led to his hanging himself.

 

July 24, 1889

 

SMITH Died on July 23, at the family residence, 78 Tisdale street, Hamilton L. infant son of George W. and Mary Smith, aged 10 months and 23 days. Funeral takes place Wednesday at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

ROBBINS Died in this city, at 3 Walnut street, on July 23, Albert, infant son of S. C. and Marion Robbins, aged 1 year and 10 months. Funeral on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

WASTELL Died at Whalley Lodge, Burlington, on July 23, Sophia Katharine, second daughter of Charles A. and Emily Wastell, in the 22nd year of her age. Funeral on Wednesday afternoon at 4:30 to St. Luke's cemetery.

 

Springstead Died on Ferguson avenue, corner Kelly street, on July 23, Etta May Springstead, aged 3 months. Funeral from the above address on July 24 at 10 a.m. Friends accept this intimation.

 

GEE Died in this city, on Tuesday, July 23, of consumption, Thomas Gee, aged 25 years and 5 months. The funeral will leave his late residence, 33½ Tisdale street, on Thursday afternoon


at 3:30. Friends and acquaintances respectfully invited to attend.

 

HAINES (Bowmanville) A lad aged about eleven years, son of George Haines, Jr., was drowned this afternoon in Vanstone's pond. He got beyond his depth.

 

TAYLOR  (Ottawa) A terrible accident by a which a 10-yeer-old girl named Maud Taylor lost her life occurred at Pembroke this morning. The deceased child and her mother, Mrs. Taylor, were on their way via the Canadian Pacific Winnipeg train (midnight) from their home at Chapleau to Pembroke to visit friends. Shortly before arriving at Pembroke the brakeman passed through the cars notifying the passengers that they were approaching the station. Three minutes later the train pulled up on a trestle bridge over the Alumet river for the engine to take on water from the tank. The time was five minutes after midnight. Mrs. Taylor and Maud got their baggage and when the train stopped, passed with other passengers out on the platform of the car, supposing that they were at the station. The child stepped fearlessly off and was immediately hurled thirty feet downward into the cold dark current beneath. The train immediately proceeded into the station, boats were secured, and in ten minutes the lifeless corpse was recovered.

 

July 25, 1889

 

NELLES  (Simcoe) There died here to-day at the residence of her youngest son, Thomas, Mary Hardy, relict ot the late William Nelles of Woodhouse, in her 93rd year. Mrs. Nelles was the mother of a large family of sons distinguished in many walks of life. The best known and longest to be remembered was the late Chancellor of Victoria University, the lamented Dr. S. S. Nelles. She will be buried in Oafcwood cemetery here on Friday.

 

McCorkam (Ottawa) At Masham Mills, Ottawa county, Quebec, on July 4, one of the old pioneers died in the person of Robert McCorkam who passed peacefully away at the advanced age of 101 years. He was not long survived by his wife who died on July 10, she being 99 years of age.

 

BOLDUC (Quebec) George Bolduc of St. Henri de Levis, an inmate of Beauport asylum, was found dead in bed.

 

DANACHER  (Halifax) Rev. Peter Danacher, Roman Catholic priest of St. Joseph's Church, died suddenly to-day.

 

July 26, 1889

 

WHITE Died on July 24, at her husband's residence, mountain top, Sarah Ann, beloved wife of Samuel White, aged --- . Funeral takes place Friday at — o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


LAKE Died in this city, on July 24, Ettie May, infant daughter of James end Sarah Lake, aged 4 months and 14 days. Funeral from — Queen street north, on Friday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

RINGROSE Died at 34 Mulberry street, on July 25, Ann, beloved wife of Horace Ringrose, aged -3 years. Funeral on Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

GILL (Ottawa) At noon to-day a lad aged 8 years, the son of J. Gill, a miller, was drowned in the Rideau river at New Edinburgh.

 

BRADLEY  (Ottawa)  By the death of Mrs. Bradley, widow of the late Capt. W. B. Bradley of Huntingdon on Saturday last, Carlton loses an old and respected resident. Mrs. Bradley passed away at the ripe old age of eighty-seven. Her maiden name was Christenie Lacasse. Mrs. Bradley had seven sons and five daughters, ninety grandchildren, and ninety-two great-grandchildren. All the sons and daughters and a large number of grandchildren and great-grandchildren were at the funeral.

 

EVANS  (Toronto) John Evans, aged fifteen years, of 371 Front street east, was drowned in the bay at the foot of Lorne street this evening.  The fatality was caused by the boy playing carelessly with a boat lying alongside the dock.

 

LAYMAN  (Kingsville) At 4 p.m. to-day the governor on the electric light machinery at the Mattawa Hotel flew off, striking William Layman in the face, killing him instantly. He was much respected, and leaves a wife and four children unprovided for.

 

July 27, 1889

 

BLACKSTONE Died in this city, on July 26, Nellie May, infant daughter of Elbert L. Blackstone, aged 3 years. Funeral from Wentworth street, G.T.R. crossing, Sunday, at 1 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

LESAGE (Montreal) An accident occurred at St. Jerome by which a child of Honore Lesage lost its life. The farmer was cutting with a mowing machine while his six-year-old daughter was playing in the grass. The child was terribly injured by the machine.

 

COX (Watford) Richard Cox of Watford was at Port Huron visiting his sons and when riding with one of them, the horse stopped suddenly and threw him out, breaking his arm and some ribs and injuring him internally from the effects of which he died last night.


STRONG A St. Thomas dispatch of July 26 says: Harry Strong, formerly of London, but for five years past living with Thomas Thomas of the Bostwick line, Southwold, left for Hamilton a few days ago on a visit to his daughters. This morning a telegram was received announcing his sudden death on Monday from heart disease. The remains were interred at Hamilton to-day. Deceased was 74 years of age and was well known throughout Elgin as the manufacturer of Strong's liniment.

 

July 29. 1889,

 

NEWANS Died on July 27, corner of King and Ashley streets, infant son of C. M. and Amelia Minnie Newans, aged 7 months and 18 days.

 

LUCAS Died in this city, on July 26, Melissa, daughter of Thomas and Jane Lucas, aged 18 years, 6 months, and 16 days.

 

PATERSON Died in this city, on July 27, at No 223 Bay street south, Mary Lillian, infant daughter of John and Lilly Paterson, aged 9 months. Funeral this (Monday) afternoon at 2 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WORLD  (Toronto) A sad drowning accident occurred on Toronto bay last Saturday night whereby Thomas L. World of 10 St. Patrick street and his daughter, Miss Lillie, were drowned. They, together with two lads, P. Parker and C. Chase, were rowing homeward from the island when the boat was swamped in the heavy sea rolling at the time. The two lads were rescued by the ferry steamer "Luella" that was passing at the time, but Mr. World and his daughter were lost. The body of Mr. World was recovered to-day near the new fort.

 

WOOD (Toronto) William T. Wood, of 119 Robinson street, aged fifteen years, was drowned yesterday while bathing at the foot of Dufferin street.

 

KELLY (Toronto) This morning at 2:45, a dissolute woman named Lillie Kelly deliberately hanged herself in the Agnes street police station. She was run in last night as disorderly and at the hour named tore a piece from the bottom of her dress and hanged herself from the bars of the window in the corridor. The alarm was given by her companion, but life was extinct before the body could be cut down. Coroner Powell will hold an inquest to-morrow at 10 a.m.

 

MIDDLETON  (Montreal) William Middleton, an employee of the electric light company went into Snowdon's boot and shoe factory on Saturday. He was told to be careful of the shaft, but as he was looking down the elevator struck him and he was instantly killed.


HOPPER  (Newmarket)  John Hopper, a farmer living about five miles from here, while walking on the railway track going south from the station, was struck by the evening express and killed. He was supposed to be under the influence of liquor and did not pay attention to the whistling of the locomotive. He was struck on the head and thrown clear over the semaphore wire, striking the surface beyond.  No blame is attached to the train hands and no inquest is likely.

 

PATTERSON (Harriston) While Frank Patterson, a boy of about eleven years of age, the eldest son of Samuel Patterson of this town, was standing in the barn of G. & W. Moore watching a rack lifter at work, the whippletree broke and struck him on the head, fracturing his skull. He died about three hours after the accident.

 

July 30, 1889

 

FRASER Died in this city, on July 28, Isabella Macdonald, beloved wife of S. W. Fraser,  aged 70 years. Funeral from her late residence, 192 Hannah street west, on Wednesday, at 8:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

HOLT  (Ottawa) Moses Holt, an Aylmer hotel keeper, is dead, aged 96.  He was one of the best known hotel men in Canada.

 

ROBSON  (Ottawa) A sad case of suicide occurred yesterday morning about nine o'clock when Miss Robson, a daughter of the late Captain Robson, of 131 Slater street, who has been an invalid for the past six months or more, took her life while in a state of mental aberration, shooting herself through the heart with a revolver bullet. Coroner Wright was called in, and after an investigation decided that under the circumstances it was not necessary to hold an inquest. The position of the body and of the weapon were, it was considered, sufficient evidence that the deed had been committed by the victim's own hand. The deceased lady was between 38 and 40 years of age. Her health had been failing rapidly of late.  In her room was found a short note haying she had no further use of life and therefore intended to get out of it.

 

DILLON Edmond Dillon, a farmer, was knocked down and gored to death by a bull at Guysboro yesterday. He was in the act of tying the bull up when the animal became enraged and turned on him. His daughter, a young woman, ran to the rescue and succeeded in securing the bull to a tree, but too late to save her father. The victim was 74 years old.

 

ADAMS A telegram was received here last Thursday morning announcing the death of Thomas Adams of Barton street east, mate on the "Clara Youell", at Fairhaven. Later information gives the following particulars. The "Clara Youell" left


Toronto on Wednesday morning for Fairhaven; About six in the evening while the crew were at supper, Adams, who was on the roof of the cabin, slipped and fell overboard. A seaman named Norton threw a line to him, but he missed it. The boat was lowered and the captain and a sailor pulled to his rescue, but when they had almost reached him, he went down. Considerable search was made but without avail. Adams was about 50 years of age and leaves a wife and a large family. The accident occurred at Thirty-Mile Point and a few miles from shore.

 

July 31, 1889

 

FARRELL Died in this city, on Tuesday, July 30, Leo Maitland, infant son of John and Millie Farrell, aged 5 months and 7 days. Funeral will take place from the residence of his grandparents, 50 Locke street south, on Thursday, at 9 a.m., to Rock Bay cemetery. Friends will please attend.

 

Ailes Died on July 30, Oswald Ewen, infant son of James and Julia Ailes, aged 1 year and two days. Funeral will take place from his parents' residence, 186 Emerald street north, at 3:30 o'clock Wednesday afternoon.

 

CLEMENS  (Brantford) George Clemens, aged thirteen, of West Brantford, was drowned while bathing in the river this afternoon. His body was soon recovered but life was gone.

 

Harcourt  (Toronto) The funeral of the late George Harcourt, who died so suddenly in Chicago last Friday, took place this afternoon.

 

WOODS  (Toronto) A very old man named John Woods was run over and instantly killed this morning while crossing the C.P.R. track on Christie street. Deceased had lived in Toronto for forty years and was said by his friends and claimed by himself to be 102 years old. An inquest will be held by Coroner Duncan.

 

GRENIER (Montreal) Adolphe Grenier, son of Mayor Grenier, died to-day after a long illness. He was 34 years of age and a man of great promise.

 

Coveny On Thursday last Matthew Coveny of Dover, one of the oldest residents, was drowned in Little Bear Creek, a stream that crosses his lot, twelve miles from here. It is surmised that he attempted to cross on some logs which rolled and he fell under them. Life was quite extinct when he was discovered. Mr. Coveny was about 60 years of age and a very highly respected citizen. Mr. Coveny has left his house about two p.m. and crossed the bridge to go to a field where the men were stacking straw. He went along the bank until he came opposite the barn and it is supposed he heard the colts that were shut up there making a noise and he attempted to cross on the timbers and fell in.


August 1, 1889

 

NICKERSON Died at his late residence, 24 Hunter atreet east, on July 31, Jesse Nickerson, aged 75 years. Funeral Friday, August 2, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Jesse Nickerson, one of Hamilton's earliest merchants, died Wednesday evening at the residence of his daughter, Mrs. L. Boyle, 24 Hunter street east.  He had a lingering painful sickness for about three months. His father was a U.K. Loyalist who settled in Liverpool, N.S., where the deceased was born on June 24, 1814. The family moved to Belle Isle Bay, St. John's river, a few years afterward. Mr. Nickerson came to Hamilton in 1834 and opened a jewellery store at 10 James street north where he remained in business for about twenty years. In 1864 he retired.from business, and until two years ago when he returned to Hamilton he lived with his sons and daughters in St. John, N.B. and Iowa. After his return he lived with his eldest daughter, Mrs. Boyle. The deceased had three children, One of the sons, Rev. David Nickerson, is a chaplain in the British army station at Manchester. The other one, Harry Nickerson, is a successful jeweller in Moncton, N.B. Mrs. Nickerson is still living.

 

EAUL (Montreal) George Eaul, the steward of the "Vancounver" went in swimming this evening and was drowned.  He was a native of Liverpool.

 

SABLE  (Montreal) Joseph Sable, a- longshoreman, aged 30, fell down the hold of the schooner "Pomeranian" to-night and sustained injuries from which he died while being taken to the hospital.

 

August 2, 1889

 

ADAMS On Wednesday evening an aged woman named Mrs. Adams was fatally burned by the explosion of a lamp at Jerseyville. Mrs. Adams was the widow of the late Nicholas Adams, a former well known resident of Ancaster township. She was alone in the house at the time and the first indication of the shocking accident was conveyed to the neighbours by observing the house to be on fire. Her son was visiting at a neighbour's house and he in company with those living near at once started for his mother's house. When they got there Mrs. Adams was found lying on the floor in the kitchen unconscious and her clothes had been nearly burned off by the fire which had apparently originated in the explosion of a lamp. The fire was quickly extinguished but too late to save the old lady's life and she died shortly afterward. Mrs. Adams was 75 years of age and had been in rather feeble health for some time. She leaves one son and one daughter.


MCBRIDE  (Toronto) John McBride, wholesale fruit merchant of 65 Colborne street, was drowned in the bay this afternoon and his body was picked up this evening at the foot of Scott street. It is feared that it was a case of suicide as the deceased had been in a state of despondency and had been much troubled in mind lately. He was 42 years old and leaves a family.

 

August 3, 1889

 

MCCONNELL Died at the residence of his son-in-law, G. A. Black, 35 Park street south, city, on August 2, Rev. S. McConnell, in his 79th year. Funeral from his late residence, to G.T. railway, on Monday at 8 o'clock a.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

HUTTON Died at the residence of her brother, H. Hutton, 46 West avenue south, on August 2, Catharine Hutton. Funeral private, Saturday, August 3, at 2 p.m.

 

HESS Died in Barton township, on August 1, David Hess, in the 8?th year of his age. Funeral takes place from the residence of his son-in-law, Daniel Gallagher, on Sunday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

There died in Barton township on Thursday one of the oldest residents in the person of David Hess who quitted this life in his 87th year. Mr. Hess was born in Barton, being the son of one of the original settlers who took up a large tract of land on the mountain above the city. The deceased gentleman never occupied any public office, but was exceedingly popular among his neighbours. He leaves one son, now a resident of Bay City, Michigan, and three daughters: Mrs. Daniel Gallagher, Mrs. James Dores, and Mrs. Daniel Young. The funeral will take place from the residence of Mr. Gallagher, Spring Farm, on Sunday, at 2 o'clock.

 

JOHNSTON (Belleville) William Johnston of this city, river driver, was drowned yesterday in the Trent above Trenton after breaking a jam of logs.

 

EWING  (Collingwood) The body of William Caven Ewing, eldest son of Rev. Robert Ewing, of this town, arrived here to-day from Sturgeon Falls where he was drowned while bathing on Wednesday last. He was employed at mission work at that place.

 

NICHOLL David Nicholl, aged 77, died at the Elgin House of Industry on Tuesday evening. He was admitted two years ago from Port Bruce in the last stages of cancer from which he had suffered for twenty-one years. Since becoming an inmate the disease which was located in his face had continued to spread until not only his mouth and cheek has been eaten away but two months ago he became totally blind, both eyes having been eaten out of their sockets by the loathsome disease. Death was a relief in his case.


GREEN (Toronto) William Green, a middle-aged man, carpenter for Medlar & Arnot, met with a fatal accident this afternoon. He was working on the elevated railway at the foot of Church street and was knocked over by a backing car, falling to the road beneath, a distance of twenty-seven feet. He was taken to the hospital and died in a few hours.

An inquest was held in the evening when it was adjourned till next week.

 

August 5, 1889

 

LEBLANC Died in this city, on August 2, Isaac LeBlanc, aged 39 years. Funeral took place on Sunday.

 

DALY Died at El Paso, Texas, on July 29, Hugh Daly, eldest son of D. Daly, London, Ontario, in his 39th year. Funeral will take place from James Dwyer's undertaking establishment, 124 James street north, on Tuesday, August 6, at 9:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

FERGUSON (Toronto) Charles L. Ferguson, of the law firm of Ferguson, Ferguson, & O'Brien, died at his residence, 92 Peter street, last evening after a long illness. The deceased was born in London, Ontario, in 1857.

 

MCDERMOTT  (Halifax) The body of Captain McDermott of Montague, P.E.I., was found in the dock at North Sydney yesterday. He was in charge of a pink and is supposed to have drowned. The inquest had not yet concluded.

 

ORMAN (Halifax) Three seven-year-old boys went bathing this forenoon. One, William Orman, was drowned.

 

ELLISON (Halifax) Mrs. Marjory Hillson, of Amherst, is dead. She was a half-sister of Sir Charles Tupper.

 

LABELLE  (Montreal)  Captain Labelle, M.P. for Richilieu, died this evening at Sorel at half past six of inflammation of the lungs. All the ships in the harbour here are flying their flags at half-mast in honour of his memory. He was at one time captain of one of the boats of the Richilieu & Ontario Navigation Company, and latterly traffic manager, and a well known figure in shipping and political circles.

 

CORBETT (Halifax) A cablegram announces the death in England of Mrs. F. A. Corbett, wife of a prominent Halifax business man and daughter of the late John Esson.

 

MCPHERSON Judge McPherson, senior judge of the county of Grey, died at his residence in Owen Sound at 2 o'clock Sunday morning. The funeral will take place on Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock.


DALY The body of the late Hugh Daly, formerly Michigan Central dispatcher at St. Thomas, is expected to arrive here to-day and will be buried at the Rock Bay cemetery.  Daly was an old Hamilton boy, his parents formerly residing on King William street, but are now in London. The deceased died at El Paso, Texas, on July 29, of consumption. He was a well known railway man. He was conductor of the train which in 1884 took the Vanderbilt party from Amherstburg to St. Thomas, 111 miles in 109 minutes.

 

August 6, 1889

 

BORNETT Died in this city, on August 4, of heart disease, Eugene Bornett, in the 51st year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, 101 Picton street east, on Tuesday, at 8:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

A very sudden death occurred yesterday afternoon before three o'clock at 101 Picton street east. Eugene Bornett, aged 51, engineer at the Hamilton Glass Works, having made arrangements to attend the funeral of Isaac LeBlanc, 32 Macaulay street west, went there in company with J. R. Latremouille, Antoine Audette, and Michael Braden about 2:30. After viewing the remains of his girlfriend, he came outside and was observed to lean against the picket fence, holding on with both hands, while his body trembled. He was urged by his friends to abandon the idea of going to the funeral and return home, but he replied that he would be all right in a minute or two. However he got worse instead of better and he was placed in a cab and driven home. While on the way he went into a swoon and never spoke afterward. He was lifted from the cab and on to a grass plot in front of the house while Mr.Latremouille hastened for a doctor and a priest. Before either arrived he had breathed his last, but Dr. Mullen upon his arrival at being told the circumstances of the case gave it as his opinion that death resulted from Heart disease. Deceased was in his usual health yesterday morning and attended mass at St. Mary's cathedral at 10:30 a.m. He complained at times of a severe pain in his left side. Mr. Bornett was a widower and leaves no family of his own. An adopted daughter whom he reared from a child to young womanhood lived with him. He was a member of St. Vincent de Paul society and the Catholic Mutual Beneficial Association. Deceased had been a resident of Hamilton for twenty-three years and was much respected by his employers and a large circle of friends.

 

LLOYD Died in this city, on August 5, James Lloyd, a native of Staffordshire, England, in his 53 rd year. Funeral from his late residence, 158 Hess street north, on Wednesday, August 7. Friends and acquaintances will please take notice.

 

LEAVERS Died in this city, on August 4, George Leslie, only son of Martha and George Leavers, aged 15 months and 10 days. Funeral on Tuesday, at 4 p.m., from 339 Jackson street west.


Mitchell Died at 'The Pines', Aldershot, on August 4, John, infant son of John and Priscilla Mitchell. Funeral from Aldershot, on Tuesday, August 6, at 1 o'clock.

 

RYERSON Died in this city, at No 96 Tom street, on August 5, Stuart Eric, infant son of James and Meda- Ryerson aged 1 year and 2 months. Funeral this (Tuesday) afternoon at 4 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CUNNINGHAM About 1:30 o'clock yesterday the body of a little boy named George Cunningham was found in the water at the foot of Macnab street near McIlwraith's dock. The little fellow was about three years of age. He was the son of Thomas Cunningham, a driver for Mcllwraith who lives near the wharf. The boy was playing about the wharf with some other youngsters when he fell in and was drowned before help arrived. The body was found floating in the water by a Mrs. Doyle who at once gave the alarm at Brown's wharf and the body was recovered.

 

BASINET (Montreal) The name of the man who was killed yesterday

on the Grand Trunk Railway at St. Henri is ascertained to be Flavien Basinet of that place. An inquest is now in progress.

 

MCLAREN Mrs. Andrew McLaren, who has been out visiting at the residence of Mr. Foster, Georgetown, for some time, was in her usual health on Thursday evening.  On Friday morning the unfortunate lady made a misstep at the head of the stairs, fell to the bottom, and received injuries as caused her death.

 

KINSELLA On Thursday about 3 p.m. the body of a man named Patrick Kinsella was discovered lying in Ramsford's grove near the railway at Goderich. Constable Yule was notified and he and Dr. Whitely proceeded to the place and examined the corpse. The doctor did not think an inquest necessary. Kinsella was an inoffensive elderly man in destitute circumstances and unable to work owing to ill health. He formerly lived in the neighbourhood of St. Augustine. He was last seen alive on Sunday week and was then walking towards the grove. The body was found in an advanced state of decomposition.

 

August 7, 1889

 

LUMSDEN Died in this city, on August 6, at 164 Queen street north, Hamilton, William Lumsden, aged 67 years, a native of the county of Wexford, Ireland, and for many years a resident of Burford township. Funeral from the Grand Trunk on Thursday by early train to Norwich, Ontario.

 

DANIEL Died at Toronto, on Monday, August 5, A. J. Daniel, son-in-law of ex-Alderman Field of this city. Funeral will take place from 211 Robert street, Toronto, on Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock.


August 8, 1889

 

DAVIS Died suddenly at Buffalo, August 7, Walter Davis, aged 38 years, son of Mr. Samuel Davis of this city. Funeral from the residence of his father, 44 East avenue south, on Friday, at 3 p.m.

