Hamilton Spectator

Deaths 1887

 

January 6, 1887

 

BURKHOLDER - Died on January 4, Susan Davis, beloved wife of Michael Burkholder, in the 80th year of her age. Funeral on Thursday, at 2 p.m., from the family residence, Wentworth street north. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

 

ARTHURS - (Toronto) Lieutenant-Colonel William Arthurs, late of the Queen's Own Rifles, who has been confined to bed for some months back, suffering from a complication of disease, died at an early hour this morning. During the Fenian raid he was ensign in the regiment and was at the affair at Ridgeway. He was at one time one of the leading drygoods merchants here, and was one of the men who brought lacrosse to prominence. He was very popular among all classes.

 

TORRANCE - (Montreal) The funeral of the late Judge Torrance took place this afternoon. The pall bearers were: Judges Mackay, Johnson, and Getts; S. Bethune, Q.C; Hon. J. J. Abbott, Q.C.; Hon. J. Stirling; J. H. R. Molson; and W. H. Lawrence. There was a very large number of representative citizens present. The service was conducted in the Crescent Avenue Presbyterian Church by Rev. A. B. Mackay. Principal McVicar of the Presbyterian college delivered an address, after which the cortege re-formed and shortly wended its way to the Mount Royal cemetery.

 

January 7, 1887

 

RICHTER - Died at the residence of Mrs. Henry Bauer, on Thursday, January 6, Ernest, son of Trausott and Caroline Richter, aged 6 years, 6 months. Funeral private at 2:15 Friday afternoon.

 

GORDON - Died on January 6, Carrie, only daughter of Robert Gordon, aged 31 years. Funeral from the residence of her father, No 72 Wellington street south, Saturday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SCOTT - (Ingersoll) About 4 o'clock this afternoon, fire was discovered in a house in the west end of town, owned and occupied by an elderly woman named Mrs. Scott. When the firemen arrived, the house was partly destroyed, and on entering the place, they found Mrs. Scott dead and burned almost beyond recognition. It is not known how the accident happened.

 

WHITEHEAD - Mrs. Whitehead, one of the oldest residents of West Flamborough township, died at her residence on Sunday last. She was one of the oldest settlers in the northern part of the township and had lived in the house in which she died for nearly half a century. She took pleasure in relating the circumstances of the early settlers and how she would go to the door at night to frighten away the howling wolves as they surrounded the house, so that she might have sleep.

 


NISBET - Mrs. Nisbet, relict of the late Stephen Nisbet and mother of Adam Nisbet, is dead in her 80th year. She resided in Beverly for about 70 years having come from the old country in 1817. She went to her daughter, Mrs. Henderson, near Listowel for a visit, and there died on Monday. Her remains were brought home on Tuesday evening.

 

January 8, 1887

 

COLLINS - Died in Dundas, on January 7, Peter Collins, eldest son of the late Bernard Collins. Funeral Sunday afternoon.

Peter Collins of Dundas, brother of Chief Collins of that place and Charles Collins, manager of the Hamilton's, died very suddenly Thursday morning. He had been in rather poor health for some time past but was not supposed to be in a critical state. He was as well as usual when his refreshment was given to him, but when his attendants returned to the room shortly afterward, he was dead. The deceased was well known and popular both in Dundas and in this city. He was an enthusiastic sportsman and was one of the best authorities in the county in all sporting matters. He contributed to many of the leading papers in the province and at one time edited a sporting journal.

 

WATSON - Died on Friday, January 7, Catharine Watson, relict of the late James Watson, in the 69th year of her age. The funeral will take place from her late residence, No 31 Maria street, on Sunday, January 9, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. James Watson, mother of Constable Thomas Watson, died last night. She was stricken with paralysis last Wednesday and had been unconscious till her death. Mrs. Watson was a native of Ireland and came to Canada in 1836 with her husband. She lived in or near Hamilton for nearly fifty years. She was a member of the Church of England and was an estimable Christian lady, held in high esteem by all who knew her. Her husband died 20 years ago, but she leaves a family of three sons and three daughters. The funeral will take place to-morrow at 3 p.m. from No 31 Maria street.

 

DAVIDS - (Toronto) Ex-Aid. Joseph Davids, a retired druggist, after reaching his home this afternoon, placed a parcel which he was carrying on a chair, and immediately afterward fell on the floor dead. Heart disease is supposed to be the cause.

 

WALSHAW - (Toronto) A shocking case of death resulting from drink came to light this morning in a house on Esther street where a man named Walshaw and his wife lived.


Both commenced to drink heavily on Monday last and on a neighbour entering the house this morning, he found Walshaw lying dead on the floor and his wife in a state of unconsciousness. Several empty whiskey bottles lay around the room. The woman was taken to the police station where she shortly afterward recovered consciousness.

 

ST LAURENT - (Montreal) Elzear St Laurent, the shantyman who had his back broken by a tree falling on it while felling wood in Michigan and who was brought to the general hospital here, died from his injuries to-day.

 

MILLIGAN - (Belleville) Thomas Milligan, a chopper in McMunn's shanty, Marmora, was instantly killed by a falling tree.

 

SHANNON - (Belleville) John Shannon, a butcher of Marmora, was fatally injured by the carcass of an ox which he had killed and suspended for skinning falling upon him.

 

WHITTEN, BRYAN - (St. John's, Newfoundland) Last evening a melancholy drowning accident occurred at Quidividi Lake. A number of people fell through the ice, and two named Whitten and Bryan were drowned. Over twenty persons were in the water at one time, but they were rescued.

 

BLUE - (Petrolia) David Blue, working for a farmer named McRoy on lot 33 in the 4th concession of Dawn township, was killed to-day. He was in the woods and felled a tree. The tree in falling struck another tree and swung round and struck Blue on the back. He fell unconscious. McRoy hastened to his barn to get a sleigh to carry Blue to his house. On McRoy's return, Blue became conscious, but died ten minutes after reaching the house and not quite thirty minutes after the accident occurred.

 

January 10, 1887

 

LEACH - Died on Sunday, January 9, Bessie Leach, wife of Robert Leach, in the 20th year of her age. The funeral will take place from 207 Mary street, on Tuesday, January 11, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GIRARD - (Montreal) An old man named Girard, 83 years of age, was found lying unconscious on the street to-day and was taken to Notre Dame hospital where he expired an hour later.

 

ELLIOTT - James Elliott, a boy 16 years old, was found dead in bed yesterday morning at No 94 Hunter street east. He lived with his grandmother, Sarah Elliott, in the basement, a family by the name of Hamill living in the upper part of the house. Mrs. Elliott went to Smithville yesterday, leaving the son in charge of their apartments. He went to the opera house in the evening and from


there to the Church of the Ascension fire. Harry Hamill went into the basement about 11:30 to turn off the water main. The boy was in bed and told Hamill he had been to the fire. Hammill went down again about 8 o'clock yesterday morning to turn on the water and found the fellow dead. Dr. Stark was sent for. He said that there had been a haemorrhage but he could not say, from a cursory examination, what caused it. The boy had not been dead over two hours when the doctor arrived. On a chair beside the bed two pieces of apple pie were found and an empty cup. The boy's parents live in Bay City, Michigan. Coroner Dr. Mackelcan was notified by Dr. Stark and will hold an inquest to-day.

 

January 11, 1887

 

GREENFIELD - Died in this city, on January 10, Jennie, eldest daughter of Joseph and Annie Greenfield, in the 23rd year of her age. Funeral from her parents' residence, 77 Elgin street, on Wednesday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

LOGIE - Died in this city, on Sunday evening, James A. Logie, aged 80 years. Funeral from his late residence, 17 Hess street south, at 2 p.m. on Wednesday, January 12, to Dundas cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

HANLEY - (Petrolia) Ebenezer Hanley, aged 12 years, was instantly killed in the township of Dawn to-day by a saw log falling on him.

 

MACDONALD - (Ottawa) John Macdonald of Glengarry, father of John J. Macdonald, the well known contractor, died here yesterday at the age of 86 years.

 

ADDERLY - (Toronto) A 12-year-old boy named John Adderly, while skating on the bay this afternoon, slipped into an airhole and was drowned. The body was recovered shortly afterward.

 

JOHNSTON - (Toronto) Thomas H. Johnston, assistant commissioner of crown lands, died suddenly Saturday afternoon from heart disease. He was 77 years of age and was probably the oldest official in the service of the Ontario government.

 

VERNER - (Montreal) A sad case of suicide occurred this morning in L. R. Baridon's drugstore. A young man, H. Verner, of Ogdensburg, N.Y., cut his throat from ear to ear with a razor. He was the son of a well known chemist who last year removed his business from Quebec to Ogdensburg. He was a very close student and was warned against overwork. A medical gentleman had examined him and at once ordered his removal home which was to have been done, but his unfortunate act put an end to the arrangements which had been made for his being sent home. Information has been sent to his father.


January 12, 1887

 

BOOKER - Died on Tuesday morning, January 11, Sarah F., beloved wife of W. D. Booker. Funeral from her late residence, 88 Jackson street west, on Thursday, at 2:30 p.m.

 

FRITCHLEY - (Attwood) A sad accident occurred yesterday afternoon in the southern part of Elma, close to the village of Monkton by which an old woman named Mrs. Fritchley lost her life. She lived in a small house alone near her daughter, and smoke was seen issuing from her door, when the hired man rushed in and found her clothing and bed on fire. She was immediately taken out and the flames extinguished. Dr. Hamilton, who was summoned to attend her, pronounced her case hopeless, and she died during the afternoon. Her body was fearfully burned.

 

January 13, 1887

 

MCDONALD - Died in Dundas, on Monday, January 10, Agnes Rachael, only daughter of William and Annie McDonald, aged 1 year and 4 months.

 

KNIGHT - (Hyde Park) David Knight of Lobo and his team were killed at a railway crossing two miles north of Hyde Park this afternoon. It seems that the horses got beyond his control and he could not prevent them from crossing in front of the approaching train which struck them before he could escape from the sleigh.

 

January 15, 1887

 

CORBETT - Died on Thursday, January 13, at the residence of her son-in-law, F. H. Lynch-Staunton, Hamilton east, Charlotte Elizabeth, widow of the late George Corbett, Esq., of Kingston, Ontario, aged 84 years.

 

MUTTER - Died in this city, on Thursday, January 13, of inflammation of the lungs, William, eldest son of Philip Mutter, aged 23 years. Funeral on Sunday, January 15, at 3 o'clock p.m. from his late residence, 46 York street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

MURPHY - Died in this city, on January 13, Ann Murphy, aged 65 years. Funeral from her late residence, 26 Picton street west, on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCMANUS - Died in this city, on January 13, James McManus, aged 51 years. Funeral will take place from his late residence, 83½ Wellington street north, at 2 p.m., Sunday. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


YOUNG - Died on January 14, Annie Young, aged 65 years. Funeral from her late residence, 84 Bay street north, on Sunday, January 16, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this invitation.

 

January 17, 1887

 

GRIFFITHS - Died in this city, on January 15, Robert Griffiths, engineer of the G.T.R., aged 32 years. Funeral on Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 p.m. from 208 Macnab street north. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MYERS - Died on January 15, Christina, wife of Theodore Myers, aged 72 years and 9 months. Funeral from the residence of her son, William Myers, 31 Queen street south, Monday, January 17, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCDONELL - (Toronto) Alexander McDonell, the well known railway and canal contractor, who was familiarly called 'Big Aleck', died at his brother's residence in the parliament buildings here on Friday. He was 80 years of age.

 

POISANT - (Montreal) A farmer named Poisant, residing at St. Isadore, went into Howick station yesterday to purchase a ticket for his home when he suddenly expired.

 

January 18, 1887

 

LAVALLE - An old man named Owen Lavalle, living in east Hamilton, dropped dead yesterday afternoon about 1 o'clock at the corner of Blake and Main streets. He was walking with a man named Griffin when he suddenly stopped and began to vomit, and in a few moments stumbled and fell to the ground, dying almost immediately. He was 75 years of age. Dr. Woolverton will hold an inquest to-day.

 

SAUCARTIER - (Montreal) Zsotique Saucartier, a second-hand dealer, residing at 183 St Lawrence street, died from the effect of swallowing three false teeth about four weeks ago. He suffered intense pain and died in great agony.

 

January 20, 1887

 

DUNKERLEY - Died in this city, January 18, Elizabeth Dunkerley, widow of the late John Dunkerley, in the 70th year of her age. Funeral to-morrow (Thursday) at 3 o'clock from 104 Caroline street south.


MCDONALD - (Victoria, B.C.) The schooner "Maggie Palling", a small craft sailing in the interests of the Alaska Commercial Co., hunting seals near Pebaloop Islands, went ashore in Bering sea on the night of January 10. She was commanded by Miss Calm McDonald, the pretty 18-year-old daughter of the late Captain McDonald who died six months ago, and had a crew of two men. One of the men was washed overboard before the schooner struck, and the remaining sailor, after a hard struggle reached land. In the morning a relief party put out for the wreck only to find the form of Calm McDonald hanging to the wheel where she had been crushed nearly to death by a falling spar.

 

DELANE - (Elora) An inquest on the body of Michael Delane, a section man from Cataract, who was found dead on the Canadian Pacific Railway track here yesterday morning, was held last night. A verdict of accidental death was rendered. His left arm was torn off, right leg fractured, neck dislocated, and the base of his skull fractured. He leaves a wife and family.

 

LANGLOIS - (River du Loup) Last night about 11 o'clock, the side rod of the engine of the Intercolonial Railway accommodation from Levis broke near St. Alexander. Both Driver Montgomery and Fireman Langlois jumped, but unfortunately Langlois had his neck broken, dying instantly. Montgomery escaped with a few broken teeth and several slight contusions.

 

SEGUIN - (Ottawa) At the Aylmer assizes, Clovis Laure has been convicted of manslaughter for fatally stabbing Hyacinthe Seguin in a drunken row at Notre Dame de Louis in October last. The jury coupled with their verdict a strong recommendation to mercy.

 

FORTH - Poor old Jackson Forth, the coloured herb doctor, is dead. He died by his own hand. His frozen body was found yesterday in his house in Welland. Jackson was a well known character hereabouts. He called himself a doctor and professed to be able to cure all kinds of diseases by the use of herbs. He carried with him always a satchel full of mysterious prescription which he would never allow anybody to read. He made periodical pedestrian professional tours between Hamilton and Buffalo and did a large practice among the coloured population on his route. Jackson was between 55 and 60 years old, but was remarkably well preserved and great in strength. Very few men of half his age could get away with him in a rough and tumble fight. He always carried a revolver, sometimes two, but if he ever used his weapons they never got him into trouble. He was well known to the police in Hamilton and elsewhere, for Jackson was not a man of strict morality and sometimes got into trouble owing to his thirst for alcoholic stimulants. When he absorbed a sufficient quantity he became unmanageable, and no one policeman could control him. It is on record that once it required five constables to take him to the cells, and it was all they could do.


When he was flush of money, he was free, even lavish, in expenditure, so much so that he has been known to stand on a street corner and throw out coin in handfuls to the boys. Two or three years ago he was set upon and robbed near Dundas by several roughs who nearly killed him. Since then he was not as strong and active as he had been. Jackson was shrewd with all his eccentricities & so full of life and good spirits that it is strange how he came to take his own life. Perhaps it was a superfluity of good spirits of another kind.

 

January 21, 1887

 

CATCHPOLE - Died on Thursday morning, June 20, Elizabeth, eldest daughter of George Catchpole, in the 24th year of her age. Funeral from her brother's residence, No 30 Nelson avenue, on Saturday, at 3 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

January 22, 1887

 

GIBBS, DOHERTY - (St. John's, Nfld) On Tuesday George Gibbs, a married man, and a young man named Michael Doherty went to Partridge Island in a boat on a shooting expedition. Not turning up, search was instituted yesterday and the boat found cast upon the rocks and considerably battered. No trace of their bodies has been discovered.

 

January 24, 1887

 

SHADBOLT - Died in this city, on January 21, Thomas Shadbolt, a native of Huntingdon, England, in the 81st year of his age. Funeral on Monday, at 2:30 p.m., from his late residence, 48 Queen street south. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

KEEFER - (Ottawa) Yesterday, Harold C. Keefer, assistant engineer in the construction of the Ontario and Quebec railway bridge at Vaudreuil, missed his footing and fell from the bridge to the ice below, receiving injuries from which he died soon after.

The funeral of the late H. C. Keefer, C.E., of this city, who died from concussion of the brain, consequent upon a fall sustained at Vaudreuil on Friday, will take place on Tuesday and will be attended in a body by all the Royal Military College graduates now in Ottawa. The deceased graduated in 1880. In 1885 he took a commission as lieutenant in the Princess Louise Dragoon Guards here, which commission he held to the time of his death. He was a prominent member of the cricket and other athletic clubs.

 

RIOPELLE - (Montreal) Alexander Riopelle, aged 22 years, a brakeman on the Grand Trunk Railway fell between two cars at Point Claire last night and was killed.


MOORE - (Toronto) An inquest on the body of Mrs. Essy Moore was held last night when the jury brought in a verdict that the deceased had come to her death by means of a blow received on the head at the hands of a party or parties unknown. She was found some days ago in the rear of her house in a dying condition with an axe lying beside her. The remains were interred, but suspicions of foul play being aroused, the body was exhumed by order of the Attorney General and an inquest ordered.

 

January 25, 1887

 

DINGWALL - Died at Mount Hope, in the township of Glanford, on Saturday, January 22, Dr. A. M. Dingwall, aged 48 years. The funeral will take place from Mount Hope on Wednesday, January 26, at 1 o'clock p.m.

 

YOUNG - Died, Mrs. Young of Chatham, Ontario, daughter of John Weatherston of this city, on January 22, aged 42 years and 6 months.

 

WORTHINGTON - Died in this city, at 115 Wellington street north, on January 23, Lucinda, relict of the late John Worthington, aged 78 years. Funeral from her son-in-law's residence, Burlington, Tuesday, January 25, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

HILL - Died in this city, on January 24th, Annie E. Hill, daughter of George H. and Jessie Hill, 196 King street was, in the 6th year of her age. Funeral yesterday, private.

 

MURRAY - (Toronto) Another sudden death occurred here this morning. James Murray, grocer, Boulton avenue, when at breakfast, fell from his chair and almost instantly expired. Heart disease is supposed to be the cause. He was 45 years of age.

 

January 26, 1887

 

CUNNINGHAM - Died in this city, January 25, at No 76 John street north, of typhoid fever, Maria, eldest daughter of William H. Cunningham, aged 16 years, 6 months, and 12 days. Funeral on Thursday, at 3 o'clock p.m.

 

HILL - Died at the corner of King William and Hughson streets, on January 25, Ruth Lilian Jane, infant daughter of Mr. A. S. Hill, aged 2 months and 17 days. Funeral from above residence on Thursday afternoon, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ROSSITOR - (Toronto) A couple of days ago the six-year-old daughter of John Rossitor, Gerrard street, was so severely burned by her clothes catching fire through the bursting of a coal oil lamp that she died to-day.


DESJARDINS - (Montreal) The body of the man who was found dead on the snowplough of a Canadian Pacific Railway engine has been identified as that of Joseph Desjardins of St. Rose. His brother came here and had the remains conveyed home.

 

STRICKLAND - (Brantford) George T. Strickland, recently deceased, was buried with military honours.

 

MCCANDLESS - William McCandless, who boarded at the house of William Lowe, 208 Macnab street north, was found dead in his bed Monday morning. For a month past McCandless has not been working and as he had also been drinking heavily, it was thought advisable to hold an inquest. Yesterday an inquest was begun by Dr. A. Woolverton at the city hospital. After viewing the body, the jury adjourned until this evening. A post mortem examination was held, but no symptoms of poisoning were discovered. The evidences are that the cause of death was some affection of the heart. McCandless was a Scotchman about 50 years of age. He was a widower and without any family. His wife died not long ago and her loss is said to have preyed upon his mind. For many years he was employed as porter for Field & Davidson, and for the past four or five years he worked for Morgan Brothers. He had not been working for a month past. He had no relatives this side of the ocean.

 

January 27, 1887

 

HIGGINS - (Woodstock) Last night about 10:30, William Higgins, drug clerk, and a son of Captain Higgins, while handling a revolver, accidentally shot himself through or near the heart and died shortly afterward.

 

COLERIDGE, WATT, BANDROT, PHILLIPS, BOOTH, CRETHY - (Halifax) Not the slightest doubt is now felt here but that the schooner lost near Upper Prosper was the "Charles Graham" from Bermuda for this port. She had only a small quantity of miscellaneous cargo on board. The following is the list of the ill-fated crew: Captain John Coleridge, of Catalina, Newfoundland, aged 40, leaves a wife and three children residing in this city; James A. Watt, of Street Harbour, mate, leaves a wife and one child residing here; Athanese Bandrot, of Cheticoup, C.B., second mate, also married; P. Phillips, cook, of Grenada, W.I.; Albert Booth, of Connecticut, seaman; James Crethy, of Newfoundland, seaman.

 

WILLIAMSON - (Guelph) Mr. J. D. Williamson sailed for England two weeks ago and died a few days after his arrival.

(* Report on January 29, that only Coleridge and Watt drowned

 


FONGER - William Fonger, about 23 years old, living at 23 Napier street, died yesterday about 11 o'clock from the effect of a dose of chloroform. He was suffering from an ingrowing toe nail and went to Dr. William Philp's about 10 a.m. to have it operated upon. He asked to be given chloroform, but the doctor told him he would not administer it unless some of his friends were present. He then went out and his brother, Charles Fonger, returned with him. The doctor examined his heart before administering the drug and found it beating naturally. He gave the man a teaspoon and a half, just enough to render him unconscious. While he was taking the nail off, Fonger appeared to be breathing away all right, but shortly after he finished the operation he noticed that Fonger's breath was becoming very weak. Dr. Woolverton, Dr. Storms, Dr. Bingham and Dr. Cockburn were telephoned for and did all in their power to restore the man to consciousness, but he was too far gone. He died about an hour after the chloroform was administered. Fonger left his house in good health and had never been sick in his life.

 

January 28, 1887

 

FONGER - Died in this city, suddenly, on January 26, William H. Fonger, aged 23 years and 1 month. Funeral will leave his mother's residence, 23 Napier street, on Friday afternoon, at 3 o'clock for the English Church burial grounds, Burlington Plains. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

NICHOLSON - Died in this city, on January 27, at her husband's residence, corner of Ray and George streets, Mary Ann, beloved wife of William Nicholson, in the 38th year of her age. Funeral from above address, on Sunday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

 

SALISBURY - Died in this city, at 267 Cannon street east, on January 27, John Frederick, son of Benjamin and Jennie Salisbury, aged 3 years and 3 months. Funeral on Saturday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

JACKSON - (Toronto) While Thomas Jackson, a farmer of Eglinton, and his wife were driving home from the city last night, their horse bolted and Jackson was thrown from the cutter against a telegraph pole, fracturing his skull. He died a few minutes afterward. Mrs. Jackson was also injured. Jackson was 54 years of age and had not been long in this country.

 

DIXON - (Toronto) Robert Dixon, a wealthy farmer of Port Union, fell down on York street this afternoon. He was carried into a cigar store where he expired in a few minutes. Paralysis is supposed to the cause of his death.

 

QUINTAL - (Toronto) - The body of a well-dressed stranger was found in the bay on December 27 last.


Undertaker McCabe embalmed the body and advertised a description of it in various papers throughout the province. Some days ago, having observed the name of a Montreal firm on the buttons of the clothing of the deceased, he sent them along with a piece of the clothing to the firm's address. This led to the identification of the man. He was Narcisse Quintal, the son of a wholesale merchant of Montreal, aged 24. His father claimed the body to-day and left with it to-night.

 

January 29, 1887

 

BROWN - Died at Dundas, on the morning of January 28, Maggie Isabel, second daughter of the late George Brown, Esq. Funeral from the family residence, Hatt street, Dundas, Sunday, January 30, at 2 p.m.

 

January 31, 1887

 

DALTON - Died in this city, on January 29, James Dalton, in the 60th year of his age, a native of County Wexford, Ireland. Funeral from his late residence, 190 Mary street, on Monday, January 31, at 8:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

MURRAY - Died in Milwaukee, on January 28, Elizabeth M., beloved wife of Arthur J. Murray, and eldest daughter of Robert Campbell, 6 Picton street west, Hamilton, aged 29 years. Funeral from her father's residence, Tuesday, at 3 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

LEITCH - Died in this city, on January 29th, at her husband's residence, 18 Barton street west, Lizzie Malcomson, beloved wife of Andrew Leitch, in the 32nd year of her age. Funeral on Tuesday at 3 p.m.

 

SWITZER - Died at the residence of her son-in-law, Dr. Todd, Georgetown, on January 30, Martha Switzer, relict of the last Major H. M. Switzer, of Palermo, in her 70th year. Funeral will leave the residence of Dr. Todd, Georgetown, at 10:30 a.m. on Wednesday, February 2, for St. James's cemetery, Toronto, arriving at Union Station at 12:35 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

ABBOTT - (Belleville) Dr. S. A. Abbott, one of the most successful physicians in the city, was found dead in bed. Apoplexy was the cause of death. The deceased was about 40 years of age and was very highly esteemed.


February 1, 1887

 

PEEBLES - Died in this city, at 85 East avenue north, on January 30, William, son of William and Bella Peebles, aged 10 months and 14 days. Funeral on Tuesday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CHARLTON - Died on Saturday, January 29, 1887, at 'The Cottage', Gosforth Colliery, Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, Mary, widow of the late George Charlton, and sister of Henry Colbeck, assistant postmaster.

 

SMITH - (St John, N.B.) Word was received here to-day of the murder at Bahia Blanca of James Smith, second mate of the barque "Investigator" of this port. The murder occurred on Christmas Day. Smith was on board of an Italian vessel when he got into a quarrel with one of the Italian seamen when the latter knocked him down and then inflicted a fatal wound in his breast with a knife. The wounded man died a short time after. He was a native of St. Croix, Nova Scotia, where his relatives are living.

 

ROBLIN - (Belleville) David R. Roblin, a son of the late Mr. Roblin, M.P.P. for Lennox, who lives here in this city with his sister, Mrs. J. H. Hambly, was found dead this morning. Deceased was about 50 years of age and was for a long while deputy registrar of Napanee. Heart disease was the cause of his death.

 

February 3, 1887

 

GOURLAY - Died at 156 Napier street, on February 2, Eleanor, the eldest surviving daughter of the late Captain Alexander Gourlay, 23rd Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Funeral on Friday next at 2 p.m.

 

WALTON - Died at 48 Charles street, Hamilton, February 1, Henrietta, second daughter of the late Rev. John Walton, in the 25th year of her age. The remains were taken to Merrickville for interment.

 

LOTTRIDGE - Died on Thursday morning, February 3, at her residence, Bay street corner of Herkimer, Sarah Bates, wife of Robert Lottridge, in the 79th year of her age. Funeral leaves on Saturday, at 12:30 p.m. for Waterdown. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

ELLIOTT - (Kingston) On Thursday night the dwelling of William Elliott situated on a small island called Star Island, a few miles down the St. Lawrence, was burned, and Mrs. Elliott and two children, aged 12 and 10 years, perished in the flames. Mr. Elliott was absent at the time. It is believed the fire was caused by the explosion of a lamp.


ATKINSON - (Guelph) Joseph Atkinson, a farmer living near Mardon, four miles from here, committed suicide on Tuesday by shooting himself in the breast with a shotgun, He leaves a wife, four sons and three daughters to mourn his loss. Deceased was well and favourably known throughout South Wellington.

 

February 4, 1887

 

THOMSON - Died at his late residence, Tamarac Lane, Ancaster township, on February 2, Alexander Thomson, aged 36 years. Funeral on Friday at 10:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FORD - Died in Barton township, in February 3, Emily Jane, only daughter of Granison Ford, aged 1 year and 6 months. Funeral from No 2 Burlington street north, on Friday, February 4, at 4 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

SCOTT - (Simcoe) Walter Scott is the name of the young man who perished in the Simcoe Woollen mill. He leaves a wife and two children. The funeral took place to-day and was largely attended by firemen, Oddfellows, and citizens. Young Bates who was badly burned is in a very critical condition. Much sympathy is felt for the sufferers and substantial relief will be offered by the citizens.

 

MCMILLAN - (Galt) James McMillan, an old resident, died on Monday, aged 75.

 

February 5, 1887

 

CUTLER - (St. Thomas) A brakeman named Albert Cutler fell from a freight train this morning near St. Clair junction on the Michigan Central Railroad and was instantly killed. He formerly lived in Windham where his father now resides.

 

NEWMAN - (Wheatley) Thomas Newman, a farmer's son living on the 5th concession of Romney, was killed yesterday while taking out timber for the Anchor Manufacturing Co. of Detroit. He felled a tree which when falling struck a limb of another tree standing by. The limb fell on his head, killing him instantly.

 

MCDONALD - (Toronto) Robert McDonald, residing at Little York station, was killed on the railway track this morning. His foot caught in a frog and before he could extricate himself he was run over by a train. Both his legs were cut off. He leaves a wife and one child.

 

February 7, 1887

 

WOOLCOTT - Died on Saturday morning, February 5, at 100 Hunter west, Charles Percival,


beloved son of Charles and Elizabeth Woolcott, aged 4 years and 5 months. Funeral from the above residence, Monday, February 7, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

ENGLAND - Died in this city, on February 5, at 55 Locomotive street, George, fourth son of Robert and Ann England, aged 21 years. Funeral on Monday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FLETCHER - Died in this city, on February 5, Joseph Fletcher, Sr., aged 79 years. Funeral from his late residence, 53 Bay street north, on Tuesday, February 8, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BEATTY - Died in this city, on February 4, Edward Beatty, a native of County Cavan, Ireland, in the 69th year of his age.

 

MADAIRE - (Ottawa) An old lady named Mrs. Sophia Madaire died a few days ago at Deschenes. Her baptismal certificate shows that she was born in a small French settlement back of Montreal in the year 1777, thus being at the time of her death 110 years of age. Notwithstanding her great age, she was bright and active up till about the time before her death and not a single hair on her head was gray. She married early in life and had eight children, five of whom are dead and the remaining three living.

 

PERM, CLAUS - (Belleville) Two Indians named John Perm and Andrew Claus, who were working in a county gravel pit near Desoronto yesterday morning, were buried in a cave-in. When they were dug out, both were dead. Penn was a married man and leaves a widow and four or five children. Claus was unmarried.

 

February 8, 1887

 

WILSON - Died in this city, on February 7, at his late residence, 288 King street west, Archibald Wilson, aged 28 years and 5 months. Funeral on Tuesday, February 8, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WILSON - Archibald, hotel keeper, died yesterday morning at his residence, corner of Locke and King streets. The deceased was troubled with an affection of the lungs and recently took a trip to Europe and another to southern California in search of better health but found no relief. He was a good-hearted, open-handed gentleman and was exceedingly and deservedly poplar among his friends which he made in hundreds during his twenty-eight years of life. He leaves a widow and two small children with whom the whole community sympathizes. Mr. Wilson was a member of Hackett lodge, L.O.L., and of the 'Prentice Boys, and the funeral will take place on Thursday at 2:30 and will be under the auspices of these organizations.


EDGAR - Died in this city, on the morning of February 7, David Edgar, a native of Annan, Dumfries-shire, Scotland, in the 57th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 8 Locomotive street, at 2:30. Wednesday. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

David Edgar has passed away. He was a native of Annan, Dumfries-shire, Scotland, He crossed the sea to the United States in 1850, and came to Hamilton in 1855 and became a builder. He made his home here even since although for the past fifteen years his lumbering business in Mitchell necessitated his spending much of his time there. He recently closed the Mitchell business. He was a consistent Reformer and always took much interest in politics. He was a member of Central Presbyterian church and a freemason. He was a good Christian, man, well beloved of his family and intimate acquaintances and held in the highest respect by all. He leaves a grown-up family of two boys and two girls.

 

SMITH - (Belleville) On Saturday afternoon Luther Smith, an old employee of Brown's foundry, was suddenly seized with illness on Front street. He was taken home and died yesterday.

 

February 9, 1887

 

FULLER - Died in this city, on February 7, Ellen Louise, only daughter of Samuel and Sarah Fuller, aged 6 months and 1 day. Funeral on Wednesday, at 3:30 from 120 Wilson street. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

February 11, 1887

 

LEDDYCOAT - (Dundas) Dwight S. Leddycoat died yesterday morning at his home here. Consumption was the cause of his death. It was just one week on Monday since Mrs. Leddycoat died of the same disease. They leave four small children.

 

BARNES - (Milton) On Sunday, a young man, 27 years old, son of Mr. Barnes, lot 18, concession 2, Esquesing, committed suicide by hanging himself in his father's barn. Disappointment in love was the cause.

 

MATHIESON - (Halifax) Last evening two young sons of Gordon Mathieson were skating on a pan of ice which had grounded in a cove about a mile outside of Pictou lighthouse when the rising tide and a change of wind released the block of ice which began to drift away from the shore. The elder boy, eleven years old, got on a small cake of ice which was pushed towards the shore by his brother with sufficient force to send it into shoaler water, plunging into which the lad was able to wade ashore. Meanwhile the large pan of ice drifted gradually away and the younger boy, finding he would be carried to sea, jumped into the water and attempted to swim ashore, but after a few strokes he sank and was drowned.


February 12, 1887

 

SHEEHAN - Died at No 5 Little Peel street, on February 11th, Joseph, son of John Sheehan, aged 21 years and 8 months. Funeral from the above address on Sunday, February 13th, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are cordially invited to attend.

 

MCCOY - The inquest on Mrs. McCoy who was killed by a falling icicle was held to-day and a verdict of accidental death returned. (Montreal)

 

DEMPSEY - (Belleville) Miles Dempsey, who lived near Demorestville, Prince Edward county, was instantly killed yesterday by a kick from a young horse which he was breaking in. The deceased was 35 years of age and married.

 

WARD - (Montreal) John Ward, who lived on Knox street, met with a premature death this morning in the Grand Trunk yards at Point St Charles. He was engaged as gate keeper and was a trusted employee. This morning shortly after 6 o'clock he went to open the gate for the pilot engine when it appears he slipped on the ice and was fatally injured by the engine running over his body. According to a late report the unfortunate man has since died.

 

SAYLES - (Courtland) A most determined suicide occurred here this evening at about 5 o'clock in the person of Edwin Sayles, hotel keeper of this place. The act was undoubtedly premeditated as set forth in a few lines left by the deceased under the bar in the hotel. The instrument used was a single-barrelled shotgun loaded with shot. The muzzle of the gun had apparently been placed against the left frontal bone and the trigger touched by the ramrod while the deceased was sitting on the floor of the bedroom, the charge producing a ragged opening in the forehead and shattering the skull and lodging at the back of the brain. His wife, who was in the kitchen at the rear of the hotel, heard the discharge of the gun but could not account for it, and a few minutes later one of the little children was passing the door and saw his father, and ran back exclaiming "Oh, pa's shot himself". Mrs. Sayles rushed into the room only to find it was too true. The neighbourhood was instantly aroused and Dr. McKay called in who at once announced that death must have been instantaneous. Following are the lines left by the Deceased. "Dear friends and brothers and sisters, I am going to leave this world and go to a higher one. May the Lord have mercy on my family and my wife, the one I love. Telegraph right away to my mother and brothers and daughters. I loved my children dearly, but I could not support them now as they would like to


be. Farewell, my dear children, farewell. This case has been worked up in secrecy, but 1 see the whole thing. Mr wife has been a good wife and true. Look at my children and that will convince you. It is for the want of education I leave this world. I am sorry to leave my children, but I am going happy. Farewell to my dear little children. Dear wife, get good places for my children".

Some financial embarrassment is supposed to have affected his mind as no other cause can be assigned for the rash act. A good deal of sympathy is felt throughout the village for the wife and family, consisting of five children, the two eldest of whom he speaks of being at service in Brantford.

 

LEE - (Acton) T. Lee, who had been working as a fireman on the Chicago and Northwestern Railway, died in Chicago of typhoid fever and his remains were brought here for interment.

 

February 14, 1887

 

MACKEAND - Died at Winnipeg, on February 13th, Alfred Mackeand, in his 38th year.

 

February 15, 1887

 

MACKEAND - Died on February 14th, suddenly, at her father's residence, the beloved wife of George Mackeand, Hannah street, of this city. Funeral on Thursday, at 3 o'clock, from 72 Hannah street west. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. McKeand, wife of Mr. George Mackeand, 72 Hannah street west, fell yesterday afternoon about 2 o'clock on Concession street near the residence of her father, Mr. Thomas Bush. The deceased lady was on her way to see her father who is ill at present, when she felt suddenly faint and fell to the ground at the corner of Concession and Markland streets. She was conscious, however, and dispatched a messenger to her father's house and assistance was sent down, and she was taken up to her father's residence where she expired shortly afterward. Dr. Mackelcan was called in, but arrived too late to render any assistance. The cause of death was heart disease.

 

CRAWFORD - (Toronto) Isabella Valancy Crawford, the well known authoress, died at the residence of her mother in this city on Saturday night. Deceased was one of the best known of Canadian writers.

 

February 16, 1887

 

VEDDER - Died in this city, on February 14, George Vedder, in the 65th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, Mill street, on Wednesday, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.


CLOYD - Died in West Flamborough, on February 12, Edith, beloved wife of John Cloyd, and eldest daughter of George Laybourne, Nelson. Funeral took place on Tuesday, February 15, to Waterdown cemetery.

 

BURNS - (Ruscome Station) A very sad and fatal accident happened here at 2 o'clock this afternoon. Patrick Burns, while attempting to cross the track, was struck and instantly killed by the Chicago express going west which was one hour late and running about sixty miles an hour. There seems to be no blame attached to anyone but the unfortunate victim who was a farmer about 40 years of age and single.

 

SEVERS - (Niagara Falls) About 10 o'clock this morning a man by the name of Severs, a resident of Clarksville, near the suspension bridge, leaped from the railway bridge. He has been in ill health for some time from the effects of a stroke of paralysis. He was about 60 years of age and leaves a wife and family. He has done a great deal of work on the bridge he leaped from at various times during the past five years. No reason can be assigned why he took the fearful leap other than temporary insanity caused by ill health and despondency.

 

AUSTIN - William J. Austin, whose death is detailed as follows in the "Orangeville Post", was a grandson of Mr. Edward Passmore, 215 John street north, this city.

Thursday evening a young man received injuries at the depot here which resulted fatally shortly after noon of the same day. On the run down from Owen Sound, William J. Austin was a light hearted, energetic, and favourite brakeman on a special freight bound for Toronto. In the Orangeville yards, the usual work of shunting was being attended to when suddenly, as death frequently comes Mr. Austin was drawn underneath the merciless car wheels. He had made a coupling and was in the act of slipping clear when the accident occurred which cost him his life. On falling to the rails, the wheels caught both feet, slightly injured the left foot, and crushed the right leg its entire length. The unfortunate man was carried to the waiting room of the depot and medical aid was summoned. Dr. Henry could not be found, but Dr. Lewis immediately answered the call and all the assistance that human skill could render was given, but it was of no avail. Mr Austin's home was in Allegheny, Pa., and he died at the age of 21, a stranger in a strange land in the waiting room of the depot. But 'one touch of nature makes.the world kin' and the company's employees, notably the agent here, Mr. Brown, were unceasing in their efforts to alleviate the poor fellow's sufferings. The young man belonged to a Methodist family and before death ended his agony, he expressed a wish that a minister of that denomination be sent for. The request was immediately complied with, but as the Rev. Mr.' Piritte was out of town, Rev. W. A. Hunter., M.A., responded and consoled the youth in his dying hours. The Canadian Pacific Railway company assumed charge of the obsequies.


MCMILLAN - (Guelph) The wife of J. P. McMillan, Crown Attorney for Dufferin county, formerly of Guelph, is dead.

 

February 17, 1887

 

CONNELL - Died on February 16, Mary Ellen, only child of James and Mary Connell, aged one month. Funeral Friday, February 18, at 2:30 p.m. from her parents' residence, 134 Catherine street north. Friends and acquaintances kindly take notice.

 

MCGUINNIN - (Montreal) The remains of Joseph McGuinnin, who fell from a train and was killed at Tilton, N.Y. on February 7, arrived at the Bonaventure depot on Sunday evening. The widow claimed the body but was so poor that she could not bury her husband. The chief of police refused to claim and bury it. The Grand-Trunk Railway officials did not claim or bury it, and the city has taken no steps to give one of its former sons the last rite of humanity. Dr. Laberge to-day had the body removed to the cemetery. He blames the Grand Trunk Railway officials for bringing the corpse into the city without his permit.

 

ASCAH - (Gaspe) A sad accident occurred about three miles out of the village yesterday. Two young men named Ascah started out caribou hunting in the morning, and when about two miles in the woods, one feeling thirsty, attempted to break the ice which covered a small stream with the butt of his gun which discharged it sending the bullet through his neck, passing under the chin, and out through the back of his head. His companion, being unable to carry him home, rested him against a tree while he went in search of help, and on returning found him quite dead. His family are distracted with grief, he being the only son.

 

BURKE - (Brantford) Dermis Burke, a dairyman, while driving to Hamilton last week, upset his sleigh and has since died from the injuries received.

 

CLIFFORD - (Brantford) George Clifford, son of D. Clifford, undertaker, is dead.

 

February 18, 1887

 

GRAHAM - Died in this city, on February 16, Ethel, youngest daughter of George and Elenor Graham, aged 7 years. Funeral will leave her father's residence, 101 Hess street south, on Friday, February 18, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends are respectfully invited to attend.

 

MOSES - Died in Toronto, on February 16, Dorothy, eldest daughter of Thomas Moses, engineer G.T.R., aged 21 years. Funeral on Friday, February 18, from G.T.R. station at 1:45 p.m. to Burlington cemetery.


BENTON, WOODRUFF, BAGOT, CARVER, MCCORMICK - (Lavant, Ont) A sad accident occurred at the Wilber mine this morning about 1:30. Five men were killed and two wounded by a fall of ground from the roof.

The names of those killed are: John Benton, foreman; Thomas Woodruff, Julius Bagot, William Carver, and James McCormick. Those wounded are Louis Blowes and Joseph Revell.

 

HARMAN - (Toronto) Yesterday afternoon Alfred, the eight-year-old son of R. H. Harman, Huron street, went coasting with some playmates on a hill on the west side of the cricket grounds. While little Harman was descending the hill on his sled, a pair of bobs carrying four boys collided with him and the sharp runner of the bob ran into his abdomen. He died this morning.

 

COLLINS (Ottawa) Rev. J. J. Collins, parish priest of Mount St Patrick, Renfrew county, and formerly of this city, died suddenly yesterday.

 

February 19, 1887

 

HOWARD - Died on Friday morning, February 18th of paralysis, William H. Howard, aged 51 years. Funeral from his late residence, 17 Rebecca street, on Monday, at 8:30 a.m. for St Mary's Cathedral. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CUZNER - Died on Friday, February 18, Maggie, youngest daughter of Luke and Annie Cuzner, aged 10 months. The funeral will take place from the family residence, No 13 Lower Cathcart street, on Sunday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

O'MALLEY - (Toronto) Dennis O’Malley, 23 years of age, employed at Hickson's boat-building establishment, fell dead in his lodging house, York street, while at dinner to-day. Death resulted from heart disease.

 

HOWARD - Mr. William Henry Howard, tailor, died at his residence, Rebecca street, yesterday morning. He was taken with paralysis on Saturday morning last and continued to grow worse until death came to his relief. Mr. Howard was born in Baltimore and came to this city thirty years ago and has remained here ever since. He was a man of sterling worth and upright integrity. He was devotedly attached to his family and was much admired by a large circle of friends and acquaintances who knew him to be an unpretentious, gentlemanly, good man. The funeral will take place on Monday morning at 11 o'clock from St. Mary's cathedral.

 

February 22, 1887

 

STOKES (Halifax) A report from Kentville says that a man named James Stokes, having been


missed and a search being instituted, suspicious tracks were found leading across the dyke straight into the river. A boat was procured and men engaged in grappling for the body with the result of securing it. A Coroner's jury was immediately summoned and evidence elicited from various witnesses proved that Stokes had been attacked on the night before by a gang of ruffians and so badly mistreated that he had to run for his life, with the result of plunging into the river where he met his death. After hearing the evidence the jury brought in the following verdict: That the deceased James Stokes came to his death on the evening of February 15 by drowning in the Cornwallis river; that the deceased had been thoroughly frightened by having been previously beaten and maltreated by Fred Rafuse, Arthur Jones, George Walker, and Irving Connors, and that in attempting to escape he fell into the river and was drowned. Several of the parties have been arrested.

 

SWITZER - (St. Catharines) Mr. Edward Switzer, contractor and builder of this city, was killed this afternoon about four o'clock by falling from the roof of a house which he was building on Lyman street. At the time he was on the roof which the men were preparing to shingle when he slipped and fell to the ground, receiving injuries from which he died a short time afterward, never having regained consciousness.

 

February 23, 1887

 

BUSH - Died on February 22, at his residence, Mountain avenue, Thomas Bush, in the 87th year of his age. Funeral on Thursday, at 3 o'clock. Friends please accept this invitation.

 

KELLY - Died at 290 John street north, Monday, February 21, Elizabeth, beloved wife of Edward Kelly, aged 31 years, 1 month, and 22 days. Funeral from above address, Wednesday afternoon, at 2:30. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

February 24, 1887

 

LUCKENS - Died at Smith's Falls, Ontario, on Wednesday, February 23, Eliza, beloved wife of Rev. T. Luckens

 

REID - Died at his residence, Saltfleet, on February 21, Peter Reid, Sr., in the 81st year of his age, a native of Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Funeral on Friday, at 10:30 a.m., from the family residence, to the Old Kirk cemetery, Mount Albion.

Mr. Peter Reid of Saltfleet died last night shortly after midnight. He was an old, well-known, and highly respected resident of Wentworth county. For the past thirteen years he had been afflicted with a painful disease and death came to him as a welcome guest. Mr. Reid was a native of Aberdeenshire, Scotland. He came to Canada in 1835 and remained in the country four years,


serving as a volunteer in the rebellion of 1837. He went home to Scotland but remained only a year, and returning to Canada, came to Hamilton, and soon after went into the milling business at Mount Albion with Mr. Ness. In 1857 he bought a farm in Saltfleet, settled on it, and lived there until his death. He is survived by six children, three sons and three daughters, two of whom are married, and four live on the farm. Mrs. Reid died several years ago. Mr. Reid was a member of the Presbyterian church and in politics was a staunch, consistent Conservative. He lived long enough to learn of the great victory of Mr. Carpenter, in South Wentworth.

 

HALL - (Brantford) George Hall, an old resident, has just died, aged 84.

 

February 25, 1887

 

MOORE - Died in this city, on February 21, at No 1 Oak avenue, Hugh Hamilton Albert, infant son of W. J. and Alice Moore, aged 11 months and 17 days. Funeral on Friday, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

LAING - Died in this city, on February 24, at 50 Robinson street, John Alexander, youngest son of John T. and Elizabeth Laing, aged 1 year and 11 days. Funeral from above address, on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MORPHY - Died in this city, on February 23, Leonard J., only child of William Morphy, aged 3 years, 6 months, and 19 days. Funeral on Friday, February 25, at 2 o'clock from 72 Hughson street north. Funeral private.

 

February 26, 1887

 

PEDEN - Died in this city, on February 25, Mary Peden, relict of the late James Peden, in the 79th year of her age. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, John Montgomery, corner of Main and Pearl streets, Sunday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

FIRKINS - Died in Toronto, on February 23, Alfred W. Firkins, aged 52 years, formerly of Hamilton. Funeral took place Thursday afternoon, to St James cemetery, Toronto.

Alfred Firkins, aged 59, fell downstairs in his son's residence, Queen street east, Toronto, last night, receiving such injuries that he died a few hours afterward.


February 28, 1887

 

ALLAN - Died on Sunday, February 27, Caroline Hutton, beloved wife of William C. Allan, in the 21st year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, 51 Florence street, Tuesday, March 1, at 3:30 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

SMITH - Died in this city, February 26, youngest son of Charles and Alice Smith, aged ? year and 10 months. Funeral from ----- street north, at 2 o'clock, Monday, February 28.

 

DECHAUTEL - (Montreal) Dame O'Dechautel has taken an action for $10,000 against the Canadian Pacific Railway Company on account of the death of her husband who was killed while working on the company's lines.

 

LORANGER - (Montreal) Madame Loranger, aunt of Judge Loranger, fell through a trap in the church of Notre Dame a few days ago and has since died of the injuries then received at the advanced age of 85 years.

 

CAVALLERE - (Montreal) An Italian named Salvatore Cavallere of Sorel, who came to town yesterday, purchased a quantity of blue potash and took part of it and died immediately after. No reason can be assigned for the rash act.

 

BERGERON - (Ottawa) a man named Bergeron, a resident of Mechanicsville and employed in shovelling snow at the C.P.R. yards, was struck by an engine last evening and killed, his body being badly mangled.

 

March 1, 1887

 

MOORE - Died at 56 East avenue north, on February 28, Eliza, beloved wife of Alfred Moore, aged 43 years. Funeral will take place on Wednesday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BAUMANN - (Waterloo) One of Waterloo's oldest residents passed away last evening in the person of Mr. Moses Baumann. He was as well as usual up to within a few minutes of his death. Apoplexy was the cause of Mr. Baumann's death. He was born in this county in the year 1815 and lived all his days in it. He was very highly esteemed for his many good qualities of head and heart. His son, Dr. Baumann, is a practising physician in this town.

 

MARSHALL - (Ayr) Ralph Marshall, Sr., was killed to-day on the farm of John Wells, North Dumfries, by a tree falling across his body while engaged in chopping.

 

CASTLEMAN - (Montreal) Timis Castleman, a passenger conductor in the service of the Grand


Trunk Railway, was sent out in charge of a snowplough this morning at Brosseau. The plough got stuck in the snow, Castleman leaped off with the intention of making known the fact for the benefit of trains which would be passing, but before he got clear of the plough, it backed upon him, striking him in the head and killing him instantly.

 

March 2, 1887

 

WINN - Died in this city, on March 1, George, eldest son of George and Jessie Winn, aged 3 years and 10 months. Funeral from parents' residence, 267 Cannon street east, on Thursday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SHARP - (Welland) A brakeman, named Sharp, fell from a freight car on the Canada Southern Railway here this morning and broke his neck. His remains were taken to St. Thomas on the mail train.

 

HURSON - (Toronto) An old man named William Hurson, while shovelling grain this afternoon in Hamilton's elevator, fell into the chute and was smothered alive before assistance arrived.

 

March 3, 1887

 

SKIRVING - Died in London, February 28, Emma, wife of David Skirving, Bank of British North America, aged 39 years.

Dr. Stark has gone to London to attend the funeral of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Skirving, formerly a resident of Hamilton. Her husband was formerly in the Bank of British North America here, but for many years has been teller in the London branch of that bank. Mrs. Skirving was a daughter of Major Towers of St. Catharines.

 

SINCLAIR - (London) A fatal accident occurred on the air line of the Grand Trunk Railway about a mile and a half east of Glencoe on Tuesday night. A farmer named John Sinclair, living in Ekfrid, had been in the village and left for home about nine p.m., walking on the track. At the first cross road there is a culvert and it is supposed that he fell into the culvert and while endeavouring to get out, a freight train came along and killed him. There was a quantity of blood on the timbers of the culvert and the remains of the deceased were scattered a quarter of a mile down the track, the head having been completely severed from the body, The remains were so mutilated that identification was impossible at first, but his name on the label of a medicine bottle and his cap furnished a clue to his identity. The deceased was about 55 years of age and leaves a wife and eight young children.


DOREEN - (Belleville) A little girl, six years old, daughter of John Doreen of Shannonville, was drowned in the Salmon river there last night. She was coasting from the high bank on to the ice through which the sled broke. The body was recovered.

 

March 4, 1887

 

BAINE - Died at her mother's residence, 79 John street north, on March 2, Libbie Pulkingham, beloved wife of J. W. Baine, aged 28 years and 1 day. Funeral will take place on Friday at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

SANDERS - Died at her father's residence, 101 Cathcart street, Violet Mable, aged 4 months. Funeral from her father's residence, R. J. Sanders, Friday at 10 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BENSON - (Montreal) A woman about 40 years of age named Bridget Benson died in a common lodging house at the rear of Roscoe's Hotel, 181 St Paul street. She went to bed in her usual health and was heard to call out. Shortly after, she expired. The woman was much addicted to drink and was separated from her husband who keeps a store in New York, having the charge of six children. The deceased told the people she had been living with that she was well connected in the city, giving the names of her relatives, and that a large amount of money was due her of which she received a small instalment every week.

 

SHEPARD - (St John, N.B.) Benjamin Shepard belonging to Chatham and employed on the Intercolonial Railway shovelling snow was crushed to death at Newcastle this afternoon. In attempting to jump from a boxcar he fell beneath the wheels and was dragged a quarter of a mile. When the train was stopped he was found to be terribly mangled and perfectly lifeless.

 

March 5, 1887

 

SEATON - Died on March 3, Elizabeth Ott, only child of William and Jane Seaton. Funeral will her parents' residence, 128 Victoria avenue north, on Monday, March 7, at 3:30. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

TRACEY - (Toronto) A middle-aged woman supposed to be Mary Tracey of Montreal deliberately suicided at the Union Station about four o'clock this morning. She went to the station late last night and said she wished to go to London on the morning train. She located herself in the waiting room and as she conducted herself in a peculiar manner, Detective Spence kept watching her movements. During his absence for a few minutes, however, a freight train came along and she jumped through the window of the waiting room and flung herself in front of it.


Three cars passed over her, cutting off her legs and otherwise mangling her body. She died in a few minutes and her body was taken to the morgue. In her pocket a letter of recommendation was found signed by Mrs. Shannon, 804 Palace street, Montreal. She had evidently been a domestic servant.

 

SULLIVAN - (St. Catharines) Michael Sullivan, at one time captain of the Neptune hose company, is dead.

 

March 7, 1887

 

FOVEY (Povery) - Died in this city, on Saturday, March 5, Rachel D., wife of Harry Povery, and daughter of the late Richard Gowan, of Saltfleet. Funeral from her late residence, 33 Barton street east, on Tuesday, March 8, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

ELLIS - Died in this city, on March 6, Eliza Ellis, relict of the late Henry Ellis, of Glanford, formerly of Sligo, Ireland, in the 85th year of her age. Funeral will leave the residence of her son-in-law, John Temple, 60 Gore street, on Tuesday, March 8, at 11:30 o'clock to the Glanford burying ground. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HINES - Died on Saturday, March 5, Laura Edith, daughter of Charles and Celestia Hines, aged 1 year, 8 months, and 8 days. Funeral private.

 

GARRISON - Died at his father's residence, Havelock, Ontario, March 1, Harry C. Garrison, in the 21st year of his age, brother of J. Garrison, engineer N. & N.W. railway, this city.

 

TROTTIER - (Montreal) A man named Jean Baptiste Trottier, aged 63 years, while returning from church last evening, dropped down on Notre Dame street and when picked up, life was found to be extinct.

 

March 8, 1887

 

MORRISON - Died at his father's residence, Locke street near York, this city, on Sunday, March 6, John W. Morrison, late of Buffalo, N.Y., and only surviving son of S. W. Morrison, in the. 29th year of his age. Funeral will take place from his father's residence, to the family burying ground (Lottridge's, lake shore, Barton), on Tuesday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

HUDSON - Died at her father's residence, corner of South and Garth streets, Edith Eveline, the only daughter of George and Elizabeth Jane Hudson. Funeral will take place from her father's residence, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


March 9, 1887

 

MCDONALD - (Niagara Falls) Angus McDonald, conductor on the Canadian division of the Michigan Central Railway, was killed at the Montrose yards at an early hour this morning. While passing from one car to another he missed his footing and fell across the rails, and one of the cars passed over his legs, mangling them so that death resulted in a short time.

 

March 10, 1887

 

MEMORY - Died in this city, on March 8, at 164 Napier street, Elizabeth Amelia, youngest daughter of John and Mary Memory, in the 7th year of her age. Funeral on Thursday, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

DODDS - Died in this city, on March 9, at No 23 Elgin street, Jean Renwick, third daughter of Robert Dodds, aged 24 years. Friends are requested to attend the funeral at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday.

 

STEWART - Died in this city, on March 9, Robert A. Stewart, eldest son of the late Hugh Stewart, aged 17 years, 6 months. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend the funeral at 4:15, Friday afternoon from hi&mother's residence, corner of Ferguson avenue and King William street.

 

PARKER - (Halifax) At Hall's Harbour, Kings, yesterday, Mrs. Henry Parker, while moving about near the stove, caught her dress in the fire and in a moment she was ablaze. She rushed into the street, completely enveloped in flame and the attention of the neighbours being attracted, the flames were extinguished. The woman was so badly injured that she died six hours afterward after suffering intense agony.

 

FRASER - Died at Ottawa, Tuesday, March 9, W. H. Fraser, Dominion Appraiser, aged 60 years. Funeral from the residence of James Walker, corner of Main and Bay streets, Hamilton, on Friday, at 3 o'clock, to Burlington cemetery. Friends are invited.

The well known Dominion appraiser, W. H. Fraser, died on Tuesday at his residence at Ottawa at the age of 60 years. Mr. Fraser had been a resident of this city for some years and was formerly secretary of the Manufacturers Association of Ontario. He acted also as secretary to the Ontario commission in connection with the centennial exhibition at Philadelphia in 1876. He took a very active part in advocating a protective policy during the campaign of 1873 and was appointed to his present position in 1880. Mr. Fraser was born in Scotland where he was brought up and educated, coming from there to New York where he remained some years before making Canada


his home. Mr. Fraser at one time was a resident of Hamilton. His remains will be brought here for burial and the funeral will take place on Friday at y o'clock from the residence of James Walker, corner of Bay and Main streets. The funeral will be under the auspices of Barton Lodge, A.F. and A.M.

 

March 11, 1887

 

LEGAULT - Died in this city, on March 10, Delphine Legault, youngest child of James Legault. Funeral will leave 16 Smith avenue, Saturday, March 12, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

MCINTYRE - Died on Thursday, March 10, John McIntyre, in the 51st year of his age. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend the funeral from his late residence, No 111 Cherry street, at 2 p.m., on Saturday, March 12.

 

QUIGLEY - (Gravenhurst) Christopher Quigley of West Gravenhurst was instantly killed at Deblaquier's mill, Log Lake, to-day while attempting to put a belt on a pulley. The unfortunate man was wearing an apron which caught on a key which fastens the wheel to the shaft.

 

March l2, 1887

 

GLEN - Died in this city, on March 11, Christina, infant daughter of Richard and Mary Glen, aged 1 year and 8 months. Funeral from parents' residence, 106 Simcoe street east, on Sunday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

HILL - Died at his residence in this city, March 11, Henry Hill, aged 61 years. Funeral will take place from his late residence, No 98 Rebecca street, on Sunday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

About 7:30 o'clock yesterday morning a report was brought to No 3 police station that Henry Hill, butcher, of 98 Rebecca street had hanged himself. Sergeant Prentice and P. C. Strongman immediately went to the house and found that the body had been cut down and was lying on the stable floor. Life was extinct though the body was still quite warm.

Mr. Hill went as usual about 7 o'clock to harness the horse and after doing so turned it loose in the yard. He removed the lines from the harness and hanged himself with them, placing them over a small crosspiece between two of the joists of the ceiling which is not much over six feet from the floor. He has been in bad health for over a year and it was known to members of the family for some time that his mind was affected although he was able to transact business as usual. Dr. Wilson had been treating him for some nervous complaint and he had notified his


friends to watch him as his brain was becoming affected by his malady. After the deceased had been out in the stable for some time the family missed him, and Mrs. Hill and her daughter went out and found him hanging as above described. They immediately gave the alarm and Donald Sutherland, Robert Wilson, Edward Watson, and other neighbours were soon upon the scene, and Drs. Wilson and Dillabaugh were telephoned for. The stable was very dark and it was with some difficulty that the body could be got at until a light was procured. Consequently a slight delay took place in taking him down, but when Mr. Wilson and Mr. Sutherland arrived they found the body quite warm and at once had him removed and laid upon the floor of the stable where every effort was made to restore animation, but without effect. The body, when found, had the feet resting on the floor with the knees slightly bent. The head had been simply placed in a loose loop formed by tying the reins over the beam, and the weight of the body, deceased being a very heavy man, had caused death by strangulation. Dr. Dillabaugh arrived shortly after the body was taken down but life was already extinct.

Mr. Hill was an old resident of Hamilton, having lived here about 32 years. He was about 60 years of age and leaves a wife and family of three daughters and one son, all of whom are grown up, one daughter and his son being married. He did business in a butcher shop on Rebecca street for many years, and his son, George H. Hill, keeps a butcher shop on King street west. His family have the sympathy of all in the sad bereavement which has overtaken them. Mr. Hill was a man of sterling character, well liked and respected by all who knew him, and many were the expressions of sorrow heard in the streets to-day when the fact of his death became known.

Dr. Biggar went down to the house of deceased and after being made acquainted with the circumstances attending the matter, decided that an inquest was not necessary.

 

FARLEY - (Toronto) Mrs. James Farley, a widow lady about 57 years of age, residing on Shuter street, committed suicide this morning by hanging herself in her house. The rope was tied to the banisters and she had adjusted the noose around her neck and swung herself over. Her husband died about two months ago and she had been very despondent ever since.

 

THOMPSON - (Montreal) This afternoon a man named B. Thompson, aged 21 years, attempted to jump off the cars at Mountain Street crossing. He slipped and fell to the ground, dying shortly after.

 

LITTLE - John Little was born in Berkshire, England, about 80 years ago when on account of a quarrel with his sweetheart, he left England and came to Saltfleet township. He served in the rebellion of 1837-38, and afterwards built a log house near Stony Creek.


There he lived for fifty years with no companion but a cat and a dog. On Monday the old man was found dead in bed by one of his neighbours who had gone to look after his wants. He was buried by the township officers.

 

MERRITT - (Brantford) Robert Merritt of Oaklands, aged 60, died from a stroke of apoplexy.

 

HEARLE (Beamsville) I regret to have to record that the hand of affliction has again fallen heavily on our well known and respected citizen, William Hearle, who has been called upon to mourn the loss of another of his family in the person of his eldest daughter, a young lady whose many virtues were well known and appreciated by nearly all in our village. Though always of a quiet and retiring disposition, she endeared herself to all with whom she came in contact, and it will be long before her place will be filled or her goodness fade from the memory of her friends. Deceased had been slightly ailing for some time and about three weeks ago got worse, but it was not until three days before she expired that it became apparent that death had claimed her, so that her demise was as sudden as unexpected. She bore her sufferings with meek resignation to her Heavenly Father's will and the summons found her waiting. The remains were consigned to their last resting place this afternoon and the large number of sympathizing friends from far and near who followed the hearse testified to the esteem in which her family are held. The floral tributes were very beautiful...

 

March 14, 1887

 

CAMPBELL - Died in this city, on March 12, Edna Christabelle, infant daughter of Edward and Marion Campbell, aged 7 months, and 12 days. Funeral from parents' residence, 198 Barton street east, Monday, March 14, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

KELLY - Died in this city, on March 12, Mary Whitelaw, relict of the late Thomas Kelly, in the 50th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, 83 Hunter street west, on Monday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

SMITH (Florence) A child, eight years of age, the daughter of Walter Smith in the township of Dawn, was killed to-day by the top of a straw stack falling upon her. Several children were playing about the stack at the time. All escaped but the one. Assistance was speedily procured, but life was extinct before the frozen straw could be removed.

 

March 15, 1887

 

LEAVERS - Died in this city, March 14, of diphtheria, James William, son of George and


Martha A. Leavers, aged 7 months and 7 days. Funeral took place yesterday afternoon from 185 Main street west. Private.

 

HILL - Died suddenly Sunday evening, March 13, Mary Sibylla, beloved wife of Mark Hill, aged 43 years. Friends are respectfully requested to attend the funeral at 3:30 p.m., Wednesday, from her late residence, No 102 James street north.

Mrs. Mark Hill of No 102 James street north died very suddenly last night. She attended the evening service at Christ Church Cathedral and was on her way home when she suddenly fell prostrate to the ground. She was carried into McKeachie's bakery and placed on a lounge where she died in a few minutes. Dr. Lafferty was summoned, but the unfortunate lady had breathed her last before he arrived. Heart disease was the cause of her death.

 

WHITTAKER - Died in this city, on March 12, Frederick C. Whittaker, aged 9 years. Funeral took place from his father's residence, corner of Wentworth and South streets, yesterday (Monday), March 14, at 3 o'clock p.m.

 

CONKLIN - Died on March 13, after a long illness borne with great patience, Willie E. Conklin, in the 21st year of his age. Funeral on Wednesday, March 15, from 127 Hunter street west, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MUNRO - Died in this city, on March 13, Mary, relict of the late John Munro, and mother of Colin Munro, aged 74 years and 8 months. Funeral on Tuesday, at 3 p.m., from her late residence, 26 Guise street. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

BARTMANN - Died in this city, on March 13, Lydia A., sixth daughter of George William Bartmann, aged 4 years and 7 months. Funeral from 84 Wellington street south, on Tuesday, at 3:30 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ANDERSON - Died in Dundas, on March 13, in the 72nd year of his age, John Anderson, father of Mrs. Neil Mackay of this city. The funeral will take place Wednesday, March 15, at 4 p.m., from his late residence, Hatt street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MITCHELL - Died at Carluke, Ancaster, on Sunday morning, March 13, Ann, beloved wife of John Mitchell, in her 70th year. Funeral Tuesday at 2 o'clock. Friends please accept this notice.

 

WARDEN - Died in this city, on Saturday, March 12, Benjamin Warden, aged 68 years. Funeral from his late residence, 21 Gore street, on Tuesday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend.


CARLYON - Died in this city, on March 14, Walter Clifton Carlyon, only son of William Carlyon, 135 John street north, aged 8 months. Funeral from above address on Wednesday, March 16, at 3 o'clock.

 

PRINGLE - Died in this city, on March 15, R. Pringle, in the 24th year of his age. Funeral from 23 Oak avenue, on Wednesday, March 16, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

LEROUX - (Montreal) Mrs. Alexander Leroux, residing at 190 Centre street, Point St Charles, was found dead in bed this morning.

 

March 16, 1887

 

SULLIVAN - Died in this city, on March 14, Mary, the beloved wife of Patrick Sullivan, aged 47 years. Funeral from her late residence, No 5 Greig street, on Thursday, March 17, at 8:30 a.m. sharp, for the Holy Sepulchre R. C. Cemetery, Rock Bay. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DENNISON - (Bracebridge) Early this morning Hugh Dennison's refreshment house, a frame building near the railway station, was destroyed by fire. It is supposed to have originated in Dennison's bedroom and when discovered had made such headway as to render it impossible to save either the building or contents. The house was broken into and every effort made to rescue the inmates, Dennison and his wife, but it was quite impossible to do so as the interior of the building was enveloped in flames. As soon as the fire could be extinguished a search was made among the debris and the charred remains of Dennison and his wife were found in different parts of the ruins.

 

FORGET - (Montreal) At the inquest on the body of Madame Forget, who was injured during the attack on the ice castle and who has since died from the effects of the same, the jury's verdict stated that such dangerous missiles known as pyrotechnic bombs should not be permitted to be discharged within the squares and streets of the city.

 

March 17, 1887

 

CROSSLEY - Irving Crossley, aged 34 years, departed this life on Wednesday morning at 5 o'clock, of heart disease. Funeral from his late residence, 73 Herkimer street. Funeral private.

 

LEITCH - (Ottawa) Wallace Leitch, baggageman on the C.P.R. local train from Montreal to this city, was killed at 10:30 this p.m. Just as the train was arriving in the station, the baggage car ran off the track and Veitch who was inside, opened the door to jump out.


Just as he jumped, the car overturned, falling on him and crushing him into a shapeless mass. He was aged about 22 years. His father, William Veitch, is a conductor on the road.

 

MCNISH - (Windsor) The inhabitants of this place were startled last evening about 9 o'clock by the announcement of the suicide of one of the oldest and most highly esteemed citizens, John McNish. At about the hour named, McNish seems to have experienced a fit of temporary insanity. He arose, secured his razor, and with one desperate blow severed the muscles, windpipe, jugular vein and artery of his throat, expiring in a few minutes. His aged wife who had no doubt witnessed the act was so overcome by the deed that she could only scream, which brought in the neighbours. For hours the woman lay in hysterics and was only quieted by artificial means. A coroner was summoned and decided that no inquest was necessary. The deceased was a man of considerable means.

 

FOX - (Windsor) Daniel Fox, a South Gosfield farmer, was fatally injured yesterday. He owns a vicious stallion and was the only one who could feed the animal. Yesterday he slipped in the horse's stall when the brute started to tramp on him. His cries attracted the attention of the hired man and Fox was taken out more dead than alive. Two of his ribs were broken and he is suffering internal injuries.

 

March 18, 1887

 

GOULD - Died in Kansas City, Frank Gould, aged 6 years, youngest child of George and Margaret Gould. Funeral from G.T.R. station, Friday morning, March 18, at 7 a.m.

 

WAGSTAFF - Died at his residence, 23 Magill street, Walter Wagstaff, aged 67 years, formerly of Dundas. Funeral on Sunday at 1:30 p.m. from his late residence to family burying ground, Dundas. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FOGARTY - (Centralia) While cutting ice in the Sauble River, two miles from this place, along with Mr. Moffat, hotel keeper, and during Moffatt's absence momentarily, Timothy Fogarty of this place apparently lost his footing and was drowned. No trace of him can be found, but the tongs which he was using were found at the bottom of the river, which leads to the belief that it is too true. Fogarty leaves a wife and five of a family.

 

HOWARD - (Caledonia) Robert Howard, formerly a miller here, died at Jarvis on Wednesday.


March 19, 1887

 

BAWDIN - Died on Monday, March 14, May Frances Jane, aged 5 years and 1 month, the beloved daughter of John and Margaret Bawdin, corner of Hunter and Foulet streets.

 

SHARP - Died at the residence, 40 ½ Hunter street east, after a painful illness of nearly five weeks' duration which he bore with Christian fortitude, George Sharp, a native of Ickham, near Canterbury, Kent, England, aged 81 years. His end was peace. Funeral from the above address at 3 p.m. on Monday, March 21. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

MCMULLEN - (Halifax) A shocking affair is reported from Mull River, near Mabou, C.B., yesterday. Two young boys named McMullen and Worth got into a dispute during which the latter became enraged, picked up a hammer, and struck the other a terrific blow on the right temple. McMullen dropped dead with a ghastly wound in the forehead.

 

March 21, 1887

 

COLLINS - Died on March 19, John, infant son of Joseph and Elizabeth Collins, aged 5 months. Funeral from his parents' residence, 306£ John street north, at 2:30 p.m., on Sunday.

 

CADDY - Died in this city, on March 19, Capt. John Herbert Caddy, late Royal Artillery, in his 86th year. Funeral from his late residence, 22 Main street west, on Tuesday, at 3:30 p.m.

 

LATTIMER - Died in this city, on March 20, at the residence, 72 Locomotive street, J. M. Lattimer, a native of Dumfries, Scotland, aged 53 years. Funeral from above address on Wednesday, March 23, at 11 a.m., to G.T.R. station, for Sutton, York county. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

March 22, 1887

 

SMITH - Died in this city, on March 21, Ellen Smith, aged 36 years. Funeral will leave her late residence, 81 Maria street, on Wednesday, March 23, at 8:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

Mrs. Smith, who met with a terrible accident at Sanford's two or three years ago, died yesterday. After recovering from the accident by which she lost her hair and scalp, Mrs. Smith took a situation in a retail store, but her health gave and she was compelled to give it up. Mrs. Smith leaves two beautiful little daughters who will be taken care of by friends.


CHARETTE - (Montreal) A young girl named Rosanna Charette, 12 years old, met with a very sad accident yesterday afternoon in the convent of St Henri. Rosanna was playing at jack stones and had in her mouth one of those small whistle balloons so much in use among children. When lifting her head to catch one of the stones as it fell, the toy went down her throat. She at once made an effort to force it back, but this simply made her condition worse for the air from her lungs inflated the balloon which then completely prevented the passage of air. The poor child went into convulsions, and the sisters in despair at once summoned medical aid but too late, as the girl died shortly after.

 

TOWNSEND - (Halifax) The schooner "Parthenia", from Trinidad, reports that on March 13, John Townsend, the first mate, was knocked overboard and drowned. The accident occurred at five o'clock in the morning. The first and second mates were knocked over together, but the latter was saved.

 

March 24, 1887

 

SPECK - Died at her residence, in East Flamborough, on March 23, from the effects of paralysis, Margaret J. Speck, the beloved wife of Mr. Stephen Speck, aged 68 years. The deceased lady had been a resident of East Flamborough for upwards of thirty years, and was universally respected as a kind-hearted and considerate neighbour, a devoted wife, and indulgent parent. She leaves a husband, one son, and three daughters to mourn her loss. Her end was peace.

 

LEAVERS - Died in this city, on March 23, of diphtheria, Clara, only daughter of George and the late Frances Leavers, aged 6 years, and 4 days. Funeral from 185 Main street west, at 10 o'clock a.m. to-morrow. Private.

 

March 25, 1887

 

MCCAULEY - Died on Wednesday, March 23, Mary McCauley, aged 31 years. Funeral on Friday at 8 a.m. from her mother's residence, No 9 Spring street. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CHAPMAN - Died in this city, on March 23, Margaret Bridget, wife of Stephen Chapman, aged 22 years. Funeral from the residence of her father, William Mulcahey, foot of Victoria avenue north, on Friday, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

KENDLE - Died in the cottage at Highfield, on March 24, Bertrand William, second son of Sarah and James Kendle, aged 4 years, 2 months, and 5 days. Funeral to leave the house for the Grand Trunk railway on Saturday, at 2:30. Friends please attend.


LEE - (Dundas) Forty years ago James Lee drove a four-horse stage from Dundas to Hamilton and always landed his passengers at the wharf in time for the morning boat east. He came down to two horses when the roads got better, kept a fruit store here, and was a well known character. Many years ago he went to St. Catharines and there he died last week and was buried in Dundas. In St. Catharines he was employed as a coachman by Mrs. D. L. St John for some time, but of late had been working for William Chaplin in the same capacity.

 

ANDERSON - (St. Catharines) George Anderson, aged 24, is dead.

 

March 26, 1887

 

HAINES - Died in this city, on Friday, March 25, 1887, Sophia, aged 2 years and 8 months, twin daughter of Lemuel and Emma Haines. Funeral from their residence, No 31 Margaret street, on Saturday, at 3:30 p.m.

 

TONER - Died in this city, on March 24, at No 1 Poulette street, Ellen, beloved wife of Hugh Toner, aged 23 years. Funeral on Saturday, at 2:30 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

WEBBER - Died in this city, on Friday, March 25, Eva, aged 20 days, infant daughter of Walter and Emma Webber. Funeral from their residence, No 13 Hess street south, on Sunday, at 3:30 p.m.

 

BOWDEN - (Windsor) E. J. Bowden, a switchman in the yards of Canada Southern Railway here, who was crushed between two flat cars on Monday night, sustained serious internal injuries, and since the accident has been gradually getting worse. The doctor said last night that Bowden's injuries were fatal.

 

BOSTON - (Ottawa) The coroner's jury into the cause of the death of Mrs. Boston at Aylmer on Wednesday has brought in a verdict to the effect that Mrs. Boston came to her death by fire accidentally set by her husband while in a state of intoxication.

 

March 28, 1887

 

CHAMBERLIN - Died on March 24, at 4 Mill street, Lilly May Chamberlin, youngest daughter of Rachael and John Chamberlin, aged 11 years and 17 days.

 

MCBRIDE - Died in Barton, on March 25, Joseph McBride, in the 92nd year of his age. a native of County Down, Ireland. Funeral from his late residence, Rymal Station, Monday, March 28, at 2 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

Joseph McBride of Rymal Station died on Friday in his 92nd year. He was born in the County Down, Ireland whence he emigrated in 1819 to Ohio.


He spent a couple of years in Ohio and Pennsylvania and returned home to settle up the family estate after which he came to Canada, settling in East Toronto Township in 1837. He remained there till the spring of 1863 when he removed to Binbrook in which township he remained till 1873. He then removed to Rymal and resided there until his death. He leaves six sons and three daughters. His wife died thirteen years ago. The deceased gentleman was well-known and highly respected for his uprightness of character, and endeared himself to his acquaintances by his many excellent qualities of mind and heart.

 

FICKLEY Died in this city, on March 25, at 36 Canada street, Annie, infant daughter of William and Agnes Fickley, aged 26 days.

 

HAWKINS - Died in this city, on March 26, at 16 Cherry street, Alice, beloved daughter of Henry and Mary Hawkins, aged 8 months, and 18 days.

 

MACDONALD - Died in this city, on March 26, Abraham Alexander Macdonald, in the 25th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 101 Rebecca street, Monday, March 28, at 2 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

MCKENNA - Died in this city, on Saturday, March 26, Thomas Arthur, youngest son of James and Margaret McKenna, aged 4 years and 10 months. Funeral from his father's residence, 79 Peter street, on Tuesday afternoon, at 3:30. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WINCKLER - Died in this city, on March 27, Carl Herman Winckler, in the 48th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 97 King street west, on Tuesday, March 29, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

TIERNEY - (Belleville) Edward Tierney, a young man who lived near Trenton, shot himself fatally with a shotgun yesterday afternoon. Dissipation is supposed to have been the cause.