Good-natured Walter L. Davis is no more. He was over at Buffalo attending the big races there yesterday when he dropped dead. The news was received here last evening and was a great surprise as the deceased was the picture of health when he left. Around the hotels and in sporting circles little else was talked about last night and his death was everywhere regretted. Few men were better known or more popular that deceased. For years he and his brothers have been the lessees of the James street market. The writer had a conversation with the deceased shortly before he left for Buffalo.  He was then in the best of health and was in excellent spirits. Samuel Davis, Jr, his brother, W. Henderson, and James Burgess went to Buffalo with him. Mr. Henderson was with him shortly before his death in the grandstand where they sat watching the races. The deceased was rather restless and was not contented to remain in the stand, preferring to walk around among the crowd. He left Mr. Henderson sitting there.  Shortly afterward the latter met him and Walter complained about not feeling well.  Without any warning he fell to the grass.  Mr. Henderson went to look for the deceased's brother.  When he returned he found Samuel Davis, Jr, and several doctors trying to revive him but their efforts were of no avail and he died ten minutes afterward. The cause of death was thought to be heart disease. The deceased was 38 years old and unmarried. He was born in Hamilton where he lived all his life. He was the second son of Samuel Davis and brother of James, Samuel, Jr., and Horace M. Davis. He always took a great interest in all kinds of sporting, his favourite sport being horse racing. He was kindhearted and good natured and made friends wherever he went. The body was brought here this morning. The funeral will take place on Friday afternoon.

 

CASMAN (Yarmouth, N.S.) A remarkable and fatal accident happened here last night. A ball had become lodged in a thirty-two pounder cannon in the drill shed and it was resolved to dislodge it with a small quantity of powder inserted through the touch-hole. Upon the weapon being discharged, the shot tore through a heavy rolled up gymnasium mattress, through the doors of the rifle rack, and entered the back of Wilson's stable where stableman James Casman was cleaning a horse, struck him a glancing blow, and broke his neck. It then passed through four heavy board stall partitions before it was spent. The effect produced was out of all keeping with the amount of powder used and many believe that those who put the ball in put some powder in first.


LAIDLAW (Toronto) George Laidlaw, the well known railway promoter, died at his residence at Fort Balsam Lake this morning.

 

MACMURCHY  (Toronto) The funeral of Mrs. MacMurchy, wife of the principal of the collegiate institute, took place this afternoon from Mr. MacMurchy's residence on Sherbourne street. The funeral procession was very long and included the majority of the high school teachers now in the city on examination business, and also a line of lads from the boys' home of the board of management  of which the deceased was a member. Rev. J. Carmichael conducted the service.  It was supposed that Mrs. MacMurchy's death was owing to apoplexy and not to drowning as at first stated.

 

MARVYN  (Toronto)  P. Marvyn, an old man who has been employed for many years in connection with the Northern elevator, tumbled into the bay and was drowned before assistance could reach him.

 

SPIERS  (Toronto) Mary Spiers, the girl who was found yesterday morning suffering from the effects of poison, supposed to have been administered by herself, died to-night at the hospital. An inquest will be held to-morrow.

 

HICKS  (Toronto) An inquest is to be held to-morrow on the body of James Hicks, a plasterer living over the Don, who died this morning under rather suspicious circumstances. Tuesday afternoon he was working at a building on Duchess street. Shortly after dinner after drinking from his dinner pail, he was seized with cramps and symptoms generally of poisoning. He was taken home and died next morning.  Paris green is supposed to have been contained in the dinner pail. Charles Cole, aged 45, and Arthur Hicks, aged 17 years, who live at Little York, were arrested late in the day, charged with being concerned in Hicks's death. The dead man and Arthur Hicks were cousins. An analysis of the contents of the stomach of the deceased showed 'rough on rats' poison and some of the same poison was found on Hick's person.

 

O'NEILL  (Ottawa)  J. O'Neill, the victim of Saturday's street railway accident, died to-day.

 

LESSARD  (Quebec) A farmer of St. Leon by the name of Joseph Lessard, while in a fit of temporary insanity, threw himself into a well and was drowned. A few mintues before the occurrence he left his house in company with wife for a short walk, but they had not gone far when he suddenly took a fancy to commit suicide. He took off his hat, placed it on the fence, then quietly divested himself of his overcoat and disappeared. The act was so quickly done that his wife had not time to prevent him. She at once gave the alarm and search was made for the body, but when taken up it was found that life was extinct. The deceased was highly esteemed by all who knew him. He was a


councillor in the parish and seemingly in good circumstances. No cause can be given for his action.

 

FINLAY  (Simcoe) The death occurred here to-day of William Finlay, one of the oldest residents of Norfolk county. Mr. Finlay was born in Quebec 81 years ago and came to this place in 1833. He was for years actively engaged as a merchant, miller and distiller, and acquired a competency.  He was at one time colonel of the Norfolk militia.

 

August 9, 1889

 

WEST. Died at 5 Nightingale street, city, on August 7, Albert Stanley, infant son of C. A. and Mary A. West. Funeral took place yesterday.

 

CARMICHAEL Died at Dagger Springs, Va., Margaret Rose, infant daughter of Rev. Hartley and Bessie Carmichael, aged 3 months.

 

EVANS Died on Thursday morning, August 8, Nellie, eldest daughter of Frank and Letty Evans, aged 11 years. Funeral from her parents' residence, 158 Locke street north, on Friday, at 4:30 p.m.

 

MOWAT Died at 61 Erie avenue, on August 7, Andrew, eldest son of George and Ellen Mowat, aged 2 years and 6 months. Funeral Friday, at 3O0 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

August 10, 1889

 

HOODLESS Died at 55 East avenue south, John Harold, youngest son of John and Adelaide Hoodless, aged 14 months. Funeral at 4 o'olock p.m., Saturday, Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DAVIES Died suddenly at Waterdown, August 8, Thomas Davies, aged 16 years, youngest son of Mr. David Davies. Funeral on Saturday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

LITTLE  (Teeswater) A sad drowning accident occurred here this afternoon. Two boys, Robert, aged 9, and John, aged 12, sons of Robert E. Little, whose farm adjoins Andrew Little's mill dam, are supposed to have gone out on a raft. From the position of the bodies when recovered it appears as though the smaller boy fell into the water, and his brother in trying to save him was also drawn in. The first heard of the accident was when their little sister was sent to find them. She saw their hats floating in the water and ran to the mill and gave the alarm. The father was away at one of the neighbours thrashing. In a short time a number of villagers were searching. Some slight hopes were entertained for the older boy when taken out of the water, but the doctor failed to resuscitate him.


August 12, 1889

 

SKINNER Died at 7 Robinson street, August 10, Stephanie Agnes, Infant daughter of Hugh R. and Marie Skinner. Funeral private.

 

HARLEY Died in Saltfleet, on Sunday, August 11, Margaret Cassidy Harley, aged 44 years, a native of county Monaghan, Ireland. The funeral will leave her late residence for Rock Bay cemetery on Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

 

ANDERSON Died at 39 Smith avenue, this city, August 11, Grace Helen Anderson, daughter of John and Helena Anderson, aged 13 months. Funeral from above address at 2 o'clock to-day (Monday) August 12. Friends and acquaintances please accept this Intimation.

 

MOSSMAN Died at his late residence, No 13 Gore street, on August 10, Mark Mossman, a native of Comley Bank, ----- , Edinburgh, Scotland, in his 80th year. Funeral to-morrow (Tuesday), at 2 p.m.  Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DALEY  (Toronto) Arthur Daley of D'Arcy street was drowned Saturday afternoon whilebathing at Centre Island with other boys. He got out beyond his depth. Some gentlemen swimming near came to their assistance and saved all the boys as they thought, but when too late it was discovered that one of them was missing. The body was found shortly afterward.

 

WILLIAMS  (Montreal) Capt. Shurman of the dredge "Nightingale" reported at the police station to-night that his nightwatchman, John Williams of Quebec, fell overboard during the night and was drowned. The body had not yet been recovered.

 

O'MALLEY  (Halifax) A two-year-old girl named O'Malley ate a package of insect powder on Friday and died last night from the effects of the poison. The package had been carelessly left within her reach. The child's father is employed on the Intercolonial Railway here.

 

JARVIS  (Peterborough) At Buckhorn this morning a young man named Richard Jarvis lost his life by drowning in the lake. The young man was formerly of Port Hope, but for some time past had been employed as a clerk at the Croft House here. A companion. Ed Welsh, of Peterborough had a narrow escape. He had sustained Jarvis who could not swim until he himself was exhausted.

 

August 13, 1889

 

JONES  (Gananoque) On Saturday John Jones, an Englishman who works as a labourer in the employ of C. B. Rogers, builder, of Gananoque, was drowned in the Gananoque river while bathing.


A letter, dated 1888, found among his effects was from a brother in Indiana which is all that is known of his relatives.

 

SEWELL  (Quebec) A despatch received from Dept island to-day brings the melancholy news of the rather sudden death of Horace Sewell, son of the late Dr. James Sewell and brother of Dr. Colin Sewell of this city.

 

CRAWFORD (Mackay, Ont) At 6:30 this evening a man named Bryce Crawford, employed by O. Dufoe in rolling logs in the Ottawa river near this place, was killed by a large stone weighing two tons falling from the bank of the river and crushing him. His fellow employees were unable to move the stone and had to go two miles for help. In the meantime the poor fellow was screaming in agony and died in that position before help came. The deceased lived at Des Joachims. He was married and had one child.

 

August 14, 1889

 

POTTER Died in this city, on August 12, Edward Potter, aged 21 years.  Funeral from Blachford's undertaking rooms on Wednesday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

KEAYS Died in this city, on August 13, Robert Fisher Keays, in the 67th year of his age. Funeral service on Wednesday, at 3 p.m., from the residence of Mrs. Baw, 65 Bay street south.

 

BUTTLER Accidentally killed at Beeton Junction, on August 12, 1889, William A. Buttler, youngest son of Mrs. S. Buttler, aged 19 years. Funeral from his mother's residence, 89 Markland street, west of Locke street, on Wednesday afternoon, at 4 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

Among the passengers on the excursion from this city to Orillia yesterday were Mrs. Sarah Buttler, a poor widow residing at 172 Markland street, and her two sons, William and David. They had taken advantage of the cheap rates to pay a visit to the eldest boy who is in the Orillia asylum. When the train was between Beeton and Cookstown, William Buttler and his brother and a youth named Winton were out on the platform of a car sporting about and tossing 'conversation' lozenges to some girls inside the car.  Suddenly when neither of his companions were looking at him, William fell off the step of the car. He was witnessed by Winton just as he was disappearing and he informed David Buttler who ran into the car and told his mother. It took some time to convey the alarm to conductor C. W. Flanders who was in charge of the train, and before it was stopped the train had run about two miles. In the meantime some section men who were working on the track and saw the young man fall came up and found the body lying by the rail with the head cut off completely and portions of the brain and skull


strewn along the track.

When the train backed up to the spot the mother of the deceased pressed through the crowd and insisted on reaching the spot despite kindly efforts to keep her away. The other boy also came up and on seeing the mutilated corpse fainted and had to be taken into the car. This, however, diverted his mother's attention upon the brother. The body was taken to Cookstown and brought to the city on the 9:30 mail train and undertaker Blachford took charge of it.

The young man who was killed was nineteen years of age and worked at the Ontario Rolling Mills Co. of this city. He was the sole support of his widowed mother.  Several members of the Irish Protestant Benevolent Society on the train raised a subscription of $44.75 for Mrs. Buttler, $5 of which was contributed by the members of the Olympic lacrosse club of Milton.  This was handed to the widow who was deeply affected by this kind act.

 

ROBERTSON  (Brantford) William Robertson, shoemaker from Belleville, aged about 60, with two companions went in the Grand river about two miles south of Brantford last evening to bathe. They could not swim and Robertson walked out into the deep water and was carried away and drowned.  His companions were unable to assist him.

 

ROCHETTE  (Quebec)  One of the oldest residents of St. Augustine, Joseph Rochette, died suddenly at his residence at the age of seventy-nine.

 

August 15, 1889

 

BURNETT Died in Milton, Ontario, on August 13, Rev. Robert Burnett, aged 66 years. Funeral on Friday, august 16, will leave N. & N.W. Railway station at 11 a.m. for the cemetery. Friends and acquaintances well please accept this intimation.

Rev. Dr. Burnett died at Milton yesterday morning of inflammation of the bladder.  He had been sick only a few days. The deceased divine was very much esteemed by a large circle of friends in this city where he spent so many years in the ministry.  Dr. Burnett was some sixteen or eighteen years ago pastor of the old St. Andrew's church (now St. Paul's), James street.  He was known from one end of Ontario to the other as a horticulturist and floriculturist and carried off innumerable prizes from exhibitions. The remains will be brought to the city for interment.

 

KINSTER Died in this city, on August 14, James Kinster, aged 52 years. Funeral from his late residence, 306 James street north, Friday, at 1:20 p.m. to Waterdown cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.


JAMIESON  (Toronto) The suicide of Tuesday has been virtually identified as James Jamieson, a shoe cutter, who has been missing from home for a day or two and who has been observed by his relatives to be in a low-spirited condition for some time past. The body has not been discovered, but the drowned man identified by his hat.

 

MULHOLLAND  (Quebec) Andrew Mulholland, plumber and gas-fitter, died suddenly this afternoon at his residence on St. Michael street.  He became unconscious after taking his dinner and died almost immediately.

 

DESBIENS  (Quebec) A labourer named Wilfred DesBiens, who was for three years a member of the garrison at the citadel, died on Friday last at Millevaches where he had gone in the hope of recovering his health.  His wife, who remained in Quebec, died here on Monday. The three children thus find themselves orphaned and entirely destitute.

 

WALKER  (Paspebiac, Que)  Colonel Walker of London, Ontario, came with some friends two weeks ago to fish at Grand River, Quebec.  He was struck with paralysis on August 8 and died this evening at J. Carberry's, Grand River.  Mrs. and Miss Walker arrived by the steamer "Admiral" this afternoon but were too late to be recognized by the sufferer who died about two hours after their arrival.

 

August 16, 1889

 

SMEDLEY (Toronto) William Smedley, contractor,of Smedley & Co., died yesterday at midnight, aged 50 years.

 

COTE  (Quebec) A veteran of the war of 1812 named Joseph Cote, dit Forgeron, of 8t. Ferdinand de Megantic, Halifax, has just died at the uge of 93 years.

 

SMITH  (Stirling) Walter Smith, a school teacher, was killed here this morning by a freight train west of the station about twelve o'clock. He was struck by the engine while sitting on the track.  He was terribly mangled.

 

MCKINLAY (Georgetown) A. C. McKinlay, L.D.S., surgeon and dentist of this place, died suddenly at New York last night while on his way home from the old country where he had gone for his health. He was a prominent citizen and an active member of the village council. He was always foremost in every movement that was calculated to advance the interest of the municpality, was very successful in his profession, and an active member of the Baptist church.  He leaves a wife and two children.



August 17, 1889

 

MITCHELL Died at the residence of her brother-in-law, Thomas Nixon, 345 James street north, on Friday August 16, Mary Jane Mitchell, aged 65 years.  Funeral will leave the above address on Saturday at 6 a.m. for Streetsville.

 

WARREN Died in this city, on August 16, Edward Warren, in the 86th year of his age.  Funeral will leave his late residence, 91 Catherine street south, Sunday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances please attend.

 

DUNLOP  (Toronto) Robert Dunlop, 282 King street east, fell downstairs and fractured his skull this afternoon.  He died at the hospital later in the day.

 

August 19, 1889

 

STONEMAN Died on August 17, Charles Percy Stoneman, printer, aged 24 years.  Funeral from his father's residence, 43 Victoria avenue north, at 9:30 Monday, August 19. Friends will please attend.

Charles Percy Stoneman, a young printer, well known in this city, died at the hospital from a glandular swelling of the neck.

 

DOUGLAS  Died on Sunday, August 18, Charlotte, relict of the late Thomas Douglas, in the 81st year of her age.  Funeral from her late residence, Burlington Plains, on Tuesday, at 2 o'clock p.m.

 

SHARP Died at Wilmington, Delaware, on Sunday, August 18, Phoebe, wife of John Sharp, late of this city, aged 22 years.

 

DAMPIER Died on Sunday, August 18, Richard Dampier, aged 31 years. Funeral from Blackford undertaking rooms, to-morrow (Tuesday) morning at 9 o'clock.

 

SHERWIN Died on Sunday, August 18, John F. Sherwin, late of Liverpool, England,  aged 28.  Funeral from the residence of his brother-in-law, F. M. Wallace, 23 Young street, Tuesday, August 20, at 10 a.m. Please omit sending flowers.

 

PECK  (Shelburne)  O. R. Peck, president of the Ontario Pump Company, Toronto, met with an accident while raising the first bent of the tower of the Shelburne waterworks yesterday afternoon which resulted in his death at 6:30 this evening.

 

GUNN  (London) A sad and fatal accident occurred Wednesday evening to the oldest son of John Gunn of the second concession of North Oxford about a mile and a half from Thamesford. George Dye who lives on an adjoining farm was engaged in thrashing and Mr. Gunn was assisting him. They had to draw water for the engine and had borrowed a neighbour's cans for the purpose.


About 6 o'clock the lad accompanied by his brother was returning to empty the cans and while going down Kerr's hill the horses suddenly started and Robbie, who was seated on one of the cans, was thrown to the ground and instantly killed, his neck being broken in the fall.  The younger boy remained on the wagon and the horses ran for home and on arriving there jumped the gate into the yard, throwing the boy off but not injuring him.

 

August 20, 1889

 

BRADFIELD Died at Detroit, on August 18, William Bradfield, formerly of this city, and brother of Mrs. Thomas Buttle, Hughson street north, aged 55 years.  Funeral takes place from his late residence, 73 Franklin street, Detroit, on Tuesday, at 2:30 p.m.

 

NIVEN Died peacefully at Dalveen, by Huntingdon,  Quebec, on August 12, Jessie Kennedy, wife of the Rev. Hugh Niven, in the 53rd year of her age.

 

GARNETT  (Toronto)  James Garnett of 41 Prince street was kicked by a horse last Sunday and was taken to the hospital where he remained until Friday. On that day he was taken home and on Saturday he died.

 

August 21, 1889

 

SIMCOE Died in this city, on August 19, Richard Simcoe, aged 63 years and 7 months, formerly of Methwold, Norfolk, England. Funeral will leave his late residence, 96 Simcoe street east, at 9 o'clock Wednesday morning.  Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

CHOATE: Died at his late residence, on Tuesday, August So, Thomas Choate, clerk of the township of Glanford, in his 69th year; Funeral will take place on Thursday, August 22, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

MELVILLE  (Collingwood) Andrew Melville, an old resident who has been largely interested in milling, lumber, and commercial industries, died suddenly to-day.

 

EMERY  (Brantford) A serious accident occurred to-day at the agricultural works of A. Harris, Son & Co.  Henry Emery and Samuel Priddle were employed at one table running emery wheels. The wheel which Emery was running flew to pieces, one of the pieces striding him on the head from the effects of which he died in half an hour.  His mate, Samuel Priddle, was struck by a piece in the abdomen, badly hurt, but it thought not seriously. Emery leaves a wife and child.

 

ROLSTON About 3 o'clock on Monday morning a man named Philip


Rolston who worked at Simmons' livery stable near the corner of King and Caroline streets was taken to the hospital by the patrol wagon.  He was insensible and seemed to be in a fit. He died at 12 o'clock that night and the police are making inquiries with a view to holding an inquest.  Dr. Crosthwaite says that the man died of delirium tremens.

 

August 22, 1889

 

FERGUSON Died in this city, on August 20, Charlotte, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Ferguson, Regina, aged 3 months. Funeral from the residence of M. Freeman, Esq., Main street east to-morrow, Thursday, at 10:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

SHEA  (Ottawa) E. Lalonde received a telegram from Rockcliffe conveying the news of the death there by drowning of James Shea of South Branch.  Mr. Shea was employed by the Upper Ottawa drive company.  No particulars have been received.  He was unmarried

 

August 23, 1889

 

MCNICHOL Died on August 22, Henry, only child of Thomas and Mary McNichol, aged -- months. Funeral to-morrow at -- a.m. from his parents' residence,  393 Hughson street north. Friends will please attend.

 

LOREE Died at Waterdown, on August 21, Maria, relict of the late John Loree, Esq., in the 83rd year of her age. Funeral from the residence of her son, Charles Sealey, Esq., Waterdown, at 3 o'clock on Saturday. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

O'LEARY  (Ottawa) A horrible accident occurred on the Canada Atlantic Railway at a few minutes to 4 o'clock this afternoon when John, the eleven-year-old son of conductor Leon O'Leary of the Canadian Pacific Railway had both his legs cut off by a train which ran over him. Young O'Leary, it seems, was on the rails when the train was approaching and not noticing it was run down and pinned under the wheels, losing both limbs. The unfortunate young man was carried into the station and his parents sent for.  He died half an hour later.

 

August 24, 1889

 

EVERETT.  (Quebec) As the ship "Ellen A. Reed" was leaving Indian Cove yesterday for sea, a seaman named Lewis Everett was sent aloft to loose the fore-topsail. Just as he reached the yard he lost his hold and fell backward into the river. He was drowned before assistance could be rendered.


Freame  (Galt)  Miss Helen S. Freame, aged 28 years, for the past seven years employed in the drygoods and clothing house of Woods & Taylor as head dressmaker, died very suddenly at her residence here this morning.  She was out driving yesterday and retired last night in good spirits. Her mother asked her at half-last six this morning how she was and immediately after replying that she felt first-rate began coughing and died within three minutes.

 

WITHERSPOON  (Belleville) R. Witherspoon, foreman in the Grand Trunk machine shop died this morning aged 25. He leaves a widow but no children.

 

August 26, 1889

 

Kilkeurse  (Ottawa)  Joseph Kilkeurse, aged 26, died at the hospital to-day from the effects of Injuries caused by falling out of a window last night.

 

Dequette,(Ottawa) A sad boating evident occurred this morning by which Mrs. Dequette,

DION  a young married woman, and Eugene Dion, son of C. Dion, military department, were  drowned.  Mr. and Mrs. Dequette and child, and Mr. and Mrs. Lemieux, with Mr. Dion, were returning from Gatineau Point in a skiff.  They went between a tug and a tow of barges. The barge struck the boat, upsetting it. The bodies have not yet been recovered.

 

MURPHY  (Trenton) About half-past two this morning a man named Patrick Murphy, formerly in the employ of S. Coyle of Belleville, was run over and killed by a train of Gilmour & Co's Railway branch running from the mills to the Grand Trunk Railway junction. As he had been drinking heavily for some time, it is supposed he lay down and fell asleep on the track as he was not seen until the train was within a few feet of him.  He has no friends living in the vicinity.

 

SUTHERLAND  (Bradford) Willie Sutherland, the eight-year-old son of Alexander Sutherland, was drowned yesterday, it is supposed accidentally, as he was last seen playing near the river during the afternoon. The body has not yet been found.

 

PATCHELL (Keswick) Edward Patchell who lives about one mile from here committed suicide last night by cutting his throat with a razor. He was about 80 years old.

 

DUNN  (Windsor)  James L. Dunn, coloured, died at his home to-day of heart disease.  Dunn has been recognized as the ablest coloured man in Windsor and was for two terms a member of the town council. He was a member of the board of education at the time of his death.  He was well-to-do and much respected.


August 27, 1889

 

BAMBERGER  Died at Abbatsford, Dundas Road, Monday, August 26, Franklin, aged 20 years, youngest and beloved son of George and Cassie Bamberger. Funeral on Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

 

THOMPSON (St. Catharines) As the barque "Valencia" was entering lock No 5 about 11 o'clock this morning a sailor named Thomas Thomson attempted to jump from the boat to the lock.  He missed his footing, falling on his chest on the lock, and was crushed to death by the barge before he could be rescued. The deceased was only twenty years of age and Captain L. A. Rush of the barge was his brother-in-law. The coroner was notified but did not deem an inquest necessary.

 

August 28, 1889

 

KINGDON Died in this city, on August 27, Abraham Lloyd, infant-son of James and Minnie Kingdon, aged 8 months.  Funeral from the parents' residence, 216 King William street,  on Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Friends please accept this notice.

 

HARRIS Died on August 27, in the sixth concession of Barton, Laura, youngest child of Richard and Teresa Harris, aged 15 months.  Funeral will take place from her parents' residence, Barton, on Thursday, August 29, at 2 p.m. to Burlington cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

LUNAN  (Toronto)  James Lunan and Joseph Stinness, carpenters, fell from a scaffold to-day while working at the Arlington Hotel. They went down forty-five feet and received very severe injuries which may prove fatal.  Both of Lunan's legs were broken.

The man, Lunan, died this evening at the hospital.

 

FOLLY  (Ottawa)  Miss Folly saw a freight train on the Canadian Pacific Railway leave the track near her home yesterday. She was so frightened at the danger of the engine demolishing the house that she fell down and died in a few minutes.

 

August 29, 1889

 

FENTON Died at the Valley Inn, on August 28, Shirley Blanche, only daughter of Alfred and Tweenie Fenton, aged 1 month and 2 weeks. Funeral on Friday at 2:30 p.m.

 

DUFFY Died in this city, on August 28, at the residence of John Vanatter, 45 Hunter street east, Eugene Duffy, aged 17 years. Funeral from his father's residence, Edward Duffy, Hall's Corners, on Friday, at 2 p.m.


HICKMAN (Montreal) A sailor named Hickman from New York while in an intoxicated condition fell from the gangway of the steamer "Greetland" and was drowned.

 

LALONDE  (Montreal) The two children of Ludger Lalonde were drowned in the canal at Valleyfield. They were driving with their father when the horse took fright and leaped into the water.

 

PILE  (St. Thomas)  William Pile, aged 72, a cripple, wandered away from home twelve days ago. Yesterday his body was found in a field half a mile from home.  His crutches had broken, rendering him powerless. He had died from starvation.

 

EDDY  (Windsor) Thomas Eddy, contractor of Toronto, attended a meeting of the Methodist church at Kingsville to consider the matter of building a fine new $20,000 edifice.  Mr. Eddy made an address,  sat down, and in a few minutes had a peculiar fit of nervous shaking.  He died before medical aid could be summoned.

 

MILLER  (St. Catharines) Richard Miller, Q.C. of Miller, Cox, & Yale, one of the oldest and most respected citizens, died suddenly here this afternoon of congestion of the lungs.

 

August 30, 1889

 

MINKLER  (Toronto) A. E. Minkler, the well known real estate dealer of No 4 King street east, died at his residence, 500 Jarvis street yesterday afternoon.  He had been sick with inflammation of the lungs and typhoid fever for three weeks, but hopes were entertained of his recovery until yesterday. Mr. Minkler was one of the best known citizens of Toronto and his death will be much regretted by all with whom he had been associated.  He leaves a wife and three children.

 

LABERGE  (Quebec) A two-year-old child of T. Laberge of St. Gideon, lake St John, was burned to death on Tuesday through playing with matches.  Its mother had left the house for a few minutes and on returning to the vicinity of her house she saw the little one enveloped in flames. Notwithstanding all she had done for the child, it died a few minutes later in dreadful suffering.

 

August 31, 1889

 

GRIFFIN Died in this city, on August 29, William Griffin, a native of Irvine, Ayrshire, Scotland, aged 42 years. Funeral from his late residence, 73 Burlington street, on Sunday afternoon, at 3:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


HILL Died in this city, on August 30, Elizabeth Ann, beloved wife of John Hill, aged 39 years. Funeral from her late residence, 147 Breadalbane street, Sunday, September 1, at 2 o'clock.  Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

 

PATTERSON Died in this city, at the residence of her son, Samuel Magill, No 13 Queen street south, on August 30, Catharine Charlotte Patterson, aged 76 years.  Funeral on Sunday, September 1, at 10 a.m.  Interment at Nelson village. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ELLIS  (Fenelon Falls)  Little Percy Ellis, son of W. E. Ellis, druggist of this place, was drowned yesterday while playing about the canal works.

 

CLAIRMONT  (Ottawa) Oliver Clairmont, a workman employed on the new suspension bridge across the Ottawa river, was drowned this afternoon.  He was working on one of the trestles when in some way he lost his hold and fell headlong into the boiling water, thirty feet below. When he rose to the surface he struck out for the shore but the current was too strong and he was carried down the river and under Booth & Perley's flume where he disappeared from view in the sight of his fellow workers who were unable to help him.  Clairmont was unmarried.

 

GINGRAS  (Quebec)  The body of the man killed on Wednesday afternoon by the Halifax express on the Intercolonial Railway between the lake at Beaumont and Harlake has been identified as that of Joseph Alpine Gingras, formerly of this city, but latterly living at Tomerhaw, Mexico, for the last 28 years. The deceased returned here last May and was visiting his father at St. Ubalde, county of Port Neuf.

 

FAVREAULT,(Chambly) An explosion occurred about 11:30 this morning in the

BETTIE  packing room of the Beloeil powder works, killing two men named Joseph Favreault and Samuel Bettie.

 

September 2, 1889

 

DOUGLASS Died on August 31, At his mother's residence, 94 James street north, Stuart Douglass. Funeral took place on Sunday afternoon.

 

PERISIEN  (Ottawa) Two men named Perisien were drowned while boating on the Ottawa river to-day at St. Joseph village, Russell county

 

GALIPEAU  (Montreal) Joseph Galipeau, the carter who was injured by being run over by a wagon on Friday night, has died from his injuries.


LENNON Father J. F. Lennon of Galt, formerly connected with St. Mary's and St. Patrick's churches in this city, died shortly before 2 o'clock this morning in Galt. He had been ill only a short time.  It is probable the remains will be brought to Hamilton for interment.

 

RUSSELL Sergeant James Russell, a veteran of the Royal Artillery who served in the Indian Mutiny with distinction, died at his residence, 86 Macaulay street east, on Friday.  His death was the result of a very delicate operation performed by several doctors and rendered necessary by the aneurism of a large artery in the right breast.

 

MCHENLEY  (Toronto) A. P. McHenley, principal of Coburg Collegiate Institute, died this morning at Niagara-on-the-lake from the effects of a cold contracted there during the recent session of Ontario teachers.

 

September 4, 1889

 

RIACH Died on Tuesday morning, September 3, 1889, at 188 King street east, George Riach, aged 23 years. Funeral on Thursday, September 5, at 3 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BURNS Died in this city, on September 3, Patrick Burns, aged 51 years.  Funeral from his late residence, 56 Wood street east, Thursday, at 2:30.  Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

KELLY Died on September 2, at Hamilton, John Birch Kelly, formerly of London, England.

 

WILLIAMS  (Halifax) Yesterday Samuel Williams, 19 years old, working in the Wentworth plaster quarries, was struck by a rock from a blast which had been carried an unusually long distance, and killed.

 

CAMPBELL (Halifax) A telegram was received by Customs Inspector Hill  to-day that L. G. Campbell, collector of customs at Baddock, had died on board the steamer "Harlow" at Neil's harbour this morning.  He was returning from Newfoundland.

 

ANDERSON  (Halifax) A. Anderson, a native of Norway, aged 44, died at the Victoria General Hospital of lockjaw. He was a carpenter on the steamer "Beta" and while in a row on Thursday afternoon last was hit on the left jaw bone with a capstan bar, dislocating his jaw and lockjaw set in. The "Beta" is now on her way to the West Indies.

 

ROUSSELOT  (Montreal) The funeral rites of the late Father Rousselot at the church of Notre Dame this morning was attended by at least 8000 people.  Over 150 priests attended in the


sanctuary. After the libera was chanted, the funeral procession to the Grand Seminaire was organized.  Rev. Fathers Larue and Larin were the chief, mourners, followed by about 130 other priests and by Justices Tachereau, Jette, and Loranger, Sheriff Chauveau, members of the houses of parliament,  and hundreds of others. At the Grand Seminaire his Grace Archbishop Fabre and 200 priests in retreat in the seminary received the cortege and His Grace chanted the libera once more. The remains were then placed in the crypt of the Sulpician fathers in connection with the Grand Seminaire.

 

MIDDLETON  (Brantford) Last night about midnight John Middleton, driver for the Waddington Carriage Co, walked off the north end of the unfinished bridge over the canal, south Market street, falling to the ground twenty-two feet below, and was killed. The night-watchman of Harris, Son, & Co and the Cockshutt Plough Co, saw him fall, hurried to the rescue, and summoned a physician but life was gone.  Lamps were hanging at both ends of the bridge to warn citizens of danger. An inquest will be held.

 

KELLY During carnival week an elderly English gentleman took a room at Mrs. Philip Wennesheimer’s boarding house, 165 Hughson street north.  On Monday morning about 3 o'clock one of the inmates of the house heard the gentleman breathing stertorously in his room, but the noise soon ceased. In the morning Mrs. Wennesheimer rapped at his door but got no answer, and thought the gentleman had gone out as he was in the habit of taking his meals uptown. During the day she became alarmed because the door of the room was locked.  A small boy was sent up on a shed to reconnoitre about 3 o'clock and reported that the inmate to be sleeping. He got in the window and unlocked the door when it was found that the man was dead in bed.  Mrs. Wennesheimer, as her name implies, is a German and she did not know much about her lodger a3 he was not very communicative.  She sent for Dr. Mackelcan and Dr. Olmsted and the latter recognized the deceased as John Birch Kelly, an English barrister who has been in the country for several years.  Dr. Mackelcan gave a certificate that the deceased died of apoplexy and the body was buried next day. The funeral was private. The services were conducted by Rev. G. E. Whitcombe of St. Matthew's church. The two sons of the deceased were present.  Mrs. Kelly boards at the American Hotel. It is understood that Mr. Kelly was an English barrister who came to this country several years ago, but did not practise here. He took up land near Ancaster and the family lived there until recently.

 

September 5, 1889

 

PRIELIPP Died at 474 Mary street, on September 3, Ameit, infant son of Herman and Williamina Prielipp. Funeral from the above address on Thursday, at 1:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.


MORRIS Died on Wednesday, September 4, at 107 Strachan street, Eliza, beloved wife of James E. Morris, and only daughter of Robert and Elizabeth A. Batty, aged 23 years. Funeral from above address, on Friday, at 2 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

MORRIS Died on Wednesday, September 4, at 107 Strachan street east, the infant child of James and Eliza Morris.  Funeral from above address, on Friday, at 2 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

September 6, 1889

 

PENNINGTON Died at 142 Jackson street west, on September 5, Albert, infant son of M. A. and Jennie Pennington, aged 11 days.

 

SICOTTE  (Montreal)  Justice Sicotte who has been sick for some months died to-day at St. Hyacinthe.

 

FLACK  (Halifax)  News has been received here of the death in Egypt of Andrew Flack, a Halifax man who was a sergeant in the Royal Irish Rifles.  He enlisted here and afterwards went with his regiment to Egypt where he took part in a number of engagements with the dervishes.  In one scrimmage he was wounded and enteric fever set in causing his death last month. Flack had a wife and two children.

 

WALLACE  (Caledonia) A very melancholy case of poisoning occurred in this village on Friday last in which Eliza May Wallace, nine years old, and only daughter of John Wallace who works on the section of G.T.R., met her death. It seems that Mrs. Wallace accompanied by the child went on Tuesday morning to Miss Ryan's, a neighbour, to assist in house cleaning. Shortly after two o'clock the girl got into a cupboard which was used for storing flour and other articles, and in which a piece of cheese had been placed about two weeks before with some strychnine in it for killing mice. The child got hold of the cheese and put it in her mouth before being noticed, but did not eat any. She soon complained of being sick and the mother and Miss Ryan did all in their power to relieve the child, but it died a few minutes after the doctor arrived, and within an hour of sucking the cheese.

 

September 7, 1889

 

GREEN Died in this city, on Friday, September 6, Richard Green, sailor, aged 83 years and 7 months, a native of Truro, Cornwall, England. Funeral from his late residence, 30 Guise street, on Sunday afternoon, at 3:30 o'clock. Friends respectfully invited to attend.


ROUILLARD  (Quebec)  On Tuesday night an old man, aged about 60 years, came here by the Quebec Central Railway from Portland with a number of others who were on their way to the shrine of La Bonne Ste Anne.  On Wednesday he suddenly dropped dead at Bernier's restaurant while taking his supper.  The body was taken to the morgue where an inquest was held this morning and the body identified as that of Jean Rouillard of Skoupegan, Me., a labourer aged 65 years and widower. A post mortem was made and a large piece of meat was found in the throat. A verdict of death from suffocation was rendered.

 

O'CALLAGHAN Frank O'Callaghan, lately a resident here, and brother of T. E. O'Callaghan, dropped dead in Toronto at eight o'clock Thursday morning.  Mr. O'Callaghan held the office of inspector of public works under the Ontario government and superintended the work in connection with the London Asylum and additions to the asylum at Hamilton.  He afterward moved to Toronto and was appointed inspector of the cottage asylum in Mimico.  He met with an accident during the work on the Hamilton Asylum from which he never fully recovered.

 

SOVEREIGN A young girl named Clara Sovereign died rather suddenly about half past ten o'clock on Wednesday night. She and her mother were living with Byron Markle near Black's corners adjacent to the village of Millgrove, and the girl who was about fifteen years of age was taken ill at the beginning of the week.  Nothing was thought of it, but Dr. Anderson of Millgrove who was called in said it was inflammation of the stomach.  He left some medicine for her which she took according to instructions,  but death followed the taking of a dose on Wednesday night.

Dr. McGregor of Waterdown, coroner for the district, went out to see the body and examined the medicine given the girl. He said there was nothing in the mixture whick would injure her and considered that death resulted from inflammation.

 

September 9, 1889

 

O'REILLY Died at Paris, Ontario, Suddenly of heart disease, Miles O'Reilly, Esq., M.D., youngest son of Miles O'Reilly, Esq., Q.C., aged 52 years. Funeral from his father's residence, at 3:30 p.m., on Tuesday. Friends will please accept this notice.

Word was received last night of the death of Dr. Miles O'Reilly, youngest son of the venerable Judge O'Reilly, of this city, which occurred in Paris last evening. The cause of death was heart disease but particulars could not be obtained.

The deceased was 52 years of age and during the past two years practised his profession at Preston. He was on a visit to Paris at the time of his death, having formerly resided in that town where he owns some property.  He received his medical training at Dr. Rolph's school in Toronto and had not resided in the city for the past twenty-five years, although a frequent

visitor. The deceased leaves a widow and two children who reside in New York.


RAE  (Montreal)  Jackson Rae, well known in banking and financial circles, died here to-day of heart disease.

 

LACROIX  (Montreal) A man named Lacroix was killed at St. Henri by falling off a balcony.

 

EVERETT  (Peterborough) Another fatal railway accident occurred on the line of the Canadian Pacific Railway about four miles east of this place early this morning.  Conductor Peck's special freight train left the Peterborough station at 3:30 a.m. eastward bound, and when about four miles out, the van and one car broke loose from the train.  It is supposed that the engineer on the breaking of the bell rope whistled 'down brakes'. Thomas Everett who was in the van ran out to perform his duty. , In the darkness he did not notice that the train had broken ( and rushed to his death. He fell off the end of the car between the rails and the brake beam catching his clothes dragged him about one hundred feet, as soon as possible the cars were stopped and the unfortunate man was picked up.  The train returned with him to the town and he was at once taken to the hospital where he lingered in agony till 11:30 o'clock. The young man lived at Toronto and the corpse was taken there this morning.

 

September 10, 1889

 

BOWIE  Died on Friday night, September 6, 1889, at the residence of her brother-in-law, W. H. Smith, Main street east, Elizabeth Sovereign, beloved wife of Alexander Bowie, of Nelson, and daughter of the late William N. Sovereign, aged 36 years.

 

FREED Died at Waterdown,  on Sunday, September 8, after a long and painful illness, Eliza Orr, beloved wife of Henry Freed, in the 36th year of her age.  Funeral service at her late residence at the beach, on Tuesday, at 2 p.m.

 

HOLLAND Died in Burlington, on September 9, James William, infant son of James H. and Phoebe Holland, aged five weeks. Funeral from his parents' residence, this afternoon, at 5 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation,

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Holland of 90 Peter street went out driving yesterday afternoon, taking their five- weeks-old boy with them.  The child took sick on the road and was taken into a doctor's office in Burlington where he died shortly afterward.

 

ELLIOTT (Ottawa) Joseph Elliott, groom in the employ of Mr. Reahon of Montreal, was terribly gored by a bull at Lansdowne Park yesterday.  He died at the Protestant hospital to-day.

 

WILCOX (St. Thomas) Mrs. Esther Wilcox, while returning from St. Thomas market on Saturday night, was thrown from her buggy and her skull fractured on a stone. She lived a few hours.


BROPHY  (Toronto)  Pat Brophy, a character well known around the St. Lawrence Market, died this evening in the Model lodging house from an epileptic fit.  Dr. Johnston will hold an inquest.

 

BEAUDRY  (Belleville)  John Beaudry, aged 16 years of the township of Radcliffe, was drowned in a small lake in that township on Tuesday last.

 

September 11, 1889

 

CLARK Died at the rectory, Ancaster, on September 9, Norman Johnson Clark, aged six weeks.

 

YOUNG Died in this city, on September 9, Eliza, beloved wife of I. C. Young, of St. Joseph, Mo., aged 39 years. Funeral from the residence of her brother-in-law, Joseph Fritman, 443 Macnab street north, on Wednesday, at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MILLER Died on Tuesday, September 10, at her late residence, 85 Wellington street north, Catharine Miller, relict of the late Hugh Miller,  aged 84 years.  Funeral on Thursday at 2:30 p.m.

Last evening Mrs. Catharine Miller, relict of the late Hugh miller and mother of Constable George Miller, died at her late residence, 85 Wellington street north, aged 84 years. The deceased was born in Donegal, Ireland, in 1805, and came to this country in 1851, locating in Hamilton where she resided ever since.  She leaves three sons;  Constable George Miller, one of the oldest members of the police force; Frank F. Miller, of Medicine Hat, N.W.T.; and James Miller of this city. The funeral will take place on Thursday at 2:30 p.m.

 

TINLING  (Toronto)  Dr. Johnston held an inquest this evening on the body of Alice Tinling who died at the police station last evening.  Upon Medical evidence it was decided that death resulted from a prolonged debauch. A 10-cent piece was found in one of the stockings of the dead woman.

 

MEAD  (Toronto)  Mrs. Mead, wife of Thomas Mead, market, gardener, residing at 352 Pape avenue, died this evening at the hospital from the results of a severe burning received this afternoon about three o'clock. The unfortunate woman had ignited the fire in the kitchen stove with coal oil when a tongue of flame struck the can, causing the contents to explode, the blazing oil enveloping the poor woman from head to foot in an instant. She was frightfully burned all over her body.  The eight-months-old baby was nearly suffocated with smoke. The fire gutted the house and also scorched the premises next door.

 

WILSON  (Toronto) Robert Wilson, an inspector on the board of works department, died this evening.  He had been in the


service of the city for thirty-five years.

 

Savany  (Ottawa)  Death from consumption here last night ended the tragic career of Charles Savany, a member of the legion of honour and at one time one of the leading politicians of France. The deceased came to Canada in 1884, accompanied by the wife of his ex-secretary.  Savany was 44 years of age.  He entered politics when quite young and was finally appointed deputy minister of justice. A clever, scholarly man, he won fame in the domain of literature, particularly for works on democracy and commentaries on the writing of Alex de Tocqueville. He was director of the Bank of Lyons and when the institution collapsed, fled to America to avoid arrest.  He was subsequently sentenced to five years' imprisonment. There are judgments of 8,000,000 francs against him to-day.  Before leaving Paris he fell in love with the handsome wife of his secretary. The secretary surprised them in a café and received a bullet which lodged in his pocketbook. Savany was accompanied to Canada by the erring woman who survives him. His first wife still lives in France.  Savany is regarded as the author of the Riel agitation, his writings helping to stir up the feelings of the French Canadians.  He drew pay for a government clerkship here for a time and last winter he edited Le Canadien in this city. On his deathbed last night he sent for Rev. Filaitre, O.M.I., and was reconciled with the church. The funeral takes place here to-morrow.

 

Larocque (Ottawa) P. Larocque, one of the Ottawa contingent of Nile voyageurs, died here yesterday from injuries received some days ago by falling from a rig in Lower Town.

(Ed. Note. In the late summer of 1884, Canada's Governor General received a request from the War Office to engage several hundred "Voyageurs" for service with the British army in the Sudan)

 

DALE  (Belleville) Thomas Dale, a farmer who lived hear Canifton, died suddenly yesterday from the effects of drinking ice water when overheated.

 

HACKLAND  (Paris) About half past seven this evening this town was thrown into intense excitement when it was known that George Hackland, clerk at Penman's office, and J. Moyle, clerk in the British Bank, were drowned in Penman's dam, but it proved to be Mr. Hackland only.  That was a sad enough case.  It appears that Mr. Moyle had let Hackland take his canoe to give a lady friend a row and while coming to shore for her the boat capsized, precipitating the occupant into about eight feet of water. He apparently could not swim, and losing presence of mind, sank. At eight o'clock he was taken out of the water and pronounced dead. There was no one near to rescue him.

 

September 12, 1889

 

MCKENNA Died in this city, on Wednesday, September 11, Harriet, eldest daughter of James McKenna, aged 22 years.  Funeral will take place from her father's residence, 129 Peter street, on Friday, September 13, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.


KEENAN Died in this city, on September 10, Mary Mason, widow of the late Campbell Keenan, in the 45th year of her age. Funeral will take place from her late residence, 188 Robert street, on Thursday, September 12, at 4 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

STOCK Died on September 10, at the residence of his father-in-law, Mr. John Baker, near Waterdown, J. Walker Stock, in his 35th year. Funeral on Friday, September 13, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

James Walker Stock, youngest son of Thomas Stock, collector of customs at Dundas, died shortly before midnight at the residence of his father-in-law, John Baker, near Waterdown. He had been sick for several months with a severe affection of the throat somewhat similar to that of which Emperor Frederick of Germany died.  Latterly a tube had to be inserted in his throat and allowed to remain there.  Milk has been his principal nourishment for some time past, it being impossible for him to swallow anything in the nature of solid food. On Monday night Drs. Osborne, McGregor, and McMahon were in attendance,  but nothing could be done for the patient and he gradually sank all day yesterday.  Deceased was only in his 35th year and a long career of usefulness seemed to stretch before him before being prostrated with the disease which prematurely ended his days.  He acted as assistant collector in Dundas. He was a general favourite in Waterdown where the family always resided.  County treasurer J. T. Stock is a brother of the deceased. The funeral will take place Friday afternoon at 3 o’clock.