 

HANN - (Stevensville) Last night between ten and twelve o'clock David Hann, a resident of Bertie, was run down by a train on the Grand Trunk Railway track about two miles out of this place. Hann was addicted to strong drink, having been in the village all day. He left for home via the railway track late in the evening in company with Mr. Winger. Upon reaching Mr. Winger's house, Hann continued on his way and went only a short distance when he was overtaken by the train and run down, being mangled in a horrible manner. A bottle of whiskey was found with him.


March 30, 1887

 

BAKER - Died at the residence of his son-in-law, I. B. McQuesten, No 15 Jackson street west, on Tuesday, March 29, Rev. Thomas Baker, in the 92nd year of his age. Funeral from the above address on Friday, April 1, at 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

A very long life was ended in this city last evening. Rev. Thomas Baker died at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr. I. B. McQuesten. The deceased was over 91 years of age. He was an Englishman and in early life was a lieutenant in the Royal navy. About fifty years ago he came to Canada and lived for a long time in Toronto and Newmarket, being pastor of the Congregational Church in the latter place. For the past ten or fifteen years he lived in Hamilton, latterly at the house of Mr. McQuesten. One daughter, Mrs. McQuesten, and two sons survive him.

 

March 31, 1887

 

MERRICK - (Ottawa) Jeremiah Merrick, sheriff of Russell and Prescott counties, died last evening.

 

TOMLINSON - (Guelph) James Tomlinson, a farmer from Maryborough township, committed suicide in the jail here this morning by hanging himself to his cell door with a towel. Deceased was 45 years of age and leaves a wife and family. Tomlinson was confined in the jail as a lunatic, his relatives being unable to procure his admission into an asylum. Financial difficulties were the cause of his trouble. As there are six insane persons still in the jail, it is evident the government should do something towards having them properly cared for as this cannot be done in a county jail.

 

April 1, 1887

 

BAWDEN Died on Tuesday, March 27, Albert David, aged 11 years and 11 months, beloved son of John and Margaret Bawden, corner of Hunter and Poulette streets. The funeral took place privately.

 

HILL - Died on Thursday morning, March 13, at 522 Munroe street, Chicago, Illinois, Susie Harrison, aged 28 years, youngest daughter of Henry Harrison of this city, and beloved wife of Walter Hill, Chicago. The remains will arrive by the 6:60 express, Saturday morning. Funeral will leave her father's residence, 51 James street south, at 2 p.m., Sunday, April 3. Friends will please attend.

 

HUTCHINSON - Died in this city, on March 31, Mr. George Hutchinson, in the 66th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 44 West avenue south, Sunday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


HUTCHINSON - Many of the "Spectator" readers will learn with regret of the death of Mr. George Hutchinson which occurred at his residence, 44 West avenue south. Deceased came to Canada from Dublin, Ireland, forty-three years ago and has been a resident of Hamilton ever since. His funeral, which occurs on Sunday, will be conducted by Excelsior Lodge, I.O.O.F. of which he was a member. In fact it was while attending a meeting of this lodge nearly three years ago, held for the purpose of attending the funeral of a deceased member, that he received the paralytic stroke which resulted in his death.

 

MURPHY - (Ottawa) An old man named John Murphy, a corporation labourer, met his death this afternoon by falling down the steps leading to the boiler room of the Provincial Normal School. He had been working on a drain outside and it is supposed he went in to light his pipe or for some similar purpose. The engineer heard the fall and found the lifeless body.

 

April 2, 1887

 

MCLAUGHLIN - Died on Friday, April 1, at her brother's residence, 1063 Yonge street, Kate McLaughlin, wife of Mr. John McLaughlin, late of Dundas, aged 32 years.

 

April 4, 1887

 

EAGER - Sunday, April 3, Sarah, relict of the late Joseph B. Eager, aged 77 years, and mother of H. A. and J. D. Eager. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, W. E. Stewart, 25 Hunter street west, on Tuesday, at 2 p.m.

 

SUMMERS - (Toronto) The body of William Summers, carpenter, was found in a puddle of water on the bay front near where he had been working. It is thought that Summers, who was subject to fits, had while in one of these fell into the shallow water and been suffocated.

 

LITTLE - (Quebec) James Little, residing on Fleuri street, St. Roach, died last night from injuries sustained from an avalanche of snow and ice. The deceased was at work in the yard of Mr. Thomas O'Neill in Daiguillon street yesterday afternoon when a mass of snow and ice came off the roof, crushing him to the earth.

 

LESSER - (Quebec) The coroner's jury held yesterday on the body of Louis Lesser, clerk, who dropped dead in Mr. Paguet's store, St. Roach, rendered a verdict of death from cerebral apoplexy. The deceased was 41 years of age and leaves a wife and four children.

 

GORDON - (Guelph) T. Gordon, the veteran printer of Canada, died here on Friday. He had worked 57 years at his trade.


April 5, 1887

 

ELLIOTT - Died in this city, on Sunday, April 3, James Elliott, in the 65th year of his age, a native of Roxburghshire, Scotland. Funeral from his son's residence, 143 Main street east, on Tuesday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

LANGTON - Died in this city, on April 3, Julia Langton, a native of County Kilkeney, Ireland, in the 70th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, 134 Jackson street east, on Tuesday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SHAW - Died at his late residence, Woodburn, Ontario, on April 3, Robert Shaw, Sr., aged 78 years.

 

DERBY - Died in this city, on April 4, William James, infant son of William and Maggie Derby, aged 1 month and 14 days. Funeral from 60 East avenue north, Tuesday, April 5, at 2 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

HUMISTON - Died in this city, on April 4, at his parents' residence, 104 East avenue north, George Willis, infant and beloved child of Willie and Julia Humiston, aged 5 months and 15 days. Funeral Wednesday, at 2:30. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

O'HAGAN - (Toronto) The remains of Edwin O'Hagan, who was shot dead by a squaw near White River junction on the C.P.R., were brought here to-day by his father for interment.

 

MAY - (Halifax) George May, a workman in the Springfield mine, was struck by a falling lump of coal on Saturday and died from his injuries to-day. The blow which was received on the head inflicted no visible injury, but the spine was injured and his body paralysed. The man had a wife and family.

 

STEPHENSON - Ridgway, Ontario, April 2, 1887, Hamilton Spectator: I have had a gentleman boarding with me for the last four or five months by the name of Edward Stephenson. He was very deaf. He had been writing a book since he has been here, and had just taken it to London, Ontario, to get it published. He came back last week. On Saturday last he left for Buffalo, walking down the Grand Trunk track. He left Buffalo this morning (Sunday) to come home again, and about six miles below here, an engine and caboose ran into him and killed him. He has no friends that I know of. If so, please ask them in your widespread paper to correspond with T. Biggerstaff, Queen's Hotel, Ridgway, Ontario. Mr. Stephenson came here on November 16. He was of very temperate habits.


MINCHEN - (Fergus) A little boy, son of Henry Minchen, aged about six years, was drowned in the Grand River here on Saturday night.

 

ATTER - The many friends of Samuel Atter will learn with regret of his death. The sad event occurred after a short illness on Sunday evening, April 3. In his death Caistor loses one of her most respected residents, he having taught the public school in his own section for sixteen years with much success. In politics he was a staunch Reformer and he was a worker in the Methodist church and Sunday school. He also took a deep interest in the cause of temperance and had made himself useful in the municipal affairs of the township having filled the offices of councillor and reeve. He leaves to mourn his loss a wife, one son, and two daughters, who have the sympathy of the entire neighbourhood.

 

April 6, 1887

 

WILLIAMS - Died in Barton, on Monday April 4, Stephen Williams, adopted son of Stephen Williams, butcher, aged 11 years, 10 months, and 9 days. Funeral from his late residence, concession 6. Barton, on Wednesday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WEBBER - Died in this city, on Tuesday morning, April 5, 1837, at his late residence, 134 John street south, Harry G. Webber. Funeral from the above address, Friday, April 8, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

PARKER - (Lambton Mills) William Parker, of Weston was killed this morning by falling from the new Humber bridge on which he was working.

 

April 7, 1887

 

MCLEAN - (Guelph) Donald McLean, collector of internal revenue, died suddenly this morning of heart disease, aged 67 years.

 

HERCHMER - (Belleville) Mr. B. F. Gildersleeve of Kingston, who went yesterday to Philadelphia to examine the body supposed to be that of his brother-in-law, George S. Herchmer of Brampton, telegraphed to Mrs. Herchmer of this city that the remains are those of her son. The deceased, who was born and educated here, was highly esteemed by a large circle of friends and acquaintances,

 

April 8, 1887

 

CAMPBELL - Died April 7, 1887, at his residence, Burlington Plains, John T. Campbell, in the 75th year of his age. Funeral on Sunday, April 10, at 2 o'clock p.m.


BLAIR - Died in Glanford suddenly, on April 7, Christina, relict of the late William Blair, in her 79th year. Funeral will leave the residence of her son-in-law, Henry Glover, Esq., Glanford, on Sunday, April 10, at 1 p.m. Friends are invited to attend.

 

O'DONNELL - (Toronto) Michael O'Donnell, who resided at 83 Victoria avenue, while stealing a ride on a Northern Railway freight train last night, fell underneath the cars near Allandale and was badly mangled. He was brought here this morning and taken to the hospital where he died shortly after.

 

PELLETIER - (Montreal) Elsie Pelletier, aged 18 years, whose clothes took fire while standing before a stove some time ago, died from her injuries this evening.

 

April 9, 1887

 

NEWSON - Died on Friday, April 8, Edith Maud, only daughter of William and Bella Newson, aged 1 year and 3 months. Funeral from No 14 Pearl street north, on Sunday, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MUGFORD - Died in Hamilton, on April 8, David W. Mugford, son of Richard and Margaret Mugford, aged 16 years and 6 months. The funeral will take place on Sunday, at 4:30 p.m., from 108 Ferguson avenue north. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

GILLESPIE - Died in this city, on Friday, April 8, Agnes Gibson, eldest daughter of Hugh and Martha Gillespie, aged 23 years and 4 months. Funeral from her father's residence, 263 Macnab street north, on Monday, April 11, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends are invited to attend.

 

BIRRELL - Died in this city, April 9, Willie, infant son of William Birrell, aged 1 year and 5 months. Funeral, Monday, at 8:30 a.m. from 73 Vine street. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

CUMMINGS - (Belleville) James Cummings, the Grand Trunk switchman who was injured on Wednesday afternoon died this morning. He leaves a widow and three children.

 

RYAN, GALL, DILLON, ALLAN, MALLARD - (St. John's) The barquentine "Susan" from this port to the Barbados with fish, collided with an iceberg and sank. Capt. Michael Ryan, Mate John Gall, seaman Frank Dillon of St. John's, John Allan of England, and steward Thomas Mallard of Ireland were drowned.

The others were rescued.


BOWMAN - (Ingersoll) Young Bowman, aged about 14 years, was drowned some days ago in the flood caused by a dam breaking away. His body was found to-day in the river Thames near a bridge not far from where the flood emptied into the river. Mr. Laird's body is still missing.

 

HOWARD - (Woodstock) James Howard, Oxford street, was found dead in his bed, having ruptured a blood vessel in his brain.

 

MCKINNON - Died David K. I. McKinnon, barrister at Belleville, Saturday, April 9, aged 23 years, 9 months. Funeral from G.T.R. passenger station, this city, Monday afternoon, at 2 p.m. Friends will kindly attend without further notice.

Chief McKinnon received a telegram this morning conveying the sad intelligence of the death of his nephew, D. K. I. McKinnon of Belleville. His death was not unexpected, for he had been ill for some months and hope of his recovery had long been abandoned. David McKinnon was one of the brightest and most promising young barristers in this province. No law student ever passed the examinations of Provincial Law Society with more brilliant success, for he never failed to receive high honours in any examination. He won several scholarships, passed twice at the head of the class, and finally obtained the highest honour possible for a successful law student, the gold medal of the society.

Mr. McKinnon was born in Hamilton, July 1863 His father was David McKinnon, barrister of this city, who died several years ago. He received his education in the Hamilton schools and was one of the brightest pupils at the Collegiate Institute. For a year he studied law in the office of Jones & McQuesten. Then he went to Belleville and continued the study of law in the office of G. W. Bell. He was called to the Bar In July 1884 and on the death of Mr. Bell about two years ago, he succeeded to that gentleman's practice.

Mr. McKinnon had already laid the foundation of an extensive practice and a wide reputation, for his brilliant talents were brought into public notice in several trials, notably for his remarkably able defence of the two bank clerks, Scott and Yarwood, who were on trial for embezzlement. He was not only a fluent and forcible speaker, but he had a judgment and a comprehensiveness of view that were beyond his years. Though not without ambition, he was modest in his estimate of his own powers and by no means self-asserting. In disposition he was gentle, strong in his friendships, and tolerant to those who differed from him. Throughout his long illness, not a petulant or impatient word ever came from his lips. In short, David McKinnon was a man who if he had lived would have had a brilliant career and would have been loved as well as admired.

Chief McKinnon will leave for Belleville this evening. He will bring the remains to Hamilton, and the funeral will take place on Monday at 2 p.m. from the Grand. Trunk Railway station.


April 11, 1887

 

PATTON - Died in this city, on April 10, Acey, daughter of James and Sarah Patton, in the 20th year of her age. Funeral from the residence, 229 York street, Tuesday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

WARNER - Died on Sunday morning, April 10, Anna, wife of Frederick Warner, aged 63 years. Funeral this afternoon at 4 o'clock from the residence of George Goering, 17 John street south. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

SULLIVAN - (Toronto) John Sullivan, an old pensioner residing in Parkdale, while walking on the Northern Railway track yesterday, was run over by an express train. His left arm and leg were mangled in a shocking manner. He was taken to the hospital where he died this afternoon.

 

CURRIE - (Ottawa) An old man named James Currie, residing in Adamstown, Renfrew county, has been found dead in a shallow well. He lived alone and is supposed to have slipped in while attempting to draw water. The deceased was 70 years of age.

 

AYLWARD - (Montreal) Rev. Father Aylward, of St. Patrick's Church, was found dead in bed this morning. Heart disease is supposed to be the cause of death. Deceased was born in Waterford, Ireland, in 1824.

 

HAMER - (Montreal) The body of Hamer, the missing student, was found in the snow this afternoon about two miles from the place where he was last seen alive. A party of gentlemen were out with some hounds, the latter being the means of discovering the body.

 

PHIPPS - (Galt) An aged lady, named Phipps, died from the effects of a fall.

 

April 12, 1887

 

BLAIR - Died on April 10, John Franklin, son of William and Christina Blair, aged 4 years, and 3 months. Funeral on Tuesday, April 12, at 2:30 o'clock from corner of Cannon and Oak avenue. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

MCGIBBON - Died in this city, of consumption, on April 11, at his father's residence, 94 Barton street east, Frank, third son of William McGibbon, in the 22nd year of his age. Funeral on Wednesday, at 2 o'clock, to the R. C. cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HAMILTON - Died in this city, at No 7 Hess street north, on April 10, Ella Katie May, youngest daughter of James and Mary Hamilton, aged 11 months.


Funeral will take place on Tuesday, at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

THOMPSON - Died in this city, of scarlet fever, at 34 Peter street, on Saturday, April 9, David Ross, son of William H. and Margaret Thompson, aged 8 years, 1 month, and 18 days. Funeral took place Sunday at 3:30 o'clock. Private.

 

MCGOUGH - Died on Saturday, April 9, at 152 King William street, Mabel Madaline, infant daughter of John and Elizabeth McGough, aged 6 months. Funeral on Tuesday, at 1:30 p.m. sharp. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BENJAMIN - (Montreal) N. Benjamin, advocate, of this city, died at his residence, Mackay street, last evening. He had been ailing for nearly a year from consumption. Notice of his death and his appointment of Q.C. were published the same day.

 

DE SAULNIERS - (Montreal) Information has been received here of the death by poisoning at Lewiston, Me., of De Saulniers, assistant editor of "Le Messenger". Deceased was the son of the late Abraham De Saulniers, formerly M.P.P. for the county of St. Maurice.

 

GRAY - (St. Thomas) James Gray, a respected citizen of Fingal, committed suicide this morning by cutting his throat with a razor. He was 75 years of age and has been despondent for some time.

 

THOMPSON - Lieutenant-Colonel E. A. Thompson, collector of customs at Niagara, is dead. His death was very sudden. Sunday afternoon he left the lodge room of the A.O.C.W. and marched with the brethren to the wharf intending to embark for Youngstown where the Youngstown and Niagara lodges were addressed by Rev. E. S. Jones. Upon reaching the wharf he was seen to fall and shortly afterward died.

 

April 13, 1887

 

MACNERNY - Died in this city, on April 12, Bridget Crowe, beloved wife of Patrick MacNerny, aged 70 years, a native of county Clare, Ireland. Funeral from her husband's residence, 85 Strachan street east, on Thursday morning, at 9 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

SINCLAIR - Died in this city, on April 12, Ada Esther, infant child of William and Rebecca Sinclair, aged 2 years. Funeral from the residence, Barton street, west of Crooks street, Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


CLARK - Died at parents' residence, No 78 Emerald street north, beloved son of Alexander and Elizabeth Clark, aged 9 months. Funeral this afternoon at 3:30 p.m.

 

GRANGER - (Brussels) Last Thursday, a farmer named Thomas Granger, who lives about two miles from Brussels in the township of Grey, attacked his neighbour John McLennan, and a scuffle ensued. Granger clasped McLennan's knees, and pushing his head between McLennan' legs, they both fell to the ground. Granger's neck was so injured that he was at once paralysed and died the next day. Yesterday Coroner Hutchinson held an inquest. The jury returned a verdict freeing McLennan from any blame in the matter.

 

CROSS - (Charlottetown) An old woman named Cross, while in a fit of mental aberration, attempted suicide on Saturday by thrusting a poker down her throat. She died in great agony on Sunday.

 

ROY - (Brantford) Ebenezer Roy, J. P., aged 75, an old resident, is dead.

 

GORING - (St. Catharines) Harman Goring, school teacher, Niagara, is dead.

 

CAMPBELL - Last Thursday, John T. Campbell, aged 75, of Burlington Plains, died. The funeral was on Sunday, On Sunday, Mrs. Campbell died. In death they were not divided.

 

April 14, 1887

 

JAMIESON - (Brantford) Robert Jamieson, son of Chief Jamieson, Onondaga, was killed by the accidental discharge of a gun. Death was instantaneous.

 

MCDONALD - (Halifax) A school teacher named McDonald, employed at McAra's Brook, Antigonish, was found dead yesterday on an unfrequented road near the town of Antigonish. Two weeks ago he purchased a phial of carbolic acid and the poison was found in his stomach.

 

April 15, 1887

 

TAYLOR - Died on April 13, Elizabeth Hardstaff, beloved wife of A. Taylor, merchant, Palgrave, aged 25 years and 8 months. Funeral on Sunday, April 17, at 2 p.m., from the residence of her mother, corner of Barton street and Victoria avenue. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CALDWELL - (Georgetown) Miss Annie Cardwell, of Erin, died the other day, aged 100 years all but a few days.


BRADY - The man recently run over by an express train at Russell, Mass., proves to be Thomas Brady of this city, son of the late Patrick Brady, for fifty years a resident of Hamilton. About eleven months ago, Thomas went to visit his brother, Patrick Brady, and sister, Mrs. Martin Waters, of Westfield, Mass. Last Tuesday he started for Hamilton and was killed. Mr. Brady leaves two sisters and a brother in Hamilton, Mrs. William White of Nightingale street, Mrs. William Warnook of Young street and John Brady of O'Reilly street. About eight years ago the Bradys' mother was killed by an express train at the Beach Road crossing of the Grand Trunk Railway, and the father died a year and eight months ago. The news of the death of Thomas was a terrible blow to the relatives in the city who have the sympathy of the community.

 

April 16, 1887

 

JUNGBLUT - (Newstadt) John Jungblut, a farmer living half a mile east of the village, was killed by lightning this afternoon.

 

MCKEOWN - (Toronto) The body of an unknown woman washed ashore at Port Credit yesterday. It is supposed to be that of Miss McKeown who so mysteriously disappeared last fall from a steam barge at the Northern wharf on which she was cook.

 

April 18, 1887

 

BROWN - Died on April 16, Joseph Henry Brown, late of Her Majesty' P.C.O. Rifles, aged 45 years.

 

POTTER - Died in this city, on April 16, Samuel Henry, infant son of James and Catharine Potter, aged 2 years.

 

HOWITT - Died in the parsonage, Stony Creek, on Saturday, April 16, Kingsley St John, infant son of Rev. F. E. Howitt, aged 7 weeks.

 

LIVERNOIS - Died in this city, on April 16, Margaret C. Crosthwaite, beloved wife of Joseph Livernois, in the 39th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, 21 Spring street, on Tuesday, April 19, at 1 p.m., to Bartonville cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

TRUSCOTT - Died in this city, on April 16, James Francis, eldest son of John and Harriet Truscott, aged 3 years and 10 months. Funeral on Monday, April 18, at 3 p.m. from the residence, 199 Wellington street north. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

JARVIS - (Toronto) F. W. Jarvis, sheriff of York, died suddenly last night. He was driving home about 4 o'clock in the afternoon and fainted in the cab. He was carried into the residence of James H. Rogers, Church street, where he died about 10 o'clock The body was taken to his late residence, Jarvis street. He was in his 69th year. He had been sheriff of York since 1859.


He had been suffering from H----t's disease, but heart disease is attributed as the cause of his sudden death.

 

DAKERS - (Montreal) James Dakers, for many years secretary of the Montreal Telegraph Company, has died at the age of 75 years. Mr. Dakers was born in Brechin, Scotland, and came to Canada in 1840. In 1847 he entered the service of the telegraph company and was soon raised to the position of secretary and manager which position he held until 1882 when he resigned.

 

ARMSTRONG - (St. Thomas) The wife of William Armstrong of a wealthy family here dropped dead this morning while engaged in housework. She was 60 years of age.

 

BROOKS - (Brantford) John Brooks was found dead in his bed. Heart disease was the cause.

 

HALL - (Brantford) Thomas Hall, a Brantford constable, died suddenly.

 

April 19, 1887

 

ALDERMAN - Died in this city, on April 17, of heart disease, after a long period of sickness.

James Edward, fourth son of William and Mary Ann Alderman, aged 12 years and 7 months. Funeral on Tuesday, at 3 o'clock p.m. from his parents' residence, No 5 Harriet street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SEMMENS - Died on Sunday, April 17, at her residence, No 3 Tom street, Amelia, beloved wife of James Semmens, in the 41st year of her age. Funeral on Tuesday, April 19, at 3:30 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

 

DERY - (Quebec) A baker, residing on Arrago street, St. Saveur, named F. X. Dery, was returning home on Saturday night from attending the meeting of the Salvation Army with two companions when at the corner of St. Genevieve and Latourelle streets, he fell to the ground and suddenly expired. The deceased was unmarried and lived with his mother and sister.

 

April 20, 1887

 

ELLICOTT - Died in this city, on April 18, Mary, relict of the late Thomas Ellicott, in the 91st year of her age, a native of Cornwall, England. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, Joseph Philp, 15 Barton street east, Thursday, April 21, at 3 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

 

O'HEIR - Died in this city, on April 19, Peter O'Heir, a native of Armagh, Ireland, aged 68 years. Funeral from 54 Wellington street south, on Friday, April 22, at 2:30 p.m.


Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

Many citizens will regret to learn of the sudden death of Mr. Peter O'Heir, an old and respected citizen, which occurred at his residence, 54 Wellington street south, yesterday afternoon. Mr. O'Heir first complained of being ill Monday afternoon and was taken home from his place of business in a cab. The deceased has been a respected resident of Hamilton for the past forty years. He was born in Armagh county, Ireland, in 1820 and emigrated to New York in 1839. He remained in New York seven years and then removed to Hamilton where he lived ever since. Mr. O'Heir was a harness maker by trade and kept a shop on Macnab street for a number of years. Eleven years ago he was appointed to a position in the customs as landing waiter which position he occupied until the time of his death. The deceased leaves a widow and three sons to mourn their loss. Two of the sons, Archibald and Hugh, are in Chicago, and Arthur, the youngest, is a barrister in this city.

 

DUGAL - (Montreal) A brakeman named Charles Dugal, belonging to Quebec, was in the act of jumping on to an engine in the Canadian Pacific yards this forenoon when he fell and was run over. He was conveyed to the Notre Dame hospital where he died about an hour after the accident.

 

April 21, 1887

 

SELLAR - Died in this city, on April 20, Jane, eldest daughter of James Sellar, aged 25 years. Funeral from her father's residence, 90 Hunter street east, on Friday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

LAPIERRE - (Montreal) A man named Antonio LaPierre, who was working on a house in course of erection on Guy street, suddenly dropped dead without having previously shown any symptoms of illness.

 

CLARK - Word was received here this morning of the death of Sheriff Clark of Port Arthur which leaves another vacancy to be filled by the local government.

 

TERREL - (Guelph) Edward Terrel, who formerly ran the Guelph, Dundas & Hamilton stage, died at Georgetown recently.

 

HACHE - (Guelph) The coroner's jury in the case of Frederick Hache, who was killed by a cave-in while excavating at the Roman Catholic church, decided that his death was accidental, but censured the contractor for carelessness.

 

ADAMS - (St. Catharines) George Adams was found dead in his apartments.


DEVLIN - (Brantford) Mrs. Sarah Devlin, of Mount Pleasant, is dead, aged 77.

 

CASE - The widow of Rev. William Case, familiarly known as Father Case, one of the founders of Canadian Methodism, died last Saturday in Belleville at the age of 91 years. Father Case died in 1845. Father Case was the first missionary to the Indians in Canada and established a Mission house on Snake island near Massasauga Point, about four miles below Belleville on the Bay of Quinte. Mrs. Case used to assist her husband in his missionary and ministerial work in those early pioneer days and was considered to be a good preacher.

 

April 22, 1887

 

FICKEL - Died in this city, on April 21, Rosa, eldest daughter of Augustus and Alice Fickel, aged 14 years, 10 months, and 18 days. Funeral from No 60 Wood street east, at 2 p.m., on Saturday. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

PENTECOST - Died in this city, on April 21, the infant daughter of H. W. Pentecost, aged 10 days.

 

PAXTON - (Toronto) Word has been received here to-day of the death of Sheriff Paxton of Ontario. He died of inflammation of the lungs. This makes four sheriffs who have died since Saturday; namely, Jarvis of York, Clarke of Thunder Bay, Duncan of Welland, and Paxton of Ontario.

 

SMITH - (Guelph) Mrs. George Smith, relict of the late George Smith, tax collector is dead aged 68.

 

WILLIAMS (Brantford) An Indian named Nicholas Williams accidentally shot himself last week and the wound has since proved fatal.

 

HARE - (St. Catharines) The body of William Hare, for a number of years a lock tender on the canal, was found Thursday afternoon in the old canal near lock No 4. He has been missing for about five weeks. He leaves a wife and family. The coroner was notified but did not consider an inquest necessary.

 

ROBINSON, ATTRIDGE - (Dundas) Diphtheria is prevalent in Kilbride and Millgrove. Last Sunday a daughter of Alexander Robinson, merchant, of Kilbride, died, and on the following day when the funeral was taking place, his son died. In Millgrove Mr. Attridge lost three children in two weeks and other members of the family are not expected to recover.

 

April 23, 1887

 

PAXTON - (Whitby)Sheriff Paxton's death announced in last night's and this morning's papers was surprisingly read by the people here. The sheriff, though still a sick man, is improving favourably.


 

 

April 25, 1887

 

MACKAY, DOUGHERTY - (Caledonia) On Friday afternoon last Isaiah Dougherty picked up some parsnips that a farmer had thrown over his fence and brought them home to his wife to eat as she had frequently asked him to do. Mrs. Dougherty and her neighbour's daughter, Miss Mackay, were down town between 3 and 4 o'clock on that day and after returning home to Mrs. Dougherty's place they ate one of the parsnips which immediately made them sick. Mr. Dougherty, suspecting that they were poisoned, went for medical assistance, but it was too late as Miss Mackay died within a few minutes after he got there, and the poison had made too much headway in Mrs. Dougherty. Miss Mackay died about 6 o'clock and Mrs. Dougherty died this morning at 3:45.

 

April 26, 1887

 

DILLON - Died on April 25, Richard, youngest son of John and Ellen Dillon, aged 1 year. Funeral from his parents' residence, 23 Ferrie street east, at 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 27. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

STINSON - (London) William Stinson, the husband of the woman whose death in London West is now the subject of a coroner's inquest, was arrested on Saturday evening. It appears that there is evidence discovered contradicting his story about where he spent the day previous to her death and showing that he struck her with a club of some sort, knocking her down, and afterward was seen to kick her. Stinson was remanded until Friday next.

 

LAIRD - (Ingersoll) The body of John Laird who was drowned three weeks ago was found in the river Thames to-day near a bridge not far from where the freshet entered the river.

 

April 27, 1887

 

GRIFFIN - Died in this city, on April 25, Julia, relict of the late Michael Griffin, in the 76th year of her age, a native of Ardfert, County Kerry, Ireland. Funeral will leave her late residence, 48 Jackson street east, for Dundas, at Wednesday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

ASKIN - Died on April 26, Robert Askin, aged 31 years. Funeral from Chapman's Sons undertaking rooms this morning at 8:30 to the Grand Trunk station.


WILLOUGHBY - (Dresden) about 7 o'clock this morning, James Moore and Thomas Willoughby, both coloured, who were working on the barge "Gondola", got into a dispute about a pair of mittens when Moore drew a revolver and shot Willoughby fatally. Moore ran away into the woods, but afterward returned and gave himself up.

 

KAIKE - (Montreal) The coroner's jury returned a verdict of infanticide against Annie Kaike. She is ill in the western hospital and when sufficiently recovered will be brought up to stand her trial.

 

VEAUGEOIS - (Quebec) A most painful intelligence has reached town from the Valley of St. Maurice where a disease known as black fever is making terrible ravages in many localities. It is also accompanied by diphtheria. At Mount Caribou, 36 miles from the Piles, the family of a French settler named Antoine Veaugeois, who was formerly in the service of the Duke de Morny at Paris, has been all but decimated. During the week before Easter, four grown-up daughters, three unmarried and the other a widow, fell victims to the disease, and a day or two later, two of Veaugeois's grandchildren, residing at Grandause, also succumbed, making eight deaths in the same family. It is said the disease is still continuing its ravages.

 

HOMIER - (Ottawa) Joseph Homier, a young man of Gatineau Point, was killed yesterday by the fall of a tree in the woods on the Black River.

 

April 28, 1887

 

LEITCH - Died at the residence of his parents, on April 27, John, second and beloved son of John and Ann Leitch, in the 37th year of his age. Funeral from the family residence, 10 Hughson street north, at 3 p.m., on Saturday. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

The many friends of Mr. John Leitch, Jr., will regret to hear of his death which took place at his parents' residence this morning. He had been ailing for some time and acting under medical advice, he spent the winter in the Bahamas whence he returned on Saturday afternoon just in time to take a last farewell to his relatives. He was one of the kindest-hearted and genial of men, beloved by all who knew him, and had the reputation of being a mechanic of the very highest class. He leaves a widow and three children to mourn his loss.

 

MCCALL - Died in this city, on April 27, John McCall, a native of Glasgow, Scotland, aged 26 years. Funeral at 2 p.m., Friday, from W. Brush's St. James Hotel, Hughson street north, to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to the Roman Catholic cemetery.


NEWPORT - Died at the residence of her parents, 180 King street east on April 27, Minnie, only daughter of William and Elizabeth Newport, aged 9 years and 6 months, of inflammation of the lungs. Funeral, on Friday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

LYNN - (Caledonia) Joseph Lynn was killed by a fall from a tree.

 

April 29, 1887

 

RAE - Died in Renforth, on April 27, Joseph Rae, aged 24 years and 4 months. Funeral from the residence of his brother-in-law, John Cruikshank, 156 Wellington street north, Friday, at 2 o'clock, p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation..

 

JACKSON - Died in Simcoe, on August 28, after a protracted illness, Charles Jackson, in his 50th year. Funeral on Saturday, at 2;30.

 

JARDINE - Died on Thursday, April 28, at 4 o'clock a.m., Jessie Agnes, aged 18 months, youngest daughter of J. W. and Ella Jardine. Funeral from her father's residence, Saltfleet, to Hamilton cemetery, on Sunday, May 1, at 11 o'clock a.m.

 

GAGNIER - Died in this city, on April 28, at 250 James street north, Amelia, youngest daughter of Mrs. S. E. Gagnier. Funeral on Saturday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

RIDDLE - Died at 292 Mary street north, on April 27, the beloved wife of Thomas Riddle, aged 28 years. Funeral on Friday morning, April 29, at 8 o'clock a.m. to the G.T.R. Station.

 

JENKINS - Died in this city, on April 28, Lovina Ann, third daughter of the late William H. Jenkins, in the 21st year of her age. Funeral from her uncle's residence, 121 Hunter street west, Saturday, April 30, at 2:30. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

RAFFERTY - (Montreal) Mrs. Rafferty, mother of Mr. Rafferty, grocer, corner of Murray and Ottawa streets, fell through a trap door in the store when going to serve a customer and was drowned in five feet of water. The water in the cellar was due to the flood. The deceased lady was about 70 years of age and much respected.

 

April 30, 1887

 

CARROLL - Died in this city, on April 29, Ann, relict of the late Dennis Carroll, aged 67 years. Funeral from her son's residence, 14 Harriett street, on Sunday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends will please accept this notice.


STARES - Died at Woodstock, on April 29, Albert Stares. Funeral on Sunday, at 3:30, from 83 Bay street north, this city, to Burlington cemetery. Friends and acquaintances are invited.

 

May 2, 1887

 

PRING - Died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Hamilton, No 106 James street south, Henrietta, relict of the late William Pring, of Her Majesty's Customs. Funeral Monday at 12:30 p.m. to the Grand Trunk station. Interment in St. Catharines.

 

BENTON - Died in this city, on April 30, Amy Benton, aged 96 years. Funeral from her daughter's residence, 99 Maria street, Monday, May 2, at 2 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

HAMILTON - Died at Detroit, on April 30, James Hamilton, late of this city, in the 40th year of his age. Funeral from G.T.R. station at 10 a.m. to-day. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BINNEY - (Halifax) Hibbert Binney, bishop of Nova Scotia, died in New York this morning, aged 67 years.

The news of the death in New York of Right Reverend Hibbert Binney, lord bishop of Nova Scotia, was received here to-day with a sincere sorrow. His lordship was universally beloved not only for his many personal qualities but for his bountiful generosity towards all public and private charitable purposes, His lordship was born in Sydney, C.B., August 12, 1819. He studied at the leading universities in England and was -consecrated fourth bishop of Nova Scotia in 1851. He leaves a widow, two sons and two daughters. The remains will be brought to Halifax for interment.

 

May 3, 1887

 

ARTHUR - Died in this city, May 2, Sybil May, beloved daughter of John and Annie Arthur, aged 18 days. Funeral from her parents' residence, 25 Oak avenue. Friends are respectfully invited to attend.

 

CLARK - (Kingston) Lawrence Clark, a labourer, was struck by a train at the Grand Trunk Railway depot this morning and killed.

 

May 4, 1887

 

RIGBY - Died in this city, on May 3, at 283 Hughson street north, Joseph, fourth son of James and Elizabeth Rigby, aged 1 year and 10 months. Funeral on Wednesday, at 2:30 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


MCFARLANE - Died in this city, on May 2, John McFarlane, aged 31 years. Funeral from his late residence, 237 Cannon street east, on Wednesday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

About 4 o'clock yesterday afternoon a deplorable accident occurred on Barton street west at the sand pit above the rolling mills. A teamster named John McFarlane, an employee of Charles Lovejoy, plasterer, was engaged in removing sand from the pit at a point where the lower part had been dug away too much and the edge of the pit overhung. The sand had become loosened by the frost coming out of it and began to fall. The unfortunate man saw his danger and began to run out, but he was too late. The edge of the falling mass of earth knocked him down on his face and fell on him, burying his body to the waist. A man who was working in the pit at the time dug him out and telephoned to Dr. Philp. McFarlane was unable to move and complained of severe injuries in his abdomen. He was removed to the hospital in a hack and expired in less than half an hour after the accident occurred. He was a young man about 32 years of age and resided at the corner of Tisdale and Cannon streets. He leaves a wife and two small children. He was a very steady and reliable young fellow and was much respected by his employer and all who knew him.

 

MCCAMIS - Died in this city, on March 3rd, George James McCamis, son of Arthur McCamis, aged 19 years and 11 months, Funeral from his father's residence, 236 Macnab street north, on Thursday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

MACABE - Died in San Francisco, California, on Monday, May 2, Ada Ewart, aged 21 years, wife of James Macabe, formerly of Hamilton.

 

ATKINS, WILLIAMS - (Kingston) At the village of Portsmouth, two children, one a son of R. Atkins, and the other a daughter of Mrs. Williams, each about five years of age, fell into an uncovered well and were drowned.

 

CAVAN - (Beachville) A man by the name of John Cavan was killed on the Grand Trunk Railway track one mile east of Beachville on Monday afternoon by the eastern express. He was a deaf mute and not hearing the train approaching was caught by the cow-catcher and hurled against the lime kiln siding.

 

DURAND - Died in this city, on May 3, Alexander Durand, in the 49th year of his age. Funeral this afternoon at 3:30 from his late residence, 28 East avenue north.

One of the most appalling tragedies that have taken place in this city occurred about 10:40 yesterday in a little frame house at 28 East avenue north where Alexander Durand cut his throat almost from ear to ear. Durand had worked at L. D. Sawyer and Co' factory off and on for some time. He had been a habitual drunkard for the past eight years and only worked when his money


was all spent, and this only to get money to buy more whiskey. During that time he has been a heart sore to his family, rendering them very little pecuniary assistance and coming home drunk and attacking them. Mrs. T. H. Pratt took quite an interest in the family, frequently giving them assistance when they were in want and using her utmost endeavour to try and persuade Durand to stop drinking, but her efforts were of no avail, and Durand kept, on in the same old rut, working for a couple of days and spending all he had made on drink.

Monday night Durand drank a pint bottle of whiskey and went around the house with a razor in his hand, threatening to take his life. Mrs. Durand became alarmed for the safety of the children and went out in the street in her stocking feet to find a policeman and have her husband arrested, but she could not find one. Yesterday morning Durand locked himself in the bedroom with the razor in his hand and would not come out. Mrs. Durand was afraid to remain in the house and took the children to a neighbour's. Word was sent to the police station about 9 o'clock that Durand was locked in the bedroom and threatened to commit suicide. Detective Reid and constable Coulter went to the house to arrest Durand. They opened the front door and found Durand locked in a bedroom just off the sitting room. Detective Reid and constable Coulter both demanded admittance and Durand replied that he would not be taken alive. He had a razor in his hand and was flourishing it about his head. Mrs. Durand and Mrs. Pratt, who had been called, both tried to get the razor, but Durand would not give it up nor open the door.

The police did not care to take the responsibility of breaking down the door. So they went to the police magistrate and obtained a warrant with instructions to execute it and break open the door if necessary. Armed with the warrant Detective Reid and constables Lowrey and Coulter, and a Spectator reporter, went to the house for a second time. Durand was still locked in the bedroom. Constable Coulter demanded admittance.

"I'll not come out. If you want me you'll never take me alive", replied Durand.

"If you give up the razor, I will promise not to arrest you", said detective Reid.

"No, I won't give up the razor", responded Durand. "I want to shave with it".

Every effort was made by the constable to get the razor from Durand, they making all kinds of promises, but he refused, and would not even open the door. The policemen determined to break open the door, thinking that. Durand would not carry out his threat. Constable Coulter knocked in the upper panel of the door and Durand stood on the bed with the dull side of the razor at his throat and said "I'll do it". Coulter then kicked in the second panel and jumped into the room, followed by the others, but just before Coulter could reach Durand, he pulled the razor across his throat and turned it around in the neck. He fell back on the bed. The throat was cut almost from ear to ear; the larynx was completely severed. The bedroom presented a horrible sight, Durand lying on the bed with the blood gushing from his throat and saturating the bed clothes. The constables carried Durand into the sitting room and sent for a physician.


When Dr. Bingham arrived, the unfortunate man had drawn his last breath five minutes after the wound was inflicted. Durand died very easily without a struggle, only a few gasps for breath being noticeable. The room in which the tragedy occurred contained one bed and a cot. Durand had the door barricaded by placing the cot against it so as to keep the constables out. The razor was an exceptionally large one and very sharp.

Durand was about 45 years old and leaves a widow and eight children, three boys and five girls. The oldest of the children is 20 years and the youngest a baby about 19 months old. Mrs. Durand was taken to Mrs. Pratt's house just before her husband committed suicide. When she heard the news her grief was terrible. She went into several fainting fits one after another. Mrs. Pratt kindly consented to take care of the children and make all arrangements for the funeral. Durand's family are very respectable and hardworking, and are entitled to the sympathy of the entire community.

 

May 5, 1887

 

JACKSON - Died in this city, on May 4, Mary, the beloved wife of Joseph Jackson, aged 52 years, a native of Cumberland, England. Funeral from her husband's residence, 96 Picton street east, on Friday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

ODER - Died in this city, on May 4, Eliza, the beloved wife of Hugh Oder, aged 44 years. Funeral from her husband's residence, 88 John street north, at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday.

 

LINDSAY - (Almonte) Mr. Sydenhan Lindsay, of Montreal, a clerk in the Bank of Montreal here, was drowned this afternoon by the upsetting of a canoe. Ernest Stephenson, his companion, son of Rev. F. Stephenson, had a very narrow escape.

 

LABELLE - (Montreal) A young man named Alfred Labelle, residing at 177 St. Cheytophe, to-day fell from the tower of the new Sacred Heart church to the ground, a distance of 72 feet. He was conveyed to Notre Dame hospital where it was found that he suffered from a fracture of the spine, of both legs, and of one arm, besides innumerable other severe bruises. He lived only five minutes after being admitted to the hospital. This is the second fatal accident at the same church within three weeks.

 

SMITH - (Brantford) An old woman named Betsy Smith was found dead in a log cabin on the Indian reserve on Sunday, It is supposed she was murdered.

 

MILLOY - (Montreal) David Milloy, employed by the harbour commission here, has been drowned at Lavaltrie.


May 6, 1887

 

DORNAN - Died in this city, at 296 Hughson street north, on May 5, William R. Dornan, aged 24 years. Funeral on Friday, at 4:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HIGGINS - Died in this city, on May 5, Norah, beloved wife of Andrew Higgins, in her 36th year. Funeral from her husband's residence, 83 George street, on Sunday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

PLATT - (Toronto) Samuel Platt, ex-M.P. for East Toronto, died suddenly from heart disease early this morning. He returned from Bermuda on Tuesday and was at his office yesterday in good health.

 

May 7, 1887

 

FLEMING - Died at the residence of her son-in-law, William Curry, 10 Greig street, on May 5, Mrs. Susan Fleming, relict of the late William Fleming, Lancaster, aged 87.

Mrs. Susan Fleming, 87 years of age, who lived with her son-in-law, Mr. William Curry, at No 10 Greig street, died yesterday from the effects of an accident which happened a short time since. Six months ago, the aged lady fell downstairs and fractured her collar bone. It was thought that she could not recover from the shock, but she rallied and grew comparatively strong again. A fortnight ago she fell downstairs and broke her thigh bone, and it was from the effects of this mishap that she died.

 

WILSON - Died on May 6, at his residence, 122 Queen street north, Joseph Wilson, a native of London, England, in the 60th year of his age. Funeral from above residence, on Monday afternoon, at 2:30 to All Saints Church, thence to Bartonville. Friends will please accept this notice.

An old, widely known, and very highly respected citizen of Hamilton, Mr. Joseph Wilson, of 122 Queen street north, died yesterday afternoon. Mr. Wilson had been ill for several months. He was an Englishman, but had lived in Hamilton the greater part of the 69 years of his life. Several years ago he sat at the city council board for No 4 Ward. Mr. Wilson was twice married and was the father of a large family.

 

LANG - (Toronto) John Lang, while working at the College street sewer, had a cart load of earth dumped upon him and was seriously injured. He was taken to the hospital where he died last night.

 

PARE - (Windsor) Richard Pare, an aged Frenchman living a hermit life near Petite Cote, a few miles south of Windsor, was found dead in his bed last night. It is thought Pare had a large amount of money concealed somewhere.


May 9, 1887

 

GUERIN - (Ottawa) Thomas Guerin, C.E., of the public works department, dropped dead this morning while working in his office. Heart disease was the cause. The deceased, though 69 years of age, was still an active and valuable officer. His family live in Montreal, Dr. Guerin and barrister Guerin of that city being his sons.

 

WALLACE - George Wallace, for many years Montreal correspondent of the Toronto "Mail", died at his residence this morning after a brief illness. The deceased was 54 years of age, a native of Ireland, but has resided here for many years. At one time he was engaged in mercantile pursuits. Afterward for two years he was manager of the Academy of Music. He was one of the oldest and best known journalists in Canada, having been city and managing editor of the "Star" and was connected with the "Herald" and for some time Montreal correspondent for the associated press.

 

WALDMAN - (Guelph) Joseph Waldman, coat maker, died suddenly. Heart disease.

 

MASON - (Brantford) A child of Ed. Mason bled to death.

 

May 10, 1887

 

YOUNG - (Halifax) Sir William Young, ex-chief justice of Nova Scotia, died last night aged 87 years. Sir William was a member of the provincial legislature, representing the island and one of the counties of Cape Breton for upwards of twenty years. In 1860 at the death of Sir Brenton Haliburton he was appointed chief justice and a few days later he had the honour of Knighthood conferred on him by Her Majesty. About eight years ago he retired, being succeeded by the present chief justice McDonald.

 

FLEMING - (Toronto) Another of Toronto's oldest citizens, James Fleming, justice of the peace and ex-alderman, died this morning. He was 76 years of age.

 

SHEA - (Guelph) Mrs. Shea of Ennotville committed suicide by cutting her throat while mentally deranged.

 

MCKEOWN - (St. Catharines) Miss Kate McKeown, a nurse in the hospital, is dead.

 

May 11, 1887

 

STAPLEY - Died in this city, on May 9, Phebe Stapley, aged 72. Remains taken to Belleville for interment.


WOOLLEY - Died in this city, on May 10, William H. Woolley, in his 24th year. Funeral from his father's residence, corner South and Little William streets, on Thursday, May 12, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

A wide circle of friends will learn with regret that William H. Woolley, superintendent of the Wentworth Street Presbyterian Sunday school of this city, died on Tuesday. a week ago last Sunday. Mr. Woolley filled his place in the school and in the evening sat with his fellow communicants at the Lord's Table. On the same evening he was taken seriously ill and after eight days of great suffering the end came on Tuesday afternoon. The fact that this is the third death in the family of the deceased within fifteen months renders the event one of the more that usual sadness. Mr. Woolley was 24 years of age and for a number of years past was a teacher in the Wentworth street school and latterly held the position of superintendent. He was a young man of great promise, a devoted Christian worker, and his loss will be greatly felt by the congregation of Wentworth Street Church in the formation and work of which he took an active part.

 

SAMUEL - (Toronto) The painful intelligence of the death of Mr. Lewis Samuel of the firm of M & L Samuel of this city, at Victoria, B.C., this morning, has been received here. Mr. Samuel was enroute home from San Francisco. It is stated that the family attribute the fatal result to the voyage on the Pacific having taken five days, and there being no physician aboard the steamer.

 

MURPHY - (Brantford) Nellie Murphy, a well known character, is dead aged 96.

 

BUDD - (Brantford) William Budd, an employee of the Waterous engine company, dropped dead at his home the other day.

 

May 12, 1887

 

GRIFFITH - Died on May 10, at 24 Mercer street, Toronto, in her 75th year, Judith, widow of the late Richard Griffith, of the county of Kilkenny, Ireland. Funeral from the residence of her son, William Griffith, 130 James street south, on Friday, May 13, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

PURVIS - Died in this city, at 299 Victoria avenue north, Bertie only son of James and Martha Purvis, aged 4 years, 6 months, and 18 days. Funeral on Friday, at 10 o'clock to Strabane cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CONWAY - Died in this city, at 230 Wellington street north, on May 11, Patrick Joseph, youngest son of James and Jane Conway, aged 2 years, 2 months, and 5 days. Funeral on Friday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


MCDONALD - Died on May 11, at 5 Erie avenue, Gertrude, daughter of Alexander and Bessie McDonald, aged 27 days. Funeral private.

 

HARRIGAN - (Quebec) A woman named Bridget Harrigan, a servant in the family of W. E. Duggan, clerk of the crown, dropped dead this morning. An inquest will be held.

 

RICHER - (Quebec) A youth named Richer, 17 years of age, drowned in the river Duchesne while driving logs yesterday.

 

ENGLAND - (Galt) John J. England, aged 33, is dead.

 

May 14, 1887

 

LEWIS - Died in this city, on May 12, Thomas, third son of Thomas Lewis, cigar manufacturer, in his 16th years. Funeral Sunday, May 15, from his father's residence, 27 Spring street, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

WRIGHT - Died on Friday, May 13, Sarah McBean Wright, widow of the late David Wright, Esq., of Hamilton, and daughter of the late Captain McBean of the 3rd Royal Veteran Battalion and of Her Majesty's West India Service, in her 91st year. Funeral from her late residence, 19 Augusta street, on Monday, May 16, at 3 o'clock.

The death is announced of Mrs. Wright, widow of the late David Wright of this city, who passed quietly away in the 91st year of her age. The deceased lady was an old resident of the city of Hamilton, but for years past has been confined to the house through ill health and the weakness of extreme old age. Her husband was a prominent and well known citizen of Hamilton. A faithful member of the Church of England, her place there and her liberality in all Christian work and especially in Christ Church Cathedral will be sorely missed. The funeral will take place from the cathedral on Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

 

KING - (Welland) Harmon King, an old resident is dead, aged 77.

 

May 16, 1887

 

SUTHERLAND - Died in this city, on May 13, William Sutherland.

 

DUFFY - (Montreal) Mrs. Duffy, residing at 44 Seminary street, the wife of a carter, met with her death under peculiar circumstances to-day. Her husband went home on Saturday night and found her in bed drunk. He slapped her in the face and turned her out of the house. She was seen sitting on the stairs leading to the upper flat. On hearing moans this morning, a Mr. Myers looked out and saw Mrs. Duffy lying with blood on each side of her. Her left temple was dinged in and there was


a large cut across her forehead. She died while being conveyed to the house. The coroner was notified and ordered Duffy, who is a sober hardworking man, to be arrested, which was done. The deceased was known to be a heavy drinker.

 

MACFARLANE - (Ottawa) John Macfarlane, a lad employed in the Canadian Granite Company's works, was kicked in the head by a runaway horse last evening and had his brains dashed out, being instantly killed.

 

SIMS (Ottawa) - A child named Harry Sims, eight years old, was drowned at the foot of the canal locks yesterday afternoon after having, in company with two others, fallen in while playing on the edge of the water. Caretaker Weston of the rowing club boathouse, which is nearby, saved the two others but did not know there was another until too late.

 

TOBIN - (Halifax) John Tobin, a plasterer, suicided to-day by cutting his throat from ear to ear and severing every artery in it.

 

LUSSIER, LAMBERT - (Quebec) David Lussier and Joseph Lambert, two carriers of provisions to the lumber camp of Messrs Hall were drowned in the river Chaudiere yesterday by the upsetting of a canoe, Their bodies have not been recovered.

 

GLYNN - (Toronto) Patrick Glynn, a Canadian Pacific yardsman, was run over by a freight train while shunting cars at the Queen's wharf last night and both legs were cut off. He was taken to the hospital where he died about four o'clock this morning.

 

May 17, 1887

 

SHEPLEY - Died in this city, on May 15, at 3 Margaret street, William Vincent, infant son of Joseph and Catherine Shepley, aged 11 months. Funeral on Tuesday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HENAULT - Died at 62 Herkimer street, on May 15, Madame Henault, aged 85 years. Funeral at 8:30 a.m. Wednesday morning to St. Mary's Cathedral. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FULTON - (Toronto) Dr. John Fulton, professor of surgery in Trinity Medical College, died last night, aged 50 years, from pneumonia.


May 18, 1887

 

BURGESS - At Galt on Sunday last died Agnes Elizabeth, wife of George Burgess, in the 23rd year of her age. She was the daughter of Alexander Bell of Rockton. Only sixteen months have passed since as a young bride she was taken to the house of a fond and devoted husband. Aggie was a young woman of most amiable and winning disposition. All who knew her became her devoted friends. She was an earnest and consistent member of the Methodist church and while she remained at Rockton was a zealous and effective worker in the Sabbath school at that place. Her faith grew brightly as her hold on life weakened and her hope of a blessed immortality lighted her across the shadowy river. She was buried at Rockton on Tuesday. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Mr. Bennett. She leaves a little girl only a few months old. Her sorrowing friends mourn her early departure but not as those without hope.

 

May 19, 1887

 

BROCKELSBY - Died in this city, on May 18, at 83 Elgin street, John Harold, infant son of Richard and Maria Brockelsby, aged 9 months and 10 days. Funeral will take place Friday at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HAMILL - Died in this city, May 18, at 138 Locke street north, Robert, infant son of John and Elizabeth Hamill, aged 7 months. Funeral on Monday at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CROSTHWAITE - Died in Bartonville, on May 18, Daniel Crosthwaite, J. P., aged 69 years. Funeral from his late residence to Burlington cemetery, Friday, May 20, at 2 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

BAGWELL - Died at her late residence, 21 Park street north, Hamilton, Ontario, on Wednesday, May 18, of apoplectic paralysis, Mary Ann, beloved wife of J. B. Bagwell, in the 78th year of her age. Funeral on Friday, May 20, at 3 p.m. Friends are requested to attend without further notice.

 

MCKAY - (Ottawa) Thomas McKay, head of the well known firm of McKay & Co, grain merchants and millers, died to-day aged 63 years.

 

FORBES - (Halifax) Dr. Joseph F. Forbes, ex-M.P. for Queen's county, died at Liverpool to-day. The cause of his death was heart disease and inflammation of the lungs. The deceased was born in Gibraltar in 1820.


May 20, 1887

 

WALKER - (London) A young lad, son of Mr. Walker, yardmaster of the Grand Trunk here, while bathing in the river near the foot of Maitland street this afternoon about 2:30, was seized with cramps and sank before his companions could reach him.

 

SMITH - Cyrenus Smith, of Port Burwell was found dead in his wagon on Saturday. Heart disease.

 

May 21, 1887

 

WINN - Died in this city, on May 19, at 288½ James street north, Ethel, infant daughter of Dominick and Eliza Winn. Funeral private.

 

CAMPBELL - (Ottawa) A brakeman named Kenneth Campbell was run over by a train of cars at Coteau Landing on the Canada Atlantic yesterday and instantly killed.

 

CARR - Thomas Carr, of West Oxford, aged 93, is dead. He had lived in West Oxford for nearly sixty years.

 

May 23, 1887

 

DUNN - Died in this city, on May 21, at his father's residence, Queen and Main streets, Arthur, in his 14th year, the beloved son of W. G. Dunn. Funeral from All Saints Church on Monday at 2 p.m.

 

HENRY - Died at her late residence, No 235 King street west, on Saturday, May 21, Jane, beloved wife of John Henry, in the 81st year of her age. Funeral on Tuesday, May 24, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MANNING - (Chatham) James Manning, a middle-aged man was killed by a train on the G.T.R. five miles west of here this morning. He was walking on the track and failed to hear the whistle. The papers found on his body show that he belongs to Detroit.

 

HARVEY - (Montreal) Samuel Harvey, a labourer on board the steamer "City of Boston",fell from the top of the cattle pens into the river last evening and was drowned. It is supposed that in falling his head struck against the edge of the wharf as he never rose to the surface of the water. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

FRACE - (Montreal) This afternoon four boys were amusing themselves in a boat attached to the barge "St Philip" in King's basin when one of them named Frace, residing with his parents at 146 Dominique street, was pushing the boat off with a stick when it broke, throwing him into the water, and before assistance could be rendered, the lad was drowned. The body has been recovered.


May 25, 1887

 

MCKAY - Died in this city, on May 24, at 12 Grove street, William Hope McKay, aged 35 years. Funeral will take place from the above address, at 2 o'clock p.m., on Thursday. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

May 26, 1887

 

FARR - Died in this city, on May 25, at 11 Strachan street east, James Joseph, youngest son of David and Mary Farr, aged 1 year, 9 months, and 5 days. Funeral on Thursday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

KING - Died in this city, on May 22, Elias King, late of the P.C.O. Rifle Brigade, aged 54 years. Funeral will leave the Foresters' Hall, at 3:30 p.m. on Thursday. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FULLER - (Toronto) on Monday week, Charles Fuller and two companions went bathing in Block House bay at the Island. Fuller disappeared and his body was not recovered until this morning when it was found floating by some men who were out boating. Fuller was 18 years of age and arrived from the old country about a month ago.

 

ARDAGH - (Orillia) Johnston A. Ardagh, M.D., of this town, was found dead in the road near here to-day. It is supposed he took a fit while in his buggy and fell out, receiving injuries which resulted fatally.

 

HAGARTY - (Ottawa) An old man named George Hagarty committed suicide this morning by hanging himself in the park at Nepean point. His lifeless body was discovered by some boys playing there.

 

CHALLION - A very determined case of suicide occurred yesterday afternoon. As the way freight from the north was coming into the city on the Northern and Northwestern Railway about four o'clock and was rounding a curve just north of the Grand Trunk bridge, the driver noticed a man standing on the track about four car-lengths ahead looking towards the train, as it thundered towards him, he deliberately went down on his hands and knees and after glancing quietly towards the train as if to check whether it was near enough, laid his chest upon the rail, and in another instant the engine went over him, mangling his body dreadfully and killed him immediately. The body was taken to the freight sheds on a yard engine and soon afterward removed to the morgue.


The man's name was Samuel Challion and he had a butcher shop at the corner of Robert and Wellington streets. For some time past his business has not been particularly prosperous and he has suffered from mental and financial depression. He leaves a wife and one small daughter who have the heartfelt sympathy of their friends and neighbours in the terrible bereavement that has happened to them. The family came to the city from Toronto about a year ago and prior to that they lived in Guelph where Challion was very well known, having been a butcher on the market there for many years.

Not the slightest blame is attached to the engineer of the train, T. Moore, who did all in his power to induce the man to leave the track by blowing the whistle and gesticulating, but though the train was only running at five miles an hour before the suicidal intention of the man became apparent, it was too close to him to be stopped. Deceased was about 55 years of age and very much respected by all who knew him.

After hearing the circumstances of the case, Dr. Woolverton decided that an inquest was unnecessary.

 

THOMPSON, VINCENT - One of the most terrible accidents that have occurred on the bay for

some years took place on Tuesday night during the violent gale of wind that preceded the thunderstorm. About 1 o'clock in the afternoon John Thompson, boat builder, living at 368 Hughson street north, left for a sail to the beach in his skiff while his wife and sister-in-law and three small children went down on the steamer "Mazeppa" and were to meet him down there when he got in. They all arrived safely and went down to John Dynes's hotel where they spent the afternoon and started for home in the skiff some time during the evening. That was the last seen of them alive. A bit after 8 o'clock a violent gale from the west sprang up and the bay was very rough, too rough for a frail skiff loaded with six persons to live. No alarm was felt at night because they did not reach the city as their friends here thought they had stayed over at the beach on account of the storm, and their friends at the beach thought they had got safely home. The first that was known of the catastrophe was about 4:30 yesterday when the body of Mrs. Thompson was found by Jacob Corey floating in the water not far from the shore. The news was telephoned to the city about 10 o'clock and this was the first intimation received by their friends here of the awful calamity.

John Thompson was about 40 years of age, a boat builder by trade, and one of the most expert boatmen on Hamilton bay. He had a family of six children, three of whom, Jessie aged 7, Edith aged 5, and a baby named Ernest, were with their father and mother in the boat and perished along with them; also a young lady named Alice Vincent, about 20 years of age, sister of Mrs. Thompson. The aged parents of John Thompson and three boys were left at home. They thought the others had remained at the beach on account of the storm and felt no serious alarm when they did not return at night, all having perfect confidence in the skill and judgment of Thompson as an experienced sailor.


The three boys went to work yesterday and did not hear the terrible tidings until they came home to dinner. When the news was brought to the old people about 10 o'clock, their grief was pitiful, the venerable old grandmother bewailing the loss of her little grandchildren in a most heartrending manner...

 

May 27, 1887

 

THOMPSON, VINCENT - Drowned in Burlington Bay on May 24, Mrs. Elizabeth Thompson

and Alice Vincent. Funeral from the family residence, 368 Hughson street north, on Friday, May 27, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CHALLION - Died in this city, on May 25, Samuel Challion, aged 64 years. Funeral from 139 Wellington street, corner Robert, Friday, May 27, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

MCKENNA - Died in this city, on May 25, at 73 Peter street, Margaret, beloved wife of James McKenna, aged 45 years. Funeral from the above residence on Saturday, May 28, at 3:30 p.m. Friends are invited to attend.

 

MOORE - Died in this city, on May 26, after a long illness, George Moore, in the 77th year of his age. Funeral will take place from his late residence, 123 Macnab street north, on Saturday, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

CAMPBELL - (Ottawa) Mr. Campbell, Conservative member for Digby, NS, died on the train from Toronto this morning. He was heard to be breathing heavily and after being lifted out of his berth, he expired without regaining consciousness. Apoplexy is supposed to be the cause. Great regret is expressed among members, among whom Campbell had become well known although this was his first session in parliament.

 

ROBINSON - (Toronto) The body of a young man was found in the bay this evening and taken to the morgue, It was afterward identified as that of Thomas N. Robinson who mysteriously disappeared on March 24. On that night he left his employer's grocery store to go to his boathouse and was not seen afterward. His forehead is crushed in over the left eye and foul play is suspected, although the motive could not have been plunder as his watch and chain were found on him. An inquest will be held.

 

GRIFFIN, MALONEY - (Dundas) Thomas Griffin, of West Flamborough, died last Saturday from ulcers in the stomach. On the same day in the same village, John Maloney died of inflammation of the lungs.


BORTIE - Alfred Bortie, a middle-aged bachelor who lived near Beamsville put an end to his existence in a remarkable and unique manner. Yesterday morning he was missing from his house and the family searched for him but no trace of him was found until late in the afternoon. There was in the neighbourhood a shallow spring into which a barrel had been sunk to keep the water from being contaminated by the surrounding earth. Near the spring Bortie's hat was found. The well being then examined, a boot was seen sticking straight up out of the water. There was a leg inside the boot and Bortie's dead body was drawn up, He had coolly and ingeniously prepared to solve the great mystery. His coat he had taken off and reversing it, put it on upside down so that his arms were thrust through the sleeves the wrong way and the body of the garment enveloped his head. Then he had plunged head foremost into the well. His arms were so encumbered by the peculiar manner in which he had put on the coat that it was impossible to free them and recover an upright position. It is probable that he had done the deed Wednesday night. The cause of the suicide is a mystery. Bortie seems to have had a penchant for that sort of thing. Five years ago he came very near dying from a dose of strychnine., He owned considerable farming property near Beamsville and shortly after his first attempt at suicide he made a will leaving all his' property to the Tults. When he recovered, this will was revoked.

 

May 28, 1887

 

BROWN - Died in Brooklyn N.Y., on Thursday, May 26, Elizabeth Barbour, aged 56, wife of John Brown, late of Hamilton, and eldest daughter of the late Daniel MacNab. Funeral at 3 p.m. on Saturday, May 28, from the residence of W. R. Macdonald, No 12 Herkimer street.

Mrs. John Brown of Brooklyn, N.Y., died at her home on Thursday. Her husband is a brother of Adam Brown, M.P., and was formerly a prominent citizen of Hamilton. Mrs. Brown was the daughter of the late Daniel Macnab, one of the pioneer merchants of the city, and sister of Mrs. Walter Macdonald and Mrs. W. F. Findlay. The family moved from Hamilton to Brooklyn about ten years ago and have lived there ever since. The body will be brought to Hamilton for interment and will arrive to-day. The funeral will take place at 3 p.m. to-day from the residence of W. R. Macdonald, 12 Herkimer street.

 

LEONARD - (Montreal) John Leonard, who was kicked by a horse yesterday, died to-day from the effects of his injuries.

 

HALSTEAD - (Allanburg) On the Queen's birthday, a man supposed to be named Halstead of Beamsville, was walking around the village acting in a deranged manner. The next morning his hat was found in the lock and to-day his body was found in the lock badly disfigured by the gates. He is a stranger here. He is supposed to have relations in Beamsville.


May 30, 1887

 

HARLOW - Died at Chatham, on May 27, Ruth Harlow, aged 27, eldest daughter of Thomas Harlow of this city. Funeral will leave her father's residence, 60 Young street, Monday afternoon, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

LAWRENCE - Died on May 28, at 39 Emerald street north, Susan Jane, beloved wife of William Lawrence, and eldest daughter of John and Grace Jordan, 2 St. John's Road, Plymouth, Devon, England. Funeral took place on Sunday.

 

MANDLEBAUM - Died on Sunday, May 29, after a short and painful illness, Mary, the beloved wife of L. J. Mandelbaum. Interment at New York City.

 

MCKAY - Died at 151 York street, on Saturday, May 28, Henry McKay, youngest son of Clara and William McKay, aged 17 months. Funeral on Monday, at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

RICHARDSON - Died in this city, on May 28, Mr. John Richardson, in the 68th year of his age. Funeral from the house of Mr. William Kell, 57 Maria street, on Monday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LAMOUREAUX - (Montreal) Captain Joseph Lamoureaux, of the barge "Davis", was working on the deck last night when he fell into the river and was drowned.

 

BURNS - (Toronto) Joshua G. Burns, a prominent member of the grand lodge of Masons of Canada, died this morning, aged 45.

 

VESSEAU, ROBINDOUX, HERRIUX,VANIER - (Montreal) Six men named Celestin Vesseau and his son Charles, Joseph Robindoux, Wilfred L. Herriux, Philias Vanier and Nelson Montreuil went over to Nun's Island last night on a fishing expedition and took a quantity of liquor with them. They seem to have spent the night in a drinking debauch for on attempting to cross over to the city again at 4 o'clock this morning, they were unable to manage the boat which was overturned and five of them were drowned, Montreuil being saved by clinging to the boat until it passed the harbour where it was seen, and he was rescued by one of the harbour police. The only body recovered is that of the elder Vesseau who managed to get into the boat again, but being unable to sit erect from sheer exhaustion, he fell back and drowned in the water in the boat.

 

DEXTER - (Halifax) The death is announced of Hon Isaac V. Dexter of Brooklyn, Queen's County, a member of the legislative council of Nova Scotia at the age of 63. The deceased was the senior member of the firm of I. V. & J. H. Dexter. He was very highly esteemed.


SLAUGHTER - (Halifax) Three young men named Clifford I. Brander, John Isenor, and Charles Nangle were arrested to-day on a charge of causing the death of Cyrus Slaughter, a coloured man, who was drowned in the lake at Preston last Sunday while trout fishing. The four men were in a boat together and according to the story of the three prisoners he fell out and was drowned. The arrests were made at the instance of Slaughter's wife who made a sworn statement accusing the youths of having killed her husband. The prisoners will be arraigned in court on Monday.

 

BASSETT - (Brantford) Robert Bassett, a seven-year-old son of J. A. Bassett, was drowned in a pond at Workman & Watt's brick yard. The little lad with two other companions went in to bathe and it is supposed got beyond his depth. The body was recovered about half an hour after drowning.

 

May 31, 1887

 

CLAPHAM - Died in this city, on May 29, at 7 Pine street, near Locke, Ester, eldest daughter of John and Elizabeth Clapham, aged 21 years and 3 months. Funeral on Tuesday, May 31, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

NUNAN - Died on Sunday, May 29, Patrick Nunan, aged 58 years. Funeral from his late residence, 245 Wellington street north, at 8:30 a.m., Wednesday, June 1, for St. Patrick's church, thence to the R. C. Cemetery of the Holy Sepulchre. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

TURNER - (Toronto) Robert Turner, an employee of the Consumers Gas Company, while walking along the railway track to his work this morning, was run over by several freight cars that were being shunted. His right leg was completely severed from his body and he died in about an hour. He was an unmarried man about 23 years of age.

 

MENGENASIS - (Montreal) J. B, Mengenasis, ex-M.P. for the county of Vaudreuil, died at Regandon on Saturday last at the advanced age of 83 years.

 

LETTS (Lindsay) Last night George Letts, aged about 24, a member of No 4 company, forty-five Battalion, was on the river in a canoe when a sudden gust of wind capsized it. His feet became entangled in the carpet of the canoe and he was unable to extricate himself and was drowned.

 

HARLOW - The announcement of the sudden death of Miss Ruth Harlow, of this city will surprise her friends. There are very distressing circumstances in connection with her death.


She was employed in Hawkin's shirt factory and for some time past was intimate with a married man employed by the firm. Nobody suspected, however, how intimate the relations were. Not many days ago when the poor young woman discovered that she was enceinte, her mental anguish was terrible and for a week she was nearly insane. She went to Chatham three weeks ago and had an abortion procured, from the effects of which she died on Friday last. The remains were brought to the city on Sunday and interred here yesterday.

 

MONTGOMERY - Dr. J. W. Montgomery, assistant physician at the Hamilton asylum, filed yesterday shortly before 1 o'clock. Last Tuesday he was struck with paralysis and though he rallied slightly after the attack, his condition has for some days been such as to give ground for little hope of his recovery. Therefore his death was not unexpected. Dr. Montgomery had just completed his sixtieth year. He was a son of the late John Montgomery who was engaged with William Lyon Mackenzie in the rebellion of 1837 and was convicted, but afterward pardoned by the Queen. Dr. Montgomery practised medicine in North Gwillumbury for many years and was appointed assistant physician of the Hamilton asylum twelve years ago. He was twice married and is survived by three sons and two daughters.

 

June 1, 1887

 

MONTGOMERY - Died on May 30, Dr. John Wilmot Montgomery, acting medical superintendent, Hamilton asylum, in the 60th year of his age. Funeral service this (Wednesday) morning at 10:30 o'clock at the Asylum. Friends are invited. Interment in Mount Pleasant cemetery, Toronto.

 

FEARMAN - Died on May 31, Harry Albert, son of Edward and Isabella Fearman, aged 8 years, 8 months, and 5 days. Funeral from his parents' residence, 172 Mary street north, at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, June 1. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCKAY - Mrs. McKay, wife of Alexander McKay, one of the oldest settlers of Puslinch township is dead, aged 82.

 

June 2, 1887

 

TAYLOR - (Moncton, N.B.) Edgar Taylor, aged 23 years, was killed in a sawmill at Botsford parish yesterday. While working alone in the lower part of the mill, his head came into contact with a saw and when found it was split almost in two.

 

TALLMAN - After an illness of about eight weeks, Mrs. Sheppard Tallman passed away last Sunday afternoon. Her brother, John Althouse died about two months ago and she was present at his funeral in good health. Immediately afterward she was taken with typhoid fever from the


effects of which she died. She was born in the township of Grimsby on the farm now owned by David Althouse, her nephew. She was married at 19 and enjoyed her new home in company with her life partner for twenty-one years when he was taken away. She still stuck to the farm although her eldest helper was but sixteen years of age. By hard work and perseverance she made a success of the farm and her family, one of whom now resides on the old homestead. The remaining four are Mrs. William Norton of Woodburn, Mrs. D. McGregor of Kilbride, and George and Sheppard Tallman of Hoopston, Illinois. She was a good mother, ever a devout Christian, abhorred laziness, had a pleasant word and smile for all, and this won her a widespread friendship. She was generally called Grandma Tallman. She had attained the ripe age of 75 years.

 

GAULT - (Montreal) M. H, Gault, M.P. for Montreal West, died this afternoon. Mr. Gault was the son of the late Leslie Gault, merchant and shipowner, of Strabane county, Tyrone, Ireland, and was officially connected with large mercantile undertakings. He was first returned to parliament at the general election of 1878 for Montreal West by a majority of 1787 votes, and was again elected in 1882, retiring in 1887. In politics Mr. Gault was a Conservative.

 

SERVISS - (Belleville) David Serviss, inside tyler of the grand Orange lodge, died in the city hall this afternoon while the lodge was in session. Heart disease was the cause of his death. The deceased, who was for many years a resident of this city, was highly respected. He was about 65 years of age.

 

BALL - A. T. H. Ball, sawyer, of Galt, is dead, aged 59.

 

WONHAM - Colonel Wonham, surveyor of Ingersoll, died recently in the Winnipeg hospital.

 

QUINLAN - Joseph Quinlan, for many years councillor of Brantford, died at Tottenham, on Monday, of paralysis.

 

KEATING - Thomas Keating, Jr. left Oneida township ten years ago. He died in Montana, on May 12, of pneumonia.

 

June 3, 1887

 

WILLARD - Died June 2, of pneumonia, Henry H. Willard, secretary of Ontario Rolling Mills Co, aged 48 years. Funeral Saturday at 2:30 p.m. from his late residence, 87½ Jackson street west. Friends of deceased please accept this notice.

 

HANCOCK - Died in this city, on June 1, at his late residence, corner of Hannah and John streets, Joseph Hancock, aged 65 years. Funeral will take place on Friday, June 3, at 3 o'clock Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


STOW - Died in this city, on June 1, Elizabeth, beloved wife of Nelson Stow, in her 60th year. Funeral from her late residence, corner of York and Dundurn streets, Saturday, June 4, at 3:30. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

CONNORS - (Toronto) A woman named Ann Connors, while walking along Lombard street to-day, fell dead. She had been drinking heavily of late and it is supposed her death was caused by the prolonged spree. She was about 35 years of age.

 

MCNAMARA - At Thorold on Sunday, the funeral of the late T. McNamara was headed by the band of the Orange Young Britons, and the service was performed by Father Sullivan, Roman Catholic priest.

 

PRICE - A young Copetown man named William Price was killed on the Grand Trunk Railway track on Wednesday near the village. He was returning from Orkney and was under the influence of liquor. The station master at Copetown says that when last seen alive he was crouched on the track on his hands and knees and did not appear to be asleep for he was moving. While in this position he was struck by an express train and instantly killed. Coroner Dr. Walker of Dundas was summoned, but did not think the circumstances warranted the holding of an inquest.

 

June 4, 1887

 

BEAUDIN - (Montreal) T. Beaudin, proprietor of the Chambly Hotel, Jacques Cartier street, was found dead in bed this morning. The coroner's jury returned a verdict of cerebral congestion.

 

NANTIL - (Montreal) The body of Camille Nantil, who lived with his parents in Leroue Lane, was found under the Grand Trunk Railway canal bridge at St. Henri this morning. He left his home on Saturday last, and never returned.

 

HENDERSON - (Toronto) Ex-Ald Alexander Henderson, one of the best known figures in Toronto streets, died last night. He came to Toronto in 1834. He was an alderman for ten years and for fifty-one years was a member of St. Andrew's Society. He was 64 years of age.

 

SPIGGS - (Halifax) A boy named Spiggs, a ten-year-old, was drowned at Montague yesterday by falling into an abandoned mining pit. Two younger brothers were with him, but they did not give the alarm until it was too late. The father of the boy is a gold miner.

 

TRAVIS - (Windsor) William Travis of Tilbury Centre, who was charged with the murder of his wife, has been not guilty by the coroner's jury. He found his wife dead in the house upon his return


home from work, and it is supposed she fell down stairs. He had the reputation of abusing his wife, and the neighbours would not believe his story when her body was found, and had him arrested.

 

GARDNER - The body of Mrs. William Gardner of Luther, stolen from the Fergus cemetery, and rescued from the Toronto pickle vats of the Toronto School of Medicine, was re-interred in the same grave on Thursday in presence of a large number of people.

 

DICKSON - A Methodist minister known throughout Canada, Rev. G. N. A. F. T. Dickson, died in London yesterday. He was born at Templenew, near Ballyshannon, county Donegal, Ireland, in 1825. He came to St. John, N.B., in 1847, and studied for the Methodist ministry, entering upon his ministerial work in 1851. Four years later he was received into full connection. During his ministerial labours he was stationed in Montreal, Kingston, Hamilton, Niagara, Oshawa, St. Johns, St. Thomas, Sarnia, London, and elsewhere. Two years ago in Exeter he was prostrated with haemorrhage from the lungs and compelled to abandon his ministerial work. He moved with his family to London and resided there until his death. In 1855, Mr. Dickson married Fanny, daughter of Rev. John Baker, of Brighton, England. She and five of the eight children survive him. All who knew the reverend gentleman will agree with the encomium of the "London Advertiser". Mr. Dickson was a man of marked scholarly attainments, exemplary character, and in his pastoral relations, he was universally beloved'.

 

June 6, 1887

 

VANNORMAN - Died on Wednesday, at the residence of her mother, in Waltham. Mass., Anna C. Whitcomb, beloved wife of Charles E. VanNorman, of Chickapee, Mass, formerly of Hamilton.

 

MARCHAM - Died at her daughter's residence, Philadelphia, on May 31, Mrs. William Marcham, late of 144 Catherine street north, Hamilton.

 

FEAST - Died on June, Mary Lenton, relict of the late Samuel Feast, aged 78 years. Funeral from her late residence, 73 Main street west, on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

LOCKHART - Died on June 3, James Lockhart, Hannah street, of H.H.B.C. Funeral at 3:30 p.m. on Tuesday.