 

RYLES, (Halifax) Two young men named Ryles and Murphy were drowned at

MURPHY  Selma, Maitland. They were out boating. The boat was found bottom up.  Neither could swim. They were aged about twenty and fifteen years respectively. Ryles was a widow's son and was his mother's chief support.

 

BENSON  (Ottawa)  On Monday near the village of Gatineau John Benson, a son of a wealthy and prominent farmer of that vicinity, met his death while at work on a farm close to his father's dwelling, cutting down wheat with a mower.  Something went wrong with the machine and while endeavouring to ascertain the cause, the horses bolted off, pulling Benson who had hold of the lines with them.  He was dragged under the heavy wheels and so badly cut about the head that he died shortly afterward.

 

DAGLEISH A dissipated resident of Brantford named Joseph Dagleish was found dead in bed yesterday. The doctor gave it as his opinion that the deceased came to his death from debility consequent on the excessive use of alcohol.

 

SPARROW Thomas Sparrow, a very old resident of Galt, passed away Sunday in his 84th year. He came to Canada from Suffolk, England, in 1832, taking up land near Berlin where he resided


some eight years, occupying during that time the position of assessor of Waterloo township. About 1840 he was appointed clerk of the Berlin division court, being one of the first occupants of that position.  He removed to Galt about 1855 and was appointed town clerk a year later which position he occupied until 1867, since which time he has lived retired.

 

September 13, 1889

 

DUNBAR Died in this city,  on September 11, Thomas a. Dunbar, aged 26 years and 3 months.  Funeral from his brother's residence, 214 Mary street, on Saturday, September 14, at 1 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

HEDLEY Died in this city, on September 12, Martha Gladys, infant daughter of Thomas and Annie Hedley, aged 1 year and 5 months. Funeral from her parents' residence, 162 Herkimer street, on Saturday, September 14, at 3:00 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GOODERHAM  (Toronto) William Gooderham, the well known philanthropist and temperance advocate, died suddenly this evening from heart disease.  He was at the exhibition this afternoon and about half past five o'clock told a niece and housekeeper who were with him that he was going downtown to keep an evening appointment. The appointment was the delivery of an address at the place known as the  'Haven', a Seaton street rescue home.  Mr. Gooderham took tea and then went to the 'Haven'. Rev. James Matheson was also at the meeting and when Mr. Gooderham had offered prayer he turned around and asked Mr. Matheson to read a passage of scripture as he felt tired himself. Mr. Matheson had just commenced readirgwhen he heard a gargling sound behind him and turning round, saw Mr. Gooderham gasping and evidently on the verge of death.  Medical aid was at once called and promptly secured, but Mr. Gooderham was already dead. He was removed to his house immediately.  Deceased was 65 years old and his wealth is reputed to be at least one million dollars. His public benefactions have always been most munificent. Although the oldest son of a family of thirteen, he refused to go into the distillery business and never had any connection with it.  On the contrary he was a consistent advocate of temperance.  Mrs. Gooderham died a few years ago, childless, and deceased never remarried.

 

GOOD  (Toronto) James Good, an old resident, died to-day aged 75 years. He is credited with building the first locomotive of Canadian manufacture.

 

MARTIN  (Toronto) Louis Kossuth Martin, aged 23, a commercial traveller and well known athlete and sporting man, died yesterday morning from the effects of a cold contracted while on a gunning expedition to Coe Hill.


Smyth  (Toronto)  A thirteen-year-old lad named Fred Smyth was drowned this evening through getting over his depth.

 

CLIFFORD Many of our citizens will regret to learn that Joseph Clifford, a long-time resident of Hamilton and foreman of the Car Works in London, and lately foreman of the Railway velocipede and car company, Kalamazoo, Michigan, died on Wednesday at that place after a six days' illness with typhoid fever. His parents who are highly respected and live on Queen street north, have the sympathy of all his old friends.

 

September 14, 1889

 

NICHOLSON Died at his residence near Waterdown, on September 13, John Nicholson, Sr., aged 73 years.  Funeral will take place on Sunday, September 15, At 2 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

VEZINA  (Quebec) A carpenter named Homer Vezina, aged 34, fell from the roof of a building to-day and was instantly killed. He leaves a wife and several children.

 

PACE  (Vienna, Ont) A sad accident, occurred at the farm of George Eveland about three miles south-east of this village on Wednesday afternoon last.  It appears that an old lady named Mrs. Margaret Pace, 78 years old, was setting fire to some brush piles when her clothing caught fire and she was burned to death. The body was horribly disfigured.

 

September 16, 1889

 

BARRETT  Died in this city, at 179 Market street, on September 13, after a long and painful illness, Elizabeth Barrett, relict of the late William Barrett, aged 50.  Her end was peace.

 

HILL Died in this city, on September 14, Isaac, infant son of John and the deceased Elizabeth Ann Hill, late residence, 147 Breadalbane street, aged 3 weeks and 2 days.

 

MCKINLEY Died, at 53 Wentworth street north, on September 14, the twin babies of John and Mary McKinley.

 

PEARCE Died in this city, on Sunday, September 15, Joseph S. Pearce, aged 50 years and 7 months, a native of London, England. Funeral from his late residence, 327 Queen street south, on Wednesday afternoon, at 3 o'clock.  Friends please accept this intimation.

 

PEIRCE Died in this city, September 15, Julia Florence Peirce, aged 11 years and 4 months.  Funeral from the residence of her mother, 45 Wellington street south, to St. Catharines, on September 16.


MITCHELL,(Halifax) News of a terrible tragedy that happened at Ship Harbour on

WEBBER Friday has just reached the city. A large number of men were in the woods hunting  for moose when one party consisting of two men named Taylor and Arrand saw at a distance what they took to be a moose.  One of them fired and immediately a fearful shriek was heard. On hurrying to the spot they found that the single shot had killed two men whom they had mistaken for a moose.  The victims were two young men named Mitchell and Webber. The shot had struck one of them in the breast and passed through and struck the other in a vital part of the neck.  Both were dead when found. An inquest commenced to-day but result is not known.

 

DAY  (Kingston) George Carr was arrested at Kingston Mills yesterday on a charge of murdering a man named Day at Delta some months ago.  Day disappeared mysteriously and Carr was suspected of doing away with him.  Ever  since Day disappeared Carr has been living with Day's wife, a son also was living with Carr and it is said he saw Carr murder his father. An older son of Day's who arrived at Delta last week from Michigan to find out what had become of his parent laid the information against Carr.

 

MONETTE  (Casselman) The body of Oliver Monette was found near here to-day in the river.  His feet were tied together and there was a bullet wound through his left arm and several cuts about the face and upper part of the body.  He was a native of this place and was 45 years of age.  He had been missing since Friday. Foul play is suspected and an inquest will be held.

 

September 17, 1889

 

WARD Died in this city, on September 16, Phebe, only child of George and Fanny Ward, aged 5 months and 11 days.  Funeral from the residence of her grandmother, 107½ Wood street east, on Wednesday at 4:30 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

 

MCCOMB Died on Sunday, September 15, at the residence of her son-in-law, Henry Crane, 38 Agnes street, Toronto, Mary Jane McComb, aged 83 years, mother of the late Thomas McComb, marble dealer, Hamilton.  Funeral from the above address at 11:30 a.m. on Tuesday, September 17, to G.T.R. Interment in Burlington cemetery, Hamilton, on arrival of the 1:45 train. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MERHARDT  (Toronto) Herman Merhardt, a German working in Davies Brewery and unmarried, committed suicide this evening by jumping off the Don bridge into the river.

 

INGLIS (Toronto) An inquest was held this evening on the body of a young man named William Inglis who died Sunday morning,


as it was alleged, from the effects of beatings he had received from Roman Catholic boys.  The deceased was the son of a protestant and there were frequent rows between him and other boys of his age in the neighbourhood.  Four witnesses were heard, the father and mother of the deceased and two medical men. There was no evidence offered to show that the deceased came to his death in the manner suggested beyond a statement made by the lad himself shortly before his death to that effect. Medical evidence showed that the deceased had come to his death from softening of the brain, hastened by a want of nourishment generally. The coroner adjourned the inquest until Thursday.

 

WATSON (Lanark)  On Friday night six or seven young men all more or less under the influence of liquor, when on their way home, stopped at the house of Margaret Robinson on the outskirts of the village.  Some of them entered the house and were in the act of committing rape on an imbecile girl about sixteen years old. Alarmed by her cries Thomas Cameron and his son who live near went to the house and ordered the men off who defied them. The young men having put out the light in the house,  the Camerons were afraid to enter and fired some shots with the intention of frightening them away.  Yesterday the body of one of the men, William Watson, was found about fifty yards from the house. An inquest is being held. Mr. Cameron and his son are among the most peaceable and law-abiding people of the community and feel their position keenly.

Later:  An inquest was held here to-day by Coroner Kellock of Perth on the Watson shooting case. The jury returned the following verdict:  That William Watson ceme to his death from a wound caused by a gun shot in the hands of Benjamin Cameron by casual misadventure.

 

CARPENTER  (Simcoe)  John B. Carpenter, one of the wealthiest and best known farmers of this province, died at his residence in the township of Townsend near this town early this morning. Deceased had been a sufferer from Bright's disease for some time but had lately been improving in health.  His death was sudden and unexpected.  He was in his 70th year.  His farm upon which he resided is known for miles around as the model farm and has frequently been described in the daily press of Canada.  It was the winner of the first gold medal given by the agricultural and arts association.  His contributions to the various funds of the Methodist church of which he was a member have for years been exceedingly liberal.  He is survived by a widow and large family of sons and daughters.

 

HOWSON  (Milton) This evening an old gentleman named Thomas Howson, a resident of Milton, was driving late into the town as the 5:35 Canadian Pacific express was coming in from Toronto. Mr. Howson was hard of hearing and it is thought he had not heard the train signal for the crossroad.  It is supposed that he was killed by being pitched out of his rig as he was thrown clear of the track.  The buggy was completely smashed and the


horse badly injured.  Deceased leaves a wife and a family of grown-up children.  One of the sons is a resident of Parkdale.

 

Etchell  (Merritton)  On Saturday when Mrs. R. Etchell, the wife of a prominent hotel-keeper, returned from Barnum's circus she was reproved by her husband for taking their little boy to the show.  She was shortly afterward detected in an attempt to drown herself and child in the canal.  On Sunday afternoon she was taken ill and confessed having taken a large quantity of 'rough on rats' having drunk it with some tea nearly two hours previously.  Several physicians were summoned, but could do nothing for the unfortunate woman who expired ten hours alter taking the fatal draught.  Mrs. Etchell was an English woman of prepossessing appearance, about 35 years of age, and highly respected.  Being of a nervous disposition she evidently brooded into a fit of despondency and under the influence committed the rash act.  Much sympathy is expressed for ber husband who suffers keenly from the sad calamity.

 

September 18, 1889

 

MEREDITH Died at Colorado Springs, on Sunday, September 1.5, Minnie E. Meredith, aged 76 years, eldest daughter of the late James S. Meredith of Dundas. Funeral from G-T.R. station, Dundas,  on Thursday, at 9:45 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MURRAY Died suddenly, on September 17, at 191 York street, David Murray, a native of Dumfries-shire, Scotland, aged 67 years. Funeral will leave the above address at 3:30 p.m. Thursday. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

David Murray, an old and respcted resident of Hamilton, died rather suddenly shortly after ten o'clock yesterday morning at his residence, 191 York street.  Deceased was taken sick during carnival week,  but recovered somewhat and was about again until Sunday last when he took to bed.  Nothing serious was apprehended, however, until this morning when he became very much worse and expired suddenly.  Dr. Leslie was in attendance  and gave the cause of death as apoplexy.

Mr. Murray was 67 years of age, a native of Dumfries-shire, Scotland, and came to Canada in 1850, taking up his residence in the city of Quebec for a while.  In 1851 he came to Hamilton and for two or three years carried on the Hamilton Gardens on Upper James street, the firm's name being Thompson & Murray. He afterward in partnership with John A. Bruce conducted the large nurseries below Cannon street where the Northern & North Western Railway freight houses and tracks are now. They were known as the Rosedale Nurseries. For three or four years past deceased had been in the employ of the city,  engaged in tree pruning. Mr. Murray always took the warmest interest in everything pertaining to agriculture and was one of the first members of the Ontario Fruit Growers Association which was formed in


Hamilton.  He was also a past president and director of the Hamilton Horticultural Society and a former member of the Central Fair board.  He was always in demand because of his complete knowledge of the subject as a judge of horticultural products at exhibitions. He leaves a wife and six children, four sons of whom, William, is in the waterworks department, and two daughters, one married and living in Ingersoll.

 

HERRICKS  (Carleton Place) About 11 o'clock this morning an accident occurred in the lumber yard of the Canada Lumber Co. whereby William Herricks, an employee of the company, lost his life. Two lorries heavily laden with lumber were running down grade in the yard.  Herricks was between the piles and waiting to cross the track, and as soon as the first one passed, rushed out, not knowing the second car was coming.  When upon the track the second car struck him, knocking him down, and passing over him, causing such injuries that the unfortunate man lived only a short time.

 

September 20, 1889

 

HEDDEN Died in this city,  on September 19, Laura Cline, beloved wife of Thomas Hedden, in her 33rd year.  Funeral from her late residence, 175 Market street, on Saturday, September 21, at 2 p.m. Friends are requested to attend.

 

FLYNN Died in this city, on Thursday morning, September 19, Johannah,  beloved wife of Matthew Flynn, aged 42 years. Funeral on Sunday afternoon, at 3 o'clock from her late residence, 464 York street, to Roman Catholic cemetery. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

KEEBLE  (Toronto)  Henry Keeble, who for twenty-five years has been a hotel keeper in this city and for the last two and a half years has been proprietor of the Commercial Hotel, was driving at the corner of Bloor and Huron streets this evening at six o'clock when the bark of a dog frightened his horse. The horse shied and threw the rig against the curbstone.  It was upset and Keeble was thrown out and killed on the spot.

 

MITCHELL  (Toronto) Ex-Aid. John E. Mitchell died shortly after eleven o'clock to-night.  He was treasurer of the exhibition and was taken ill only a couple of days since.  He was a well known and popular citizen.

 

JAMES  (Ottawa) Alexander James, judge in equity, died in Dartmouth, N.B., last evening aged 73 years.

 

CARROLL  (Goderich) This afternoon about four o'clock Patrick Carroll, a well known resident of this town and formerly a member of Colborne Township council, died suddenly while sitting in his house reading the paper. Deceased, although an elderly man was apparently in his usual health during the day and his


death was a surprise to his many friends in this city.

 

JARDEN  (Prescott)  The body of Samuel Jarden, engineer on the ill-fated "Myra", was found this morning about one mile below the town in a fearfully scalded state.

 

September 21, 1889

 

HILL Died in this city, on September 19, Mary, beloved wile of John Hill, aged 23 years.  Funeral from her father's residence, 123 Macaulay street east,  on Saturday, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

WEBB Died in this city, on September 20,  Percy, youngest son of John Webb, contractor, aged 10 years and 3 months. Funeral will take place from his father's residence, corner of Wellington and Murray streets, on Sunday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

SMYE Died in this city, on September 20, Amy,  beloved wife of Thomas Smye,  in her 24th year.  Funeral at 4 o'clock on Sunday from 167 Hunter street west.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

September 23, 1889

 

RIVIERE Died in this city, on September 21, Edward Mark Riviere,  son of John and Mary Riviere, aged 8 years. Funeral from his parents' residence, 182 Markland street, on Monday, at 2 o'clock.  Funeral private.

 

BRYAN  (Toronto) Mary Bryan, the housemaid at the residence of John Morison, Jarvis street, was found dead in bed, having been suffocated during the night by an escape of gas.  The gas tap was found to be half on, and the girl must have either blown the light out or turned the gas on again after extinguishing the flame. The deceased came to the city about two years ago from county Wicklow, Ireland.

 

September 24, 1889

 

ALEXANDER Died in Grimsby, on Sunday morning, September 22, Marjorie, daughter of Dr. R. A. Alexander, aged 19 months, Funeral on Tuesday at 11 o'clock.

 

KOELLA Died at Carlisle, on September 23, Emma Koella, daughter of the late August Koella, aged 31 years. Funeral will leave her late residence, Carlisle, on Wednesday morning at 9:30 a.m. for Burlington cemetery, Hamilton. Friends will please accept this notice.


MCDONALD (Quebec) An old man named Alexander McDonald, residing in Mount Pleasant village died suddenly at his residence yesterday.

 

CULBERT  (Ottawa) George S. Culbert, aged twenty-one years, of this city, went to British Columbia two years ago and became a sailor on the ship "Salsette".  He left Australia for Rotterdam and intended on arriving at the latter port to leave the sea and return home.  For the sixth time he started on his trip round Cape Horn and everything looked bright and prosperous for him. A heavy storm struck the ship when off the cape and he was washed overboard.

 

September 25, 1889

 

SHARP Died at Auburn, California, on Sunday, September 22, Alexander M. Sharp,  son of ex-Aid Sharp of Hamilton, aged 36 years.

 

THOMPSON Died in this city, on September 24, Eliza, beloved wife of W. H. Thompson, aged 56 years.  Funeral from her late residence, 145 Hess street north, on Thursday afternoon, at 2 o'clock.  Friends will please accept this notice.

 

MCLAUCHLAN Died in this city,  on September 23, Emily, beloved wife of Alexander McLauchlan, a native of Inverness, Scotland, aged 69 years. Funeral from her late residence, 68 Locomotive street, on Thursday, at 3 o'clock.  Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

BOUCHARD  (Quebec)  Joseph Bouchard was accidentally killed a few days ago at Bale St. Paul by the upsetting of a load of hay which he was conveying to the barn.  He was pitched between the feet of the horses where he was found dead.

 

SPENCE A fatal accident occurred at Harrisburg at noon yesterday. Archie Spence, a wheel tapper, was inspecting the coach from the Brantford train which is brought to Hamilton on the Kincardine accommodation due here at 12:20.  The engine of the Kincardine train was shunting a baggage car. After Spence has finished inspecting the car he stepped on to the other track and the engine came along and cut him down. It had been around a curve and Spence did not see it.  He was horribly mangled and died almost immediately. Both his legs were cut off above the knees and his body almost cut in two. It was a horrible sight. Spence is a married man and lived at either Harrisburg or Paris. He had been employed on the railway for some years. The accident delayed the Kincardine accommodation.

 

September 26, 1889

 

ECCLESTONE Died in this city, on September 25, Gordon Stuart, youngest son of W. S. and Amelia Ecclestone, aged 7 months and


6 days.  Funeral from his parents' residence, No 23 Erie avenue, at 4:30 p.m., Thursday.  Friends will please accept, this notice.

 

MCCULLOCH Died at Burlington, on Wednesday morning, September 25, Agnes,  wife of Peter McCulloch, Sr.  Funeral will take place from the family residence, on Friday, at 2:30 p.m., to Burlington cemetery, Burlington. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MCBEENE  (Cornwall) A man apparently about 50 years of age arrived in town on Monday night and registered at the American House as John McBeene.  He remained at the hotel till to-night when he went down to the steamer "Bohemian" where he purchased a ticket for St. Anicet. He then left the boat and came up to the hotel and remained there for sometime and left for the boat, arriving at the wharf at about 7:30.  He walked off. The waiter saw him as he fell and immediately threw him a rope, but the unfortunate man did not catch it.  They could hear him call for help but before they could lower a boat his cries were silenced.  He said he was from London and the authorities wired the chief of police in that place.  His body has not been recovered and the probabilities are that it will not be until it rises, as the current is very swift where he fell in.

 

POTTRUFF Late yesterday afternoon while a heavy freight train was running into Dundas on the steep grade between Dundas and Lynden and when it was a mile and a half west of the town, the engineer saw a woman walking along the middle of the track ahead of the train.  He blew the whistle vigorously,  but the woman did not seem to notice it.  At any rate she did not turn around. It was impossible to stop the train; the grade is too steep. On it rushed and solitary figure still plodded on apparently oblivious of danger. The fireman started to climb down in front of the train with the hope that he might avert the approaching catastrophe, but before he could reach the cowcatcher the train overtook the unfortunate woman. She was hurled over the embankment and the train rushed on. as soon as it could be brought to a standstill, the engine was detached and sent back to the scene of the accident. The woman was found dead at the bottom of the embankment. The body was taken to Dundas and in the evening was identified as that of Mrs. Pottruff of Harrisburg. She was 65 years of age. Her son-in-law, Mr. Galbraith, keeps a hotel at Harrisburg and one of her married daughters lives at Stony Greek. Mrs. Pottruff was an eccentric old lady and at times hardly accountable for her actions. She had started yesterday to walk all the way from Harrisburg to Dundas and had nearly reached the latter place when she met her death in so sudden and terrible a manner.  She was hard of hearing which accounts for her failure to hear the warning whistle given by the engineer.


September 27, 1889

 

KENNEDY  (Montreal) The coroner's inquest into the death of Rudolf Kennedy, aged 6 years, has been concluded.  The lad was knocked down by a butcher's cart driven by Alfred Dublis. The jury returned a verdict of manslaughter and Dubois was committed to the Court of Queen's Bench.

 

GODIN  (Montreal) A young man named David Godin, employed at Lambert's restaurant, was found dead in his bed this morning.

 

KEMP The funeral and interment of the late Joseph Kemp took place from the Hotel Dieu hospital this afternoon and was attended by all classes of people.  A very large number of the Ships' Labourers Benevolent Society of which deceased had long been a member, as well as other organizations, were in attendance to pay their last tribute of respect to the remains. The service in St. Patrick's church was very imposing after which the funeral cortege proceeded to St. Patrick's cemetery. (Quebec)

 

GRAY  (Chatham)  Last evening Michael A. Barry, 36 years old, a bartender living here, and Thomas Gray, carpenter, 44 years old, living on Grand River avenue, were seen wrestling just outside of the exposition grounds at Detroit.  Those who saw them thought it was a friendly tussle until Gray dropped to the ground as the result of a kick in the abdomen.  Gray was taken to the Harper hospital where he died this afternoon. Barry was arrested at Detroit this morning and arraigned before Justice Baetcher this afternoon.  He pleaded not guilty to the charge of murder and his examination was set for October 3. He was committed without bail.

 

September 30, 1889

 

LOTTRIDGE  Died in Barton, on September 28, Matilda A., eldest daughter of William and Nancy Lottridge, aged 24 years. Funeral from the residence of her father, Beach Road, on Monday, at 1:30 o'clock.

 

ROSS  (Toronto)  John McRae Ross, an old resident of the east end, died yesterday at his residence on Degrassi street, at the age of Ninety-two.

 

STANTON  (Toronto) Thomas Stanton, 198 Smith street, over the Don, an elderly man working as plasterer's labourer, committed suicide Saturday afternoon by hanging himself with a muffler that had been passed through a stovepipe hole in the ceiling and attached to a broomstick placed over the hole. The deceased placed a chair under the hole, mounted it, tied the muffler around his neck, kicked the chair away from under him, and hanged himself.  The wife came home drunk, cut him down, and though he was stone dead, put him in bed and got into bed herself.


Deceased had been drinking heavily for some days.  There will be no inquest.