James Lockhart, a highly respected citizen, died at his house on Hannah street, yesterday. Mr. Lockhart was 56 years of age. He was a Scotchman by birth and in the service of the Hudson Bay Company. For two years he had been suffering from consumption and only recently returned from the south whither he had gone for the benefit of his health. He leaves a wife and one daughter.


KIRKPATRICK - (Kingston) A farm labourer named Kirkpatrick was killed near Rideau station about a mile and a half from this city, on Saturday afternoon. The horse was thrown into the ditch and the wagon and man into the cowcatcher and taken down the track. At a cattle guard the wagon was broken and the driver cast into the ditch. It is understood that the man's neck was broken. He was married.

 

HARVIE - (Colborne) Mrs. F. L. Harvie died very suddenly this morning of heart disease. She was apparently in good health up to the time of death. The deceased was about 60 years of age and leaves a husband and two children.

 

June 7, 1887

 

CROSS - Died on Sunday, June 5, George A. Cross, aged 34 years. Funeral from his late residence, No 12 Jones street, on Tuesday, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

George A. Cross, who was injured by. a cave-in of a sewer on King street west last Friday, has died from the effects of the injuries which he then received.

 

BARRY - Died in this city, on June 6, John Barry, in the 63rd year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, 18 Hunter street east, on Thursday morning, June 9, at 8:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

John Barry, barrister-at-law, died at noon yesterday at his residence, on Hunter street east. Mr. Barry had been in failing health for a considerable period, and for the past two weeks he had suffered from an affection of the heart which was aggravated by a severe cold, His death was rather sudden though not wholly unexpected.

Mr. Barry was a native of Ireland, having been born in the Green Isle 63 years ago. When quite a young man he emigrated to Canada and for some years taught school in London, Ontario. But the duties of the pedagogue were distasteful to him and he took up the study of law and became a practising barrister in London. About thirty years ago he came to Hamilton with his young family and made this city his home. Here he resided practising his profession successfully until 1881 when he purchased a farm in Nelson township and settled in with his family. Two years later the family left the farm and lived in Burlington for a few months and then returned to the city. Of late years Mr. Barry did not practise his profession and lived in comparative retirement, enjoying the companionship of a few choice friends.

The deceased gentleman was a man of noble heart, broad liberal mind, and cultivated tastes, a thorough gentleman in his instincts and his outward life. He was a Roman Catholic in religion and a Conservative in politics. The last time Mr. Barry appeared in public was at the mass meeting in the Grand opera house to protest against the Crimes bill when he made a vigorous speech.


He was not a man who sought the public for public honours. Once, however, he was induced to run for alderman and was elected, but he sat in the council only one year. He was also president of an Irish national society which included men of all religious denominations before the present National League was heard of.

Mr. Barry leaves a widow and family of seven children, four sons and three daughters, all grown to manhood and womanhood. Two of the sons are married.

 

GOGOLIN - (Pembroke) The execution of David Gogolin, a German who in October last killed his tenant, a woman, because she refused to vacate his house or pay rent, took place this morning at 8 o'clock and was witnessed by about fifty people.

 

June 8, 1887

 

FERGUSON - Died in this city, on June 7, at 77 Walnut street, Jane, beloved wife of William Ferguson, aged 65 years. Funeral will take place on Thursday afternoon, at 3:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.

 

CROWE - (Toronto) Coroner Johnston has been asked to investigate a case of alleged manslaughter. On the Queen's birthday several boys, while playing, quarrelled and John Crowe, 13 years of age, residing on Mansfield avenue, was knocked down by two larger boys who it is alleged kicked him unmercifully about the head and body. Crowe was taken home in a partially unconscious condition and gradually became weaker end weaker until Sunday last when he died.

 

June 9, 1887

 

HOBSON - Died in this city, on June 8, Mrs. Mary Hobson, aged 85 years. Funeral will take place from her late residence, 196 Napier street, on Friday, June 10, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BROWN - (Bedford, Ont) The dwelling of A. Brown was consumed by fire this morning between 12 and 1 o'clock. Four small children were burned to death, aged about 9, 7, 5, and 3 years. Mr. and Mrs. Brown barely escaped with their baby. The origin of the fire is not known. The remains have been taken out and taken to Verona for burial.

 

PERKINS - (Kingston) James Perkins was the man killed on the G.T.R. at Collins Bay on Tuesday morning. His remains were identified here to-day. He went to sleep on the track while intoxicated. His home was near Deseronto.


June 10, 1887

 

VEVANT - (Montreal) An old deaf and dumb man named Vevant, while walking along the Canada Atlantic track just outside of the village of Lacolle, was struck by the morning express and instantly killed.

 

SUMMERS - (Montreal) Mr. Summers of this city received information from Dickensen's Landing to-day that the body of his son, George, who was drowned under such distressing circumstances last autumn in company with the late F. McLachlin while fishing in Lake St Francis, has been recovered. It was found within one hundred yards of the spot where he met his death. The body of Mr. McLachlin has not yet been recovered.

 

PERAULT - (Montreal) A man named Perault fell asleep on Commission street and fell over a distance of thirty-five feet. He was removed to Notre Dame hospital where he died a few minutes after his admission.

 

DONOGHUE - (Kingston) A woman, wife of a man named Donoghue, committed suicide by hanging herself to a branch of a tree last week. The poor woman was insane. Her body was only discovered after it had been hanging three days.

 

BROWN - (Almonte) Joseph Brown, a boy about 16 years old, was drowned here on Tuesday evening.

 

MCADAM - (Halifax) A woman named Kate McAdam was accidentally killed on a ferry boat between Sydney and North Sydney this afternoon. She and a man were precipitated into the water by a gangway giving way, and the woman was struck on the head by the paddles or floats and picked up insensible. Before medical assistance could be procured, she was dead.

 

SAYEN - (Almonte) David Sayen of Ripon, Quebec, was killed and D. Ferguson of Carleton seriously injured on the drive of logs of Edwards & McLaren of Ottawa, now running past here. A jam occurred on the Falls at Rosamond Woollen Company mill, and about thirty men had been working at it from Wednesday noon until about one p.m. to-day, when the logs started so quickly that the men who escaped had great difficulty in doing so. Sayen went over the falls with the logs and was killed instantly.

 

RUSSELL - (Brockville) John Russell of North Norwich was drowned this afternoon by falling off the Canadian Pacific dock. He had been here on his wedding trip and was married only eight days.

 

CALDWELL (Dundas) Not a soul within twenty miles but knew Thomas Caldwell, the nurseryman of the York Road, who had done business hereabouts for many years. His friends were as numerous as a man could desire and he was generally esteemed.


A week or so ago he stepped on a rusty nail which penetrated his boot and ran into his foot. Tetanus was the result, not blood poisoning as was reported, and Mr. Caldwell died of lockjaw, the first stage of this trouble on Sunday. His funeral took place on Tuesday and was largely attended by friends and by his fellow members of C.O.O.F. and A.O.U.W.

 

TAYLOR - Last evening while a lot of boys and young men were indulging in some horse play among themselves on the Crystal Palace grounds, one of those unfortunate accidents occurred wherein by a peculiar combination of circumstances, an apparently harmless action has resulted fatally. The unfortunate victim in the present case was a coloured lad named Thomas Taylor, aged about 16. He was playing with some other boys and young men on the palace grounds and engaged in a wrestle with a young fellow named John Torrance, in the course of which he received a severe squeeze between the legs of his opponent, and being in rather poor health and not internally strong, the squeeze which probably would not have affected a boy in sound health brought on a haemorrhage from which he died a couple of hours after. For several years Taylor has been troubled with inflammatory rheumatism.

 

June 11, 1887

 

MANSON - Died on June 10, at the residence of her son, 24 Hannah street east, Jane, relict of the late Mr. William Manson, in the 75th year of her age.

 

PICKLE - Colonel N. Pickle, a U.E. Loyalist, a survivor of the rebellion of 1837 and a Mason of sixty-four years' standing, died at Hagersville, Thursday, aged 89.

 

DUNN - James Dunn, of Stratford, a Grand Trunk Railway blacksmith, was run over and killed by the yard engine while on his way to work yesterday morning. He was 56 years of age.

 

WINTERBERRY - (Toronto) Thomas Winterberry, a messenger of the Quebec Bank who was seriously crushed in the elevator on Monday last, died at the hospital last night.

 

June 13, 1887

 

GORMAN - Saturday morning David Garson went to Lambton Mills and recognized the body of the unknown man who died there Friday as that of Edward Gorman of this city. It appears that the deceased went to Toronto about four weeks ago to collect $200 that was owed him there. Although the deceased was over 70 years old he would never ride on a railway train, but always preferred to walk. After receiving the money on Tuesday, he started on his way back and was taken sick at Lambton Mills. The proprietor of the Biggar House wanted to send him to Hamilton


on the train but the deceased said he would be well enough, to start for home the next morning. He was taken worse through the night and died in the morning. All the money found on the deceased was $7. At first it was supposed that he had been attacked and robbed by footpads, but no marks of violence were found on the body and the coroner decided the cause of death was inflammation of the lungs. The body was exhumed and brought to this city on Saturday night. The funeral took place from the residence of his son-in-law, Thomas Brown, 61 Canada street. The pall bearers were: William King, J. King, William Sinclair, William Mellody, Harvey Holmes, and William Herald. The deceased came to this city from Ireland about forty years ago. He lived here a short time and then moved to Toronto where he lived until sixteen years ago when he removed to Hamilton. He leaves a wife and seven children.

 

June 14, 1887

 

WILLIAMSON - Died in Barton, on June 12, Henry Williamson, aged 61, a native of Caithness-shire, Scotland. Funeral at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, June 14. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DODD - Died in Dundas, on June 13, at the residence of Mr. Edwin Woodhouse, Hatt street, of cerebral congestion, William Dodd, late of 74 Merrick street, Hamilton, aged 52 years. Funeral will take place from the above residence, at 3 p.m., Wednesday, June 15. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCLELLAN - (Thorold) A little girl about 12 years of age, the daughter of Donald McLellan, sawyer, of this place, fell into the canal here this morning while on her way to school and was drowned before assistance could be rendered. The body was recovered shortly afterward.

 

GILLETT - Alfred Hancock is a youth of about 17 summers. He was exported to this country about a year ago by a benevolent lady named Miss Smith who resides at Herrington, England, and spends her money in doing such things. Since then he has been in no less that four situations, and though the reasons for which he left two of them are unknown, his conduct in the third with Dr. Vernon of this city was of such a nature as to warrant that when Canada secured his presence she did not gain a heap. After leaving Dr. Vernon's place he was engaged by W. E. Boyd and William Holland, two gentlemen boarding at the house of Thomas Gillett, corner of Stinson and Wellington streets, as their 'boots' or valet and has been in that position for a couple of weeks.

Yesterday morning he was engaged in dusting Mr. Boyd's room when he found a revolver lying on the dressing case and picked it up to dust it also. While holding it in his hand,


Beatrice Gillett, the 16-year-old daughter of the proprietor of the house, came into the room when the revolver went off of its own free will and while he was merely standing talking to the girl about something else and holding it in his hand. The bullet, a large 32-calibre one, entered Miss Gillett's breast a couple of inches above the right nipple, passed through her right lung, and came out below her shoulder blade at the back. She fell to the floor, bleeding profusely, and Doctors Vernon, Smith, and Mullin were summoned immediately, and did all they could for the poor young woman.

When Dr. Vernon recognized in the shooting his former employee, he immediately summoned the police, and Hancock was arrested by Sergeant Major Smith and taken down to No 1 station where a warrant, charging him with shooting and grievously injuring Beatrice Gillett was sworn out against him...

The poor girl never recovered from the effect of the wound. She sank rapidly and died at 2 o'clock in the afternoon. Miss Gillett was a very handsome and sprightly young girl, a member of James Street Baptist church, and the terrible accident has proved a great shock to her relatives and friends, especially to her father who has been in very delicate health for some time. She was a great favourite in the neighbourhood and the people are very outspoken in their opinion of the more than culpable negligence, not alone of the boy, that resulted in such an unfortunate occurrence.

 

June 13, 1887

 

BAGLEY - (Toronto) The body of the woman found floating in the bay yesterday has been identified as that of Mrs. Matilda Bagley, 494 Parliament street. She was 57 years of age and was of respectable and sober habits. She left home on Sunday to go to church and that was the last seen of her alive. It is believed she suicided while in a fit of mental aberration.

 

June 16, 1887

 

MORTON - (Montreal) Francis Morton, 20 years of age, brother of the well known lacrosse player, fell into the canal to-day and was drowned.

 

RUSBOTHAM - (McKellar, Ont) Two boys, sons of Ishmail Rusbotham, were drowned this afternoon in Squaw Lake. Their ages were 15 and 12. They ventured on a saw log held against the shore of their father's farm by the wind while the river drivers were absent for dinner. The bodies were recovered by the men soon after.

 

JOHNSON - An insane man named Joseph Johnson, of Galt, hanged himself in Berlin Jail on Monday.


June 17, 1887

 

SMITH (Ottawa) The body found in the Rideau canal this morning has been identified as that of Mrs. Smith, wife of James Smith, an engineer on the Canadian Pacific Railway, now absent on a trip. She left her home on Maria street about 8 o'clock this evening and had not since been heard of by her friends until the body was identified this evening. The deceased, who was 25 years old, had two children. How the drowning came about is still a mystery. The inquest had been adjourned until Monday.

 

June 18, 1887

 

YOUNG - Died on June 9, at Hillsborough, Sierra county, New Mexico, after a lingering illness, Frances Walcoft, wife of J. Morris Young, and youngest daughter of the late Thomas Racey, Milton, Registrar County Halton.

 

June 20, 1887

 

MACKIE - Died in this city, on June 17, Archibald Mackie, late of Glasgow, Scotland, aged 23 years and 3 months. Funeral took place yesterday.

 

SHAW - (London) Last night about 10 o'clock a party of volunteers who had been in the city during the evening, while proceeding up Adelaide street on their way back to the camp, heard a couple of shots fired from a house quite close to the camp and the voices of a man and a woman, seemingly in a heated quarrel. They halted to see what was wrong when suddenly a man burst out of the house and ordered them to move on. As they did not seem disposed to do so, however, the man flew into a passion, and stepping to the fence, exclaimed with an oath, "If you don't go away, I will make you", at the same time aiming a blow at one of the volunteers named Ralph Shaw, a private in the Chatham company of the 24th Battalion, burying the knife in the poor fellow's side, severing one of his ribs and inflicting a fatal wound. The wounded man was picked up by his comrades and carried to the camp surgeon's tent where he expired in about two hours. The murderer, Charles Stephenson, well known throughout the city as 'Pig's Feet Charlie' was immediately put under arrest and taken to the police station. Feeling ran high in Twenty-Fourth when they heard of their comrade's sad fate and lynching was openly talked of. In fact a party of about 150 men did actually start for the jail, but were stopped at the campground boundary and ordered back. Orders were subsequently given not to allow any of the Twenty-fourth men out of the grounds during the rest of the day without a pass. An inquest will be held to-morrow after which the remains will be sent to Chatham in charge of a company of men from the Twenty-Fourth.


CROTHERS - (Ottawa) Alexander Crothers, of this city, conductor on the Canadian Pacific Railway, fell between the cars at Sudbury last evening and was crushed to an almost shapeless mass. He was a young man and a general favourite.

 

ALLEN - (Owen Sound) A farmer named David Allen, residing on the 8th line of Sydenham, was instantly killed yesterday by a falling tree while working at a chopping bee at the farm of Michael Daley. The unfortunate man was about 40 years of age and leaves a wife and four small children.

 

HAY - (Brantford) Last evening at the residence of H. Wood, Robbie Hay, a five-year-old son of Robert Hay of Richmond, Quebec, was playing with a ball which rolled into a cistern. The boy went to look into the cistern after the ball and fell in and was drowned before being rescued. Mrs. Hay accompanied by her little boy came here a few days ago to visit Mr. Wood.

 

SWARTZ - M. Swartz of Strathroy, father of Jacob Swartz, of Hespeler, fell into a railroad culvert the other day and was fatally injured.

 

June 21, 1887

 

TAYLOR - Died in this city, on June 19, of brain disease, John Taylor, a native of Durham, England, in the 45th year of his age. Funeral from 78 Hughson street south, at 10 a.m., on Wednesday, June 22. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

MAYHOOD - Mrs. Mayhood of Arkona dropped dead on Sunday morning as she was preparing for church.

 

HART - (Quebec) The body of the young man, Michael G. Hart, who mysteriously disappeared on the day of the last federal elections from Indian Cove, was found floating in the river opposite St. Michael this morning.

 

GILLETT - The investigation into the cause of Beatrice Gillett's death was concluded yesterday. The coroner's jury decided that the deceased came to her death by being accidentally shot by a revolver in the hands of Alfred Handcott, but from the evidence adduced no malice was intended. The jury warns the public generally to keep all firearms in a safer position. Handcott was brought before the jail magistrate and discharged.

During the progress of the inquest investigations were made into the character and conduct of the boy Handcott, and it was ascertained that the reasons for which he had left his various situations were in no way discreditable to him. The evidence of two former employers and certificates from two others are quite favourable to the lad.


June 22, 1887

 

COUTTS (Goderich) A heartrending and tragic accident occurred here to-day while a royal salute was being fired in honour of the Queen's jubilee. A premature discharge occurred while gunners Oliver Pennington, Richard Parke, and Master were loading a cannon. The two former were blown aside and the ramrod struck James Coutts, son of George Coutts who was in front of the gun. The ramrod passed through his body in the region of the heart and pinned him to the ground. Death was instantaneous. The rod on withdrawal disclosed a frightful spectacle to the awe-stricken spectators who witnesses the sad affair. Parker's injuries are very serious, the discharge having struck him in the face and body. It was feared his eyesight was destroyed, but the doctors think the casualty will be averted. The father of the deceased was among the spectators.

 

POWER - (Halifax) Rev. Mgr. Power, vicar-general of the Roman Catholic diocese of Halifax, died to-day.

 

June 23, 1887

 

FERGUSON - Died at Burlington, on June 21, William Dow Ferguson, eldest son of George and Janette Ferguson, aged --- years and 4 months. Funeral on Saturday, June 25, at 1 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

BUILDER - A distressing accident occurred yesterday at the beach about noon. The children of Mr. C. M. Counsell were bathing in the bay side of the beach with their nurse, a young woman named Ada Builder, Shortly before 1 o'clock the children burst in upon Mrs. Counsell with frightened faces and told her that Ada was drowning in the bay, Mrs. Counsell hurried to the spot, dashed into the bay, and dragged ashore what proved to be the lifeless body of the poor young woman. It was lying in only two or three of water. It is supposed Miss Builder took cramps and was thus unable to drag herself out of the shallow water. The deceased was an American girl. It has been considered unnecessary to hold an inquest in this case.

 

June 24, 1887

 

TOMPKINS - Died in this city, at his late residence, 280 King street west, on June 21, Edward Tompkins, aged 53 years: Also on June 22, John Tompkins, aged 22 years. Funeral will take place Friday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

John Tompkins, aged 22, son of Edward Tompkins who choked to death Tuesday evening, died yesterday.

 

HULL - Died in this city, on June 22, George, son of William and Mary Hull, aged 24 years.


Funeral from his father's residence, No 20 Pearl street south, on Saturday, at 2 p.m., to All Saints Church, thence to Burlington cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CYPRIEN - (Quebec) After hearing the evidence in the case of Charles Cyprien who suicided the other day by jumping from Dorchester bridge, the jury returned a verdict of death from syncope in the river St. Charles.

 

June 25, 1887

 

HUNTER - Died in this city, on June 24, William, third son of John and Elizabeth Hunter, aged 24 years, a native of Tyrone, Ireland, Funeral will leave his father's residence, no 4 Albert road, at 3 p.m., Sunday, June 26. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

THOMAS - (Elora) A man named John Thomas, a teamster employed by W. Gray, lime burner, Elora, while drawing lime in the afternoon and standing on the tongue of the wagon to fix some part of the harness, fell between the horses which moved on, drawing the loaded wagon over his shoulder and chest, killing him instantly.

 

VILLIERS - (Kingston) The wife of Col Villiers, DAG, died this morning after an illness of a month. The colonel in consequence of the bereavement being obliged to resign the command of the military camp to Col. Bolton of Cobourg.

 

HARRISON - James Harrison, of Harrison Bros has gone to Milton to attend the funeral of his father who died on Wednesday morning.

 

June 27, 1887

 

PEER - (Niagara Falls) Steve Peer, the local celebrity who outdid Blondin in daring feats around Niagara and recently crossed the rapids on a three-eighths cable, is dead.

Ever since he did the daring act he has been drinking very heavily and William Leary, proprietor of the Elgin House where Peer has been stopping has been watching him closely. This evening about 7:30 Peer went out unobserved with John Gillespie and a stranger, and later was seen with two men near his rope. As he did not show up by 8:30 and no trace could be found of him elsewhere, it was supposed that he had attempted to walk his rope and had fallen from it or tumbled over the bank, and ropes and lanterns were procured and Peer's brother with John Connolly, was lowered down. Near the bottom of the incline they found the lifeless body cut around the head. There was a large gash leading from his nose over the top of his head so that his brains protruded, and death must have been instantaneous. His body was raised to the top of the precipice by means of ropes and taken to the Elgin House where it now lies awaiting the coroner.


A good many rumours are afloat regarding how he met his death, amongst them one that he suicided, there being, it is said, some trouble between him and his wife. The general belief is that he attempted to walk out on the cable when recovering from his drunk and lost his footing and fell into the abyss below.

 

DELANEY - (Montreal) Mrs. Delaney, aged 76, who fell from a balcony while separating a drunken man and woman who were fighting, died from her injuries.

 

CAMERON - (Toronto) Chief Justice Sir Matthew Crooks Cameron died shortly after 11 o'clock last night. During the last days of his illness he suffered great pain which he bore with fortitude and patience. He was 65 years of age, having been born in Dundas in 1823. He was called to the Bar of Ontario province in 1849; was created Queen's Counsel in 1862; was elevated to the Bench in 1878; and was raised to the position of Chief Justice of the common pleas division in 1884. During his practice at the Bar he was acknowledged to be without compeer in criminal cases. He was a strong Conservative in politics and held office in the government of Hon John Sandfield Macdonald. It is only a few weeks ago that the honour of knighthood was conferred upon him. He leaves three sons and three daughters.

 

AITKEN - (Toronto) The body of Robert Aitken was found floating in the bay yesterday. Last Monday he and some other boys were playing near the water's edge when a drunken man chased them, and it is supposed that young Aitken, in trying to make his escape, fell into the bay and was drowned. An inquest was commenced last night and adjourned till Tuesday night. The drunken man is not known.

 

CANTIN - (Quebec) Thomas Cantin, aged 65, deliberately suicided by hanging to-night.

 

CIMON (Quebec) S. X. Cimon, M.P. for Charlebois, died suddenly at 4 o'clock this morning. He retired about midnight, took an epileptic fit, and died in a few minutes.

 

MARSHALL - (Kingston) Samuel Marshall, a labourer working on the farm of Matthew Vanorde, Township of Kingston, lost his life on Saturday by a landslide.

 

FOUNTAIN - Emory Fountain, of East Oxford, was kicked by a horse on Friday and died on Saturday.

 

DINGMAN - Mrs. Elizabeth Dingman of the township of Saltfleet departed this life on May 3 at the early age of 27 years. She was the oldest daughter of Thomas Tweedle, Binbrook, and was married some six years ago, and leaves an infant son, her only child. Her last illness was short and though severe was borne with the utmost resignation. During her illness she manifested much


solicitude for the welfare of her friends and exhorted them as far as her strength permitted to get ready for the blessed reunion of the other world. She was very much respected in life. Of a quiet and unobtrusive disposition, she was happy in death, and was followed to her last resting place by a very large assemblage from far and near. Of her it may be truly said, "Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, for they rest from their labours, and their works follow them".

 

June 28, 1887

 

BURT - Died in this city, on June 25, Mary, relict of the late James Burt, in her 59th year. Funeral Tuesday, June 28, at 3:30 from her late residence, 223 Barton street east. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

On Saturday afternoon Mrs. Mary Burt, 223 Barton street, was apparently in her usual good health. She had taken a walk and felt quite well. At 6 o'clock, she was taken ill and at midnight she was dead. The nature of the disease has not yet been determined. The deceased estimable lady was the relict of the late James Burt. She was well and favourable known to a large circle of acquaintances and her many friends were shocked to learn of her sudden death. She leaves two sons and a daughter who have the warmest, sympathy of the community. John D. Burt, of St. Paul, Minn, and R. Bruce Burt, dentist, of Collingwood are her sons. The funeral will take place to-morrow at 3:30.

 

FITZPATRICK - (Montreal) Mrs. Bartholomew Fitzpatrick, a private patient in the Longue Pointe hospital, set fire to her clothes last week, and was so severely burned that she lingered in agony until last night when she died.

 

CHARLEBOIS - The late L. D. Charlebois, M.P.P. for Laprairie, whose death was announced to-day, was born in Laprairie on February 16, 1843, and was married in 1868 to a daughter of J. B. Varin, M.P. Mr. Charlebois has been since 1875 a member of the provincial legislature, and at the last election defeated George Duhamel, now solicitor general, by 23 votes.

 

ROOT - (Montreal) Thomas Root, residing with his wife and family at 72 Banguinet street, was found dead in his cellar with his throat cut from ear to ear. The cause of suicide is supposed to be through sickness and debt, part of his wages having been seized by a bailiff last week. He had the reputation of being a hardworking man and a teetotaller.

 

GILLIES - (Glencoe) About 2 p.m. yesterday, a young man by the name of Dougald Gillies, aged 23 years, was drowned while bathing in the Thames river a short distance from the Strathburn post office. His body was found about 7 o'clock last night. He was a resident of Bismarck, Ontario.


June 29, 1887

 

MORSE - (Toronto) The body of George D. Morse, a well known cattle dealer and ex-soap manufacturer, was found in the bay at the foot of Berkeley street this morning. It is supposed he had accidentally fallen into the water last night. He was 54 years of age.

 

PINKERTON - (Toronto) Samuel Pinkerton, a brakeman on the Canadian Pacific Railway, while jumping on a train a few miles east of the city last night, fell and was fatally injured. He died in a couple of hours. His body was brought into the city and his brother who resides in Greenock township, Bruce county, was notified. Deceased was a married man and 34 years of age.

 

June 30, 1887

 

MCGRATH - Died in this city, on June 29, Edward McGrath, aged 62 years. Funeral will leave his son's residence, 286 Macnab street north, for Dundas, Saturday, July 2, at 9 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

AKIN - (Montreal) James Akin, insurance agent, died suddenly at his residence this morning of heart disease. He was preparing to come downtown when he complained of faintness and fell to the floor and expired. Mr. Akin was for years connected with the Canada Life and Mutual Union of New York, and other leading companies. He had recently established a general insurance agency in the city and had excellent prospects.

 

SQUIER - W. R. Squier, ex-county judge of Huron, is dead.

 

July 2, 1887

 

LYNG - Died on June 30, Catharine, wife of J. Lyng, aged 34 years. Funeral at 2 p.m., Saturday, July 2, from 33 Oak avenue. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LENOIR - (Montreal) A young man named Lenoir was drowned while bathing at Cote St. Paul to-day.

 

MAY - (Montreal) Mrs. May, an elderly woman who washing clothes in one of the pools of water at the Cote St. Louis quarries, to-day, fell on her face in the water and was drowned.

 

THOMPSON - (Kingston) A sad accident occurred on the cricket field in connection with the fireworks display, a printer named Joseph Thompson was hit by a rocket which swept down upon him and instantly killed him. The head was almost severed from the body.


July 4, 1887

 

HARRISON - Died in this city, on July 1, Harriet, wife of W. H. C. Harrison, in the 58th year of her age.

 

MCKALVEY - Died on July 3, Mary Jane McKalvey, youngest daughter of Thomas McKalvey, aged 11 months. Funeral will leave the residence of Thomas McKalvey, 151 Duke street, to-day at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ALLISTON - (Toronto) A man named Joseph Alliston had his two little sons out boating on the bay this evening when one of the children fell overboard. The father jumped in and succeeded in rescuing the child but was drowned himself.

 

KELLEY - (Toronto) Another drowning accident occurred in the bay this afternoon. Some boys were bathing near the old fort when one of them, Johnny Kelley, 12 years of age, got beyond his depth and was drowned. The body was recovered about two hours afterward and taken to the father's house on Euclid avenue.

 

LEPINE - (Montreal) When five young men were rowing down the river below Montreal yesterday, one of them named Wilfred Lepine was drowned.

 

GARLEAU - (Montreal) A boy named Gideon Garleau, residing with his parents on Notre Dame street, was drowned in the river to-day while in bathing.

 

AUGE - (Montreal) Godfroi Auge of St. Jerome came to the city this morning and paid a visit to Mr. Gauthier, 381 Dorchester street, a relation of his. Mr. Gauthier has in his employ a man named Joseph Clavell, and he undertook to have a wrestling match with Auge. The men were wrestling on the sidewalk opposite Mr. Gauthier's and Auge had been overcome by Clavell when he (Auge) suddenly turned pale, commenced bleeding from the nose, and complained of headache. He rose, but tottered and fell dead.

 

MCLAREN - (Montreal) J. C. McLaren, leather merchant, who was thrown from his buggy about two weeks ago, died to-day from the effect of his injuries. The late Mr. McLaren at one time represented one of the wards in the city council.

 

HUNT, SICILY - ((London) Between 12 and 1 o'clock Sunday morning a freight train left the rails about two and a half miles north of St. Thomas on the London & Port Stanley road. The train consisted of twenty-three refrigerator cars containing dressed beef, fifteen of which were completely smashed up. Two young men named Thomas Hunt and Joshua Sicily, who were stealing a ride, were crushed to death, Sicily being instantly killed and Hunt dying shortly after


 being taken from the wreck. A companion named Kains escaped injury and immediately left the scene. The accident was caused by the breaking of an axle.

 

BOGLE - (Belleville) A little boy, five years old, named Harry Bogle, son of Mr. Robert Bogle, was drowned in the river to-night by falling from a saw log. The body was recovered.

 

MORRIS - (Forest) This afternoon a stranger attempted to reach the east bound train which was standing at the depot; he was struck down by the 2 o'clock incoming westbound express. He was badly crushed and died in a few minutes, never regaining consciousness. The body is that of a man about 50 years of age and stout. Some suppose it to be that of Morris, of Morrison, a highlander who worked near Galt last winter and has a farm rented somewhere in Ontario.

 

FARRELL - Last week Mrs. Thomas Farrell of St. Catharines and her three children were visiting James Molyneaux of Kilbride. The youngest child got hold of a bottle of ammonia and drank it. Dr. Jones was summoned, but he could not save the child's life, and it died about an hour after drinking the ammonia.

 

July 5, 1887

 

DESROSIER - (Montreal) Word was received here to-day that a young girl named Desrosier was killed by lightning at Vaudreuil on Saturday afternoon just before the heavy thunderstorm when she was going to milk the cows.

 

BARTON - (Toronto) Drowning accidents are becoming of daily occurrence, a bright little fellow named Henry Barton, 11 years of age, was fishing at the Northern elevator wharf this afternoon with his brother and two companions when he accidentally fell into the water and was drowned before aid reached him. The body was recovered shortly afterward and taken to his father's residence, 264 Markham street.

 

July 6, 1887

 

RUMSEY - Died on July 5, Elizabeth Mabel, only daughter of Thomas and Emma Rumsey, aged 1 year, 3 months, and 10 days. Funeral from the parents' residence, 71 Victoria avenue north, on Wednesday, July 8, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WHITE - Died at her residence, No 8 Cannon street west, on Tuesday, "July 5, Eliza, widow of the late Thomas White, in her 70th year. Funeral, Thursday, July 7, at 3 p.m.

Mrs. Eliza White, widow of the late Thomas White, and mother of Dr James White, died at her son's residence, Cannon street west, yesterday. She had been ill for about six months and her death has been expected almost daily for some weeks.


Mrs. White was a native of Ireland, but came to America while very young and lived in Philadelphia. For nearly forty years she has resided in this city. She is survived by three sons and two daughters. Mrs. White was a noble example of the true Christian lady. She will be greatly missed at Knox church where for many years she had been foremost in all good work.

 

TUPLIN - (Summerside, P.E.I.) The mysterious fate of a young girl at Margate has made quite a sensation here. Last Tuesday evening a daughter of John Tuplin left her father's house about nine o'clock. She had thin slippers on her feet, had nothing on her head, and was clad in a thin cotton dress. She told some members of the family that she had an appointment that night with a young man named Millman by whom she alleged she had been led astray. This was the last seen of her. Millman is suspected of foul play, but has not yet been arrested. About dusk on Tuesday evening a man was lurking in the woods in front of Tuplin 's residence. A boat generally anchored near Millman's was also seen that night on the other side of the river near Tuplin's. Yesterday evening the girl's body was found in the southwest river. There was a stone tied around the neck. Dr. Carruthers of Summerside has gone out to hold an inquest.

Later developments in the Margate. P.E.I., tragedy establish beyond doubt the fact that the girl Tuplin was murdered, and her body thrown into the river where it was found, a post mortem examination disclosed two bullet wounds in the neck and head, and the coroner's jury returned a verdict that she had been shot and killed by a party or parties unknown. Millman, the alleged seducer of the girl, and a man named Byrenton, supposed to have been an accomplice in the crime, have been arrested.

 

MANTEAU - (Montreal) Joseph Manteau, night watchman in Porter's tannery, was found dead this morning by a workman as he first entered the premises. Heart disease was supposed to be the cause of death.

 

PERAULT - (Quebec) A foul murder was perpetrated at Cote St Louis this evening. A man named Joseph Perault was found dead in a field with his head crushed in by a stone weighing fifty pounds. Two men named Dupre and Charlotte have been arrested on suspicion as the deceased had been drinking with them. The accused said they had no recollection of what had taken place. Dupre's cousin said to the deceased that some one had thrown a large stone through his window wanted to find out who had done it, to which the deceased replied, "you need not pass your own cousin", meaning Dupre, who on hearing this said he was going to kill somebody to-day, and the next heard was that Perault was found dead as already stated. The deceased was a widower, 40 years of age, and resided with his father.


MILLER - (Quebec) George Miller, the guardian of the esplanade, and for the past 26 years connected with the Culler's office, dropped dead at 9 o'clock this morning while on duty on the esplanade. The deceased is supposed to have died from heart disease.

 

MCCONNELL - (Kingston) On Thursday, a young man named McConnell, aged 22 years, engaged in building a bridge at Latimoor's rapids, near Lindhurst, accidentally slipped and fell into the stream. He was drowned.

 

YEO - William Yeo of Hibbert got drunk in Mitchell on Saturday, On the way home his horse ran away. He was thrown out and killed.

 

HURST - (Woodstock) Sunday afternoon the remains of Thomas Hurst were interred in the Methodist cemetery. The pall bearers were his six sons who resolved to themselves to perform these last sad rites for all that remained of their esteemed father. At the grave four of the sons sang an appropriate quartette.

 

July 7, 1387

 

APPLEGARTH - Died at East Oaklands, California, June 28, Mabel, youngest daughter of the late John Applegarth, of Applegarth's mills, East Flamborough, in the 57th years of her age.

 

CAIRO, LIGHTFOOT - (Toronto) About 1:30 this afternoon as the ferry steamer "J. L. McEdwards" was leaving the wharf at Mead's, a little Italian lad named Salvatore Cairo, who played the violin, fell overboard. Notwithstanding the repeated warnings of the captain, he was in the habit of walking around on the wooden projection that runs along the sides of the boat, and in doing so he made a misstep. A young lad named Thomas Lightfoot, an employee of Mead's hotel, plunged in to the rescue and was making good headway when the boy suddenly clutched him by the throat and they disappeared. The boy's body was found a short time afterward about thirty yards distant from the point where he fell in, and it was taken home. Lighfoot's body has not yet been recovered.

 

DUCHESNAY - (Quebec) Mr. Duchesnay, M.P. for Beauce, died from typhoid fever.

 

CURRY - (Montreal) A young man named Curry while swimming in one of the basins of the Lachine canal was seized with cramps and drowned.

 

July 8, 1887

 

YOUNG - (Montreal) Robert A. Young, a young man aged 21, engaged as a glass blower in the North American Glass Company's works, Parthenais street, had occasion to jump off a bench while at work a few night's since when he alighted on and was impaled by an iron blowpipe,


and was taken to the general hospital. Internal inflammation soon after set in and the unfortunate young man succumbed to the effects of his injuries to-day.

 

July 9, 1887

 

BOURQUE  - Died on July 7, at 67 Steven street, Charles Alfred, only son of Alfred and Mary Bourque, aged 8 months. Funeral will take place, Saturday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCKENZIE  - Died in this city, on July 8, John McKenzie, aged 23 years. Funeral from parents' residence, 153 Macnab street north, on Monday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

BOUCHER  - (Montreal) Mrs. Boucher who attempted suicide at St. Louis de Millend yesterday has died from her injuries.

 

LEOPARD  - (Guelph) A young man named Leopard from Palmerston, a brakeman on the Grand Trunk Railway, got one of his feet caught in a frog at the junction here last night and was run over and crushed so badly that he died about an hour afterward.

 

MCDOUGALD  - (Allenford) Widow McDougald was found dead at 2 o'clock to-day, shot through the breast twice by Sam Hughes. Hughes was arrested.

 

CHAPIN  - (Uxbridge) This afternoon Walter Chapin, aged about 10 years, eldest son of Frank Chapin of this town, was drowned in the grist-mill pond.

 

WALTERS  - Captain John Walters of Picton, aged 60 years, one of the best known mariners on Lake Ontario, is dead. He was once a member of the Prince Edward County council and afterward was a town councillor. He was very wealthy. His death is attributed to the severe exposure he underwent last spring in his gallant rescue of a party who had ventured from Duck Island to the mainland and had not been heard from for some time. This he learned on reaching the island where he had gone to ascertain how the people and his property had fared during the winter. Upon being asked if he had seen them, and not having met them, he immediately put off in search, and after a labourious pull of seven miles he found the missing ones with their boat fast in the ice, and after several hours’ hard work he finally brought them to shore. Shortly afterward he became ill and never recovered.

 

July 11, 1887

 

BUCKLEY  - Died at Niagara Falls, on July 8, William P. Buckley.


MCKEAN  - Died at his late residence, 100 Hughson street north, on July 10, David Miller McKean, a native of Armagh, Ireland, aged 53 years. Funeral at 4:30 on Monday, July 11. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

BOYD  - Died in this city, on July 10, James Boyd, aged 55 years and 3 months, a native of Ayrshire, Scotland. Funeral from his late residence, No 3 West avenue north, on Tuesday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

THOMPSON  - (Orangeville) R. Thomson, late traveller for McNesson & Bobbins, chemists, New York, has been found dead here from some unknown cause. The body was in an advanced state of decomposition. The coroner is now holding an inquest.

 

PHILLIPS  - (Wingham) A young lad named Harry Phillips, aged 10 years, was drowned while bathing in the Maitland river yesterday morning.

 

SULLIVAN  - The body of an old shoemaker named Tim Sullivan who disappeared last fall has been found in the river at Exeter.

 

MCPHAIL  - Neil McPhail, an old settler of Erin township, died of paris green the other day. It is not known whether it was suicide or accident.

 

July 12, 1887

 

MCKAY  - Died at No 12 Grove street, on July 11, Walter Scott McKay, aged 8 months and 15 days, youngest, son of the late William H. and Joanna McKay. Funeral Tuesday, July 12, at 3 p.m.

 

MCCONNELL  - (Thorold) A labourer named Patrick McConnell was drowned while bathing in the canal here Sunday afternoon.

 

BOHEMER  - (Berlin) On Sunday morning at 6 o'clock an accident happened at Petersburg which resulted in the death of a man named Charles Bohemer, a cooper by trade, who has lived for the last five or six years in Detroit. He was in company with his brother on his way to visit his parents at Manheim, and being on the fast express train wanted to get off at Petersburg where the train does not stop. They said that the conductor agreed to slacken the speed of the train and when he did they jumped. The brother got off all right, but Charles slipped and got his legs under the wheels. One foot was cut off at the ankle and the toes of the other crushed to a jelly. The train was stopped and Bohemer brought to Berlin where the right leg and the big toe on the left foot were amputated. He had, however, lost too much blood to rally, and after intense suffering died about 3 o'clock.

 

CASIST  - (Quebec) A section man named George Casist while working on the track in the G.T.R. yards at Point Levis this morning was run over and killed by an engine and five cars. He leaves a widow and eight children.


JENKINSON, STEWART, TAYLOR - (Halifax) The midshipmen of HMS Canada went sailing and with the boat, have disappeared. They were last seen tacking in a stiff breeze near dark last evening, and it is supposed the boat was upset by a squall. It was a small boat and had but one sail. An oar belonging to the boat was found in the basin to-day. Large parties from the ship are grappling and searching the basin since daylight to-day. There is little doubt that all drowned. Their names were Jenkinson, Stewart, and Taylor. One of them is 16 years old and the other two 15 years each. Stewart is said to be the son of Col. Stewart who was with the Ninety-Second Highlanders in the Soudan.

 

LESLIE - (Quebec) The girl who was found drowned in the river at Levis on Saturday is supposed to be Annie Leslie, aged 29 years, who arrived at Levis on Thursday night per steamship "Grecian". She hails from Edinburgh, Scotland, and was going on to Montreal to visit some friends and afterward to Petrolia, Ontario, where she was engaged in service. An inquest was commenced to-day but adjourned, waiting the arrival of some immigrants, now in Montreal, as witnesses.

 

PERKINS - An infant son of George A. Perkins of Petrolia set fire to its clothing while playing with matches last Wednesday and was burned to death. The child's mother was also badly burned in trying to put out the flames.

 

July 13, 1887

 

BUTTERWORTH - Died on Monday, January 11, John Frederick, youngest son of John and Mary Butterworth, aged 10 months and 7 days. Funeral on Wednesday, at 2:30 p.m., from his father's residence, 16 Blyth street.

 

MCDONALD - (Ottawa) Miss Catharine McDonald of St. Andrew's, Glengarry, suicided this morning by jumping into a lumber slide at the Chaudiere. She has been in poor health for some time past, and escaped in her nightdress from the residence of a friend residing near the scene of the sad affair.

 

BOULANGER - (Quebec) Capt. Boulanger, of the schooner Mignonette which a arrived this afternoon from Glace Bay with coals reports that the mate, his own son, fell from the rigging and was lost overboard during the passage from St. John to Glace Bay.

 

July 14, 1887

 

TREMBLAY - (Montreal) Tremblay who was injured at Cote St. Paul last night has since died.


MURRAY - Died at 22 Hess street south, on July 13, Minnie, only daughter of the late William Murray, Esq., and grand-daughter of the late John Colville, Esq., Saltfleet.

 

THOMPSON - (Chatham) J. B. Thompson, roadmaster on the Erie & Huron Railway, was killed yesterday at Wallaceburg by cars running over him. He was 58 years old. His wife and family reside in England.

 

GLASSCO - Thomas Glassco, tax collector of Brantford, died on Monday evening, aged 79. He was a brother of W. H. Glassco of this city.

 

HUBBARD - An eight-year-old son of G.T.R. conductor Hubbard of Sarnia died on Monday from the effects of a blow from a ball which he received last Friday while playing baseball.

 

CLARK - James Clark, an old Dundas boy, was accidentally drowned in a creek at Cambridge City, Indiana, on July 4. He had been employed by his brother-in-law, James Gilchrist, as tool dresser of the crew engaged in drilling a gas well in the vicinity. The deceased was 29 years old. He was a native of Dundas and lived in the district nearly all his life. In 1876 he married Miss Jean Gilchrist of this city who with three children survive him.

 

July 15, 1887

 

AMEY - Died in this city, on July 14, Lily May Amey, aged 4 months and 21 days, second daughter of Thomas and Mary Amey. Funeral from late residence, 90 Elgin street, at 3 p.m., on Friday, July 15. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

KERLEY - Died on July 13, Ida Mabel, youngest daughter of Henry T. and Mary Kerley, aged 7 months and 20 days. Funeral, 2 p.m., Friday, July 15, from No 8 Inchbury street south. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

EVANS - Died on July 14, Jessie Gordon, infant daughter of Danford and Annie Evans, aged 4 months and 21 days. Funeral Saturday at 2 p.m. from No 44 Oxford street. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

TOUPIN - (Quebec) A boy named Toupin, aged 13 years, was drowned this afternoon while bathing in the river St. Charles.

 

July 16, 1887

 

LAPPINTE - (Montreal) Early this morning a stoker on board the "Persia" named Joseph Lappinte came out of a cab under the influence of liquor and was going on board when he struck his head against a porthole, dislocating his neck, from the effects of which he died in about five minutes.


THOMPSON - (Ottawa) The death is announced of Mrs. Thompson, mother of the Minister of Justice. Her decease took place at the residence of her son-in-law, collector Sergeant at Barrington, NS, on Saturday. The deceased was in her 82nd year.

 

NEWMAN (St. John) News comes from Urban's beach, Campobello, that a 10-year-old daughter of Jeremiah Newman has died from the effects of an indecent assault committed upon her several days ago by a man named Barnes who has since fled to the United States.

 

FUCHS August Fuchs, a prominent citizen of Berlin, is dead.

 

MITCHELL - William Mitchell, a Paris cooper, ran a splinter into his hand. Blood poisoning ensued and he died last Monday.

 

July 18, 1887

 

ALLAN - Died on Saturday, July 16, at 6 a.m., Lizzie, youngest daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Allan.

 

WOLFE - Died on July 16, Suddenly, Thomas Wolfe, aged 27 years. Funeral at 2 p.m., Monday, July 18, from the residence of his brother, Michael J. Wolfe, 65 Stuart street west. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Saturday morning Thomas J, Wolfe, who has been staying with his brother, M. J. Wolfe, proprietor of the Tremont House, 65 Stuart street west, expired rather suddenly. For some time past he had been suffering from haemorrhage of the lungs and after his return from St. Louis about six weeks ago where he had been residing with his parents, he had a very severe attack. On Saturday he was seized with another attack and while his brother was assisting him to a drink of water he expired. Deceased was 23 years of age and served his time with Mr. Chadwick of James Street north as a metal spinner. He began to fail while working at his trade in St. Louis and it is probable that the dust from the soft metals used in that trade hastened his death. He was a quiet young man and was well and favourably known in this city.

 

ARMSTRONG - Died on Sunday, July 17, Joseph Armstrong, eldest son of Isaac and Mary Armstrong, aged 32 years and 9 months. Funeral will, take place on Tuesday afternoon, at 3 o'clock from 95 Market street. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Joseph Armstrong although comparatively a young man, having been only in his 33rd year, has been well and favourably known on the grain market for over fifteen years. On Saturday up to noon he was at his post as usual, and no very serious symptoms of ailment were developed until Sunday morning. Deceased who was lame had been suffering from his leg for years and it eventually developed into a decline. He died on Sunday evening at 6 o'clock at his father's residence, Market street, surrounded by the members of the family. Deceased was a native of this city and was highly esteemed by a large circle of friends. He will be buried this afternoon at 3 o'clock.


MCLAREN - Died at the residence of his father, 90 West avenue north, on Saturday, July 16, William James McLaren, second son of William McLaren, in the 23rd year of his age. Funeral will leave his father's residence on Monday afternoon, at 3:30. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

COLEMAN - (Ottawa) Norman Coleman of Eganville, contractor for the new Roman Catholic church at Douglas, South Renfrew, fell from the tower yesterday and received injuries which resulted in his death last night.

 

LAHAIS - (Ottawa) A French-Canadian deaf mute named Lahais was run over yesterday by the Canadian Pacific Railway express at Britannia, a short distance west of this city. The unfortunate man had his legs cut off, dying shortly afterward. He was walking along the track at the time. The engineer-brought the train to a standstill only when too late.

 

FRETZ - (Belleville) John Fretz, who was injured by a streetcar on Thursday, has died from the effects of his injuries.

 

SYLVESTER - (Quebec) A young man named Sylvester, aged about 22, an emigrant on the steamship "Parisian", jumped overboard at the Grand Trunk depot this morning and was drowned.

 

SEARS - (Moncton) To-day while Chauncey Sears of Sackville parish was driving a team loaded with timber, he fell from the load and a wheel passed over his body and head, killing him

instantly. He belonged to ---gie and leaves a wife and eleven children.

 

THOMPSON - Miss Thompson of London fell from the pier at Port Stanley and was drowned.

 

BAPST - A workman on the Niagara Falls racetrack named Christopher Bapst of Buffalo was sunstruck Saturday afternoon and died shortly afterward.

 

DRENNON - Last Tuesday William Drennon of Maryborough, aged about 60 years, while attending the Orange celebration in Mount Forest died very suddenly. The old man became overcome by the great heat and was observed to go to a pump and take a drink of water

and then sit down beside a building where he suddenly expired without a struggle.

 

HUNTER - The wife of Rev. W. Hunter of St. Andrew's church, Orangeville, gave birth to a daughter one day last week. The child's head was somewhat sore and the attending physician gave instructions to have the head rubbed with castor oil. The nurse committed the terrible mistake of rubbing the head with carbolic acid which she found in a bottle near that containing the castor oil. The infant lingered for three days when it died in great agony.


SMITHERS, TRAINE, ZEALAND, DONNELLY, BOYLES - (St. Thomas) It has now been ascertained that the victims of the railway accident number twelve: Mrs K. Smithers & child; Mrs. S. Traine and child; S. G. Zealand, and child; Mrs. J. Boyles and three children; engineer Donnelly; Herman Ponsford, who died this morning from injuries; and Mrs. S. G Zealand, probably fatally injured.(editor’s note see PONSFORD THE GREAT RAILWAY DISASTER AT ST. THOMAS)

 Mr. Zealand, who was killed at the railway accident at St. Thomas and whose wife and child are reported to be fatally burned, was an uncle of E. G. Zealand, deputy sheriff of this city.

 

July 19, 1887

 

GORDON - Died on July 18, at his residence in Nelson, Mr. John Gordon, aged 70 years and 8 months. Funeral Wednesday, July 20, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

SAYER - Died in Hamilton, Sunday, July 17, at 76 Caroline street north, Mrs. Ada Sayer, a native of the county Roscommon, Ireland, in the 53rd year of her age. Funeral on Tuesday, at 2 o'clock Friends and acquaintances are respectfully Invited to attend.

 

GAVILLER - Died on July 17, at 21 Herkimer street, Charlotte Gaviller, wife of A. Gaviller. Funeral at 3:30 o'clock on Wednesday afternoon.

 

July 21, 1887

 

EGAN - Died in this city, on July 19, Emma Hazard, beloved wife of Thomas Egan, in the 50th year of her age. Funeral will take place from her late residence, 120 Cannon street west, on Thursday at, 4 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BERGENT - (Montreal) Fatal accidents are becoming of daily occurrence along the wharves. This morning about 11 o'clock as a Parisian named Charles Bergent, aged 20, and living at 1215 Notre Dame street, was shovelling in the hold of SS Lismore, a tub of coal which was being hoisted up accidentally gave way and the whole weight fell upon the poor man's head. He was taken to the hospital where he died. The deceased had been in Canada but a short time and is believed to be unmarried.

 

DAVIS - (Toronto) A coloured boy named Davis, son of John Davis, King street east, was drowned while bathing in the Don river this afternoon. The body was recovered shortly afterward.


BEVENS - Edwin Bevens, aged 46, of Thamesford, hanged himself at the London Asylum on Sunday. He was dead when found.

 

NICHOLLS - John Nicholls, a well known and respected farmer of the township of East Zorra, swallowed paris green on Sunday and died on Monday.

 

July 22, 1887

 

JOHNSON - (Windsor) A man named Johnson, watchman on the Canadian tug "International" was drowned in Lake Erie yesterday. The tug was lying near Rondeau. Johnson went in swimming. He got beyond his depth, was taken with cramps, and sank before assistance could reach him. The body has not been recovered.

 

HOWARD - (London) One of the passengers on a Sarnia train said last night that a carpenter named Frank Howard has recently been paying marked attentions to a Miss Lafarge whose friends are said to live in Tilbury Centre, Matters finally came to a crisis and the pair were to be married yesterday at the Farmers' Hotel in Sarnia. All preparations were made, and the would-be bride, the witnesses, and the clergyman were on time, but the bridegroom was missing. After waiting for a considerable time, a general search was instituted and the dead body of Howard was found suspended by a rope to one of the beams in the barn on the hotel premises, evidently a case of suicide, the motive for which has not yet transpired.

 

MILLS - (Kingston) It is learned from Arden that a sad drowning accident occurred last night. Mrs. W. B. Mills, her two daughters, and sister-in-law went for a bathe in the lake near there. One of the children got beyond her depth when the other three went to the rescue, and the result was that all except the younger daughter were drowned.

 

MUSTARD - John C. Mustard, builder, of Norwich, stepped on a rusty nail two weeks ago. A week later lockjaw set in and after lingering for three days in terrible agony he died.

 

July 23, 1887

 

NORMAN - Died at No 1 Florence street, on Thursday, July 21, Mrs. J. W. Norman, the beloved wife of John W. Norman, aged 63 years. Funeral from the above address on Saturday, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

CHISHOLM - Died in Stratford, on Thursday, July 21, of typhoid fever, Thomas Chalmers Chisholm, merchant, formerly of this city, aged — years. Funeral from G.T.R. station upon arrival of the 1:50 p.m. train, Sunday.


HUTCHINSON - (Barrie) Miss Louise Hutchinson, head cook at the Simcoe House here for the last five years, committed suicide last night by taking four ounces of laudanum. Personal misfortune is attributed as the cause.

 

KETECHESON - (Belleville) James Ketecheson, a Grand Trunk brakeman, whose parents reside near the city, was accidentally killed while in the discharge of his duties this morning.

 

LATCHET - (Baden, Ont) An eastern bound G.T. freight train from Chicago to-day ran into a number of cows lying on the track near the railway station at this place. The locomotive was thrown off the track and badly wrecked, and seven or eight cars broken into pieces. A brakeman by the name of Latchet was killed.

 

July 25, 1887

 

MEYERS - Died on July 24, William Earl Meyers, in the 45th year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence,----------, on Tuesday, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

WALLACE - Died on Saturday, at No 4 Wellington street, Hugh Robinson, beloved son of Hugh E. and-----Wallace, aged------. Funeral at — o'clock to-day.

 

FOLEY - Died of consumption, July 22, at St. Joseph's Convent, in this city, Mary Foley, in the---year of her age, and the 7th of her religious life. Funeral will take place from the Convent Chapel, on Monday morning at half past 8 o'clock.

 

PINEAULT - (Montreal) Pineault, the chief cook of the steamer "Three Rivers" which collided with the "Hochelaga" a couple of days ago, died from his injuries to-day.

 

MCDONALD - (Toronto) A sad accident happened here this afternoon. Percy McDonald, son of J. K. McDonald of the Confederation Life Insurance Company, was with another gentleman and a lady rowing on the lake opposite the rifle butts when a stray bullet fired by one of the volunteers who were practising struck him in the side, and passed clean through his body, afterwards passing through the side of the boat. The unfortunate youth was brought to shore and afterward conveyed in the ambulance to his father's residence. He will not recover.

Percy McDonald, eldest son of J. K. McDonald, who was shot through the body by a stray bullet aimed at the rifle range yesterday afternoon, died this morning. He was about 17 years of age and a fine athletic young lad. His death has caused a general feeling of indignation which will no doubt lead to the butts being moved from the Garrison commons to some other locality where there is less danger of accidents. Many narrow escapes have occurred to persons in skiffs from stray bullets, and about ten years ago a daughter of Dr. Winstanley while in a boat was struck in the face by a bullet which broke her jaw.


ALCOMBRECK - (Belleville) George Alcombreck of Sidney was drowned in the Moira yesterday near Foxboro while engaged in fishing.

 

July 26, 1887

 

CURRIE - (Halifax) News was received this afternoon of a terrible affair which occurred at Beaver Harbour, east Halifax, on Saturday. George Currie, of Beaver Harbour went to the house of his uncle, Henry Hawbolt, with the intention, it is said, of picking a quarrel with him. Arriving at the house he smashed in the door. Hawbolt, having seen Currie coming to his place, loaded a gun with shot and after the door has been broken, he threatened Currie that he would kill him if he entered the house. Hawbolt, it appears, then discharged the gun, the contents entering Currie's bowels. Some persons who were near at hand picked Currie up and sent for the doctor. When the medical man arrived he said that Currie could not live. The doctor's prediction proved correct, for yesterday morning Currie died in great agony. Hawbolt immediately after the shooting took place surrendered himself to the authorities. Both men lived near each other and it is said have been engaged in illicit liquor selling and have been at swords' points for a long time. The mother of Currie is Hawbolt's sister.

 

TAYLOR - (Toronto) Lizzie Taylor, second daughter of C. C. Taylor, of the Customs House, went a few days ago to look after the house of her sister, Mrs. Paull, Spadina avenue, during the family's absence at Gananoque. On Saturday night Miss Taylor was stooping over the gas stove during some cooking operation when the linen apron caught fire and almost instantly her clothing was a blazing mass. Her screams attracted the attention of some labourers who were passing and they rushed into the house and extinguished the flames. The unfortunate young lady was, however, so terribly burned about her head, shoulders, and breast that she died this morning after enduring great agony.

 

July 27, 1887

 

COLE - Old Mrs. Cole of Waldemar drank a solution of paris green mistaking it for water, and died.

 

DODDS - Jimmy Dodds, who cut his throat at Brantford, died Sunday morning. When asked why he did it, he said, "God only knows".

 

July 28, 1887

 

QUINN - Died in this city, on July 27, Patrick youngest son of Richard and Ellen Quinn, aged — years and 6 months. Funeral from his late residence, James street north, on Friday, July 29, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances please attend.


KILVINGTON - Died on July -27, Mary Aretta, fourth daughter of Thomas and Alfie Kilvington. Funeral from the parents' residence, 254 King street east, at, 2 o'clock, Thursday afternoon.

The grass has hardly commenced to sprout on Beatrice Gillett's grave before the sad story is recalled by the death of Thomas Kilvington's six-year-old daughter, Mary Aretta, under circumstances almost identical. It was the same old story that has been told time and time again: children come across firearms and playfully pull the trigger. Despite the frequent warnings the public never think to keep revolvers and guns locked up until some terrible calamity befalls them. How gladly would they dispense with their use altogether if they could foresee the future. What once was a happy home is now overcome with consternation and grief just through a little thoughtlessness.

During the summer Mr. Kilvington's family has resided at Burlington with a relative of Mrs. Kilvington's. Yesterday morning she returned with her two daughters, Clara Mary and Mary Aretta, aged 4 and 6 years respectively with her. Mary Aretta was the pet of the family. She was a pleasing little thing with dark hair and went by the nickname of Paddy. During the afternoon the children were visited by Bertie Nichols, aged 6, and his sister, Flossie, aged 9, children of W. H. Nichols who lives at 267 King street east, almost opposite to Mr. Kilvington's conservatory. A sort of attachment exists between the two families and the children are continually visiting backward and forward. The four of them were playing in a bedroom at the front of the house while Mrs. Kilvington and Mrs. Howard were ironing in the kitchen. About 3:15 they heard the report of a gun followed by shrieks from the children. Mrs. Kilvington rushed to the bedroom exclaiming, "Where is my Paddy?" and found her lying on her right side near the window with the left side of her face blown completely off and bleeding profusely. She was dead when they arrived and her little doll was found lying on the floor beside her. The grief of the mother was terrible. She cried for her little Paddy until kind friends assisted her out of the room.

Mr. Kilvington was standing outside talking to John E. Brown and when they heard the shots, they hastened into the bedroom. A double-barrelled breach-loading gun was found lying on the floor beside the bed. The gun was generally kept in the closet, but yesterday it was standing in one corner of the room. The children ran out of the room after the accident. Flossie Nichols said her brother Bertie took the gun out of the corner and laid it on the bed. The deceased was standing near the window with her face towards the gun, dressing her little doll. Bertie was fooling with the gun and it went off before they knew it, and the deceased fell to the floor. She could not say whether Bertie pulled the trigger or not. The reason She was not struck was because she sat on the bed with the other little girl and the muzzle of the gun was pointed the other way. No words were spoken between Bertie and the deceased.

Coroner Woolverton was notified and decided an inquest was unnecessary as the boy was so young that he could not be held responsible. He questioned the boy and found out that the story about how the accident occurred corroborated his sister's statement. The funeral of the deceased will take place from her father's residence, this afternoon.

 


LIBERTY - (Belleville) David Liberty, a private in the Fifteenth Battalion and a student in the commercial college, died last night from cholera morbus. His remains were taken to his home near Sarnia for interment.

 

POIVIN - (Ottawa) Madame Poivin, wife of a labourer residing in Mechanicsville, a suburb of this city, committed suicide by poisoning last night. She has, it is claimed, been drinking for several days past. When her husband returned home at noon yesterday, she received a scolding because no dinner was prepared. This treatment enraged her, and last evening she secretly took poison, subsequently exclaiming that she would be in hell in half an hour. Her agony was terrible, but death took place within an hour.

 

MASON - (Dundas) A terrible accident carrying pain and sorrow and death in its train occurred at the Canada tool works of Messrs John Bertram & Sons on Thursday afternoon. The facts are these: Along with others, Frank Mason who usually works in the room presided over by Alex Bertram was engaged that afternoon in assisting to move heavy lathe beds in the ware room. All went well until 4 o'clock. Just about that hour young Mason moved behind some heavy castings, among them being three lathe beds weighing 20,000 pounds each, which were piled one on top of the other and which, notwithstanding much work in the same room of a jarring nature, appeared perfectly solid and immoveable to the ordinary touch of one or a dozen men.

He stooped and picked up a piece of wood or plank, presumably to use as a lever in moving a heavy casting which was then on rollers, and instantly without the slightest warning, the three lathe beds already mentioned as being piled one above another, fell forward upon him, pinioning him by the feet and legs. The plank was between the brick wall and the victim, and a stepladder was against the wall about halfway down the length of the beds. Had it not been for the ladder his legs would have been instantly amputated by the 60,000 pounds of solid iron which crushed him between them and the plank and walls of the building. His position when fixed in the iron vice was that his feet and legs were pinioned and he sat partially sideways on the upper of the fallen beds.

 Instantly the men of the shops took measures with the utmost kindness and consideration animating them to rescue the wounded youth. A single cry escaped him and that brought his father who was working in the same shop to his side. The parent's feelings may be better imagined that described and over such grief we draw a veil. The conduct of the hapless victim in this extreme position of pain and peril was such as will make his comrades upon this fatal day forever speak of him with admiration for his wonderful pluck, bravery, coolness, and presence of mind.


Seated upon this iron which was crushing out his young life relentlessly, he from time to time directed the movements of the willing hands which were endeavouring to ease his burden, himself the coolest and most self-possessed man in the room. On the accident occurring, a physician was at once sent for, and by the time he was released Dr. Ross, and shortly afterward Drs. Walker and Bertram, were in attendance. He was carried by toil-worn hands to the office of the firm. Here he was washed and preliminary attention was given to his injuries. Then he was carried to his sorrowful home and their full extent learned. One of his ankles and the bone of the same leg were broken, the other leg crushed into a shapeless mass, and there were internal injuries, and outside bruises on other portions of his body discovered.

All that medical skill could do was done, but in spite of his brave and cheery demeanour, he sank to rest on Tuesday morning about 9 o'clock.

The deceased who comes of a family eminent in mechanics -his father who graduated as a machinist at Portsmouth, England, being considered a master mechanic in the works there, and his brother, James, who learned his trade in the Canada tool works and who is now foreman in the works at Hamilton, Ohio - only entered Bertram's two weeks before the day he died. He had been at the high school and this method of spending his holiday was in pursuance of a desire on his part to assist in defraying the expenses of his education as a physician which profession he had chosen to devote his life to. This makes the calamity all the more deplorable. The world so far as mortal vision extends, can ill afford to lose men of his calibre. He was steady, industrious, and clever, and although his life was cut off at the age of 22, his death will leave no inconsiderable gap.

 

July 29, 1887

 

CHAMPAGNE - (Montreal) The eight-year-old son of Hon Mr. Champagne, Legislative Councillor, was accidentally drowned while bathing in the river at St. Eustache yesterday.

 

STEVENS - At a point about a mile below the International bridge Wednesday evening about 9 o'clock was committed a murder as cold-blooded and atrocious as ever occurred on that quiet Canadian frontier.

On Sunday last George Stevens and Peter Nettle met at a drinking place at Victoria and had some words. They quarrelled for some time and would have come to blows if bystanders had not interfered and prevented it. They parted then, each threatening that he would get even the first time that an opportunity presented itself. That opportunity came last evening for the first time and at the hour named. Nettle was quietly walking down the Canadian shore with a double-barrelled breach-loading shotgun in his hand. He had been shooting blackbirds. When a little over a mile below the bridge he came across Jim Ludridge, Jack Keller, and George Stevens and another man seated in a boat and finishing the hauling of the seine.


When Nettle came abreast of the boat, Stevens looked up quickly and said, "Who are you shooting at?"

Nettle replied, "I am shooting at birds, but damn you, I'll shoot you if you don't get out of the road".

This enraged the men and as if by impulse, they all sprang to the beach. Stevens was in front, and as he came rapidly up the bank, Nettle told him to keep back. Stevens, however, kept coming and when he was within forty feet of Nettle, the latter deliberately placed the gun to his shoulder, took aim, and pulled the trigger. Stevens threw up his arms, uttered a groan, and fell dead, shot through the heart. He never spoke and scarcely seemed to move, so quickly had death resulted.

The other men seemed dazed and stunned for a minute, and then after partly realizing the awful tragedy which they had witnessed darted for the murderer. He was game and stood his ground, but had dropped the gun. One of the party picked this up and saying, "Damn you, I'll brain you", struck at him. The butt end of the gun only glanced from his head but the blow had been sufficient to cut the scalp and cause the blood to flow freely.

Nettle then started up the river and for an hour after the shooting seemed to be doing about as he liked. He then went towards Victoria and was met by Constable Richard Griffin. The latter had heard of the murder and was then looking for the man, a description of him already having been sent to Buffalo police. Griffin said, "Who's shot down there?"

"I don't know" replied Nettle. "I shot a fellow down there".

"What's the matter with your head? It's bleeding", said Griffin.

"Oh, they struck me with the gun", he answered.

Griffin then took him into custody and after being locked up for a short time, he acknowledged the shooting, but said it was done in self-defence.

The body of Stevens still lay on the river bank, but was finally removed by order of Coroner Douglass and placed in Sherman's boathouse for the night.

The murdered man, George Stevens, was about 27 years of age and unmarried, and had a bad reputation. He had served terms in the large Canadian prisons, and about three ago broke out from the Toronto central prison, in company with another convict. They were seen and fired upon. Stevens's companion was shot dead, but he escaped and came to this city. Since then he has led a vagabond life along both sides of Niagara river. His mother lives about three miles below the bridge and is in poor circumstances.

Peter Nettle, the man who did the shooting, is about 47 years of age and has a wife and one son. They live at Nettle's Point and have been known as quite respectable people though it is said the father rather liked to brag a little about fighting, and was not averse to taking a hand in a. row.

Fort Erie and Victoria are very much excited over the murder and many interesting circumstances are expected to be brought to light, as it is said there is more behind the affair than is generally known.


An inquest was conducted by Dr. Brewster of Ridgeway, and a verdict of justifiable homicide rendered by the jury.

 

July 30, 1887

 

COLLINS - Died on July 29, at 59 Wood street east, Thomas, infant son of Joseph and Elizabeth Collins, aged 9 months. Funeral on Monday, at 3:30. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

COPNER - (London) Coroner Lansing's jury in the case of Thomas W. Copner, of this city, found dead at the Madison House, Detroit, returned a verdict of death from strangulated hernia.

 

BEDDOME - (London) The funeral of the late George B. Beddome, who was drowned at the Narragansett pier one day last week, took place from his father's residence, yesterday afternoon.

 

TOMPKINS - On May 23, William Fletcher and John Tompkins got into a fight at the Crystal Palace ground during which Tompkins was pretty badly used up. His face was cut and he complained that his side was sore where Fletcher kicked him. About two weeks after the fight he was taken sick and became gradually worse until June 22 when he died. A warrant was issued for the arrest of Fletcher on the charge of assault, but the police could not find him until Thursday afternoon when he was arrested for fighting on the street. At the police court yesterday Sergeant Major Smith asked to have the prisoner remanded until Monday. Although the complainant is dead he said there were several witnesses who saw the fight. The object in adjourning the case was to obtain the evidence of the physician who attended Tompkins as the case may develop into a more serious charge than common assault. (See page 84)

 

August 1, 1887

 

MADIGAN - Died at 18 Mulberry street, Frank, youngest son of J. W. Madigan, aged 9 months.

 

SWEET - Died in this city, on July 30, Captain Walter Sweet, in the 45th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 49 East avenue north, on Monday, August 1, at 3:30 p.m. Friends are cordially invited to attend.

In the removal by death of Capt Walter Sweet, Hamilton loses one of the most highly respected citizens. Mr. Sweet has been ill nearly two weeks but no serious result was anticipated until Thursday evening when he became worse and after intense suffering passed away this morning at an early hour. Deceased was born in Bideford, England, and from early boyhood was engaged in the merchant service in different parts of the world. For many years he was master of the "Undine", "Gulnair", and other vessels sailing out of this port.


He has conducted a successful business as grain warehouseman and earned a character for ability and integrity throughout. He was an esteemed office bearer of the Congregational church, and member of the Masonic fraternity, Unity lodge 47, I.O.O.F., and A.O.U.W., in the latter order being receiver of Dixon lodge for a number of years. He leaves a wife and one daughter, and a large circle of relatives and friends by whom he was universally loved.

 

THOMPKINS - Died on July 29, at 199 East avenue north, Mary Ann, infant daughter of George and Elizabeth Thompkins, aged 9 months and one week.

 

WILLIAMSON - Died on July 30, Rose Amelia, infant daughter of T. M. and Louise Williamson.

 

WINER - Died at Hamilton, July 30, John Winer, Esq., in his 87th year. Funeral Monday, August 1, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

In the death of John Winer, late of the firm of Winer & Co, Hamilton loses one of the oldest and most respected citizens. Mr. Winer was born in the United States in 1800 and came to this city in 1829. In the following year he started a drug business and for a period of fifty-four years continued with uninterrupted success. In 1845 his whole stock was destroyed by fire and though suffering heavily by the disaster, he went courageously to work again and before long had not only retrieved it but was once more on the high road to prosperity. In 1848 C. N. Sims of Montreal was taken into partnership with him and the firm continued under the name of Winer & Sims until 1853, when Lyman Moore entered the partnership which was known as Winer, Moore & Co., until 1857, when a partnership was formed in the present style. In 1884 he retired from business and has since been in very feeble health, having suffered continuously for the past five years from the effects of a stroke of paralysis.

Mr. Winer was a man of sterling integrity and rare business tact and enterprise, and the record of the progress of the firm of which he was for so many years the senior partner is closely identified with the progress of the city. In 1845 he was one of the thirty-seven business men of Dundas and Hamilton who formed the first Board of Trade, only four or five of whom are living. For several years he represented No 6 ward in the city council and was always noted for his public-spirited efforts for the advancement of the city's interests.

Mr. Winer leaves a widow and three daughters, the latter: Mrs. George W. Brega, of Hamilton; Mrs. Dr. Cook, of Chicago; and Mrs. John Masson, of this city. He had only one son and he died in Chicago shortly after the fire in 1871 from the effects of a cold received during the great disaster. Two grandsons are living in that city, Dr. John Winer and William Winer.

The funeral will take place from his late residence, 96 Main street east, this afternoon at 3 o'clock.


DANBY - Died in this city, July 31, at 24 Young street, W. J. Danby, in the 31st year of his age. Funeral will take place from the above address, on Tuesday, August 2, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MALCOLM - Died on Saturday, July 30, at 246 York street, James Alexander Malcolm, in the 46th year of his age. Funeral will take place from his late residence, on Tuesday next, August 2, at 4 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

Many citizens will be deeply shocked on hearing of the sudden death of James A. Malcolm of the firm of Malloy and Malcolm, carriage makers. On Wednesday he was in his usual health and going about the city, but that evening he was attacked with inflammation of the bowels and died on Saturday night.

Mr. Malcolm was one of the best known and most popular young men in the city. Of a cheerful and obliging disposition, he made friends of all who came in contact with him, and his smiling face and hearty voice will be sadly missed by those who had the pleasure of knowing him. Mr. Malcolm was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1851, and came to this country when twelve years of age. In 1876 he entered into partnership with John Malloy and the firm has carried on a successful and profitable business in carriage making ever since. He was prominent in Masonic circles, being past master of St. John's lodge, first principal for the past three years of St. John's chapter, a Knight Templar, a member of Murton lodge of perfection, and prelate of Godfrey de Bouillon preceptory.

He leaves a widow and two small children. His father and mother are both alive and he leaves two brothers, William Malcolm of the firm of Malcolm and Souter, and Thomas D. Malcolm of Toronto. The funeral will take place from his late residence, 246 York street, to-morrow afternoon at 4 o'clock.

 

LARIN - (Montreal) A Mrs. J. D. Larin of this city died here about twenty minutes after returning from a pilgrimage to St. Anne. She was not very well and the excessive heat is supposed to have caused her death.

 

POWER, CHRISTIAN - (Halifax) While a party of two young men and seven young ladies were out in a sail boat off Prospect, west Halifax, to-day, the craft was capsized and two young ladies were drowned, Bessie Power and Annie Christian, Their bodies have not yet been found. Miss Power lived in Boston and was visiting friends in Prospect. The other young lady was a daughter of William Christian of Prospect.

 

JOYCE - (Montreal) A boy named James Joyce, aged 13 years, while bathing at the baths on St. Helen's Island, was seen disappearing under the water, but before assistance reached him he was drowned. The body was shortly afterward recovered. This is only the second accident that has occurred in the baths during the last fifteen years.

 


August 2, 1887

 

HIPKINS - Died, Rachel Wolfe Hipkins, July 30, aged 22 years. Was buried Sunday, July 31, at 3 p.m. from 257 James street north.

 

DAVIS - Died on August 1, at 72 East avenue north, Walter Earnest, infant son of William J. and Alice M. Davis, aged 2 weeks. Funeral on Tuesday at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MCFARLANE - Died in this city, on July 31, Bertha McFarlane, third daughter of John and Cecile McFarlane, aged 13 months and 23 days. Funeral on Tuesday, August 2, at 10 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GREER - (Belleville) Thomas Greer, who was injured on the Grand junction Railway on Tuesday evening, died last night from the effects of his injuries.

 

ROUTLEDGE - Archie Routledge, aged 8 years, fell from a passenger train near Cornell on Friday evening and had one leg taken off. He lay bleeding on the track for an hour and a half before being discovered, and in spite of medical aid died a few hours after he was rescued.

 

August 3, 1887

 

WORK - Died in this city, on August 2, William Work, in the 27th year of his age. Funeral from his father's residence, 31 Liberty street, Thursday, August 4, at 3 o'clock. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

August 4, 1887

 

WILLIAMSON - Died in this city, on August 2, Cornelius James, youngest son of Thomas and Caroline Williamson, aged 8 months. Funeral from his father's residence, 265 Hughson street north, Thursday, August 4, at 9:10 a.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

WINTERBOURNE - Died on Monday, July 25, AD. 1887, aged 6 years and 11 months, Margaret Maitland, the dearly beloved and only child of Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Winterbourne, widow of the late Charles Maitland Winterbourne.

 

POWERS - (Picton) James Powers, a young lad about 17 years old, was drowned here this evening while bathing at what is known as Pottery dock.

 

ERSTRAIN - Carl Erstrain, a pondman at Cushing's mills, was drowned this afternoon while attempting to cross the pond on two logs.


GRAHAM - (Toronto) A 14-year-old boy named Graham whose parents reside on Sydenham street was drowned in the Don river about one o'clock this afternoon. He was employed carrying water to men working on the Don improvements and fell from a scow into water.

 

MCCARTHY - Dermis McCarthy, 80 years old, had his brains dashed out this afternoon by a set of shears breaking while a boiler was being recovered from a derelict tugboat. Death was instantaneous. (St. John)

 

DIOENNE - (Quebec) Auguste Dioenne of B. Battery, who was injured on the Intercolonial Railway at St. Charles station yesterday while attempting to board a moving train, died from his injuries in the Marine hospital to-day. An inquest will be held. He will have a military funeral.

 

CONWAY - (St. Catharines) The body of a labouring man about 40 years of age was found in the canal near Port Dalhousie this afternoon. He is supposed to be James Conway who formerly worked in the elevator at Port Dalhousie and who has been missing for several days.

 

COPLAND - W. L. Copland, for fifty years a resident of St. Catharines, is dead.

 

CLEMENT - The coroner's jury has decided that J. P. Clement of Niagara died from natural causes and that the arsenic found in his remains came from the earth of the graveyard.

 

SMITH - On Tuesday evening Mrs. Jacob Smith, living on the 5th concession of Glanford, went to milk her cows. Not returning to the house for some time, members of the family went in search of her. They found her lying dead beside her pail. Deceased had been ailing for some time with heart disease and dropsy, but her death in so sudden a manner was not expected.

 

August 5, 1887

 

O'CONNOR - (Montreal) John Carroll and D. O'Connor, two butchers of St. Ann's market, have not been agreeing very well lately and this afternoon O'Connor went up to Carroll and said he was doing all the business and that he had better close his stall. This roused Carroll who seized a carving knife and rushed at O'Connor and cut his throat to such an extent that he died immediately after. Carroll has been arrested on a charge of murder.