 

ROSENDAHL,(Ottawa) A Finlander named Rosendahl and a companion named John

LONDIGO Londigo, engaged on the Gatineau Valley Railway construction, lost their lives last evening through a landslide in a cutting near Ironsides. The cutting at this place is quite a deep one.  It seems that stakes were being driven in the sides near the top in which hangs the lantern to give light to the men at work, and timekeeper Sandon who was above watching the operation noticed the bank about to give way. He called to the men, almost ten of whom were working below, and all escaped except the two above named. Rosendahl was about 36 years old.  He had been only three months in Canada. He leaves a family of four children. Londigo is 20 years old.

 

TYE  (Brampton) L. W. Tye, eldest and only surviving son of George Tye,  proprietor of the "Brampton Times", took a paralytic stroke on the street last evening, fell over, and never rallied. He was 40 years of age.

 

October 1, 1889

 

ROBSON Died at Waterdown,  on Monday, September 30, 1889, Jerusha Robson, relict of the late William Robson,  in her 6?th year. Funeral on Wednesday, October 2, at 2 o'clock p.m. from her late residence to Waterdown cemetery.  Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

SAVRIN  (Ottawa) At the village of Rockland on Saturday a boy names Victor Savrin, aged about fourteen, was drawn into machinery and lost his life.

 

SMITH  (Port Hope) The funeral of the late Hon. Sydney Smith, Q.C., of Cobourg, took place to St. John's cemetery this afternoon where a number of the public ministers of the province attended, the members of the legal profession of the county being present in a body.  Deceased was buried side by side with his two deceased sons.  A short service was conducted at St. John's Church prior to the the burial, sermon by Rev. Mr. Spragge of Cobourg and Rev. Mr. Saunders, incumbent of St. John's. The pall bearers on the occasion were the five sons of the deceased: William,  John, Sydney, Henry, and Fred; and Dr. Bunham, son-in-law, of Toronto.  The weather was dismal and rainy which prevented many more from attending, but it was a very large funeral nevertheless.

 

October 2, 1889

 

DEMPSEY Died at 'The Homestead' near Milton, on Sunday, September 29, 1889, Elizabeth Dempsey, youngest daughter of the late John Dempsey, and sister of Mr. George Dempsey, of this


city, aged 54 years.  Funeral from her late residence, on Wednesday, October 2, at 11 a.m., to the old cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

TURNER  (Halifax)  Benjamin and Stephen Turner, fishermen, were drowned at New Haven, G.B., to-day by their boat capsizing.

 

FOUCOURT  (Ottawa)  News reached the city yesterday of an accident at the North Nation river by which a man named Foucourt lost his life in a horrible manner. The details are meagre but so far as could be ascertained it seems that one day last week two brothers , farmers named Foucourt, organized a deer hunting expedition.  Each armed himself with a gun, and after duly loading with buckshot, they started for the place where the deer frequently were seen.  While on their way one of the guns accidentally went off.  The buckshot and slug contents struck one of the brothers in the neck, almost severing the head from the body.  Death was instantaneous.

 

STAFFORD,  (Port Rowan) The schooner "Erie Wave", commanded by Captain Stafford,

MARLATE  capsized last night between here and Clear Creek, and eight persons were

SOPER drowned. The vessel had been aground for some days and had an extra crew

BELL  aboard to assist in getting her off. The wind and high water allowed her to float  and the crew made canvas, and a squall struck her.  Four of the crew were drowned and four landsmen who were on board. Two of the crew reached shore... The names of the victims are: Captain Thomas Stafford, Robert Marlate, Edward Soper, and George Bell, and four others from Clear Creek, names unknown.  The names of the three who succeeded in swimming ashore are: Thomas Baker, and Azarial Vaughan of this place, and Joseph Crawford of Clear Creek. The sad intelligence has cast a gloom over the entire community.

 

October 3, 1889

 

ADAMS  (Montreal) The death is announced of W. H. Adams in Florida from snake bite. Adams was a grandson of Rev. B. Dawson, and a brother of Frank D. Adams, lecturer in theology at McGill University, this city.

 

MCDONNELL  (Wallaceburg) Alexander McDonnell, father of W. J. McDonnell, shipbuilder, of this town, was found dead in his orchard this afternoon by his wife.  He was picking apples when last seen.  The ladder on which he was standing has a broken rung which apparently was the cause of his falling.  His neck was broken and when found the body was lifeless and cold.

 

CHADWICK  (Stratford) Thomas Chadwick, a man of about 46 years of age, came here from Hamilton when the new shops were opened. He was a fitter by trade and when in the Hamilton shops he was frequently taken with epileptic fits while at work, but when he


came here the change seemed to do him good and up to about a month ago he enjoyed comparative good health and freedom from his old malady.  During the last month he was taken bad again and laid off work.  He was able to be about, and yesterday while crossing past the Dominion Hotel just across from the depot he was again taken with an epileptic fit.  He was taken to his home just a few doors away on Downie street and a doctor sent for, but before the medical man arrived he was dead.

 

SPECK  (Smithville)  On Thursday, August 29, a usually quiet, and inoffensive young man named Civillian Speck, the seventeen-year-old son of Henry Speck of Caistor, was on his way from prayer meeting when he met with a crowd of young men near Gilmore's blacksmith shop in Merritt settlement, Lincoln county, a short distance from Smithville. Previous to this, a disagreement had arisen between Speck and another young man named William Garrison who was somewhat older, and the parties were induced to fight although very much against their will it is said. The encounter was terribly brutal.  Speck bled profusely, but the full extent of his injuries was not ascertained until the following day when it was found that some blunt instrument must have been used in the fight as Speck's skull was fractured in two places and his hat was full of holes.  Dr. McMurchie of Smithville was called in, who with the assistance of Dr. McCallum of Dunnville, performed the difficult operation of trepanning, thus relieving the patient of the pressure of the broken pieces of bone upon the brain, which operation it was thought might save the young man's life.  In the meantime the assailant, Garrison, had secreted himself or left the country.  The authorities, however, hold to the belief that he is still concealed by his friends.  The injured lad lingered for a time under the best physicians when death finally relieved him of his suffering on Tuesday of last week, September 24.

 

October 4, 1889

 

Newning Died at the residence, Auburn, Texas, on September 21, Annie Brush, wife of Charles A. Newning.

 

MCRAE  (St. John, N.B. ) To-night the citizens were horrified to hear it whispered about that Mrs. McRae, wife of Rev. Dr. McRae, had met her death by being poisoned. The authorities and physicians are endeavouring to keep the matter quiet on the ground that the ends of Justice might be affected by the disclosure of all the facts,  but this is hard to do, as all the main points are out.  It appears that a box of choice confectionery was received by mail by Mrs. McRae on Tuesday addressed to Rev. Donald McRae,  city. She opened the box and ate. On examination of the candy afterward, it was proved beyond all doubt that the confectionery contained strychnine in it, and a post mortem examination showed that this was the cause of her death.  This evening it was discovered that similar packages were


received by the Rev. J,. Desoyres, rector of St. John's Episcopal church, and the Rev. J. Dienstadt of the Exmouth Methodist church,  but both escaped the terrible consequences of eating in a strange manner.  Mr. Dienstadt had opened the box and was about giving some to his child when his wife had a presentiment that something was wrong and would not allow the child to touch it.  Mr. Desoyres on opening his put a piece of candy in his mouth and immediately discovered a very bitter taste and spit it out, thinking some one had been endeavouring to play a joke on him.  He was prompted, however, to show the candy to Dr. Harding, and that gentleman at once said there was strychnine in it.  The box of confectionery like the one sent to Rev. Mr. McRae was then handed over to W. F. Best to analyse and he has reported that there is enough strychnine in either box to poison a whole family.  It was late to-night when these facts leaked out sufficiently to be relied on, but the news soon spread throughout the city and has created quite great excitement. Coroner Berryman to-night empanelled a jury.  After viewing the body,  inquiry was adjourned until Monday.  Rev. Dr. McRae arrived here to-day but the cause of his wife's death has not yet been communicated to him.

 

BLOOM Yesterday morning a man who had given the name of James Bloom was found dead in bed at the Red Lion Hotel, Dundas. When last seen he was in good health and the supposition is that he committed suicide.  He was a stranger in Dundas and came to the hotel last Tuesday.  He was about 65 years old,  five feet eight inches high and looked like a farmer.  He was dressed in a dark brown suit of tweed and gaiter boots.  Little else is known about him in the town.  When he did not come down yesterday the people around the hotel became suspicious and on going into the room they found him dead in bed. About $4.45 was found in

his pockets.  That was all the money he had.  He wore a white shirt which bore the name of William Jamieson.  It is thought that perhaps the man did not give the right name when he registered at the hotel.  As the circumstances connected with the man's death were suspicious an inquest was opened before Coroner Woolverton and a jury at noon yesterday. After the jury viewed the body the inquest was adjourned till next Tuesday.

 

October 5, 1889

 

TENEYCK Died in this city, on October 4, Mary Ann, the beloved wife of Arthur TenEyck, aged 26 years.  Funeral from her late residence, 196 King William street, on Sunday, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WILLIAMS  Died in this city,  on October 3, Harriet, Beloved wife of Matthew Williams, aged 49 years and 6 months.  Funeral on Sunday, at 1:30 p.m., from 219 George street.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


KEYES  Died on Friday,  October 4, Sadie, daughter of Robert and Rebecca Keyes, aged 10 years.  Funeral on Saturday, at 2 p.m., from 241 Mary street.  Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SMART  Died on Friday, October 4, at No 149 Hunter street west, Helen Smart,  sister of Mrs. D. Kennedy.  Funeral on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m.  Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

HAGAR Died at Grimsby, October 3, 1889, suddenly, the result of an accident, Roy Hamilton Hagar, youngest son of D. L. and Lena A. Hagar, aged 6 years, 3 months, and 28 days. Funeral on Saturday at 2 p.m. from his father's residence, to Grimsby burying ground. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

A distressing accident occurred about two miles from Grimsby on Thursday afternoon.  Roy Hagar, the six-year-old son of Lewis Hagar and nephew of S. D. Biggar of this city, was playing with the children of G. Smith, a neighbour.  The boy was on top of a load of wheat which the Smith boys were drawing. The wagon was stopped at the bottom of a hill to give the horses a rest.  When they started again, the boy slipped off the wagon and fell under the wheels which passed over his stomach. Those on the wagon did not notice him fall, but Mrs. Smith saw the accident from the window. She was so overcome that she went into hysterics. The boy died twenty or thirty minutes after the accident. No bones were broken and he did not complain about any pain.

 

CORNELL Benony Cornell, treasurer of the township of Beverly, died at his home in Rockton on Wednesday afternoon of dysentery. Deceased was in his 65th year and had occupied the office of treasurer for more than thirty years.  Mr. Cornell was one of the pioneers of the settlement around where he died and was universally respected.  His wife and a son who live at Galt survive him.  The funeral will take place from his residence in Rockton this afternoon at 2 o'clock.

 

TANDY  (Montreal) T. Tandy, general freight agent of the Grand Trunk Railway, dropped dead at his house to-night of heart disease.  He was only 32 years old, and a most efficient officer.

 

October 7, 1889

 

JACKSON Died in this city, on October 5, Annie E. Jackson, aged 21 years. Funeral from her brother's residence, No 72 Wellington street south, this afternoon at 2 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Miss Annie Jackson, daughter of Mrs. S. Jackson who lives at the corner of Hunter and Wellington streets, died very suddenly Saturday afternoon.  The young lady went out visiting with her mother Friday night, and when they returned home she was taken sick. Heart disease was the cause of death. Miss


Jackson was a member of James Street Baptist Church. Special mention of her death was made at the services in the church yesterday.

 

JAGOE  Died at Baltimore, Md.,  on October 5, William Jagoe, formerly of this city.

William Jagoe,  brother of John F. Jagoe, who used to live here, died in Baltimore, Md., after an illness of five days. The remains will be brought here for interment and will arrive to-day.

 

BRIGHT  (Toronto)  Between two and three o'clock this afternoon Mrs. Mary Bright, a fish woman, who lives in a room in Andrew Shea's  house, 142 George street,  jumped from her bedroom window into the street below.  She w as terribly injured and died while being conveyed to the hospital in the ambulance. An inquest will be held.  The deceased woman was the worse of liquor and the police had been called in during, the night on account of the disturnbance she had been making.

 

FINDLAY Mrs. Elizabeth Findlay, wife of James Findlay, market gardener,  525 Pape avenue, was walking on the Grand Trunk track near her home on the way to visit a married daughter on Saturday afternoon.  It was raining and she held an umbrella in front of herself and did not see that two trains were approaching from opposite directions.  Finally when she attempted to avoid one she was knocked down by the other.  Her neck was broken. Deceased was about 55 years of age.  An inquest will be held this evening. (Toronto)

 

Poyntz  (Halifax)  Colonel James Poyntz, probably the last of the Waterloo veterans, died at Windsor to-day, aged ninety-five.

 

October 8, 1889

 

McGregor Died in this city, on October 7, Jane, third daughter of the late John McGregor,  Funeral on Wednesday, at 3 o'clock, from the residence of her brother-in-law, Dennis Gleeson, 114 Market street.  Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

GILEY  (Montreal)  Robert Giley while eating his supper was choked to death by a piece of meat.

 

KERR  (Campbellford)  Mrs. William Kerr, aged 73, living on the tenth concession of Seymour, died very suddenly last night about eight o'clock under peculiar circumstances.  She was around in her usual health, had helped milk the cows, and afterward was performing her household duties when she began to raise wind from the stomach and in ten minutes was dead, having turned quite black.

 

KELLY  (Blythe)  Mrs.  P. Kelly, wife of Patrick Kelly, reeve, died at her late residence yesterday morning.  She had been


ailing for about four years, her trouble being dropsy. She was tapped in the neighbourhood of six hundred times. From one and a half to two pails of water had been taken from her weekly.

 

October 9, 1889

 

WARRACK Died at 89 Hunter street east, Catharine, beloved wife of William Warrack.  Funeral on Friday, at 2 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

Jagoe  Died at Baltimore, Md.,  on Saturday,  October 5, William Jagoe, aged 68 years.  Funeral at 2 p.m.,  October 9, from the residence of his brother, John F. Jagoe, No 20 Stinson street. Friends are invited to attend.

 

RAMSAY Died at Hamilton, Ontario,  on October 8, Alexander Ramsay, eldest beloved son of a. G. Ramsay, aged 35 years and 4 months.  Funeral from his father's residence, on Thursday, at 3 p.m.

Many will regret the death of Alexander Charles Ramsay, only son of A. G. Ramsay, president and managing director of the Canada Life Assurance Company, which occurred yesterday morning;.  He had been ill for several months,  but his death was a great shock, as his relations had hoped that he would recover.

Mr. Ramsay was a comparatively young man and very popular, being well liked by all who met him, particularly the clerks in the office of the company.  He was born in London, England, about 36 years ago,  but he lived the greater part of his life in Hamilton.  Many years ago he was in the office of the Canada Life here.  Latterly he was connected with the British Bank. Then he went to Halifax, N.S., where he acted as secretary of the branch of Canada Life.  Returning here, he was appointed superintendent of the company which office he filled for six years.  Some years ago he was married to Miss Annie Broughton, daughter of the late Frederick Broughton, formerly manager of the Great Western Railway.  He leaves a wife and two young sons.

It was in July that Mr. Ramsay was taken sick.  While at Murray Bay and along the St. Lawrence, he contracted a severe cold which became worse and worse and finally turned to consumption.  On his return home from Murray Bay his illness became serious, but at times his condition improved under skilled medical treatment and there was a faint hope that he would recover.  Within the past few days, however, he had another bad spell and death relieved him of further suffering at 8:30 yesterday morning.

 

October 10, 1889

 

LEWIS  Died suddenly in this city, on October 9, Dora, beloved wife of Charles Lewis,  aged 57 years. Funeral from her late residence, 197 Locke street south,  on Friday afternoon, at 2 o'clock sharp, to Beverly.


WORKMAN  (Montreal)  The death of Thomas Workman, Sr., partner of the large wholesale hardware house of Frothingham & Workman, occurred this afternoon. He was president of the Molson's Bank, of the Sun Life Insurance Co., and a member of the City and District Savings Bank, besides  being prominently connected with several other Institutions for over a half a century. Mr. Workman has been a prominent figure in the financial and commercial world and had won the unswerving confidence of those which he was officially connected with and the public generally.

 

October 11, 1889

 

MCKILLOP Died at 44 Victoria avenue south, October 10, Jessie, Infant daughter of A. A. and E, M. McKillop.

 

SIMS  Died in this city,  on October 10, Genevieve M., Daughter of James a. and Frances Sims, aged 5 months and 23 days. Funeral ori Saturday, October 12, at 2 p.m. from 130 West avenue north,  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FARISH Died at 70 Augusta street,  this city, on October 10, Mary, relict of the late John Farish.  Funeral on Saturday, at 3:30 p.m. Private.

 

POLES  (Lindsay) About 6 o'clock this morning the town was startled by what seemed like a heavy explosion.  Houses in various parts of the town felt the vibration and the sound was heard miles away.  The boiler in John Dovey's mill had exploded. The mill is situated on the east bank of the river about half a mile from Kent street.  So terific was the explosion that the frame mill was about levelled to the ground and parts of the building and machinery blown and scattered a quarter of a mile or more from the scene of the disaster.  Several large plate glass windows in stores on Kent street were broken.  The cause of the explosion was supposed to be a lack of water in the boiler but as yet the full particulars cannot be obtained as the engineer, John Poles, the only person on the premises at the time, was killed.  Had the accident occurred ten minutes later the employees would have been assembled for work.

 

GRAHAM (Strathroy) This morning Mrs. Messiahs, who keeps a boarding house on Colborne street, was somewhat starled on going to call one of her boarders to find him dead in bed.  She at once notified the authorities and Coroner Billington and the chief of police at once visited the scene.  From the facts gleaned by the coroner, the landlady, and the boarders, it appears that the deceased's name was Graham and he was between 60 and 70 years of age, a pedlar of patent medicines, and came here about three weeks ago.  He seemed to be rather well informed, had plenty of clothing,  paid his board regularly, and had in his possession some $70 in gold and $150 in silver. From papers found upon him, it seems he has been working for J. L. Stevens


of Hamilton, has a son in Winnipeg, and is also supposed to have a daughter. Cause of death is supposed to have been heart trouble. The authorities' efforts to find his friends so far have proved useless.

 

October 12, 1889

 

WILY Died at Donald, B.C., on September 26, David Berkley Wily, C.E., formerly of Montreal.

 

FLANDERS  Died in this city, October 10, at No 63 Cathcart street, Herbert, infant son of Charles and Minnie Flanders, aged 2 weeks.  Funeral Saturday morning at 10 o'clock.  Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

OLIVER The funeral of the late Judge Oliver, who died at the Ottawa College last night,  will take place here to-morrow. He was for many years In poor health.  At the unveiling of the Tabaret statue yesterday he delivered an impressive address in which he extolled the many virtues and good qualities of the noble man to whose memory the monument was erected.  On behalf of the alumni  association he handed it over to the keeping of the university authorities.  He is supposed to have contracted a cold at the banquet last night and withdrew, dying shortly afterward.

 

HILTS  (Halifax)  While the wife of John Hilts of Cambridge, Hants county, was loading a revolver it discharged, the bullet entering her abdomen.  The wound caused her death some hours later.

 

October 14, 1889

 

BOWEN Died in this city,  on October 12, at his late residence, 53 East avenue south, Frederick James Bowen, last of Toronto, in the 42nd year of his age.  Funeral will take place from above address, Tuesday, at 10:30 a.m., to G.T.R., King street station, thence to Toronto by train, leaving at 12:30.

 

YOUNG  Died in this city, at No 5 Robinson street, west of Locke, on October 12, David Young, a native of Caithness, Scotland, aged 90 years.  Funeral Monday,  October 14, at 3 p.m. friends please accept this intimation.

 

RYALL  Died on October 10, James Hazlett Ryall, son of the late George Ryall, M.D., and half-brother of Dr. Isaac Ryall, aged 41 years.

 

MCDONALD  (Bloomfield) A distressing accident happened here this morning.  A bright little boy of some two years, the youngest son of Aaron McDonald, a farmer, while playing about, got hold of a phial containing toothache remedy and swallowed a


portion of the liquid,  causing immediate congestion of the throat.  All that friends and prompt medical aid could do were of no avail.  In less that an hour he was dead.

 

IRWIN  (Windsor) Yesterday at the residence of George W. Irwin near Leamington, Mr. Irwin's son, aged about 21 years, was preparing to go out shooting.  While loading one of the barrels of a double-barrelled gun, the other barrel which had previously been loaded was discharged, the contents passing through the young man's head, killing him instantly.  He was an only son.

 

MCCLOSKEY  (Toronto)  Mrs. Matilda McCloskey, wife of John McCloskey, an employee of Elias Rogers & Co., took paris green on Saturday morning and died shortly afterward.  She was about 35 years of age and had been for some time in a very melancholy state.  She died in great pain, but professed gladness at the prospect of death,  an inquest is to be held.

 

October 15, 1889

 

McLagan Died in this city,  on October 13, Jane, wife of ex-ald McLagan, aged 70 years.  Funeral from her husband's residence, Main street east,  on Wednesday, at 3 p.m.

 

PEIRCE  Died at 130 Hunter street west, Hamilton,  on October 14, 1889, William D. Peirce,  commercial traveller, in the 37th year of his age.  Funeral from the above residence on Wednesday at 1 p.m. sharp, to G.T.R. depot, thence to St. Catharines.

 

WOOD  (Montreal) George 'Wood, an employee of the Beaver Line, was loading plate glass to-day on the wharf, when the mass, weighing 1300 pounds, fell upon him and killed him.

 

SHEPPARD  (Toronto)  Thomas Sheppard,  of the second concession of East York, died yesterday at the residence of his son-in-law, Christopher Harrison.  He was in his 85th year and hale and hearty.  He was one of the few remaining rebels of 1837.

 

RATZ  (Elmira)  John Ratz, reeve of Elmira, died to-night at 7:30, after a painful illness of about ten days.  For some years Mr. Ratz has been troubled with indigestion and of late his trouble took a more serious phase, terminating in death. Mr. Ratz was born on December 7, 1833, being therefore in his 56th year.

 

October 16, 1889

 

TYNDALE  (Montreal)  Matthew Risdale Tyndale, for seven years in the employ of G. W. Clarke as stationer and for a number of years manager of the establishment, met his death by drowning on Saturday last.  Deceased, accompanied by George Muirhead, a fellow employee, went to Chateauguay to spend a two-weeks'


holiday camping and hunting on one of the islands near there. Muirhead attempted to shove a boat off, but in doing so, missed his footing and fell into the deep water.  The current being very swift and the water very cold, he found that his strength was leaving him and cried out for assistance to his companion who was at some distance up the bank.  Mr. Tyndale ran down to the water's edge and jumped into the swift current to save the life of his comrade.  No sooner had he struck the water than he sank and never rose to the surface.  The body has not yet been recovered.

 

VAIL  (Ottawa) A terrible accident occurred on the Canada Atlantic Railway track at Clark's Island yesterday afternoon from the effects of which John Vail, a popular freight conductor, died this morning.  Deceased was engaged at the time in looking after some cars in the freight yard when he was run down by a shunting locomotive.  Two of his legs and one arm were taken off. Vail was standing with his back toward the engine.  He had been employed on the road for the last two years and ran between House's Point and Coteau,  He leaves a family.

 

OLIVIER  (Quebec) The Rev. Abbe Olivier,  professor of belles lettres at the seminary, died at the general hospital last evening after a couple of weeks' suffering.

 

QUINN  (Belleville)  Peter Quinn, formerly of this city, was killed on a railway at Mount Clemens, Michigan, on Sunday.

 

O'NEIL  (Sarnia) Three young Point Edward men named Samuel O'Neil, Fred Kaupp, and Nelson Wager, were out hunting to-day on the London road about ten miles from here and about noon hour O'Neil was shot dead by the sudden discharge of Wager's gun. The contents entered the back of O'Neil's neck and he was instantly killed. The three men were looking up a tree after squirrels. Wager took aim, his foot caught in a root, he stumbled, and the gun fell over his shoulder, going off and shooting O'Neil who stood behind him.  O'Neil was 17 years of age and was a son of J. F. O'Neil, the postmaster of. Point Edward, and was an intelligent and industrious young man.

 

IRVINE  (St. Thomas)  Our Ruthven correspondent writes: The citizens of Olinda were horrified Friday morning by an appalling accident whereby a young man, Louis Irvine, lost his life. He had spent the night with a young friend and the two had decided to spend the day in hunting. Louis humourously remarked to his mother, while preparing for the hunt, that she must have the kettle on so as to cook his black squirrels. He had loaded one barrel of his gun and was loading the other when by some means the barrel was discharged, taking effect in the young man's chin, blowing out his teeth and scattering his brains over the floor. He fell backward into his mother's arms and died. Your correspondent visited the grief-stricken home and was met by a sight never to be effaced from memory. Teeth and brain


were lying upon the floor while the corpse was beyond recognition.

 

October 17, 1889

 

BARLOW Died in this city,  on October 16, John, son of John and Alice Barlow, aged 19 years and 4 months.  Funeral from his father's residence, 49 Oxford street,  on Friday, October 18, at. 3 p.m.  Friends anc acquaintances will please attend.

 

GREENFIELD Died in this city, at No 69 Victoria avenue north, on October 16, Hattie M., only daughter of Joseph Greenfield, aged 21 years.  Funeral Friday, October 18, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LOBB  (Toronto) Francis Lobb, a man of 46 years of age and brother of the ex-alderman, shot himself through the heart this afternoon about half past two.  He leaves a wife and six children.  He was the oldest employee in the treasury department, having been there nineteen years.  Latterly he had been the chief of the rent and taxation division of the department. For some time past he had been in ill health and became very melancholy in consequence.  This is the only assignable reason for the tragedy of to-day.  He had no money to take charge of and the city treasurer reports his accounts perfectly regular. He was at work as usual this morning and went away to lunch at one o'clock.  He went directly to the office of his brother, Ex- alderman James Lobb,  56 Front street east, and in the hallway of that building he pulled out a revolver and shot himself. Great consternation prevailed at the city hall when the tragedy became known, and several committees which were in session or were to be held were adjourned out of respect to the deceased who was very popular with all the officials and aldermen. No inquest will be held.

 

TANGNAY  (Quebec) This morning Coroner Boileau was notified of the sudden death of a young man named Tangnay at Levis during the night. The circumstances surrounding the case are wrapped in mystery and it is feared that foul play has been at work. It appears that on Monday night last Mr. Tangnay of Levis, who is employed on board a steamer, arrived home rather late and found his wife, son, and another man in an intoxicated state lying in bed together.  He immediately ejected the stranger from the house and nothing more was known of the scandal till it was rumoured this morning that Tangnay, Jr., aged 25 years, had died during the night.  His mother and a man named Lavalee were put under arrest this morning and brought to town. An inquest will be held to-morrow.

 

BUTCHER  (London)  Mrs. Hannah Butcher, wife of Benjamin Butcher, and mother of Nelson. and W. Butcher, died last evening at the residence on Governor's Road. She had attained


her 71st year and was one of the pioneers of Western Ontario where the family located when the county was quite unsettled, and with pride she would relate the experience of those who paved the way for the occupants of to-day.

 

HARRIS The quiet village, Ailsa Craig,  was startled this morning by the announcement that the wife of Charles Harris, a well known and respected resident, had taker her life by means of a razor.  The unfortunate woman had been troubled with a large tumour in the stomach for a couple of years past and on June 20 last was admitted to the city hospital to have an operation performed on her.  After she had sufficiently recovered her strength, she returned home in July,  but was suffering such pain that  she was unable to sleep and took very little nourishment.  Her husband had occasion to go away on business on Monday until Saturday, and left his wife in charge of the latter's sister.  This morning the last named got up to light the fire about seven o'clock and Mrs. Harris slipped quietly out of bed into the pantry and with a butcher knife cut a great gaping wound but did not think it sharp enough to finish the job and with the greatest coolness placed it back in its accustomed place and got her husband's razor.  With this the half-crazed woman made a terrible gash under her chin extending frcm ear to ear and severing the windpipe.  When her sister found her she was lying on the floor with the blood flowing in a large stream from the wound.  Medical aid was summoned but before the doctor arrived, the vital spark had fled.

 

October 18, 1889

 

MILLARD  (Montreal)  James Millard, for twenty years employed in the store of Gibbs, the tailor,  committed suicide to-night. Three months ago he had a stroke of apoplexy and has been acting strange ever since.  To-night after he had bade his family good night he went upstairs.  A revolver shot was heard and he was found lying in blood with a ball through his temple. He died in forty-five minutes without having spoken. He was 45 years of age and leaves a wife, a grown-up daughter, and a son who is employed in New York.

 

BIRTLE  (Toronto) Mike Birtle, the man who was shot in the head three weeks ago by Louis Dean, a coloured man into whose house he tried to get a forcible entrance between one and two o'clock in the morning, died this morning at 11 o'clock.

 

ROBINSON (Toronto)  While Albert Robinson,  son of William Robinson, proprietor of the Carleton brickyard, wag returning home from the city this evening in a brick wagon, the vehicle was struck by a train and Robinson was instantly killed.

 

KRAUSS (Toronto)  Dr. Frank Krauss, a well known practitioner and formerly a popular journalist, died suddenly this morning from heart disease. He was 42 years of age.


October 21, 1889

 

WELCH Died at 29 Spruce street, Toronto, on October 19, Geraldine, daughter of Thomas and Louise Welch, aged 1 year and 8 months.  Funeral this  (Monday) afternoon, from G.T.R. station, Stuart street, on arrival of Toronto train, due 1:45. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

ASHTON  (Toronto)  Edward Ashton, the lad whose skull was fractured by his being knocked out of a brick wagon owing to a collision with a coal cart at the corner of Leslie and Queen streets, east of the Don,  on the 14th instant, died at the hospital this morning.  Bell, the driver of the coal cart, is at his home still seriously ill, but with a good chance of recovery.

 

TOPLET  (Napanee) This morning about four o'clock the switchman of the Grand Trunk Railway found a young man about 25 years old dead on the track at the crossing about 200 yards west of the station.  He was identified as Russell Toplet, a school teacher of Collins Bay.  It is supposed he tried to jump on an east-bound train and was drawn under the cars.

 

ENGLISH  (Strathroy)  Colonel John English, clerk of the division court, and for many years colonel of the 26th battalion, died here this morning in the 52nd year of his age.  The funeral will take place on Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock.  He had been ailing for some weeks past,  but it was not thought until the last day or two that it was serious.

 

GARNETT  (Halifax)  Patrick Garnett, aged 78, while attending mass in St. Peter's church this morning, fell back in his pew and was a corpse inside of ten minutes.  Heart disease was the cause.

 

TURNER Died at the family residence, Highfield, on October 19, James Turner, in the 64th year of his age.  Funeral will take on Tuesday, October 22, at 3 p.m.

On Saturday evening a man who for upwards of a third of a century has been one of the foremost of Hamiltonians and one of the most universally esteemed passed away from this life. Hon. Jumes Turner died at his residence, Highfield, a few minutes after six o'clock. It is now two months since the handsome face and stately presence of the senator were seen on the streets of the city.  His illness, however, dates farther back than the present. About two years ago he was threatened with the loss of his sight by cataract and he undertook two operations which were only partially successful. To a man of Senator Turner's energetic nature and active habits, the enforced inactivity which resulted from the treatment of his eyes was very irksome and it is surmised that the sudden cessation of physical exercise which became necessary hastened if it did not cause the disease which resulted in his death. It was shortly before the summer


carnival that Mr. Turner began to feel unwell, but he did not suspect that there was anything serious the matter with him, and during the first three days of the carnival he was at his office giving a cheery welcome to his numerous friends and customers who came here from all parts of the country.  It- was on Thursday, August 22, that the indisposition took a serious turn.  On that day he left his office and went home, complaining that he felt unwell.  Since that day he was not seen again in the city.  Up to a few days ago the exact cause of Mr. Turner's illness was not definitely known.  There was an internal abdominal growth,  but whether it was an abscess or tumour could not be ascertained by the physicians in attendance - Drs. Ridley, Malloch, and Mullin of this city, and a surgical specialist from Buffalo.  Last Wednesday, however, all doubts were set at rest by the bursting of the abscess.  At first it was hoped that this climax to the disease would prove favourable, but it soon became evident that Mr. Turner's system, already enfeebled by his long confinement,  could not endure the drain upon his strength. On Thursday he grew worse and his strength gradually but surely ebbed away until death came on Saturday evening. He was conscious up to within an hour of the last and at one o'clock was able to speak. His end was very peaceful. Surrounded by the members of his family, all of whom were present but two sons, John T. and James L. Turner, he quietly sank to sleep,' the sleep that knows no waking'.

Mr. Turner was born in Glasgow, Scotland, on March 31, 1826. His father was the late John Turner of McLellan & Turner, power loom manufacturers.  Young Turner received his education at private school, and later on at the Glasgow high school. When in his twenty-second year he came to Canada to push his fortunes, proceeding direct to Hamilton which has been his home ever since. His elder brother, the late John Turner, was  established in business here as a wholesale grocer when he arrived in Hamilton, and the younger brother entered the establishment and was soon admitted to the firm as a partner.  Not many years afterward on the death of his brother, Mr. Turner became the head of the firm and very soon the impetus which he gave the business by his shrewdness,  energy, and unswerving integrity made it one of the most extensive wholesale houses in the country.  For many years Mr. Turner has been recognized as among the foremost business men in Canada.  He was one of the first to recognize the boundless resources and possibilities of our Northwest territories. As early as 1867, he established a branch of his business in Fort Garry, and the business which he then founded was flourishing under the name of Turner, Mackeand, & Co, wholesale grocers of Winnipeg.  In 1869 he made a tour through the Northwest territories, then almost terra incognita, in company with the late Hon. Joseph Howe, and since that first visit, he has almost annually visited the Northwest, and two or three times extended his tour to the Pacific coast.  In 1882, he sailed down the Saskatchewan from Edmonton to Winnipeg.  In 1875 Mr. Turner built the first brick store in Winnipeg.  In addition to his Winnipeg business, Mr. Turner established a branch in Montreal


and was special partner in the firm of Turner, Ross, & Co., tea merchants and wholesale grocers of the metropolis of Quebec province.

Mr. Turner was essentially a public-spirited man.  He took a deep interest in all enterprises that promised well for the country and especially for Hamilton, for he was a good citizen and loved his city.  He was one of the chief promoters of the Wellington, Grey & Bruce, the Northern and Northwestern, the Northern & Pacific junction,  and the Hamilton & Lake Erie Railways, having been a director of those roads and the only president of the last named.  He was one of the founders of the Board of Trade and was the president as far back as 1869 and continued as one of the most active members up to the period of his last illness.  He was also a director of the Bank of Hamilton.  When in January, 1884, he was elevated to the Dominion Senate,  the appointment was universally commended as a wise one, and its wisdom has been proven, for in the senate as in every other sphere of activity, Mr. Turner's sagacity, prudence, foresight and energy have enabled him to do good service for his country.  In fact, in every field of effort in which he has laboured, Mr. Turner has taken a foremost place naturally and by the tacit consent of his fellow workers.  He was by nature a superior man, born to lead.  A lifelong Conservative, the deceased gentleman had been an honour and an ornament to the great party which he loved so well and which he served so faithfully.

Senator Turner was a member and trustee of the Macnab Street Presbyterian Church from the date of its establishment. For some time before his death he was the only survivor of the original trustee board of the church.

In June, 1850, Mr. Turner married Caroline Huldah Greene, of Kingston,  Ontario, and became the father of four sons and four daughters.  His wife and seven of his children survive him. The eldest daughter married R. K. Hope of this city, and died several years ago.  The living members of the family are: John T. Turner,  of Edmonton, NWT;  James L. Turner, of Winnipeg; W. R. Turner,  of Hamilton;  and A. D. Turner, of Montreal.  One of the daughters is Mrs. J. Hunt, of London. The other two are unmarried and live at home.

The funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon at 3 o'clock. Services will be held at the house and the remains will be conveyed direct from Highfield to the cemetery.

 

October 22, 1889

 

POWELL  (Ottawa) Ex-Sheriff Powell died to-day, aged 63, after four days'  illness.  Death was caused by a carbuncle, at the base of the brain.  Mr. Powell was one of the best known men in Eastern Canada.  He entered public life in 1852 when he was elected member for Carleton which he represented continuously in the Canadian Legislature until 1866.  Mr. Powell subsequently became sheriff of the same county.  In 1847 he edited the


Bytown "Gazette".  He is a brother-in-law to Senator Clemow.

 

SAWLE  (Welland)  W. T. Sawle, editor and proprietor of the Welland "Telegraph", died at his residence here Sunday evening. He was formerly connected with the Brantford "Telegram" and the Caledonia "Sachem".  He was a prominent Conservative, also a member of the Masonic body, and was a captain in the military. Mr. Sawle was liked and respected.  Deceased had been ill for some time.

 

October 23, 1889

 

STEPHENSON Rev. William Stephenson,  D.D., a former minister of the Methodist denomination in Canada, died at Flushing, L.I., on Wednesday.  The deceased, during a long and active career in Canada, filled leading pulpits in Toronto, Hamilton, and several other cities.

 

BODWELL E. V. Bodwell of Vancouver, B.C. died suddenly on Friday night while sitting in a car at Morley, N.W.T.  He was on a shooting trip.  Deceased was 64 years old and had resided in Vancouver two years.  He was offered the mayoralty last year and was formerly of the Board of Trade.  From .1867 to 1875, be sat in the House of Commons for South Oxford and was afterward superintendent of the Welland canal.

 

MAYNE  (Toronto)  William Mayne, an inmate of the central prison, who has been in durance for five months and would have been free in November, hanged himself in his cell  last evening.

 

BERIAND (Montreal) Louis Beriand, merchant, aged 43 years, died suddenly at his residence Sunday night, an inquest was held and a verdict of death from cerebral apoplexy returned.

 

GOULD  (Halifax) A frightful accident occurred last night at Naphan, a few miles from Amherst.  Jeddore Gould had been out gunning and returning home, laid the gun which was heavily loaded on the wood pile.  Towards evening he went to remove it, and it is supposed took hold of the muzzle to draw it towards him when the gun discharged, the whole contents lodging in his bowels. He managed to walk to the house when he fell over-backward, exclaiming "I am Shot", and died in a few minutes.

 

October 24, 1889

 

FISHER Died in this city, on October 23, Margaret Fisher, aged 72 years.  Funeral from her late residence, 24 Ashley street, on Friday, at 2 p.m., to Stony Creek. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

HAMPSON Died on October 10, at his residence, Nether Hall Road, Doncaster, England, J. a. Hampson, Esq., in his 70th year,


father of Messrs J. Edward, George, and Walter Hampson, of this city.

 

CARTER Edward Carter, a farmer of Beaver Dam,  Ontario, was t found drowned in a creek on his farm last evening.  He was subject to fits and no doubt while in one of them fell into the creek and was drowned before discovered.

 

Dykeman  (Guelph)  Ellery Dykeman, aged about 17 years, eldest son of Mrs. Dykeman, was accidental killed this forenoon by a train which struck his conveyance while he was crossing the track in front of it.

 

FLYNN  (Guelph) George Flynn, night switchman at the Grand Trunk Railway freight yards here, got his foot caught in a frog last night and was run over by a passing freight car. He received terrible injuries and lived only a short time. An inquest will be held.

 

LYNCH  (Guelph) Geoffrey Lynch, an old settler of Guelph township, who emigrated from Ireland about 1835, died suddenly at the general hospital here to-day,  Deceased was employed at Higinbotham's wharf, Toronto, for a number of years.

 

NIXON A woman about 40 years of age, wife of a man named Jacob Nixon,  came to board at the Western Hotel, Ancaster, about three months ago.  On Tuesday morning, she was found dead in bed by Mrs. Wilson, the wife of the proprietor.  The deceased had been in poor health for some time past and Dr. Richardson thought that death was caused by heart disease.  The woman's husband lives in the village.  She leaves no family.  The body will be buried to-day.

 

October 25, 1889

 

MOODY Died in this city, at 15 York street, of whooping cough, the infant son of Christopher Moody, aged 8 months. Funeral will leave the above address on Saturday, at 3 p.m. Funeral strictly private.

 

COREY  Died Elisabeth Corey, aged 55 years, wife of Frank Corey, of Hamilton Beach.  Funeral at their own home, Sunday at 2 o'clock p.m.

 

CHARTRAND  (Montreal) A fatal explosion of dynamite cartridges took place in St. Jean Baptiste ward this morning whereby one person lost his life. Five were injured and many of the houses in the neighbourhood were badly damaged. The corporation road department is making a drain on Panthaleon street, and the contractor was blasting for that purpose with dynamite cartridges, each containing three-quarters of a pound of the explosive. At 6:25 the dreadful shock was felt throughout the ward. Houses tottered, windows crashed, shutters were scattered all over the street, people were lifted out of their beds, pictures and


mantelpieces were loosened from their fastenings and scattered over the floors, ceilings fell, walls cracked, and roofs were detached from the walls on which they rested.  The contents of stores were also greatly damaged, the shock breaking the shelves, scattering the glassware vessels into fragments, and pouring their contents on the floor,  a crowd gathered at the blasting works where the explosion occurred.  From the debris was taken the dead body of a workman, John Chartrand, 21 years old.  He leaves a wife and two children.  The wounded are; Mrs. Antoine Charbonneau, M. A. LeBlanc, Madame LeBlanc, Phillippe LeBlanc, Mrs. A. Belodeau.  The explosion was caused by Chartrand lighting a fire in the forge while four of the cartridges were close to the fire, which exploded.  Then the shock set off the two boxes which were stored there.

 

SHUPE Reuben Shupe, who had his skull smashed in by a cordwood stick in a fight which occurred on a Northern & Northwestern train on the night of September 13, died yesterday at Hagersville.

 

October 26, 1889

 

CAMERON Died in this city,  on October 25, Isabella, wife of Duncan Cameron.  Funeral from her husband's residence, 299 York street, on Monday afternoon, October 28, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GOODGER Died in this city,  on Friday, October 25, Ann Goodger, wife of William Goodger, malster, aged 54 years.  Funeral from her late residence, 127 Cannon street west,  on Sunday afternoon, at 4 o'clock.

 

October 28, 1889

 

DARTNALL Died in this city, on October 26, 1889, William Dartnall, aged 52 years, a native of Kent, England. Funeral from his late residence, 52 Catherine street south, on Monday, at 1 p.m., to St. George's Church, Rymal.  Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

ROUSSEAUX Died in this city, on Saturday, October 26, Maggie Mackinnon, the beloved wife of J. Brant Rousseaux. Funeral Tuesday, October 29, at 2 p.m., from the residence of her brother-in-law, 419 Bay street north. Friends and acquaintances please accept this notice.

 

MCCLEARY  (Toronto) An elderly man named David McCleary committed suicide some time Saturday night on the York street wharf by taking whiskey, laudanum, and carbolic acid, the three bottles being found beside the corpse at noon to-day.  He had in his pockets a letter from George Holdsworth of Kiddermaster, England, and one from Marion McCleary of Paris, Ontario


October 29, 1889

 

FLETCHER  Died in this city,  on October 27, Eliza, wife of the late William Fletcher, aged 76 years.  Funeral from her son-in-law's residence,  388 Cannon street east, on Tuesday afternoon, at 3 o'clock.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

EVANS Died at her residence, East Hamilton,  on October 28, 1889, in the 54th year of her age, Mary Jane Vaux, wife of the late Rev. J. S. Evans, D.D.  Funeral on Wednesday afternoon, at 3 o'clock.  Friends will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Evans, wife of the late Rev. Dr. Evans, governor of the Children's Home on Main street, who was seriously injured in the St. George railway accident on February 28,  died yesterday morning.  She was a sister-in-law of Senator Sanford. Mrs. Evans's injuries consisted of several wounds about the head and some painful scalds.  She never rallied from the shock to her nervous system and her death was caused by the injuries received. The deceased leaves four children.

 

CASHMAN Died In this city, on October 27, 1889, Timothy Cashman, aged 91 years, a native of county Kerry, Ireland. The funeral will leave his late residence, 162 Hannah street east, at 8:30 Wednesday morning.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Timothy Cashman,  a corporation labourer,  died at 162 Hannah street east this morning, aged 91.  He had been sick for about a year.

 

THOMPSON Died in this city,  on October 27, Rebecca, beloved wife of Jobn Thompson, in the 78th year of her age. Funeral will leave her late residence,  532 Hughson street north, on Tuesday, October 29, at 2 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

DAVIS Died in this city, this (Tuesday) morning, at his late residence, 71 Wilson street, John A. Davis, aged 57 years. The funeral will leave the above address at 2:30 p.m. on Thursday.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

MCKINERY  (Ottawa) John McKinery, aged 6 years, who was run over by a carriage on Saturday, died to-day.

 

VINCENT  (Windsor) a woman named Vincent died suddenly of heart disease in a Grand Trunk passenger coach between Chatham and Windsor this morning.  She was about 60 years of age, resided in Chatham, and at the time of her death was coming to visit relatives in Windsor.

 

WOODWORTH  (Halifax) a telegram was received here to-day


stating that E. Woodworth, formerly a ship builder in Cornwall, had been drowned in Georgia.  He was at one time a member of the Manitoba legislature and was a brother of D. B. Woodworth, ex-M.P.

 

October 30, 1889

 

COOK  Died at Prospect Place, mountain, on October 28, Agnes, eldest daughter of the late Duncan Turner, and widow of the late William Cook, Albion Mills. Funeral from her late residence, to Mount Albion cemetery,  on Thursday afternoon, at 2 o'clock.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation and omit sending flowers.

 

STREET  Died in this city,  on October 28, John Street, aged 48 years.  Funeral from 142 King William street, Wednesday, at 3 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

COOK  (Toronto)  Diphtheria has broken out in the village of East Toronto.  There are between seven and ten cases there. One entire family named Cook has been stricken down, and one of the members, a little boy, died yesterday.

 

MCFARLANE About 5 o'clock yesterday afternoon, the police found the dead body of William McFarlane in his house on Queen street south of Concession street.  The house which is situated a short distance from the street is an old broken-down two-storey frame building, hardly fit for a human being to live in. McFarlane was an eccentric old character about 68 years old. He was married but had lived alone for a number of years, his wife being employed as a domestic by Samuel Roos of East avenue south.