 

RYAN - (Toronto) A roofer named Ryan, while at work this morning on the roof of Munday's new building, Queen street west, fell to the ground, a distance of forty feet, and was almost instantly killed.


RIGBY - (Quebec) A brakeman on the Quebec Central Railway named Rigby was accidentally killed at Robinson station, near Sherbrooke, this afternoon while coupling cars.

 

August 6, 1887

 

HUNT Died in this city, on August 5, Benjamin, infant son of Benjamin and Annie Hunt, aged 4 months. Funeral from 20 Young street, on Saturday, August 6, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCKENNA - Died in this city, on August 4, Annie Cameron, beloved wife of John McKenna, aged 46 years. Funeral from her husband's residence, 4 Bailey street, on Saturday, August 6, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

EVANS - Died on August 5, the Rev. John S. Evans, D.D., in the 66th year of his age. Funeral will leave the Children's Home, Main street east, Hamilton, on Monday, August 8, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Rev. John S. Evans, D.D., brother of Robert Evans, merchant tailor, and governor of the Children's Home, Main street east, died at an early hour yesterday. Deceased had been in charge of the home since its inception and a large number of children had passed through his hands. He was a clergyman of the Methodist denomination and had been in harness for a number of years. Mr. Evans had made many friends among the church-going people of Hamilton. He will be buried on Monday afternoon.

 

GORDON - Died at 45 Hess street north, August 5, James Gordon, late of the P.O. department, this city. Notice of funeral will be under the auspices of Lodge of Strict Observance, A.F. &A.M.

James Gordon who for several years past had been an invalid through paralysis, died last evening at 45 Hess street north. Deceased was a native of Scotland, but had been a resident of Hamilton for nearly thirty years. He was for a number of years in the drygoods business. In years gone by he took an active part in everything connected with the 13th Battalion, and served with honour at the battle of Ridgeway. For many years previous to his aliment, he was an efficient clerk in the post office. Mr. Gordon was married but leaves no family behind him. His death will be sincerely regretted by all his old companions of the 13th Battalion.

 

SMITH - (Montreal) George Smith who has been in the habit of taking a bath in the St. Lawrence at La chine every night was drowned last evening. It is supposed that when diving his head struck against a stone, and he was killed. His body has not yet been recovered.

 

STEVENSON (Toronto) A 3-year-old daughter of R. Stevenson, 69 Seaton street, was sunstruck Wednesday morning and died last night. This is the first fatal case of sunstroke recorded here this summer.


COYNE - (London) The funeral of the late Mrs. James Coyne of London south, took place to Oakland cemetery yesterday afternoon and was numerously attended by old residents and friends of the family. Mrs. Coyne, nee Miss Proudfoot, was the first lady teacher in London, and in 1835 taught the London Ladies' seminary. She was an accomplished scholar.

 

August 8, 1887

 

HYDE - Died in this city, on August 7, Mary Ann Turner, relict of the late Thomas Hyde, aged 82 years and 6 months.

 

CLINE - Died on the Dundas Road, on August 5, Lucy Hatt, beloved wife of Joseph Cline, aged 59 years. Funeral on Friday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited.

 

HENDERSON - Died on Sunday, August 7, James Henderson, aged 81 years. Funeral from his late residence, No 33 Emerald street north, on Tuesday, at 2:30 p.m.

 

RIGSBY - Died in this city, on August 6, Ellen Dutton, beloved wife of John Rigsby, in the 68th year of her age. Funeral will leave her late residence, 133 King William street, at 3 p.m. on Monday, August 8. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WAKEFIELD - (Toronto) During yesterday afternoon's storm, an old resident of west Toronto Junction, named Wakefield, took shelter in a frame building in course of construction. The building was blown down, the falling timbers striking Wakefield and killing him instantly.

 

LAVE, SCOTT - (Toronto) Two drowning accidents occurred on the bay. About 4 o'clock yesterday. in the afternoon a 14-year-old boy named Walter Lave whose parents reside on Clyde street while bathing at the Wiman baths, got beyond his depth and sank. His body was quickly recovered but life was found to be extinct.

About 8 o'clock at night a boat containing James Scott, Alice Stout, and Robert Gowan capsized in the bay and Scott was drowned. Gowan swam for two hours before he got to shore. He had a terrible experience, having been seized with cramps in one of his legs which compelled him to float on his back most of the time.

 

JULIEN, TAILLEUR, LALONDE - (Montreal) A sad accident occurred at Back river this afternoon whereby three young French-Canadians lost their lives by drowning. It seems that the party went out to spend the afternoon there. One of the deceased went in to bathe and suddenly was heard calling for help as he was being carried into the rapids.


Two of his friends jumped in after him, but they shared alike, being overcome by the swift current. The bodies have been recovered, One of the unfortunate men's names is Gauthier, another is named Lalonde, and the other name is not known.

(Next day the names were given as Julien, Tailleur, and Lalonde)

 

HAMELL - (Ottawa) The body of a barge captain named Hamell, who came to Ottawa from Ruckladd on Friday to hire a brig, was found to-night in the Ottawa river at the foot of the Rideau canal. The deceased at the time of his disappearance is supposed to have had a considerable sum of money in his possession. An inquest will be held.

 

August 9, 1887

 

QUARRY - Died at the residence of her father, 39 Market street, of cholera morbus, Caroline Louise (Carrie), second daughter of Joseph and Agnes Quarry, aged 4 years and 4 months. Funeral on Tuesday, at 4 o'clock.

 

NEVIEW - (Tecumseh, Ont ) On Saturday Dennis Neview, aged 16, made an attempt to board a westbound G.T.R. express freight train between Tecumseh and Pike Creek, and was thrown against the van in the attempt, and injured. He died yesterday afternoon.

 

BRENNAN - (Montreal) A melancholy drowning accident occurred to-day on St. Helen's Island whereby two lives, that of a mother and son, were sacrificed. It appears that Mrs. Brennan, residing at 79 Nazareth street, along with four children, three of whom belonged to her, with her sister, Mrs. Couturier, went over to the island. After landing they betook themselves to the military department's enclosure which is situated to the left of the landing stage. Here it seems Mrs. Brennan's little son, 10 years old, went to bathe when he was swept away by the strong current. His mother seeing the child's danger jumped in only to meet her own death as the current is so strong at this particular place that bathing was strictly prohibited. Mrs. Brennan's sister called for help which arrived too late to save the lives of the mother and son who were both drowned. The bodies were recovered.

 

August 10, 1887

 

SLEMMINGS - Died at Point Edward, on August 4, --------the only child of Phillip and --- Slemmings, aged 6 months.

 

SHARP - Died at the residence of his father, 5 Queen street south, of typhoid fever, Charles Sharp, aged 23 years, youngest son of William and Ethel Sharp. Funeral at 4 o'clock on Wednesday.


HENNESSEY - Died in this city, at 19 Wilson street, Hugh Hennessey, a native of--------.

 

August 11, 1887

 

CAPE - Died at her residence, Fort Rouge, Winnipeg, ----------, wife of John Cape.

 

LINSTEAD - Died in this city, on August 9, of heart disease, Clara Linstead, aged 7 years and 8 months and 25 days. Funeral from her mother's residence, No 200 Catherine street north, to-day, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MORGAN - Died on August 10, at-------street south, Herbert Hamilton, the son of R. J. Morgan, in the fifth year of his age. Funeral will take place, Thursday, at 4 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

WHEELER - Died at his residence, 84 Elgin street, on Tuesday, August 9, ----- Wheeler, aged 63 years. Funeral will take place at 8 a.m., on Friday, to the G.T.R. station. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully Invited.

 

FORSTER - Died at the residence of Mrs. F. Erskine, Galt, on August 10, Katie, youngest daughter of William and Ann Forster. Funeral from her parents' residence, 13 Colborne street, this city, on Friday, August 12, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BEATTY - (Cobourg) Edward Beatty mysteriously disappeared from his father's house a few days ago and no trace of him could be found until yesterday morning when his hat was discovered floating in the harbour. Boats have been out grappling and this evening they found the body. It is generally believed that he committed suicide. Mr. Beatty was son of Dr. Beatty of this town and lived in Stratford where he practised law.

 

WATSON - (Montreal) A young man named Charles Watson was this evening killed by a shot from a revolver in the hands of his brother, Alonzo, a youth of 19 years. The shooting is believed to have been accidental. The youth, however, has been taken into custody.

 

MURRAY - (Quebec) A 12-year-old son of Jacob Murray was drowned this morning at the New Liverpool cove by falling off the booms at that place. The body has been recovered.

 

August 12, 1887

 

ALLARDICE - Died on August 10, at 299 Main street ----; George R. Allardice, aged 38 years, a native of Dundee, Scotland. Funeral on Friday, at 3 o'clock, Friends will please attend.


The funeral of the late George R. Allardice took place yesterday and was attended by Crescent Lodge I.O.O.F., together with a fair representation of the stonecutters' union, and other friends. Deceased was a native of Dundee, Scotland, and died at the early age of 38 years from stonecutters' consumption. He had been a resident of Hamilton for about fourteen years and was very highly respected. He leaves a widow and four small children to mourn his death.

 

O'NEIL - Died in this city, on August 10, Bridget, daughter of Patrick and Catharine O'Neil, in the 30th year of her age.

Funeral will leave her father's residence, --------. on Friday, August 12, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

ALBURRY - (Montreal) A distressing fire occurred on St. Dominique street, at an early hour this morning whereby the family was burnt and a boarder burned to death. Before the arrival of the brigade, two men at the risk of their lives dashed through the flames and saved two men and a child. The house was occupied by Mrs. Jean Baptiste Oullette who let out furnished rooms to single gentlemen. One of these named Alburry, a Belgian by birth occupied a room in the attic. He was in the habit of reading by night and Madame Oullette states that she had often warned him of the bad habit. He had gone to bed last night slightly under the influence of liquor and had no doubt continued his practice of reading. It is supposed he fell asleep and upset the lamp. He failed to escape and was found by the firemen lying on the charred remains of the bed, burned to a crisp.

 

SULLIVAN - (Dundas) Miss Lizzie Sullivan, daughter of the headmaster of the Roman Catholic separate school, died last Saturday.

 

HENNESSEY - The funeral of the late Hugh Hennessey took place yesterday and was largely attended. The cortege proceeded from the house, Wilson street, to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to the Rock Bay cemetery. Deceased was a resident of the city since 1847, and served his time as a locksmith with the late Thomas Lalor. He was a splendid mechanic and he and his brother, Patrick were the inventors of a time lock, now generally used in connection with large safes. He was a native of Wexford, Ireland, and was 55 years of age. Mr. Hennessey was a man that was universally respected for his kindly disposition. He leaves a widow and ten children to mourn his demise.

 

August 13, 1887

 

WHYTE - Died in this city, on August 10, Andrew Thomas, infant son of Andrew and Mary Whyte, aged 2 months, and---- days. Funeral took place on Thursday, August 11, at 2 p.m.


LINDSAY-WETHERALL - Died at Caledonia, on Thursday, August 11, Muriel, twin daughter of Alexander and Helen Lindsay-Wetherall, aged --- months and 24 days.

 

SMYTH - Died in this city, on August 13, James B. Smyth, aged 24 years. Funeral from the residence of Mr.-----------, on August 13, at 2 p.m. Friends are requested to attend.

 

DAVIDSON - Died in this city, on August 12, at the residence, 166 Bay street north, John Davidson, aged 52 years. Funeral on Sunday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

John Davidson who in later years has been known as a bailiff died at his residence, 166 Bay street north, on Friday. Deceased was a native of Scotland. He came to Hamilton about forty years ago and was employed for a number of years as book keeper and manager for the late J. Morrison, stove dealer and tinsmith. Mr. Davidson opened the Rob Roy hotel, John street south, and afterward for a number of years acted as a city bailiff. He was of a kind-hearted disposition and many a poor person in this city had reason to feel thankful that they had not got into worse hands than those of John Davidson. He has been in failing health for several months and died at the age of 52 years.

 

GENDRON - (Montreal) Joseph Gendron, a native of St. Alphonse, Chicamointe, employed at the Canadian Pacific coal dump, was killed this morning by a locomotive while crossing the track to go to dinner. He was terribly mangled, his left leg and arm being dismembered and his body cut in two.

 

SMITH - (Niagara Falls) Philip Smith was drowned this morning while working at the new assembly grounds. He was a married man, aged 32 years. His wife resides in Buffalo.

 

August 15, 1887

 

LAMARCHE - (Montreal) A man named Alexis Lamarche committed suicide by taking paris green last night.

 

WARREN - Died in this city, on August 12, Gertie, youngest daughter of Patrick and Mary Warren.

 

CARON - (Montreal) Word has reached here that Miss Adeline Caron, a cousin of Mr. Caron, M.P.P., was burned to death at Louisville on Friday night. She was carrying a lamp in her hand when it exploded, setting fire to her clothing and burning her terribly.

 

SIMPSON - (Toronto) George Simpson, a young Englishman, was fatally injured at the Humber yesterday afternoon. He was standing on an embankment till the express from Hamilton went past, but had evidently miscalculated his distance, as he was struck on the forehead and knocked


down the embankment. He was picked up and brought into the city on the train, but died about an hour later.

 

LACHE - Ivanhoe Lache, ledger keeper of the Bank National, this city, fell backward from the wharf at Gatineau Point last night and was instantly killed, his head coming in contact with the gunwale of a steamboat alongside. The body was recovered from the river half an hour later. (Ottawa)

 

August 16, 1887

 

KELLY - In this city, on August 15, John Kelly, aged 32 years. Funeral from his father's residence, 293 King William Street, Wednesday, at 2 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

TREVASKIS - Died in this city, on August 15, George Edwin, youngest son of George and Kate Trevaskis, aged -- months and — days. Funeral will leave his father's residence, on Wednesday, August 17, at 2 o'clock p.m.

 

LOONEY - (Toronto) Daniel Looney, blockpaver, who was run over by a street car last night and had his leg amputated at the hospital, died this afternoon from blood poisoning.

 

SHEAD - (Ottawa) Robert Shead, a retired lumber merchant, died here on Saturday, aged 69 years.

 

MCLAREN - (Quebec) Mr. McLaren, repairer of the telegraph lines between Sault au Cochon and Berunas, sent his son last week to make some repairs. The young man took his gun with him, but not returning, a search was made for him when he was found dead in the woods, having evidently shot himself accidentally.

 

NEWCOMBE - (St. Thomas) a fatal accident happened this afternoon whereby Alice Newcombe, an attractive and interesting little girl of 10 years was instantly killed. She was fond of horseback riding, and was out riding unaccompanied by anyone when her horse stumbled, pitching her off, dislocating her neck. Mr. Newcombe is employed in one of the government departments at Ottawa, but is at present spending his holidays in this city.

 

NIVEN - (Stratford) A lad named Kenneth Niven, 13 years of age, was drowned while bathing in Victoria lake this afternoon. He got beyond his depth, and two companions, being unable to swim, could not render any assistance. The body was recovered this evening.

 

August 17, 1887

 

SHUTTLE - Died in this city, on August 16, at 247 Bay street north, Ruby Elvina, infant daughter of Joseph and --- Shuttle, aged 4 months and 2 weeks. Funeral this (Tuesday) afternoon at 3 o'clock.


EAGER - Died at Broson, Florida, on August —, of rheumatic fever, Benjamin Eager, of Burlington, aged 29 years.

 

FREEMAN - Died at the Beach, August 15, Herbert, youngest son of W. A. and Charlotte Freeman. Funeral from his father's residence, 80 Elgin street, August 18, at 2 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

TENEYCK - Died in this city, on Tuesday, August 16, Jane, beloved wife of Martin TenEyck, aged 60 years. Funeral from the family residence, 64 Catherine street south, on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Jane TenEyck, one of the oldest residents of Hamilton, died suddenly Tuesday night. She was visiting at the house of S. Davis, East avenue south. While sitting on the verandah talking with her friends, she complained of a pain in her head and soon afterward fell forward unconscious and died about midnight. Mrs. TenEyck was 60 years old and lived her whole life in or near Hamilton, having been born within a few miles of the city. She was the wife of Martin TenEyck of 64 Catherine street south and mother of one daughter and four sons, one of whom is Dr. TenEyck, the well known veterinary surgeon. The deceased lady was an active and useful Christian worker and will be greatly missed in Gore Street Methodist church of which she was a prominent and valued member.

 

WHITE - Died on August 17, at his residence, No 10 Burlington street, East Hamilton, William C. White, in the 66th year of his age. Funeral from the above address, on Friday, August 19, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

William C. White, one of Hamilton's oldest carpenters, died at his residence, Burlington street, East Hamilton. He had been ailing for nearly a year and his death was therefore not unexpected. He had been a resident of Hamilton since a young man and for many years carried on a carpenter business at his shop on Macnab street north. More recently he lived outside the city limits, but had not followed his trade to any great extent for several years. He was a member of First Methodist church and had many friends in the Christian community of the city. He leaves a widow and two sons and three daughters, all but one of whom are grown up. He will be buried on Friday, at 2:30.

 

ORR - Died at his residence, 82 James street south, on August 17, John A. Orr, aged 36 years. Funeral on Friday at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

John Alexander Orr, of the firm of Orr, Harvey & Co, who has been ailing with congestion of the lungs for the past few weeks, succumbed yesterday at noon to the dread disease.


Orr was a remarkably fine young man and possessed many sterling qualities, and his death deprives Hamilton of a most valuable citizen. When only a lad he started as a junior clerk with the late John Garrett and gradually rose step by step until he became the managing partner of the business. Seven years ago he started out for himself and became the senior partner of the firm of Orr, Harvey & Co. By strict business habits and fair dealing the success of the firm since the start has been phenomenally great and to-day ranks as among the largest wholesale boot and shoe houses in Canada.

Deceased was an active supporter of Christ Church Cathedral and at his death was a member of the cathedral board of management. He was also a respected member of the Masonic fraternity. In fact Mr. Orr was one of those men who are always ready to put their hands in their pockets for any worthy cause and an enumeration of his kindly deeds would require a considerable space in this paper. He leaves a widow and four children. The funeral will be held at 3 p.m. on Friday.

 

August 18, 1887

 

HAYES - (Montreal) Patrick Hayes, living on Prince street, Griffintown, died suddenly this morning. Inquest to-morrow.

 

LAMB - (Toronto) Edward Lamb, formerly a member of the London, Ontario, police force, suicided this afternoon at his brother-in-law's residence, 49 Camden street, by shooting himself through the heart with a revolver. He has been married only five months. About a month ago he had a slight attack of brain fever from which he has suffered ever since. He disappeared three weeks ago and remained away a week. On returning he could not give any account of where he had been nor his object in going away. He was sent to the hospital and left it on Monday. He has since been threatening to suicide and was closely watched, but this afternoon he succeeded in getting hold of his revolver with the result stated.

 

RYMAL - About 1:40 yesterday, a middle-aged man named Peter Rymal who had just arrived from Chicago dropped into Samuel Easter's tavern near the market and shook hands with Mrs. Easter. He took three or four steps to look at a time table and all at once dropped dead. Deceased was a native of Waterdown, but for many years had been a resident of the western states. It is claimed that about thirty years ago he was employed in the Hamilton post office, but none of the officials remember anything about it. His relatives reside in East Flamborough, but in the meantime his body was removed to the morgue at the city hospital. He was about 60 years of age.

 

August 18, 1887

 

FARQUHAR Died on August —, in the 78th year of her age, Janet Buchan, relict of the late William Farquhar. Funeral from Hughson street north, on Friday, at 4 p.m.


RYMAL - Died suddenly, in this city, of heart disease, Peter H. Rymal, of Chicago, aged -- years. Funeral from ------------ corner of Hess and Peter streets-------. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BALLANTYNE - (London) On Tuesday last George Ballantyne died at the advanced age of 83 years. The deceased gentleman emigrated from Scotland about 49 years ago, taking up land first in the township of Southwold, and about eighteen years ago removed to Caradoc where he continued until his death.

 

FITZGERALD - Yesterday morning James Fitzgerald, a respected resident of the northern portion of the city, was found dead in his bed. Mr. Fitzgerald was 60 years of age and had been a resident of Hamilton for upwards of forty years. He was for many years in the employ of the old Great Western Railway, and about fourteen years ago opened a saloon on Bay street north and continued in the liquor business for a number of years. He accumulated a considerable amount of property and had for some time past been living on his money. He had been in excellent health previous to his death and was going about as usual yesterday. About half past five yesterday some of the family on going to awaken him, found him dead. Dr. White was sent for and when he arrived half an hour afterward the body was still warm but life was extinct. The deceased leaves a widow and four children. The cause of death was heart disease.

 

RYMAL - No inquest will be held on the body of Peter Rymal who died of heart disease in Easter's saloon on Wednesday. Yesterday the brother-in-law of the deceased, W. H. Crooker of Waterdown, arrived in the city to claim the body and the funeral will take place from the residence of his sister, corner of Hess and Peter streets.

 

August 20, 1887

 

MILLS - (Listowel) An accident which proved fatal happened here on the G.T.R. this morning. While a brakeman named Richard Mills was performing his duty on a freight car from Stratford which arrives here at 11:45, he fell between two cars on the track and before the train could be stopped several cars had passed over him, inflicting injuries to which he succumbed at 4:40 this afternoon. His remains will be taken to Stratford.

 

HART - A brakeman on the Grand Trunk named Hart was fatally crushed at Harrisburg Thursday morning while coupling cars. He was taken to Galt where he died in the evening. He belonged to Mildmay, Ontario.


August 22, 1887

 

NISBET - Died at his residence, corner Victoria avenue and King William street, on August 20, Matthew Nisbet, aged 35 years. Funeral Monday, at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Matthew Nisbet, hatter and furnisher, of this city, died on Saturday night of a pulmonary disease after a protracted illness. Mr. Nisbet was a very popular young man and deservedly so, for he possessed in a large degree the qualities of mind and character which tend to make men beloved by their acquaintances. He was a native of Burlington, but had lived in Hamilton several years and was well known here. A widow and two children survive him. The deceased was an active and valued member of the Unity Lodge, No 7, and Canton Hamilton, No 2, I.O.O.F., and members of both these organizations will attend the funeral in uniform. The funeral will be held this afternoon at 4 o'clock.

 

MACKIE - (Port Hope) William Mackie, proprietor of the St. Lawrence Hall, one of the best known and most popular hotel men in the province, died this morning after an illness of ten days, aged 56 years and six months.

 

OGG - (Toronto) A six-year-old boy named George Ogg, whose parents reside on Hayter street, was instantly killed last night. He and other boys were jumping on to the front of the street roller, driven by David Manna, when he fell off, the roller passing over his head, crushing it to a pulp.

 

MITCHELL - (Montreal) Mrs. John Mitchell of St. Urban street fell dead in her house last evening. Heart disease is said to be cause of death.

 

ROBERTS - (Montreal) A man named Roberts who recently arrived here from England and who had spent a number of years in active service in the British army died to-day. Deceased was to have gone to St. Johns to a situation in a day or two. He leaves a widow and a young child.

 

STEWART - (Grimsby Park) A sad drowning accident occurred on Saturday night. Five young men, James Stewart, James Gow, Henry Goering, W. Moore, and Henry Fearman, came from Hamilton on a yacht and anchored fifty yards from the shore. They had engaged rooms at the Park House, but a strong wind sprang up and part of the number determined to return to the yacht and remain for the night. In attempting to return, the dinghy was capsized by the heavy sea running, and three of the young men, Stewart, Fearman and Moore, were rescued by Coady, city treasurer and architect Lennox, both of Toronto. Stewart, being unable to swim, was drowned. His body was recovered this forenoon and sent to Hamilton to-night, Coroner Rosebrugh not deeming an inquest necessary. All the young men except Fearman were in the employ of Macpherson, Glassco


& Co, grocers, of Hamilton. Moore suffered to-day from fatigue and says had he not been rescued when he was, he would have been drowned. This is the first drowning accident here since the camp was first opened.

 

POTHICA - William Pothica who resides on the corner of East avenue and Evans street and who is an old and respected employee of the Meridan Britannia works, about six weeks ago sent his family on a visit to their old home at Three Rivers. On Saturday word was received that his 9-year-old son was drowned, and Mr. Pothica immediately proceeded to where the accident occurred. It appears that the lad had noticed a man on a passing vessel throw a pail over with a rope for the purpose of drawing water. The tod got a pail with a piece of rope and tried to emulate him. He threw the pail over the wharf near where he was stopping and the current which is swift caught the pail and pulled the lad into the water, and before assistance could be rendered his body was carried away with the stream. The parent is very highly esteemed in the Meridan works and much sympathy is felt for his misfortune. The lad will in all probability be buried at Three Rivers.

 

August 23, 1887

 

STEWART - Drowned in lake Ontario, on the evening of August 20, James Stewart, aged 21 years. Funeral will leave the residence of Mrs. R. Kilgour, 81 Catherine street south, at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, August 23. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

DAVIS - Died at Aikman avenue, East Hamilton, on Monday, August 22, Emma, beloved wife of Walter Davis, aged 28 years. Funeral at 3 o'clock, Wednesday afternoon, from her late residence. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend without further notice.

 

DENTON - John Denton, an old and highly respected resident of Port Dalhousie, died there on Sunday.

 

DINAN - (Montreal) A melancholy occurrence took place at the residence of E. W. Stratty of the firm of Stratty Bros, Brokers of St. Francois Xavier street. A fortnight since a young girl entered his service as a domestic and yesterday she committed suicide by taking paris green. No cause can be assigned for the rash act committed by Frances Dinan who came here about two months ago from Chatham, N.B.

 

SWEETLAND - (Ottawa) The funeral of the wife of Sheriff Sweetland took place to-day and was very largely attended.

 

CURRAN - (Ottawa) R. Curran, aged 19, fell from a wagon outside the city Saturday night and was killed.


KILLAM - (Halifax) Samuel Killam, Sr., brother of the late Thomas Killam, died at Yarmouth yesterday. He was 82 years old and worth from a quarter to half a million dollars.

 

COFFIN - (Halifax) Joseph Coffin, a prominent citizen of Barrington, died yesterday at the age of 84. He was elected to the Nova Scotia Assembly in 1851 and served for one term.

 

MCARTHUR - (Winnipeg) Alexander McArthur of north-pole expedition fame died suddenly yesterday. Opium eating was the supposed cause.

(Editors note; McArthur was a founder of and wrote several papers for the Manitoba Historical Society and led an unsuccessful expedition to the North Pole to study the birds of the Arctic.)

 

August 24, 1887

 

HOLDEN - Died in this city, on August 23, at 127| James street north, Charlotte, infant daughter of Walter and Charlotte Holden, aged 12 months and 16 days. Funeral on Wednesday, at 2:30 p.m.

 

WEBB - Died in this city, on August 23, Edith Blanche, youngest daughter of John and Sarah Jane Webb. Funeral from father's residence, 99 Murray street east, on Thursday, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CARNEY - William Carney, an aged pensioner, died at St. Catharines on Saturday afternoon.

 

MCPHEE - Monday afternoon a two-year-old child of William McPhee of Stratford fell into a cistern and was drowned.

 

August 25, 1887

 

KERR - Died in this city, on August 23, Elizabeth, relict of the late Alexander Kerr of York, Ontario (Grand River), aged 79 years. Funeral from the residence of J. Hastings, Markland street, on Friday, at 9 a.m. Interment at York cemetery.

 

ALDRIDGE - Willie Aldridge, aged 8 years, was drowned in the Grand River near Caledonia on Saturday.

 

CAMERON - Thomas Cameron, a Beverly bachelor, aged 65, died suddenly at the American hotel in Galt last Sunday.

 

August 26, 1887

 

CARROLL - Died in this city, on August 23, James P. Carroll, aged 23 years. Funeral from R. Pray & Son's, King street west, to-day, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

LACOMBE - (Quebec) Young Lacombe who was injured in the Quebec shoe co's works by being caught in the belting died last night. He was an orphan.


SIMARD, PAQUETTE - (Montreal) A deplorable accident happened at Terrebonne on Monday afternoon. Two ten-year-old boys, sons of Mr. Simard of Montreal  and Mr. Paquette of Terrebonne, were constructing an impromptu raft when young Simard fell into the water and as he could not swim sank immediately. Paquette jumped after him, but Simard threw his arms around him and drew him to the bottom. Both bodies were recovered.

 

August 27, 1887

 

BABB - Died in this city, on Friday, August 26, Elizabeth, wife of James Babb, aged 40 years. Funeral will leave her husband's residence, 96 Victoria avenue north, on Sunday, at 2 p.m. Friends are kindly invited to attend.

 

MCLEOD - Died in this city, on August 26, Elizabeth McLeod, relict of the late Archibald McLeod, aged 66 years. Funeral from her late residence, 123 James street north, Sunday, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation,

 

HARRIS - (Brantford) John Harris, president of the firm of A. Harris, Son, & Co, manufacturers of agricultural machinery here, died last night. Funeral to-morrow (Saturday) afternoon at 3 o'clock.

 

ROBISCHEIN, DEVEAU, DOWLING DOWLING DOWLING - (Halifax) At Salmon River, Yarmouth county, this morning, five fishermen started out in two dories to look after their nets when the fierce wind lifted their dories in the air and turned them over. In one dory were Arcol Sammer and James Kelly. The latter succeeded in righting the dory, dragged his companion into it, and they succeeded in reaching the shore safely. In the other dory were Maude Robischein, Marine Deveau, and Albert Dowling. When their boat overturned one of them succeeded in getting on the bottom, but was knocked off by the surf, and all three were drowned.

 

PRIESTMAN - (Toronto) The town of Parkdale, adjoining Toronto, is greatly excited over a murder this morning of one of its well known residents, Joseph Priestman, Jr., agent for the Northwestern Masonic Association of Chicago. At 5 o'clock this morning, Constable Smith, who is also a lamplighter for the town, was proceeding down Dunn avenue near the lakeshore which is a very lonely portion of the town. He discovered a man lying across the sidewalk in a pool of blood. On close inspection constable Smith found that the man was dead. Close by he found a British bulldog revolver from which a bullet had evidently been fired. Along the sidewalk were scattered a number of the dead man's private papers. The pockets of his pants were turned inside out and had been robbed of their contents, consisting of money, a gold watch and chain, and other articles. A valuable ring was left on one of his fingers. Smith identified the body as that of


Priestman, and after procuring assistance, had it conveyed to his late residence where the scene was touching, deceased's wife and three daughters being frantic with grief. Priestman left home last night about 9:30 to see some gentlemen on a business matter, expecting to reach home again in an hour. That was the last time the family saw him alive. Priestman was about 43 years of age and was in comfortable circumstances. He came from Welland to Toronto about a year ago and started an office in Manning's arcade. It is believed he had a good sum of money in his possession last night. Coroner Lynd thinks it is a case of suicide end explains the rifling of the pockets by the theory that some tramp came along and finding the body lying on the sidewalk helped himself to the contents. This suicide idea, however, is not generally believed and it is looked upon as a clear case of murder. An inquest will be held to-night.

 

August 29, 1887

 

SALISBURY - Died on August 27, of inflammation of the kidneys, Harry Norman, son of B. and J. Salisbury, aged 4 months and 18 days. Funeral at 3 p.m., Monday, August 29, from his parents' residence, 267 Cannon street east. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

JOHNSTON - (Toronto) John Johnston, an employee of the Grand Trunk car depart merit, was run over and killed yesterday afternoon. He was carrying two buckets of water across the track when a shunting engine struck him and the wheels went over his body, mangling it terribly. Deceased has two sons who are conductors on the Grand Trunk.

 

DETRESE - (Montreal) The man who was killed on the C.P.R. track near St. Clete on Thursday has been identified as L. Detrese of St. Clete where the remains have been forwarded for interment.

 

BALZARETTI - (Quebec) Mr. Napoleon Balzaretti died suddenly last night at his boarding house. Dr. Walters was summoned and when he arrived stated that death had taken place about a quarter of an hour since. Mr. Balzaretti was an employee of the civil service, Ottawa, but had been in Quebec some time. He was a nephew of the Hon. J. G. Blanchet and was about 30 years of age. At the coroner's inquest a verdict of death from apoplexy was returned.

 

BOYD, PAUL - (St John, N.B.) Three young men named John Boyd, Sam Paul and M. B. Russell went sailing on the Kennebecasse river near Riverside yesterday when a squall upset the boat. Boyd and Paul were drowned. Russell clung to a piece of board and was saved. The bodies have not been recovered.


September 1, 1887

 

HUNTING - Died in this city, on August 31, Samuel Hunting, in the 77th year of his age. Funeral will take place from the residence of his son, S. H. Hunting, 67½ Main street west, on Friday, September 2, at 3 o'clock. Friends are respectfully invited to attend.

 

MCCONNELL - (London) Benjamin McConnell, farmer on the townline between Malahide and Bayham near Carlton, who was severely injured the other day by being crowded in the stall by a horse, died on Monday night from the effects of his injuries. He was 75 years of age and was one of the oldest and most respected residents of the county.

 

THOMPSON - (Waterdown) Sunday afternoon, the remains of the infant son of Charles Thompson of Strabane, were brought here for interment, a large number among the friends.

 

September 2, 1887

 

FRASER - (Halifax) William B. Fraser, a Spring Hill merchant, was drowned in Fountain lake this morning by the upsetting of a scow. He was out on a fishing expedition.

 

HAMILTON - (St John, N.B.) Hon W. Hamilton, the oldest member of the New Brunswick legislative council and the only member whose commission dates before confederation, died to-day at Dalhousie. He was 76 years old.

 

September 3, 1887

 

TURNER - Died at Belleville, on September 1, Mrs. Turner, relict of the late John Turner, Esq., formerly of this city. Funeral will leave the Grand Trunk station on the arrival of the train at 1:45 p.m., Sunday, September 4.

 

WEBB - Died in this city, after a long and painful illness, William Henry, third son of John Webb, contractor, aged 20 years. Funeral will take place from his father's residence, 99 Murray street east, Sunday afternoon, at 3:30 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Eighteen months of pain have terminated in the death of William Henry Webb at the early age of 20 years. He was the son of John Webb, contractor, 99 Murray street east. For a year and a half the young man has suffered severely from an abscess. Four surgical operations were performed for the purpose of giving him relief but without permanent benefit. The last operation, performed two weeks ago, was more that the disease-worn body could stand and young Webb never rallied from the effects. He was sensible to the last and bore his long and painful illness with rare patience and bravery. The deceased was born in Folkstone, county Kent, England, and came to Hamilton with his father in 1871.


CODY - (Halifax) Edward P. Cody, a seaman on board the brigantine "Grace Butler" was lost overboard on the passage from Demarara to this port. He was 17 years of age and belonged to Halifax. The "Grace Butler" experienced a fearful hurricane on August 25 and 26 in latitude 35:50, longitude 64:25, and suffered considerable damage. The foresail and topsails were torn to pieces, the skylight and cabin doors blown in, the cabin and forecastle flooded, and everything on deck broken loose.

 

LEBLANC - (Montreal) A clerk in the revenue department named Hugh LeBlanc of 676 Sanguinet street, aged 28, died suddenly to-day in his own woodshed where he had gone to fetch kindling wood.

 

TAIT - Thomas Tait, for many years court crier for Norfolk, died last Sunday at the advanced age of 81 years.

 

September 5, 1887

 

BETZNER - Died in Beverly, on September 2, Mary, wife of David Betzner, late of Hamilton, aged 28 years.

 

SEXTON - Died in Toronto, on September 3, Mat Sexton, formerly of this city, in the 27th year of his age. Funeral from 225 Hughson street north, on Tuesday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

LITTLEWOOD - Died in this city, on September 3. George Littlewood, a native of Unsworth, Yorkshire, England, in his 57th years. Funeral from his late residence, No 9 Murray street, at 3 p.m. on Monday, September 5. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

 

URQUHART - (Uxbridge) On Thursday noon last, Wesley Urquhart, the 17-year-old son of Alexander Urquhart of Udera, went to lead a bull to the back fields when in some way the brute attacked and killed him. No one saw the dreadful occurrence and the lad was not missed until late at night when his body was found shockingly mangled. The animal had never previously shown any vicious tendency.

 

LABADIEU - (Windsor) A man named Labadieu was run over and instantly killed on the Great Western division of the Grand Trunk at Stony Point by a mail train which arrived at Windsor at 8 o'clock last night.

 

LARKINS - (Toronto) Mary Larkins, a domestic servant in Mrs. McManus's boarding house, Peter street, fell downstairs yesterday and broke her neck. She died in a few minutes.


DOUGHERTY - (Kingston) A convict named Alexander Dougherty of Stratford hanged himself in the dungeon of the Kingston penitentiary to which he had been sent for misconduct.

 

WATTS - B. S. P. Watts of St. Thomas, aged 77, was found dead in his bed last Friday.

 

FARES - The body of Mrs. Fares, lately drowned at Port Colborne, was found on the rocks at Point Albino on Friday.

 

ARMSTRONG - The death is announced of T. L. Armstrong, an old resident of Strathroy, and at one time principal of the public schools, at the age of 70 years.

 

September 6, 1887

 

BENNETT - Died in this city, on September 4, Charles Bennett, aged 29 years. Funeral will take place from his mother's residence, 138 Macnab street north, Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

BUSCOMBE - Died on September 4, at No 71 Herkimer street, Ina Zena, only child of Frederick and Lydia Buscombe, aged 1 year.

 

CHEGWIN - Died at Dundas, on September 5, Ann Chegwin, relict of the late James Chegwin, in her 76th year. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, William Cooce, Dundas, on Wednesday at 4 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

BRIGGS - (Toronto) T. H. Briggs, manager of the Toronto Willard Tract depository, died of typhoid fever yesterday morning. He contracted his illness five weeks ago while attending the Niagara Believers' Conference of which he was treasurer. He was one of the most active Methodists in the city.

 

ROBICHAUD - (Halifax) Joseph Robichaud whose skull was fractured by being struck with a falling board at the new Dalhousie College building last week, died at the Victoria hospital last night. He was 24 years old and belonged to Chezzelcook. (Ed. Note NS).

 

September 7, 1887

 

MUTTER - Died in this city, on September 5th Freddie, the youngest son of Philip Mutter, aged 10 years. Funeral will take place from his father's residence, 46 York street, on Wednesday afternoon, at 1:10 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

REDDEN - (Kingston) A farmer named Redden, going home from the Barnum's Circus last night, fell out of his vehicle and was fatally hurt.


EAST - Mrs. Henry East of Wilson street left a short time ago on a trip to the old country for her health, but a telegram received last evening announced the sad news that she had died at New York yesterday.

 

LEWIS - The funeral of the late John Lewis took place from 89 Rebecca street yesterday afternoon. The deceased was a member of Shoemakers' Assembly, 2132, Knights of Labour, and the members of that order attended the funeral in a body. The pall bearers were: George Wynn, Sr., George Wynn, Jr., William Wynn, Herbert Knapp, L. Slaughter, and J. Slaughter.