The last seen of Mr. McFarlane alive was on Sunday last. Between ten and eleven o'clock he was seen by William Lord, a milkman for whom he worked, and James Findlay who lives at the corner of Locke and Concession streets.  Later in the day about three o'clock his wife visited him.  They had a long conversation and when Mrs. McFarlane started for home her husband accompanied her going several blocks with here.  That was the last seen of him alive.  He was then apparently in good health,  as he was addicted to drink his wife noticed particularly that he was sober at the time.

As McFarlane did not report to Lord on Monday or yesterday, he and the neighbours suspected that something had happened to him.  Mr. James Findlay called at police headquarters and told Constable Gruikshank that he believed the old man was dead. Constables Coulter and Johnston went in the patrol wagon to the house. Finding that the door was locked, the constables peeped in the window and saw McFarlane lying on the bed. A terrible stench came from the room.  Breaking open the door the constables entered the house. They found McFarlane lying on his back on the bed. He was dead. The body was swollen and looked as if


the man had been dead for a couple of days.  He wore a pair of trousers, a vest, and a shirt.  There were no marks of violence on the body.  In the vest pocket Constable Coulter found a purse and 36 cents.  The house was in a filthy condition. In a room upstairs there were about twenty pigeons. The constables found a set of good furniture locked in another room and in the shed they discovered seven or eight chickens. When the room was entered two dogs were guarding the corpse.

Coroner Philp was notified.  He examined the body but, could not find any evidence of foul play.  He instructed the police to take the body to the morgue.  The coroner notified the Crown Attorney who decided to wait for further development before ordering that an inquest, be held.

On September 30,  McFarlane was arrested by Constable Johnston for being drunk.  The old fellow was in the habit of getting drunk,  but he was quiet and never gave the police much trouble. Mrs. McFarlane was very much affected when she was told of his death.  Although she had not lived with him for a number of years,  she visited him quite frequently.  McFarlane had two daughters.  The furniture found in the house belonged to one of them who is married.

 

October 31, 1889

 

STOREY (Toronto) James Storey, a small boy, tried to Jump on a street sweeper this evening end was knocked over on his head and killed almost instantly.

 

JOHNSTON  (Ottawa) A Kemptville dispatch says that when Henry Johnston was driving home from town on Tuesday evening, October 22, his horse took fright while entering his own gate and upset the buggy, pitching him out on his head, which caused rupture of the spinal cord or column.  Mrs. Johnston hearing the noise ran out and found her husband lying unconscious.  He never recovered. He leaves a wife and seven children to mourn his loss.  Mr. Johnston was a member of the Church of England, but because he did not attend closely to church requirements his family was refused entrance to the church with the corpse after the grave was dug.  His wife had it taken to Oxford Mills.

 

GERMAN  (Picton) W. German, a well known resident of the county, was killed at Freeport, N.Y., on Monday by a railway train. The body arrived here to-night.  Mr. German left here four weeks ago to visit friends in Freeport.

 

CHRISTIE  (Ploton) The remains of Mrs. Christie, one of the victims of the "Quinte" disaster, were brought here this evening for interment.  Mrs. Christie was the mother of Capt. Christie who was In command of the "Quinte" at the time of the disaster. The body of her nine-year-old son who also lost his life has not been recovered yet.

(Ed. Note “Mrs. Christie, mother of the captain of the boat, and her 12 year old son were in the Ladies cabin a few moments before the alarm was given, but have not been seen since.” Buffalo Evening News Oct, 24)


November 1, 1889

 

ROBERTSON Died on October 31, at 115 George street, Duncan Ernest, infant, son of Charles Robertson.  Funeral on Friday, November 1, at 4 p.m.

 

BEGY  (St. Catharines) Albert Begy, foreman in J. C. Harris's cigar factory, dropped dead at his house this afternoon on Queenston street.  Mr. Begy was at his work as usual yesterday. He went home this forenoon not feeling well. Heart disease was the cause. He leaves a wife and one child.

 

November 2, 1889

 

STURT Died on Friday, November 1 at 104 Stinson street, Agnes Sturt. Funeral will take place on Sunday at 3 p.m., from the residence of her brother, Walter P. Sturt, 104 Stinson street. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

DONOHUE  (Toronto) A switchman on the Grand Trunk Railway named John Donohue was run over and instantly killed while coupling a freight train at Little York station about 10:30 o'clock last night.  It is supposed that the deceased caught his foot in one of the wheels.  He was about 28 years of age and leaves a wife and one child.

 

VANKOUGHNET  (Cornwall) The entire community was shocked this morning when it was made known that Miss Kate Vankoughnet, daughter of the late Hon. P. Vankoughnet, had committed suicide by hanging herself with a dish towel in the cellar of her residence on Amelia street between midnight and six o'clock this morning.  Miss Vankoughnet had been in depressed spirits for some time and her actions were noticed and a strict watch kept on her.  Last night she appeared to be in the best of spirits and played with Mr. Poole's children with whom she was living. Mrs. Poole went to the deceased's bedroom at midnight and found her lying with her clothes on upon the bed.  She woke the deceased saying that she would go to bed in a few minutes. That was the last seen of her alive.  When the servant girl entered the cellar about seven o'clock this morning she was horrifed at seeing Miss Vankoughnet's body hanging to a hook in a beam.  She alarmed Mr. Poole who cut the body down. A doctor was summoned and pronounced life to be extinct, a verdict of suicide while labouring under a fit of mental aberration was rendered.

 

November 4, 1889

 

CROWE Died in Dundas, on Friday, November 1, Eliza Scott, beloved wife of Thomas Crowe, aged 36 years. Funeral took place to-day.


ALLEN Died on Sunday, November 3, William Henry, infant son of Frank and Maggie Allen.  Funeral will take place to-day (Monday) at 2 p.m. from No 22 Strachan street west.

 

WATSON  (Toronto) A coroner's jury will investigate the circumstances attending the death of John Watson, an engineer, aged 38 years and married, who died this evening at 78 Berkeley street.  Saturday evening he gave symptoms of strychnine poisoning and was ill all night and all yesterday.  He was attended by four doctors but died in great agony at six o'clock.

 

HAMEL (Quebec) Mr. Hamel, a farmer, died suddenly at his residence at Cape Rouge yesterday. The cause of death was heart disease.

 

November 5, 1889

 

HENDERSON Mrs. Henderson, wife of Captain Henderson of Burlington, was found dead in bed yesterday.  She had been complaining of noise in her head for several days, but was able to attend to her household duties.  Last night she retired at the usual hour.  Dr. Richardson came to the house and examined the body,  but did not deem an inquest necessary.  He said that her death was probably caused by some affection of the brain. The deceased lady was about 60 years of age and leaves a large family of daughters to mourn her demise.  She was highly esteemed in the village where she had resided for many years.

 

PATSON  (Stratford) Robert Patson, foreman of the engineers' department works of the Grand Trunk Railway, committed suicide by hanging himself in his barn.  Deceased was about 60 years of age.  It had been noticed of late that he was suffering from melancholy which is supposed to account for the act.

 

FREEMAN  (Toronto) Frank Freeman, a painter, died of suffocation while in a drunken stupor on Saturday morning. An inquest was considered unnecessary.

 

MACLEAN  (Halifax)  James Maclean, a fisherman, was found dead in his boat this morning between the island and the mainland, lying across the thwarts with his arms folded. Cause of death is unknown. Some think it was heart disease, and others that he fell and struck his head against one of the thwarts while coming abaft after hoisting the sail.

 

PERRON  (Quebec)  Isaac Perron of Notre Dame de Montauback, Portneuf, was accidentally killed thereon Saturday while excavating a well. The earth caved in on him.

 

November 6, 1889

 

ANGERS  (Quebec) The Rev. Mother St. Louis, nee Adele Angers,


aunt of the lieutenant-governor and superior and founder of the St. Charles hospital of the Good Shepherd convent, died yesterday.

 

DOWNER  (Port Dalhousie) Capt Frank Downer, of the barge, "D. P. Dobbins", was drowned this morning about five o'clock by being knocked off the foot gates of a lock In the new Welland canal by the crank of the water wheel which works the valves of the gates.  His body has been recovered.  Captain D. lived in Port Huron, Michigan, and his wife was on the barge with him.  He leaves a family, all of whom are grown-up.

 

November 7, 1889

 

O'BRIEN Died in Saltfleet, on November 6, John J. O'Brien. Funeral will leave his father's residence, Saltfleet, on Friday at 10 o'clock for R.C. cemetery.

 

HANNAH Died in this city, on November 6, John Hannah, late of Orosshill parish of Kirkmichael, Ayrshire, Scotland, aged 77 years. Funeral on Friday, November 8, at 2 o'clock p.m. from the residence of his son-in-law, Alex McNab, 374 James street north. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

LEGAULT  (Ottawa) Alphonse Legault of Kemptville was fatally gored by an infuriated bull yesterday.  He lived two hours.

 

DAVIDSON Died Wednesday, November 6, at his residence, Rosedal Toronto, Charles Davidson, aged 54 years.  Funeral on Friday afternoon, November 8, at 3:30 p.m. to Mount Pleasant cemetery. Toronto friends will please accept this notice.

Charles Davidson died suddenly at heart disease yesterday at his home in Toronto. Davidson used to be a prominent citizen of Hamilton.  He was a member of the firm of Field & Davidson and moved to Toronto thirteen years ago to take charge of the business of his uncle, William Davidson.  He was a native of Forfarshire, Scotland, and in 1853 when a youth of seventeen years he came to Canada with his family, and settled in Hamilton

As a young man he took an active interest in municipal affairs and was three years elected to the city council as an alderman for old St. George's ward.  One year he served as chairman of the market, fire, and police committee.  Mr. Davidson was a prominent freemason, a past master of Barton Lodge and a member of Hiram chapter, Royal Arch Masons, and Murton Lodge of Perfection, A. & A.S. rite. He is survived by his wife and two children, a son and a daughter. Yesterday, the day of his death was also the twenty-third anniversary of his wedding. The funeral will take place in Toronto to-morrow afternoon and will be attended by many of the deceased gentleman's old Masonic friends from Hamilton.


November 8, 1889

 

BOLGER  (Quebec)  William Bolger, aged 60 employed for the last twenty years in the customs house, dropped dead while returning home on John Street last evening. The cause was apoplexy.

 

November 9. 1889

 

REID Died in this city, on November 8, Elsie, second daughter of the late W. W. Reid.  Funeral from the residence of her mother, 25 Wellington street north, on Sunday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

REYNOLDS  Died at Hazelton, Kansas, on October 30, Clarence S., youngest son of A. B. and M. A. Reynolds, and grandson of the late J. B. Holden, aged 17 years.

 

WALKER  (Toronto)  Joseph Walker, a man 24 years of age, killed himself by taking 'rough on rats'. At the inquest this evening a verdict of suicide was returned with a rider to the effect that the poison spoken of be placed in the same category as arsenic.

 

November 11, 1889

 

O'HEIR Died in this city, at 90 Wellington street south, Fanny, widow of the late Peter O'Heir, on November 10, in her 63rd year. Funeral on Wednesday, November 13, at 9:45 a.m. to St. Patrick's church, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery.

Mrs. Fanny O'Heir, widow of the late Peter O'Heir of this city, died at the family residence, Wellington street south, last evening. Although she had been ill for a long time, her death came rather suddenly and unexpectedly.  Mrs. O'Heir was the youngest daughter of the late Archibald Gillespy.  She was born in Nether Denton, Cumberland, England.  She came to Hamilton with her family forty-five years ago and resided here without intermission until her death.  In 1855 she was married to the late Peter O'Heir who died two or three years ago. The deceased lady was a Roman Catholic, a member of St. Patrick's church.

 

FITZGERALD Died in this city, on November 8, Maria Hamilton, aged 71 years, wife of Major W. H. Fitzgerald, 68th Regiment, Durban Light Infantry.  Funeral from her son's residence, 242 Main street west, Monday, at 2 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

MURRAY  (Quebec)  Henry Murray of Point Levis, aged 26, was accidentally drowned at Newaygo, Ryerson Hill, Michigan, a few days ago.


RICHARDSON  (Montreal) A. W. Richardson, an old resident of the Windsor Hotel, died very suddenly of apoplexy on Saturday.

 

LEACH  (Toronto) An inquest was held last evening at the hospital on the body of the farmer killed at Pape Avenue crossing. The father of the deceased was present and testified that the name of the deceased was Henry Leach and he was aged twenty-eight. The inquest was adjourned until Tuesday.

 

HEAGARTY  (Toronto) Thomas Heagarty, an old railway man, was killed at the Northern elevator on Saturday evening. The shafting had got out of gear and the machinery starting suddenly, deceased  was thrown Against the beams, death being instantaneous.

 

November 12, 1889

 

MACDONALD Died in north Barton, Sherman street, on November 11, Gordon Macdonald, infant son bf Elizabeth and the late John Macdonald, aged 1 year and 11 months. Funeral Wednesday, at 3:30 p.m.  Friends will please Accept this intimation.

 

SALISBURY Died at 79 Locomotive street, on November 10, Benjamin Salisbury, Sr., in his 80th year. Funeral will take place from the above address, on Tuesday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCQUADE  (Toronto)  Patrick McQuade, a well known newspaperman and lately from Prince Edward Island, died at the hospital to-day from typhoid fever, aged twenty-seven.

 

November 13, 1889

 

BROUGHTON Died in this city, on November 11, Mary, beloved wife of William Broughton, aged 30 years. Funeral will leave her late residence, 18 Inchbury street, on Wednesday at 2 p.m.

 

WILLIAMSON Died on November 11, in the 80th year of her age, Agnes Colvin, relict of the late Alexander Williamson, formerly of Cobourg.  Funeral from the residence of her son, A. P. Williamson, 516 James street north, on Wednesday, November 13, at 2:30 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HUNTER  (Toronto) As Alexander Hunter, a well known and highly respected resident on the Don Mills road, was returning home last night, a sudden turn in the buggy overturned it.  He was thrown out and his neck was broken, death being almost instantaneous.

 

DESCHENES  (Ottawa)  Pierre Deschenes of Conroy Mills was killed yesterday by a falling tree.  He leaves a wife and three children.


DEROCHER  (Quebec)  Joseph Derocher, a barber, for the last two years an inmate of the Beauport lunatic asylum, was found dead in his cell yesterday.

 

KELLY  (Trenton) At an early hour this morning, William Kelly, conductor on a Grand Trunk freiglrt train, was run over and instantly killed at the Grand Trunk Railway station here. He was passing along the top of his train which had been cut in two to do some  switching.  It is supposed he had forgotten the fact of its being cut, and stepped off in the darkness. No inquest was held.

 

CALE The inquiry into the railway accident which occurred at the Junction Cut last Wednesday night and was the cause of death of John Cale was continued before Coroner Mackelcan at No 3 police station.  The verdict was that the accident was caused by Ernest Stephenson, the telegraph operator misplacing the switch.

 

November 14, 1889

 

HILL Died at Saltfleet, on November 12, Sarah Ann Carpenter, beloved wife of James Hill, aged 65 years. Funeral will take place on Thursday, at 1:30 p.m.

 

ROSS Died in this city, on November 12, David Ross, aged 60 years.  Funeral on Friday, November 15, at 3 o'clock from his late residence, 66 West avenue north. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

 

HARRISON Died at the residence of her son-in-law, J. W. Marter, asylum for the insane, on November 12, Ann Harrison, aged 75 years. Funeral on Thursday morning at 8 o'clock to G.T.R. Interment at Brantford, Ontario,

 

MACKINLAY  (Halifax) The death is announced of Andrew R. MacKinlay, head of the book and stationery firm of A. & W. MacKinlay. He left for England a few weeks ago for the benefit of his health, and to-day a cable was received stating that he died this morning.  The cause was heart disease.  The deceased was a retired colonel of the 63rd Rifles and about 58 years old.

 

HARRIS  (Alton) A terrible calamity occurred here this morning about 3:30 by the breaking of a mill dam at McClelan's flouring mill about a mile west of the village.  Two lives were lost, six mill dams and four bridges carried away, houses and building wrecked,  and thousands of dollars worth of property destroyed. One old couple named Harris were carried away and their house and all swept down the torrent.  Many others narrowly escaped with their lives, being rooted out of their sleep by the water rushing through their houses. At daylight the village presented a terrible appearance. The streets were washed into holes, sidewalks torn up, logs and rubbish piled in the streets...


November 15, 1889

 

DICKER  Died in this city, on November 14, Frances, wife of William Dicker,  in the 68th year of her age.

 

CULLUM Died at Spokane Falls, Washington Territory, on November 13, John, the second son of David and Elizabeth Cullum, in the 28th year of his age.

A telegram delivered to his parents in this city brought the intelligence that John Cullum, a young man well known here, had died at Spokane Falls, Washington Territory, where he has been residing for a few years.  There was no further information given and his relatives were much shocked as he was in good health when last heard from.  He was a brother of Miss Cullum, president of the Ladies Protestant Benevolent Society.

 

November 16, 1889

 

MACKIE  Died at Beamsville,  on Friday morning, John A. Mackie, son of Rev. James A. Mackie, and nephew of Mrs. Alfred Morgan, aged 27 years.  Funeral will take place at Brantford on Saturday afternoon.  Train leaves G.T.R. Stuart street station at 9 a.m.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mr. John A. Mackie, who was one of the most popular young men in Hamilton, died at Beamsville yesterday morning.  He had been sick for a couple of years and his friends had given up all hope of his recovery. He was the only son of Rev. James Mackie and was born in Beamsville about twenty-seven years ago. He lived in Brantford, Guelph, and Beamsville during the early part of his life, coming to Hamilton about ten years ago. He entered the warehouse of A. Duncan & Co. as junior saleman and by his business ability he worked his way up until he was appointed European buyer for the firm, a position in which he was very successful. Two years ago last September he was taken sick and had to resign his position. The last two winters he spent in the south with the hope that the warm climate would benefit him.  There was little improvement in his health when he returned from the south last spring.  Since, he was very feeble and his death was expected any day.  Mr. Mackie was highly esteemed by all who knew him.  He was of a jovial dispostion and when he had his health he took a great interest in baseball. Among the young men few were as popular as the deceased. The funeral will take place in Brantford on Thursday. The body will leave Beamsville in the morning and will pass through Hamilton at 9 o'clock.

 

DEWERT Died in this city, on November 14, John Dewert, son of William Dewert, aged 27 years. Funeral will leave his father's residence, 64 Wellington street north, on Sunday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock.  Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.


MCDONNELL Died in this city, on November 15, William J. McDonnell, late inspector of weights and measures, aged 56 years. Funeral will leave his late residence, 60 Burlington street west, on Sunday at 3 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

Ex-inspector William J. McDonnell, of the weights and measures department, died yesterday at his residence on Burlington street at the age of 56 years. The deceased had been suffering from cancer in the head for the past seven months.  He was released from his post about a month ago after nine years of faithful government service.  He was appointed on June 29, 1880, and proved himself a popular and efficient officer during his official career.  He leaves a widow and a large family to mourn his loss. The funeral will take place on Sunday afternoon.

 

SMITH  (St. Thomas) Gideon Smith, 21 years of age, employed by Paulin & Price, hardware merchants,  suddenly dropped dead from heart disease this afternoon while engaged in a playful scuffle.  His mother, a widow, lives in Bloomsburg, near Waterford, Ontario.

 

RICKER  (Montreal) A man named Ricker was injured this afternoon by a packing case falling upon his body. At the general hospital an operation was performed for the ligature of an intestine, but the man died upon the table.

 

HATCH  (Toronto)  Rev. Dr. Edwin Hatch, from 1854 to 1862, professor of Trinity University here and rector of the Quebec high school from 1862 to 1867, when he became vice principal of St. Mary's Hall, Oxford, died in England on Sunday.

 

November 18, 1889

 

KANE  (Toronto)  Some time last night Edward Kane, a plasterer, murdered his wife, Mary. The two had been drinking whiskey during the day and both are said to have been drunk in the evening. After committing the crime, Kane lay down on a lounge beside the dead body and slept off his debauch, waking up this morning to find the bruised and bleeding body of his wife. The remainder of the day he spent in a drinking bout and mentioned incidentally that his wife was dead.  This set an investigation on foot and the terrible deed was discovered.  Kane in the meantime had taken the alarm and fled.  The police are scouring the country for him, but he has not yet been captured. The murder is one rarely equalled in point of atrocity. The body was terribly hacked and beaten, and one terrible wound on the back of the head was inflicted evidently with a flatiron which lay near. The house in which the murder was committed is situated at the western corner of Stanley Park and Defoe street and forms one of the rough-cast cottages standing together at that point. Later; The man Kane was arrested about 11:30 this evening and locked up at No 2 police station.


WILSON  (Ottawa) The intelligence of the sudden death in New York of Dr. Wilson, law clerk of the Dominion House of Commons, created general regret here.  The deceased who was universally respected left Ottawa on Friday night for New York accompanied by his daughter whom he proposed to place in a training school for nurses.  Dr. Wilson suffered from heart disease for several years past.

 

CRAIGEN  (Halifax) Charles A. Craigen, deputy prothonotary, entered a hallway on Water street at 2 o'clock this afternoon and fired a revolver shot into his right temple and died at 5:30- The shot entered his brain and the doctor could not find it.  Craigen was about 33 years old and had been deputy prothonotary for about ten years, previous to which he was a clerk in the office for some years.  The affair caused a profound sensation, Craigen being well known and much liked, particularly by the legal fraternity.  His parents are still alive although very old.  The unfortunate young man was at his office on Tuesday for the last time.  He was unmarried.

 

November 19, 1889

 

McComb Died in this city, on November 18, Olive Alphy, youngest daughter of William and Alphy McComb,  aged 10 months and 14 days. Funeral will leave her parents' residence, 21 Oak avenue, on Tuesday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

KIRKNESS Died in this city, on November 18, Mrs. Margaret Kirkness, a native of Stromness, Orkney. Funeral from 347 Hannah street west, on Tuesday, November 19, at 1 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CLARKE Died on Monday, November 18, of haemorrhage of the bowels, Willie, second son of W. R. Clarke, aged 9 years and 5 months. Funeral on Wednesday, at 4 p.m. from 234 King William street.

 

SPENCE  (Toronto) Ex-alderman James Spence died here Saturday, aged 86 years.  He had been in the country since 1828 and was in arms on the government side in the rebellion of 1837.

 

MCGRATH  (Toronto) A lad named Daniel McGrath, living with his parents on the south-east corner of Cumming and Degrassi streets, died yesterday from what is pronounced to be black diphtheria.  He had a sore throat on Wednesday and nothing being done to check it, the disease grew until it proved fatal.

 

November 20, 1889

 

DINEEN Died at St. Joseph's Convent, on November 18, Sister M. Louise Dineen, in the 29th year of her age and the 13th of


her religious life.  Funeral on Wednesday at 9 o'clock.

 

HAMEL  (Montreal)  Omer Hamel, a young longshoreman, was assisting in the work of unloading the Bossiere Line steamship "Electrique" this afternoon when he fell from the gangway to the main deck, a distance of eight feet, alighting on his head. The Notre Dame hospital ambulance was telephoned for,  but by the time it arrived he was dead.

 

SKINNER  (Toronto) Mrs. Colin Skinner, a lady well known in benevolent aud charitable circles, died this evening.  She was sister to Robert Jaffray, and an energetic WCTU worker.

 

November 21, 1889

 

PETTIT  Died on November 19, Harriet Eliza, widow of the late John Pettit, in her 74th year.  Funeral will take place on Thursday.  Meet at the house at 1 o'clock.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BRUNNING  (Prescott) The dead bodies of Mr. and Mrs. Brunning of this town were found last night side by side in the house they occupied here.  The bodies were found alongside their bed. The woman bore marks of violence about the head, but Brunning had none whatever.  It is supposed by many here that Brunning disposed of his wife and then committed suicide. They were both about 40 years of age and of dissipated habits. Fortunately they leave no children to survive them. Brunning was a mason by trade. An inquest is being held over the affair. Great-excitement exists here since the discovery of the bodies.

 

CANANA  (Ottawa) The unfortunate man named Canana who was severely burnt at J. R. Booth's mill about a week ago, died last night in extreme agony.

 

MCDONALD  (Dundas) Michael McDonald, son of the late John McDonald, who built the Elgin House block, died at the House of Providence yesterday afternoon.

 

November 22, 1889

 

BARTON  (Brantford) The body of Henry Barton of West Brantford was found on the Grand Trunk Railway track at Mount Pleasant with a leg and an arm broken and a deep cut on the head. The deceased was a butcher and left home yesterday morning to do some killing in the country.  He was very deaf.  It was supposed that he was struck by a passing train. An inquest will be held.

 

REID  (Kingston) About noon to-day the body of a woman was found floating in the slip adjoining Richardson's elevator. It was soon learned that the unfortunate woman was Mrs. L. G. Reid of Belleville, a daughter of D. A. Waddell, harness maker. She


came to Kingston six weeks ago to be treated for an eye affliction that tendered her almost blind and stopped with her father on Division street.  It is thought that she left her father's residence during the forenoon with the intention of proceeding to the shop, but owing to her partial blindness passed the shop and proceeded on to the foot of the street and fell off the wharf.  Her husband is in Montana.

 

HALLORAN  (Sarnia) Mrs. Halloran, aged 79 years, died last night in jail where she had been sent as a vagrant.  She had been in comfortable circumstances once, and has sons in the district doing well.

 

HARVEY Yesterday afternoon five men, John Harvey, Samuel Cheeseman, James Robinson, William McBride, and Arthur Duggan, were at work excavating a bank of clay in Isaac Beer's brick yard in the west end when the surface caved in, instantly killing John Harvey.  In excavating clay for bricki a large crust on the surface is left intact as it is not suitable for purposes of manufacture, and the men occasionally dig away beneath this crust until It hangs over in a dangerous manner. This had been done in the instance mentioned. Harvey was deeper in the excavation when about twenty-five feet of the bank caved in immediately over his head and crushed him to death in an instant. The unfortunate man's skull was crushed like an egg shell. As soon as the news reached the city, Sergeant Cassell and Constable Harris went up with the patrol wagon and removed the body to Chapman's undertaking establishment.  Dr. White was informed of the facts and decided that an inquest was unnecessary.  Harvey was an unmarried man, about 28 years of age, and boarded at 48 Margaret street.  His two brothers are also employed by Mr. Beer. No blame can be attached to anyone in connection with the dreadful affair. The deceased and those with him did not take the requisite precaution of removing the surface as they went along.

 

November 23, 1889

 

WEBSTER Died suddenly in this city, on November 22, Annie M., beloved wife of Edward Webster, aged 41 years. Funeral from her husband's residence, 230 Victoria avenue north, on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m.  Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

A rather sudden death occurred yesterday afternoon at Victoria avenue north.  Mrs. Webster, wife of E. Webster, machinist, has been in delicate health for some weeks, but yesterday she was seized with alarming symptoms and died about five o'clock.  Neuralgia of the heart was supposed to be the cause of death.

 

CLINE  Died at Appleby, Middle road, Nelson, county Halton, on November 22, Isabella, wife of Jacob Cline, in the 83rd year of her age. Funeral on Sunday, November 24, at 2 p.m.


Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Isabella Cline, an old and esteemed resident of Nelson township, passed away yesterday morning at the ripe old age of 83 years.  Mrs. Cline with her husband settled on their present homestead when the surrounding country was in its primitive condition of forest. Through well-directed industry they succeeded in accumulating a competency as well as bringing up a large family of sons and daughters who occupy prominent positions in their native country.

 

LEITCH  (Paisley)  It will be remembered that on the night of February 4 last a man named George Leitch was lost and no trace of him could be found. Foul play was suspected by some, while others thought he was still living in parts unknown. Detective Green was here trying to work up the matter,  but all without success.  To-day a young man named Millar was sporting and hunting in the woods about two miles from here when he found the body of a large man, or rather only the bones and clothes. He gave information and the son of Mr. Leitch and Constable Elvas and Millar drove to the place and had no difficulty in identifying the remains as those of Mr. Leitch, owing to the clothes and a foot rule still in the pocket. The remains were in a bush about five miles from the river. The coroner has been notified and it is expected that an inquest will be held.

 

DUGAS  (Quebec) A three-year-old son of Marcel Dugas of Grand Bay, Saguenay, fell into a large vessel of boiling water a few days ago and was terribly scalded.  The little sufferer lived only a few hours after the accident.

 

ZIMMERMAN A sad drowning accident occurred on Chesnut avenue, in North Barton, yesterday. A four-year-old son of E. O. Zimmerman, a tea merchant living on the avenue, wandered away from the house about four o'clock. About half an hour afterward Mrs. Zimmerman missed the child and began to search for him. She searched all over the yard but could find no trace of him until she looked into a large cistern in the yard and was horrifed to find the child in there.  She was frantic with grief when she pulled up the body of her child and found that he was dead. Kind friends assisted her in taking the body into the house and tried to console the distressed mother. There was no cover on the cistern and the poor little fellow hadfallen into it shortly after he left the house.

 

November 25, 1889

 

TRISTRAM Died in Toronto, on November 22, 1889, Annie Backas, relict of the late G. A. Tristram, aged 82 years, deeply regretted. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, M. A. Egener, 130 Herkimer street, Monday, at 10 a.m. No flowers accepted.


JACKSON Died at the family residence, Woodside, Abingdon, on Saturday, November 23, Ernest A., third son of John and Mary Jackson, aged 19 years. The funeral will take place on Tuesday, November 26, at 12 o'clock noon.  Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

Henderson  (Allanburg) William Henderson's wife was found drowned in a pond back of their residence at 2 o'clock to-day. She had been complaining of a pain in her head for some time. About 12 o'clock she went out and said to her husband to be good to the children, and that was the last seen of her until her body was found floating in the pond. She leaves nine children, the youngest being only seven months old.

 

ROBINSON  (Montreal) George Robinson,  of Point St. Charles, one of the oldest Grand Trunk conductors, fell through a bridge at Vaudreuil last night and was drowned.

 

Davis  (Montreal)  A man named Alderic Davis was killed yesterday afternoon at Lyman's spice mills.  He was employed in handling tomatoes when an elevator descended and killed him instantly.

 

MCINDOE  (Montreal) A woman named Jane Mclndoe was found drowned in the canal yesterday and a verdict of accidental death was returned.

 

MCEWAN  (Ottawa) A sad accident occurred at Maxville on the Canada Atlantic Railway to-day.  Daniel McEwan, son of Thomas McEwan of Roxboro, was crossing the track with a load of machines when the horse got frightened at an engine and ran away, killing McEwan instantly.

 

LUCAS Early yesterday morning when night watchman Brass was walking along the Northern and Northwestern Railway track, he found the dead body of a man lying a short distance this side of the city timber yard, near the Wellington street crossing. The body was frightfully mangled. The head was cut off and was lying a few feet from the track. The right leg was almost severed from the body and was also broken at the knee. The right arm hung by a mere thread and was horribly crushed. Both the feet were cut off, the wheels having passed over them and out the shoes. The heel of the right boot was cut off as clean as if it had been done with a knife. The man wore his working clothes.  In the pocket of his overcoat a new pair of overalls was found.  From the appearance of the track it looked as if the body had been dragged about thirty yards.

Shortly after finding the body, the police were notified and constables Coulter and Gibbs went to the spot in the patrol wagon and took the body to the morgue. The constables found one dollar In silver a few feet from the track.  During the afternoon Thomas Lucas, a blacksmith, living at 441 Wellington street north, called at the morgue and identified the body as that of his son, Thomas Lucas, Jr, who lived at the corner of


Burlington and Wentworth streets near the railway. The body was so disfigured that the father could not distinguish the features of his son, but he identified the clothing. The deceased was in the habit of walking along the track and the supposition is that he was struck down by a passing train while he was on his way home. His wife met him about 7:30 near the corner of James and Vine streets. She wanted him to accompany her, but he refused. The deceased's brothers, Robert and George Lucas, met him after that time. George Lucas saw him with James McCallum about 10 O'clock and tried to get him to go home, but Lucas had been drinking and refused to go. The unfortunate man worked at Laidlaw's foundry. He leaves a wife and four children.  He was about 36 years old and had lived in Hamilton all his life.

Coroner Woolverton will hold an inquest at the hospital at 11 o'clock to-day.

 

November 26, 1889

 

LUCAS Died on November 24, Thomas Lucas.  Funeral from the hospital at 3 o'clock on Tuesday afternoon.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCKENZIE Died in this city, on Sunday, November 24, Kenneth McKenzie, in his 73rd year, a native of Dingwall, Ross-shire, Scotland.  Funeral from his late residence, 13 Locomotive street, on Tuesday, November 26, at 3:30 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

THOMAS  (Owen Sound)  Charles F. Thomas,  so seriously injured on Saturday night by falling from the main to the second deck of the steamer "Algonquin", died early this morning.  He never rallied after the accident.  Deceased leaves a widow and eight children.

 

DAVIS  (Toronto) George Davis, the hotel keeper who injured himself while out shooting on Thanksgiving Day, died this evening.  He was 43 years of age. An inquest will be held to-morrow evening.

 

MARS  (Toronto)  Mark Mars, one of the best known of Toronto's commercial travellers, died yesterday at the Tecumseh Hotel, London.

 

MURPHY  (Quebec)  James Murphy who accidentally fell into the hold of the Allan line steamship "Carthagenian" on Wednesday succumbed to his injuries to-night in the Hotel Dieu.

 

GOULET (Quebec) The remains of a resident of St. Romuald named Goulet who was killed and partly devoured by bears in the valley of the Ottawa arrived here to-day for interment.


MARSIN  (Quebec) A man named Marsin, confined in the Belmont lunatic asylum, drowned himself on Saturday in an old well in the garden, the cover of which he is supposed to have raised with a pick.  The coroner will hold an inquest to-morrow.

 

November 27, 1889

 

SUTTON Died in this city, on Monday, November 25, William Sutton, in his 37th year.  Funeral from his late residence, 172 Robinson street, on Wednesday, November 27, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

LECKIE Died at 262 West avenue north, Monday evening, November 25, David Ewing, aged 1 year and 6 months, son of William R. and Isabella Leckie.  Funeral Wednesday, November 27, at 3 o'clock from above address.

 

CHISHOLM Died of paralysis, in this city, on Tuesday, November 26, Catharine Williamson, beloved wife of Robert Chisholm, a native of Wick, Caithness, Scotland. Funeral will leave her late residence, 35 Bay street south, on Thursday, at 2:30 o'clock.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MURPHY Died in this city,  on November 26, Emma, daughter of the late Patrick Murphy, aged 9 years and 2 months. Funeral will leave her mother's residence, corner of Wood and Macnab streets, Thursday afternoon, at 3 o'clock.  Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

COYAN  (Toronto) An inquest is being held this evening on the body of the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Coyan who was found dead in bed with its parents this morning. The inquest proved that the child was accidentally suffocated by its parents and a verdict was returned accordingly.

 

GIBAND  (Montreal) The Rev. Abbe Giband of the Church of Notre Dame who has been ill with heart disease for some months past died to-day.

 

BRASS  (Windsor )  On Sunday last Joseph, second son of Charles Brass, a farmer in Maiden township, took his father's shotgun, went into a small outhouse, and there deliberately blew the top of his head off, scattering his brains in all directions. The suicide was 18 years of age and it is said committed the rash act because of some difficulty with a girl sweetheart.

 

November 28, 1889

 

CRAWFORD Died in this city, on Wednesday, November 27, Catharine L. Crawford, wife of Thomas Crawford, 47 Smith avenue, formerly of Oswego, N.Y.  The remains are to be interred at Oswego.


GLADD (Kingston) John Gladd, engineer on the steam-yacht "Spray", was drowned on Saturday near Alexandria Bay.

 

November 29. 1889

 

MCCLUSKY Died in this city, on Thursday, November 28, Ellen McClusky, aged 42 years.  Funeral from the residence of James Millar, 69 Elgin street, on Saturday, November 30, at 10 a.m. Friends and acquaintances kindly accept this intimation.

 

MILLS Died on November 28, at 94 Queen street south, Ann Hannah Mills, eldest daughter of the late James Mills, in her 81st year. Funeral will leave her late residence,  on Saturday, November 30, at 2 p.m.

Miss Ann Hannah Mills, eldest daughter of the late James Mills, died yesterday at her residence, 94 Queen street south. She was a sister of the late Hon. Samuel Mills, George H. Mills, and William H. Mills.  She was born in 1809 and had lived in Hamilton all her life.

 

Chisholm Died on November 28, at Oakville, W. H. Chisholm, 43 years of age. The funeral will leave his residence at 3 p.m. on Saturday.

 

PAYNE Died in this city, November 28, Nellie, beloved daughter of F. and S. Payne, aged 22 years and 9 months.  Funeral from her parents' residence, 191 Wellington street north, on Saturday, November 30, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WHISTERS,  (Toronto)  James Whisters and John Maugham, arrested some time

MAUGHAM  since as vagrants, died this morning in jail.Formal inquests have been held.

 

BROWN (Montreal) Frederick Brown, aged 70 years, dropped dead at his work from heart disease.

 

LENIHAM  (Ottawa)  Charles Leniham, aged 22, while out hunting near Pickanock,  Ottawa county, was fatally shot by the accidental discharge of his shotgun.

 

MITCHELL  (Sarnia) The schooner "Breck" arrived here this morning with her flag flying halfmast.  On Tuesday night while off Cove Island, Sandy Mitchell, a young man 20 years old, was washed overboard and lost.  He hailed from Collingwood.

 

DUNDON  (Dundas) Michael Dundon, a farmer residing near the town, was found lying dead on the floor in his house last evening by Messrs Mason and Reynard, two of his neighbours. The deceased was in town on Saturday.  He has a married daughter living in Hamilton.  He was about 70 years old.


November 30, 1889

 

MCKEE  (Toronto) Mrs. Ann McKee, wife of Hugh McKee, 37 Shirley street, suicided this afternoon in a most terrible fashion. She has been in the asylum but was discharged some time ago. After taking dinner with her daughters she went upstairs to her bedroom and cut her throat most fearfully, using first a bread knife and then a razor. The first intimation of the terrible tragedy received by the girls was the blood dripping from the ceiling. They went Upstairs and found their mother on the floor quite dead, her,throat cut from ear to ear. Dr. Lynd was notified and decided it was not necessary to hold an inquest.

 

WATSON (London) A sad and fatal accident occurred on the farm of Mrs. James Archibald in McGillivray township on Monday last, the victim being George Watson, a young Englishman Who has been in this country only a little over a year. Watson was one of four men who were engaged in felling trees and splitting them into cordwood and he had been employed in the work for about two weeks.  He was just about to quit for the day, having felled his own tree, and was helping one of his mates to get his to the ground when the tree came down with a crash and before Watson could get out of the way he was pinned to the ground by a heavy limb. His companions took no time in going to his assistance but they found him unconscious.  He was extricated from his postion and conveyed to his employer's house. Everything possible was done but he died about noon. The deceased had an ugly wound on the head and was severely Injured internally, He has no relatives in this country.

 

HARVEY  (Guelph) W. H. Harvey, the Guelph murderer, was hanged at 8 o'clock to-day in the presence of about fifty people. The execution was bungled by an amateur hangman, said to have come from the back townships, and the man was slowly strangled to death. The noose was caught in the jaw instead of behind the ear and when the weight dropped, the body was merely jerked up about a foot and a half instead of jerking up and falling as usual. Harvey refused to say anything before his death and he met his doom with the utmost calmness...

 

BASKERVILLE  (Woodstock) William Baskerville, an ex-livery stable keeper of this place, committed suicide by hanging at his farm in Burford township to-day.

 

December 2, 1889

 

KINMOUTH Died at Erie, Pa., on November 29, Mrs. Kinmouth, formerly of Walnut street, Hamilton. Funeral will take place on Monday morning, December 2, from the G.T.R. Stuart street station on the arrival of the 2:30 p.m. train.


NICHOLSON Died on November 30, at No 156 George street, Euphemia, Infant daughter of William and Mary E. Nicholson. Funeral on Monday, December 2, at 2:30 p.m.  Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MEADE Died in this city, on December 1, 1889, at her late residence, 21 Charles street, Anna Meade in her 66th year. Funeral private.

 

December 3, 1889

 

SMITH Died in this city, December 2, Beatrice Louise Smith, aged 6 years, eldest daughter of Henry and Ellan Smith, at her parents' home, 407 Mary street.  Deeply regretted. Her end was peace.

 

EPPS Richard Epps of Ancaster suicided yesterday afternoon by drawing a razor across his throat.  He lived with his son on the outskirts of the village and was 73 years of age. No cause assigned.

 

December 4, 1889

 

HORNING Died in Barton, December 2, Harman S. Horning, in the 50th year of his age.  Funeral from his late residence on Friday, December 6, at 10 o'clock a.m.  Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

NIXON Another disastrous railway accident occurred on the Grand Trunk near Merritton yesterday afternoon.  One man was killed and three others injured. They were employees of the road and lived in Hamilton. The accident was caused by a pitch-in between No 33 freight coming west and a mud train, or as the railroad men call it, a wildcat.

The wildcat was composed of eight flat cars and a caboose with a gang of thirty labourers in charge of Thomas Newhall and it was engaged in taking earth out of some cuttings east of Merritton and dumping it down an embankment on another part of the line near the tunnel under the Welland canal.  The train was standing on the embankment and the labourers had just finished shovelling the earth off the cars when No 33 freight bound west came flying round a curve some distance off. Newhall immediately yelled to the driver to pull out as fast as he could and try to run away from the oncoming freight. The engineer did so but the brakes were hard on and before he could coax a move on the heavy train, No 33 was on them. The thirty labourers were on the flat cars and saw the freight coming and they immediately began to run forward and some of them jumped off. The freight train caught up on the wildcat, however, and ploughed into the train, throwing nearly all the flatcars into the ditch. The panic-stricken men ran in all directions in order to avoid being caught in the wreck, but when the engine of No 33 was


finally brought up in the ditch, it was found that James Nixon had been killed and Martin Allen, William Hyland, and Thomas McKeough severely injured, besides half a dozen others who got off with slight hurts....

 

December 5, 1889

 

BROWN Yesterday Mrs. Brown, widow of Paolo Brown, died at the House of Refuge where she had lived for a number of years. She was 100 years old, and many persons claimed that she was even older than that.  Her husband was formerly city bell-ringer and crier.  He died about forty years ago. The deceased was the oldest inmate of the House of Refuge.

 

LYMBURNER  (Owen Sound) A fatal shooting accident occurred yesterday afternoon near Dyer's Bay on the Saugeen peninsula. It appears that two young men named Alexander Kennedy of the firm of William Kennedy & Sons of this place, and Hiram Lymburner, son of Horace Lymburner of Owen Sound, were out after game. The bush being pretty thick, Kennedy saw what he supposed to be a deer, and taking deliberate aim, fired at the object, when to his horror he discovered that he had shot his companion through the back. The wounded man lived only a few minutes.  He was 26 years old and leaves a wife and two children. The body will be brought here to-day.

 

RECHARD  (Quebec) A printer named Francois Rechard, aged 71 dropped dead last evening at his residence, St. John Street, on returning from work.

 

MCINNES  (Halifax)  Philip Mclnnes, an Intercolonial Railway brakeman, fell from the top of a car shortly after midnight at Richmond and landed on the track.  He was dragged a short distance when his foot caught in a frog, and three cars passed over him, completely severing one leg and leaving the other hanging by a shred.  Both legs were amputated at the hospital several hours later, but the poor man died at noon. His suffering was frightful.  It took an hour and a half to get him to the hospital and the night was bitterly cold.  McInnes was 39 years old and leaves a wife and six children at Richmond. He belonged to Pictou.

 

December 6, 1889

 

TRAVERS On September 21, Mrs. Travers, an elderly woman living alone near Alberton in Ancaster township, was the victim of a most brutal outrage.  Before dawn three or four men broke into the house and ransacked it for money which they supposed to be concealed there.  When they could not find any, they seized Mrs. Travers and demanded her to give up what money she had. The spirited old lady refused, whereupon they beat her and put her through nameless torture of the most cruel description until she


became insensible. Then they renewed their search, found $10, and went away with it. When daylight came., Mrs. Travers crawled to her nearest neighbour, Robert Mulholland.  She was more dead than alive, bruised and battered, and her face and clothing covered with blood, a piteous sight, enough to melt the heart of the most hardened criminal.  Two men named Burnside and Sager were arrested on suspicion of being implicated in the outrage but there was not sufficient evidence against them.

Since that dreadful morning, Mrs. Travers lingered in a precarious condition.  Her physician could not tell whether she would live or die. About two weeks ago she was smitten with paralysis on the side where she had received the most injury. She lingered until last Monday morning when she died.

 

WALSH  (Toronto)  Coroner Duncan held an inquest this evening at the hospital on the remains of Annie Walsh who died this morning from the effect of burns received during the absence of her mother from home. The jury returned a verdict formally stating the cause of death and declaring their opinion that it was due to the neglect of Mary Walsh, mother of the child.

 

HUTCHESON  (Ottawa) Robert Hutcheson, night yardman at the Canada Atlantic yard here, met his death suddenly at ten o'clock this morning.  He was walking between the stake and the moving car, seemingly unconcerned of the danger of his position. One of his fellow workmen called to him to look out or he would be caught, but before he could get away, he was caught between the stake and the car and instantly killed.  The stake pressed against his breast  just over the heart.  The car was going at a rate of about three miles an hour.  Dr. Church was summoned but his services were not needed.  Death had been instantaneous. He was 27 years of age and unmarried.

 

COLOMBE  (Quebec)  The regular up train on the Intercolonial Railway last evening collided with a farmer's team while crossing the track near St. Thomas station. The cart, which was loaded with hay, was hurled a considerable distance and the farmer named Octave Colombe pitched into an adjacent ditch. He was picked up insensible and was carried into the station where efforts were made to revive him, but he expired a few minutes after.

 

December 7, 1889

 

COWAN  (Chatham) E. F. Cowan of the Canadian Pacific Railway staff who was so seriously injured at Chatham on the Grand Trunk Railway on Saturday last necessitating the amputations of both thighs died this morning at 8 o'clock. Everything that human aid could do was done for the sufferer. He had three trained nurses, one of whom was Miss Scott, daughter of the Hon. R. W. Scott, coming all the way from Ottawa to minister to his wants, such a favourite was the deceased in Ottawa society.


W. C. Halifax Hall and the other Canadian Pacific engineers together with a host of personal friends were assiduous in their attention.