 

RUPPELL - Two or three years ago an outrage was committed on a young girl near Concession street by four young men. Three of the culprits were captured and sentenced to long terms in the penitentiary. The fourth, Charles Ruppell, escaped to the states. He engaged in various employment and is supposed to have quite reformed. At least he earned enough money to send for his wife and two little children and to support them. A few months ago he got employment as a brakeman on a railway in Michigan. He worked steadily at this occupation until last week when he fell between the cars, was run over, and killed. The body arrived here on Monday night. There was some misunderstanding about the express charges and the coffin was allowed to remain all night exposed in the yard of the American express company. Yesterday morning it was taken to Pray's undertaking establishment where it was opened and the body viewed by the friends of the deceased and recognised. One of the thighs was smashed and there was a deep gash on the back of the head. The remains were removed to the house of Ruppell's father, Main street west, whence the funeral took place yesterday. Ruppell leaves a young wife and three children, the youngest of which is an infant in arms.

 

MULHOLLAND - Mrs. Mulholland of Port Dalhousie died yesterday aged 92 years. Mrs. Mulholland was the widow of a veteran of the battle of Waterloo.

 

GROVES - Capt. Henry Groves, high constable of Middlesex, died on Saturday at his residence, London, in the 81st year of his age. Mr. Groves was born in England, came to this country in 1832, served as a volunteer during the rebellion of 1837-38, and took part in two engagements.

 

September 12, 1887

 

WADDELL - Died on Friday morning, at the residence of her son, R. R. Waddell, Mary Gage, widow of the late Thomas Waddell, in the 83rd year of her age. Funeral from 31 Hunter street west, on Monday, September 12, at 3 p.m.

 

RUTHERFORD - Died on September 9, Charlotte, wife of James Rutherford, aged 38 years. Funeral at 8:30 a.m., Monday, September 12, from the residence of her husband, 281 James street north. Friends will please accept this intimation.


SPECK - Died at his residence, East Flamborough, on Saturday, September 10, Stephen Speck, aged 68 years. Funeral to take place from his late residence, on Monday, September 12, at 2 o'clock p.m.

 

BEARE - Died in this city, on September 11, Florence May, youngest daughter of Joseph and Florence Beare, in her 16th year. Funeral to-day at 3 p.m. from 81 West avenue north. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SEAGRAVE - (Montreal) Alice Seagrave, aged 20 years, residing at Lachine, who took a dose of 'rough on rats' on Tuesday, died to-day at the general hospital.

 

MCGOWAN, HORN - (Halifax) Alfred Horn, William McGowan, a son of McGowan's, and a man whose name is unknown put off from the seal rocks, Scatarie Island, on Wednesday evening in a dory to set their fishing nets. A heavy sea was running and the boat was swamped and all four were drowned within a short distance of the shore. No trace of the boat or the bodies has since been found.

 

RICHMOND - (Halifax) A train with one passenger car attached and a freight train collided on the Cumberland Railway near Springhill Junction late last night. The engines were running tenders first and both tenders telescoped and were completely demolished, but the machinery of the locomotives was not seriously injured. The engine drivers and firemen were all more or less hurt, but only one received fatal injuries. Fireman Richmond, 17 years old, was thrown on top of one of the tenders and received internal injuries from which he died to-day. One of the drivers forgetting his orders is supposed to be the cause of the accident.

 

ETHERINGTON - Young James Etherington of Niagara Falls, Ontario, went coon hunting last week. He followed a coon to a high branch of a tall tree and losing his balance fell fifty feet to the ground. He died next day.

 

September 13, 1887

 

FEAVER - Died on September 12, Thomas Feaver, aged 56 years. Funeral from his late residence, King street west, near toll gates, on Tuesday, September 13, at 4:30 o'clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

MACABE - Died at San Francisco, on September 6, Charles McCabe, Pacific Coast agent, Chicago and Alton R. R., formerly of Hamilton, aged 42 years.


RUSSELL - Died in this city, on September 11, Esther, the beloved wife of A. G. Russell, and sister of Charles Mottashed, in the 34th year of her age. Funeral from 94 Wilson street, on Tuesday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

LANE - (Montreal) Oliver Lane, fireman, who was seriously injured on the Grand Trunk Railway, two miles east of Waterville, on September 1, died on September 10. A coroner's jury has rendered a verdict that Lane came to his death by gross negligence on the part of Oliver, agent, and Jeffries, switchman, of Waterville, and McWilliams, conductor. No blame whatever is attached to the railway company.

 

GARNEAU - (Quebec) Madame Garneau, wife of Hon P. Garneau, commissioner of crown lands, died at 9 o'clock this morning. She had been suffering for about a fortnight with haemorrhage of the lungs. Deceased was 55 years of age.

 

LANGELIER - (Quebec) John Langelier, brother of Mayor Langelier, died yesterday from an abscess of the brain. Before September he worked night and day to finish the fourth volume of 'Des Jugements et Deliberations du Conseil Souvereign'. For the last five or six years he has done a Benedictine work that is transcribe in the old registers of the French dominion which he had gathered together with great labour and weary research and study. The correction of the proofs naturally imposed upon him a herculean amount of care and labour. Next came the publication which he watched with the greatest care and closest attention and which most probably caused the fatal malady which ended his useful life. He was in the 33rd year of his age.

 

September 14, 1887

 

KENNEDY - Died in Saltfleet, on September 13, John Kennedy, only son of Thomas Kennedy, aged 24 years. Funeral will leave his late residence, Thursday, September 15, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

TAYLOR - Died in this city, on September 13, John Taylor, moulder, aged 66. Funeral will take place from 169 Macnab street north, on Wednesday, September 14, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

COSTELLO - Died on September 13, Lizzie, third daughter of Patrick and Eliza Costello, aged 10 years, 10 months, and 13 days. Funeral from her parents' residence, 56 Queen street south, at 2:30 p.m. on Thursday, September 15.

 

HARMAN - (Montreal) A labourer named David Harman was found lying dead on Common street this morning.


September 15, 1887

 

DOWLE - Died at Detroit, at the residence of her grandparents, on September 13, May, daughter of Frank Dowle, late of Hamilton, aged 4 years and 5 months. Funeral from G.T.R. depot, Hamilton, on arrival of 1:50 train on Thursday, September 15. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

MCLAREN - Died on September 14, at his residence, 99 West avenue north, William McLaren, in his 54th year. Funeral will take place from the above address, at 2:30 on Friday. Friends and acquaintances please attend without further notice.

 

PURDOM - (London) The wife of Thomas Purdom, barrister, of this city, died at her residence this morning.

 

DUBREIL, ODILE - (Quebec) Two children, named Omor Dubreil and Ovid Odile, aged 3 years and 6 months, and 7 years respectively, were drowned in the Lachine canal to-day while playing truant from school.

 

LEMIEUX - (Quebec) A grover named Lemieux dropped dead at the door of his store to-night.

 

HUFFMAN - John Huffman of Eagle village was kicked by a horse on Monday night and instantly killed.

 

VOGETTE - John Vogette, a Linwood, Waterloo county, weaver committed suicide by hanging himself to the corner post of his loom on which he had been working through the day. His wife, to whom he had been married less than a year, entered the weaving room and found him, as she supposed, leaning against the corner post of the loom, but as he made no answer, she took hold of him to find to her horror that he was hanging and dead. The cord with which he had committed the fatal deed consisted of some carpet warp containing only 21 threads, and had evidently been prepared beforehand, and a loop large enough to slip his head through, then resting his throat upon the cord he had slipped back, allowing the weight of his body to fall upon his throat. Death was produced by suffocation.

 

September 16. 1887

 

MCEWEN - (Ottawa) A young girl named Martha McEwen died in Waterton, N.Y., recently after giving birth to a child. The deceased was 14 years of age. The unfortunate girl turns out to be a daughter of Albert McEwen, a wealthy farmer residing near North Gower Village, county of Carleton. The father of the deceased girl has entered an action against R. Andrews of Burritt's Rapids for $50,000 damages for alleged-seduction. The trial will come off at the assizes in this city. Andrews is a relative of the deceased girl and is one of the wealthiest and best known men in that section of the country.


September 17, 1887

 

SHIELDS - Died in this city, at 9 Hunter street west, on September 15, John Shields, aged 39 years and 7 months. Funeral from the above address, Sunday, September 18, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MILLMAN - Robert Millman, an old resident and successful farmer of Oxford county, died on Tuesday night of typhoid fever. He was born in Beverly township where his parents, both English, settled early in the century. A few years since he sold the farm and removed to Woodstock where he lived in retirement.

 

September 19, 1887

 

SMITH - Died on September 18, Edith Letitia, infant daughter of Charles L. and Jane Smith, aged 1 year and 10 months. Funeral at 3:30 p.m., Tuesday, from No 717 West avenue north. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

THOMSON - Died in this city, on September 16, Thomas Thomson, youngest son of James and Jane Thomson of Guelph, aged 27 years. Funeral from 293 King William street on Monday, September 19, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

Friday evening Thomas Thomson of the firm of Gardner & Thomson died rather suddenly at the residence of his partner. Mr. Thomson had been lingering in the last stages of consumption for some months past, but lately has been slightly better. His partner, Mr. Gardner, got married lately and Mr. Thomson was present at the wedding though in a very weak state at the time, and when the young couple returned from their bridal tour was desirous of paying a visit to their new home. The young man's desire was complied with and he was taken down to Mr. Gardner's residence on Park street north, but Friday evening about ten o'clock while sitting on the sofa talking to Mrs. Gardner he suddenly expired. The young lady was naturally very much frightened and has since been quite unnerved by the shock. The body was removed to the house of Mr. Gardner's father where the young man had been staying for some years past, and the funeral will take place from there this afternoon. He was an exceedingly estimable young fellow and has many friends who will be sincerely grieved to hear of his death.

 

CRIESTEN - (Colborne, Ont) A man named Alof Criesten, 24 years of age, while stealing a ride on an eastbound freight train of the Grand Trunk Railway, fell between the cars, having his right leg badly crushed and other portions of his body badly injured. The limb was amputated. He was conscious long enough to give his name and age, but no other particulars, and died at 2 o'clock this afternoon. Half of the face side of an envelope was found in his pocket the address on which is Peter Nelson, P.O. box, 55, Port Arthur, Ontario, On the other side written in pencil is Robert Johnson, Schrieleed, C.P.R., Ontario.


September 20, 1887

 

MITCHELL - Died at the residence of Charles L. Walker, 75 Wellington street north, Elizabeth, second daughter of the late Daniel Mitchell, Sr. Funeral Wednesday, September 21, at 3:30. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

STRONG - Died at Hamilton Beach, on Sunday, September 18, 1887, of congestion of the lungs, Capt. W. F. Strong, second son of the late Capt Thomas Strong, Royal Navy, aged 65 years. Funeral at Galt.

 

MULHOLLAND - Died in this city, on September 18, Margaret, the beloved wife of William Mulholland in the 65th year of her age. The funeral will leave her husband's residence, 59 Catherine street south, Tuesday, September 20, for St. Paul's Church, Mount Hope. Friends and acquaintances please accept this notice.

 

GALENY - (Toronto) Thomas Galeny, caretaker of the Toronto yacht club building on the esplanade, went out in a dinghy last night to examine the moorings of some of the yachts. This morning he could not be seen around the premises and the bay was dragged, resulting in his body being found. He was about 24 years of age.

 

BROWNE - (Toronto) Dodwell Browne, book-keeper in the Irish Canadian office, was knocked down on Saturday by a runaway horse and he died this morning from the injuries received.

 

HARRIET - (Ottawa) The body of a man named Harriet, a middle aged labourer, was found floating in the canal basin this morning. It is supposed to be a case of accidental drowning.

 

DUCKETT - (Montreal) William Duckett, ex-M.P.P. for Soulanges, died at Coteau Landing last evening, aged 63 years. The deceased for five consecutive years sat in the House of Commons at Ottawa, and for the past fifteen years has represented Soulanges in the local legislature.

 

KELLY - (Kingston) The body of the man found floating near Oswego some time since turns out to be that of Kelly, the engineer and one of the convicts who escaped from the penitentiary on the yacht "Juno". He was identified by the clothing which was sent to the penitentiary by the coroner.

 

MACKENZIE - James Mackenzie, lumber merchant of Sarnia, and a younger brother of Hon. Alexander Mackenzie died on Thursday last.

 

ALLEN - David Allen of Port Dover, aged 26 years, was mate of the schooner "Dauntless". Last Friday when fifteen miles off Charlotte he was reefing the mainsail when he fell overboard. Efforts were made to save him, but they were unavailing owing to the heavy sea.

 


September 21, 1887

 

FITZGERALD - Died on September 19, 1887, Angus Fitzgerald, aged 19 years and 1 month. Funeral from his parents' residence, No 14 Picton street, at 2 o'clock, on Wednesday, September 21. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HANYLS - (Ottawa) A post mortem is being held on the body of Samuel Hanyls whose body was found floating in the canal yesterday. Foul play is suspected.

 

STEELE - (Halifax) A man named Steele was killed, and several others were injured by a fall of coal in the Sydney mines last night.

 

September 22, 1887

 

LYLE - Died in this city, on Thursday morning, of heart disease, Mrs. Richard S. Lyle, daughter of William Richardson, in the 26th year of her age.

 

MCMASTER - (Toronto) Hon. William McMaster, while addressing a meeting in McMaster Hall last night, fainted and remained unconscious for some time. He was removed to his residence on Bloor street where he died about 4 o'clock this morning.

 

CAMPBELL - (Toronto) It is now believed that the man supposed to have been drowned through the ferryboat collision on September 13, was Thomas Campbell, a young man, 29 years of age, who resided with his father, Minton Campbell, farmer, Durham, Grey county. He left Durham on Monday, September 12, intending to return home on September 15. He visited the exhibition on September 13 and has not since been seen or heard of. A hat picked up in the bay at the scene of the collision has been identified by the young man's father as exactly resembling the one he wore when he left home. He was about six feet, three inches in height and weighed about 180 pounds. The bay will be dragged in the vicinity of the collision.

 

September 24, 1887

 

MAHONY - Died in this city, on September 23, Hannah Gage, wife of J. C. Mahony. Funeral at 3 o'clock, Sunday, from the residence of her son-in-law, John Bradley, 62 Catherine street north.

 

CAMPBELL - The bay was dragged to-day for the body of the young man, Thomas Campbell, of Durham, Grey county, who was supposed to have been drowned through the ferryboat collision of September 13. It was found close to the scene of the collision and taken to the morgue. An inquest was commenced to-night.


COOK - (Kingston) A little daughter of E. H. Cook. Desoronto, was killed by a train yesterday. She was dazed by the train and unable to get out of the way.

 

September 26, 1887

 

BOECHLER - (Goderich) Mrs. Boechler, wife of the proprietor of Boechler's Mills, a few miles up the Maitland river, was accidentally drowned last evening.

 

September 27, 1887

 

MONTGOMERY - Died on September 25, Annie M. M., third daughter of the late William Montgomery, aged 21 years. Funeral at 3 p.m. on Tuesday, from her mother's residence, 116 Young street.

 

HURD - Died on September 25, Hiram Burton, infant son of H. G. and Eva R. Hurd, aged 4 months. Funeral yesterday afternoon.

 

NICHOLSON - A very distressing case of accidental poisoning occurred near Millgrove last Friday night. William Nicholson of the 6th line of East Flamborough has been prostrated by a low fever for the last two months, and last week two of his daughters - the eldest, Alice, aged 12, and the other, Susie, aged 8 - showed symptoms of the same disease. Dr. Anderson of Millgrove was summoned on Friday to attend the children. He prescribed quinine and left six powders for them to take. One of these powders was administered to each of the patients on Friday evening. Very soon afterward both children grew alarmingly ill. They became unconscious and gave every symptom of being under a powerful narcotic. The neighbours were summoned. Coffee and emetics were forced down the throats of the unfortunate little ones. But all to no purpose. One died about midnight and the other two hours later. The funeral of both was held on Sunday and was attended by hundreds of people from many miles around. Mr. Nicholson was too sick to rise from his bed to see the remains of his children.

An inquest was opened by Dr. MacGregor of Waterdown but no evidence was taken. Dr. F. E. Woolverton of this city held a post mortem examination.

A "Spectator" reporter, having heard that the fatal drug had been obtained from J. A. Zimmerman, druggist, of this city, called on him to-day. "All I know of the affair is this", said Mr. Zimmerman. "On Thursday, September 8, Dr. Anderson came here and bought some things, among others an ounce of quinine. I had no quinine in stock, and when he asked for it, I sent my clerk over to Winer & Go's for the required amount. The clerk returned with the ounce of quinine done up in white paper and labelled. Dr. Anderson waited for the clerk's return and when the parcel of


quinine arrived he took it along with his other purchases and went out".

"Did Dr. Anderson buy any quinine from you since then?"

"No, I'm pretty sure he did not".

Dr. F. E. Woolverton was also seen yesterday. "We did not examine the stomachs" said he "because such a very small dose had been administered. They have been sealed and are now in possession of the coroner who will send them to Toronto to be analysed if he is authorized to do so. We examined the four powders that were left. They were morphine".

While the inquest was in progress a similar case of fatal poisoning was revealed. Mrs. Rymal, who lives near Millgrove, died rather suddenly a few days ago. Dr. Anderson had attended her also. Mr. Rymal brought to the doctor one of the supposed quinine powders which had been administered by the doctor. It was examined and found to be morphine.

There are two explanations of these unfortunate cases. Either the clerk in Winer's who sold the drug to Zimmerman's clerk gave him morphine instead of quinine, or else Dr. Anderson mistook one for the other.

The inquest will be resumed next Monday in Waterdown.

 

September 28, 1887

 

HUNTER - Died in this city, on September 26, George Hunter, tailor, a native of Jedburgh, Scotland, aged 52 years. Funeral from his late residence, 64 Tisdale street, on Wednesday afternoon, at 2:30 of clock. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

BROWN - Died at the residence of his son, 9 East avenue north, on Tuesday, September 27, James Brown, in his 63rd year. Funeral Thursday, at 4 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

 

BENTON - (Montreal) Mrs. G. H. Benton, who came here about six weeks ago to get lessons from O. Jacobini, artist, died under mysterious circumstances in the Balmoral Hotel to-day. Shortly after her arrival it was seen that she was of an excitable nature which is supposed to have been caused by drinking brandy. Medical aid was summoned, but she gradually grew worse and died to-day. It is believed she had been taking opium on the quiet, which was the immediate cause of death.

 

ROACH - (Toronto) Miss Roach, 45 years of age, who was employed during the summer as cook on board the steamer "Hastings", was found dead in her bed at her boarding house, 57 Ontario street, this morning. A package of insect powder, a portion of which had been used, was found beside her on the bed, and it is supposed she suicided. She was in good health when she retired last night. An inquest will probably be held.


BARCLAY - (Toronto) Rev. Dr. Barclay, late pastor of the old St. Andrew's Church, died at his residence, John street, to-night in his 75th year. He was an enthusiastic curler, and was for years chaplain of the Royal Caledonian Curling club.

 

September 29, 1887

 

FINCH - Died at 225 Victoria avenue north, on Wednesday, September 28, William Henry P. Finch, a native of Springfield, N.Y., in his 73rd year. Funeral on Friday, September 30, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

 

SKIRVING - Died in London, suddenly, on September 28, of diphtheria, David Skirving, of the Bank of British North America, aged 44 years.

David Skirving, teller of the Bank of British North America, died of diphtheria this morning, and owing to the nature of the disease the funeral took place in the afternoon. The deceased was one of the most popular residents of London. His banking experience extended over twenty years, he having been first sent out from Glasgow to Halifax by the Bank of British North America authorities. Subsequently he was transferred to Hamilton, and again in 1871 or 1872 to London. Mr. Skirving took a great interest in all sporting matters. One sad phase of Mr. Skirving's death is the fact that he had just completed twenty years of hard work in the bank and as a reward had been given six months holidays to revisit his native land which he intended to start for shortly.

 

September 30, 1887

 

CANNELLE - (St. Catharines) Angus Cannelle, the man who had his foot smashed on Monday by the iron pillar falling from the bridge crossing the new canal at Thorold, had his foot amputated on Wednesday afternoon at the hospital. The unfortunate man was unable to recover from the shock of the operation and died last night.

 

October 1, 1887

 

GRAHAM - (Petrolia) A farmer by the name of Richard Graham coming into town to-day with a load of wood, by some means slipped and fell down, the wagon and contents passing over him and killing him instantly.

 

October 3, 1887

 

BURTON - Died in this city, on October 2, Charles John, second son of George and Emily Burton, aged 5 years and 10 months. Funeral private.


DAVIES - Died in this city, on October 1, John C. Davies, aged 25 years, son of Henry and Isabella Davies, of 129 John street north. Funeral will take place from above address, at 2:30 p.m.,  Monday, October 3. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend without further notice.

 

ALLAN - (Ottawa) Minnie Allan, daughter of a respectable farmer living near Chelsea, died Thursday evening from the effects of poison, administered it is supposed by herself. Dr. Davis who was sent for, on arriving, found that her recovery was impossible. She would have become a mother in a few months. She denied having taken anything but a little laudanum, but after her death two letters were discovered in her bed, supposed to be in her own handwriting, in which she confirmed that she had been betrayed, that her betrayer had married recently, and preferring death to disgrace, she had resolved to put an end to her existence. An inquest will be held.

 

STANYER - (London) A little eight-year-old son of Henry Stanyer, foreman of the Empire Oil Company, left his home at about six o'clock last night to go over and call his father to tea. The little fellow found his way into one of the upstairs rooms where the oil was being pumped into the agitator. He was overpowered with the gas and fell to the floor where his body was found at half past six by some of the night men. A doctor was called in, but found that life had fled before the little fellow was removed from the influence of the gas.

 

JOHNSTON - (Montreal) Samuel Johnston, the absconding treasurer of the Hamilton Powder Co., was being brought back from Ogdensburg last night by the directors. The train was late and he managed to elude the officers at St. Henri station, two miles out. When he was missed, search was made for him, but he could not be found. Inquiry at his residence, Ste Famille street, also showed that he had not gone home. His body was found this morning on Fletcher's field near the Lansdowne toboggan slides with a pistol nearby. Bullet holes were found in his ear. It is generally supposed that his affliction caused both defalcation and suicide.

 

TAYLOR - (Bracebridge) To-day while Charles O'Brien who runs a threshing machine was engaged at the barn of Mrs. Donnelly, about nine miles from here, Samuel Taylor, who owned a rival machine, entered the barn when an altercation arose between the two men.

It appears that ill feeling had existed between them and on this occasion Taylor accused O'Brien of undermining him in getting the Donnelly threshing, claiming that it had been promised to him, Taylor. This was denied. Taylor then called O'Brien a liar when the latter struck him twice, and he fell into the arms of some workmen, dead. O'Brien gave himself up. Samuel Taylor was an old resident of the township of Macaulay, and had been a councillor for several years.


October 4, 1887

 

READ - Died at the residence of W. P. Giles, 123 Market street, Hamilton, on Monday, October 3, Mrs. S. L. Read, aged 64 years. Funeral from above address, on Wednesday, at 3 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CONROY - (Ottawa) Mrs. Robert Conroy, aged 72, widow of the late lumberman, died yesterday at Aylmer.

 

GREELEY - (Montreal) A man named William Greeley, lately arrived from England, fell from the top of a house in course of construction at Pointe Claire a day or two ago and was killed on the spot.

 

MACAULAY - (Kingston) The widow of the late Hon. John Macaulay, legislative councillor, died this morning.

 

VAUGHAN - (St John, N.B.) Alexander Vaughan and a nine-year-old son went partridge shooting at Beiresville, Kings county, on Saturday. In dragging his gun over a stump, it discharged, and the contents entered the old man's side. The son went for assistance and on returning in four hours, Vaughan was insensible and died in a short time. He leaves a wife and six children.

 

October 5, 1887

 

FOSTER-REEVES - Died in this city, on October 4, Joseph Foster-Reeves, aged 43 years. Funeral from his late residence, 118 Locke street north, on Saturday, October 8, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

FOSTER - Died in this city, on Tuesday, October 4, Charles Foster, in the 64th year of his age. Funeral on Thursday, October 6, at 3 p.m. from his late residence, 40 George street, to All Saints Church.

The death of Charles Foster, food inspector of the city, which occurred yesterday morning, was not unexpected. Mr. Foster had had three attacks of apoplexy within a comparatively short time and for several days his family has realized that he could not recover. Mr. Foster was a native of Dundalk, Ireland, where he was born in 1824. In 1832 his parents started for Canada with their children. His father died on the ship on the way out, but his mother determined to remain in Canada and came to Hamilton with her sons. For a short time the family lived in Hamilton and then settled on a farm in Nelson where several of Mr. Foster's brothers still live. About 1837 Mr. Foster came back to this city and started to learn the tailoring business with the late Donald McLellan and in 1844 he was enabled to start in business on his own account. He continued in business until his appointment of food inspector in the city in September, 1883.


Mr. Foster served his fellow citizens faithfully and ably for several years as an alderman for No 3 ward. He was elected in 1876, 1877, 1880, 1881 and 1882. He was an old member of Barton Masonic lodge and a member of All Saints Episcopalian Church. In politics Mr. Foster was a Liberal-Conservative from sincere conviction and proved himself a faithful and zealous member of the party in many a contest. But his broad and liberal mind, genial temperament, and affable manners made his popular among all classes and he could never be charged with being a bigot in anything.

He leaves a widow and family of three sons and two daughters. The eldest son is W. O. Foster, druggist, of St. Thomas. C. H. Foster is senior partner in the firm of Foster & Macabe, wholesale dealers in Toronto. T. K. Foster is in business in this city. The elder of the two daughters is Mrs. Dr. Snider of Menota, Man. The youngest daughter is unmarried and lives at home.

The death of Mr. Foster will be generally regretted. He was universally liked and had a larger circle of intimate friends than most men enjoy. For half a century he lived among us. For some years he occupied a prominent position in city affairs and both in public and private his life was such as to compel respect of all citizens and the affection of his friends.

The funeral will take place on Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock from the family residence, No 40 George street.

 

BOURNER - (Montreal) The following comes from St. Hughes. A farmer named Louis Bourner committed suicide Sunday morning by cutting his throat. Seeing that he was late in getting up, his wife went into the room and found him covered with blood and moaning. She rushed to the neighbours for help, but when they arrived he was dead. Bourner was a well-to-do farmer and greatly respected. No cause of his rash act is known.

 

ALLEN - (Quebec) John Allen, a sailor on the schooner "Oregon" died on the trip from Montreal to Quebec, He was interred here.

 

GODBOUT - (Quebec) The coroner's jury in the Island of Orleans tragedy have returned a verdict that the said Joseph Godbout, Alphonse Godbout, and Arthur Godbout were killed on September 24 by the explosion of a shell which had been left on the beach of the parish aforesaid on September 22 last by the employees of the Quebec Cartridge factory. An action will be entered at once by the father of the deceased.

 

October 6, 1887

 

PELLETIER - (Quebec) The body of Capt. Pelletier, master of a schooner lying in the Louis basin, was found in one of the ponds in rear of St. Andrew street this afternoon. How the occurrence took place is unknown. An inquest will be held.

 

SMITH - (Belleville) A. L. Smith, an ex-alderman and justice of the peace, died yesterday in his 72nd year from a stroke of paralysis. Mr. Smith was one of the wealthiest men in the city.

 


October 7, 1887

 

HOPKINS - (Toronto) The man killed at Little York yesterday turns out to be Robert Hopkins who was an inmate of the House of Providence here for some time. Very little is known of his antecedents.

 

October 8, 1887

 

MCAVAY - Died in this city on October 7, Theresa, beloved wife of Patrick McAvay, in her -5th year. Funeral from --- Barton street, on Sunday, at 2:30. Friends kindly accept this notice.

 

HALL - Died in Barton township, Friday, October 7,-------Hall. Funeral private.

 

MARTIN - Died on Friday, October 7, at 82 Main street west, Theres Martin,------------.

 

FOLEY, HAZARD, PAPPA - (Toronto) Capt Trowell, chief engineer Ellis, and Mrs. Blood, stewardess of the ill-fated "California", arrived here to-night. They brought with them the bodies of George Foley, bursar; Andrew Hazard, cabin boy; and Miss Pappa, ladies' maid. The latter two bodies were sent east to-night, Miss Pappa to Kingston, and Hazard's to Napanee. Foley's will be sent to Collingwood to-morrow morning. The captain and chief engineer denied to say anything about the wreck at present.

 

CLARKE - (Guelph) Dr. Clarke of Palmerston, who had been living in Guelph for the past year, died this morning, aged 74.

 

October 10, 1887

 

GRANT - Died on October 8, at Dunstone House, King street east, the residence of her mother, Mary A., second daughter of the late Peter Grant, Esq. Funeral will take place on Tuesday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend.

 

MASON - Died on September 28, Thomas Mason, of Burlington, in his 72nd year. Funeral took place Saturday, October 1, to English Church burial plot.

 

GAY - Died in this city, on October 9, Jane, eldest daughter of James Gay, 66 Hughson street south. Funeral from above address on Tuesday, October 11, at 3 P.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


GURNETT - Died on October 8, Anne, the beloved wife of L. A. Gurnett, in the 62nd year of her age. Funeral at 3 p.m. on Monday, from her late residence at Ancaster.

 

LAMPKIN - (Ottawa) Sergeant Thomas Lampkin, late of the 17th Regiment of Foot and Royal Canadian Rifles, died here this morning, aged 53.

 

GAETZ - (Halifax) A farmer named John Gaetz entered a provision store in Dartmouth this afternoon and while standing at the counter dropped dead.

 

SMITH - (Quebec) Walter Smith, inspector of government offices and asylums, died here yesterday from congestion of the lungs after ten days' illness.

 

October 11, 1887

 

HOUSE - Died in this city, Alice Mary, only daughter of Charles House. Funeral at 2 o'clock on Tuesday, from her father's residence, No 205 Catherine street north.

 

NIXON - (Barrie) John Nixon, a farmer living about two miles north of here, was run over and instantly killed near Allandale on Saturday night by the Hamilton express. The engineer saw him lying across the track but could not in time stop the train. The doctor thinks he fell in a fit while walking on the track. He leaves a wife and four children.

 

FITZGERALD - (Toronto) About ten o'clock last night while Kate Fitzgerald, 16 years of age, daughter of Mr. Fitzgerald, Brant place, was going upstairs, she burst a blood vessel and died before medical assistance could be obtained.

 

BELLHOUSE - (Montreal) James G. Bellhouse, of the firm of Bellhouse, Dillon & Co, died suddenly to-day. He was quite well on Saturday and attended the hunt club races. Heart disease was the cause of death.

 

October 12, 1887

 

HOUSDEN - Died in this city, Alice Mary, only daughter of Charles Housden. Funeral took place at 2 o'clock on Tuesday, from her father's residence, No 205 Catherine street north. (See above under House)

 

HOGAN - Died on Tuesday, October 11, F. J. Hogan, son of J. H. Hogan, Esq., 47 Park street north, aged 27 years. Funeral from above address, on Thursday, October 13, at 2 o'clock sharp. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


SENECAL - (Montreal) Hon L. A. Senecal, president of the Richelieu & Ontario Navigation Co, died shortly after four o'clock this afternoon. A few weeks ago he had a stroke of paralysis and has never recovered. He was born at Varennes, province of Quebec, on July 10, 1829, and has sat in both the Quebec and Dominion parliaments, being made a senator last spring. He was also president of the Montreal Street Railway Co. He has constructed several railways in the province.

 

LAVERDIERE - (Quebec) The man Moisie Montminy who yesterday accidentally shot and killed Denre Laverdiere at Levis, Quebec, was to-day acquitted by the coroner's jury.

 

HENDERSON - (Burlington) It is a painful duty this week to record the death of Mrs. Wilson Henderson of the Burlington Hotel which occurred on Thursday evening after an illness of five weeks. For some days before her death she was considered convalescent and no fears were entertained, but on Thursday evening she grew suddenly worse and expired in a few hours. The funeral took place on Sunday afternoon to the English Church cemetery and was largely attended. The premature death of this kind and charitable lady has created a blank hard to fill. Great sympathy is felt for the stricken husband.

 

October 13, 1887

 

MCPHERSON - Died in this city, on October 12, Gordon Roland, infant son of James A. McPherson, aged 7 months. Funeral on Thursday at 2:30 o'clock, 195 Main street east.

 

JOLY - (Montreal) Mrs. Joly, aged 57 years, living at Hochelaga, died suddenly last night. When her husband retired he left her sitting on a chair near the bed, and found her this morning still there, but a corpse.

 

ANNAND - (Halifax) A cablegram announces the death in Sydenham, England, of Hon William Annand, formerly of Nova Scotia. He took a prominent part in politics for many years, being the first elected of the house of assembly fifty years ago. He was agent-general for Canada in London from 1877 to 1879, and at the time of his death was agent for Nova Scotia in London.

 

WALSH - (Lucan) William Walsh, a farmer residing a mile and a half west of Lucan, while going home from the village at eight o'clock last night, accidentally fell into a cattle guard and being somewhat stunned by the fall, raised his head above the level of the guard just as the mixed train from the west was passing, when it completely severed his head, killing him instantly. He was an unmarried man.


October 15, 1887

 

LAUGE - (Montreal) A man named Charles Lauge, 30 years of age, employed at the Canadian Pacific Railway, was picked up by the police at the corner of Duke and Wellington streets, to-night, bleeding profusely. He was taken to the police station and thence to the hospital where he remained in an unconscious condition until he died from fracture of the skull. Murder is suspected as a hammer was found beside him, covered with blood.

 

DECHANE - (Midland) Lyman Dechane and his son were to-day buried underneath a large stone weighing about five tons which they were attempting to sink. They were both dug out alive, but Mr. Dechane died two hours afterward. The son will in all probability recover. One leg is broken and bruised, but otherwise he is not seriously hurt.

 

October 17, 1887

 

DENEW - Died on October 15, at her late residence, 95 Emerald street north, Annie Stewart, beloved wife of John Denew. Funeral on Monday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

RUSSELL - (Quebec) Willis Russell, proprietor of the St. Louis hotel for the past fifty years, died to-day of congestion of the lungs after one day's illness.

 

VILLIANCOURT - (Quebec) The jury in the court of Queen's Bench this morning returned a verdict of not guilty against Villiancourt who was under indictment for the manslaughter of his wife who, it will be remembered, died a few days ago at Charlesbourg, said to have been starved. Another indictment stands against him for neglect.

 

DUCKWORTH - (Montreal) A young man named John Duckworth, aged 26, who resides at St. Lambert, proceeded to Victoria Bridge this morning intending to cross on a freight train. There is a perfect network of rails and he got his foot caught in a frog and a locomotive engine, coming up, cut him into several pieces, killing him instantly. Deceased was unmarried.

 

POLSON - (Mimico) An old woman named Polson, residing at Mimico, committed suicide on Saturday afternoon by taking a dose of strychnine. As the deceased was in comfortable circumstances no cause can be assigned for the deed.

 

October 18, 1887

 

RITCHIE - (Paisley) This morning about 3:30 o'clock a fire was discovered in a swelling house occupied by Mrs. S. R. Ritchie. She and her youngest son are visiting in Toronto. The eldest son,


about 25 years of age, was left alone in the house. When first seen, the fire was burning in the kitchen which adjoined the bedroom of the young man. The bedroom window was broken in as speedily as possible but before the body could be procured life was extinct. Four doctors worked for several hours with him but of no avail. It is supposed he had been suffocated. The flames were confined to the one building. The cause of the fire in unknown. Part of the furniture was saved.

 

MILLER - Died in this city, on October 17, Joseph Miller, painter, in the 71st year of his age. Funeral from No 6 Macnab street south on Wednesday at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

Joseph Miller, Hamilton's oldest painter, died at his residence, Macnab street, yesterday in his 71st year. Mr. Miller was a native of County Leitrim, Ireland, but arrived with his parents at Bytown, now Ottawa, when a mere child. A little over 50 years ago he arrived in Hamilton and was only a short time here when Mackenzie's rebellion broke out. He joined one of the Hamilton companies and took his part in the ranks against Mackenzie.

After the rebellion was over he again went to work with his brush and since that time he has been known as one of Hamilton's best ornamental painters. He has left his mark on many of the fine buildings in the city, and the tasteful gilding and lettering in the windows of the city banks and mercantile houses around the city attest to his proficiency in the art of fine lettering. He was also known for his taste as a grainer and general ornamental painter. Mr. Miller was of a quiet unassuming disposition and worked at his art up to a short time previous to his death. He was left a widower a little over a year ago since which time his health has been failing. He will be buried to-morrow afternoon.

 

BOUCHER, COUTLEE, DUFORT, MORIN - (Montreal) No less that four sudden deaths have just occurred here. Mr. Boucher, who was injured on the wharf on Friday night, succumbed

suddenly to-day. Joseph Coutlee who worked at Lamoureux's factory suddenly felt unwell and was taken to the hospital to here he died in two hours. Dr. F. Dufort, aged 46, dropped dead in his laboratory, and Miss Morin was dressing to go out for a walk when she complained of an acute pain in her head, and upon being taken to her room expired in a few minutes.

 

HAMELIN - (Montreal) A day or two ago a two-month-old baby boy of Mr. Hamelin, St. Lawrence street, was left by itself in a bedroom, and an hour or so later the mother came in and found the babe had died. Its face indicated most severe sufferings, and the direct cause of death is attributed to an immense volume of smoke which had found its way from the bakery through the door. No inquest was deemed necessary.


MASSE - (Montreal) The following story comes from Chambly county. Two brothers named Masse left their father's house on Thursday last to enjoy a day's shooting. Upon entering the wood they separated. One of the young men shortly afterward discharged his gun, killing his brother who was but a short distance away.

 

MCKAY - (Halifax) A fearful affair is reported from Lome, Picitou county, to-night. Yesterday the wife of William McKay, a miller, administered a large dose of carbolic acid to her sixteen-year-old daughter in mistake for medicine. The girl lingered in terrible agony till to-day when she expired.

 

NELLES - (Cobourg) At 4:30 o'clock this afternoon, Rev. Dr. Nelles, chancellor of Victoria University, died of typhoid fever after only six days' illness. He was conscious to the last. The town and college are in deep mourning over the irreparable loss. He had been for thirty-seven years the head of the university of Victoria College.

 

LANDERS, BUCHANAN, SCOTT - (Quebec) Robert Nell's boarding house at Lake Edward was burned Sunday night. These perished in the flames: Thomas Landers, aged 55; William Buchanan, aged 18; and George Scott, aged 28. Several others were badly burned and otherwise injured.

 

WOODS - (St. Catharines) About ten o'clock this morning George Woods, an eight-year-old son of John Woods, fell off Betton's bridge over the Twelve-Mile creek while fishing and was drowned.

 

CHEEVERS - (Brantford) Michael Cheevers, employed by Humphrey Davis, a horse trainer, died this evening from injuries received on Saturday in a runaway.

 

RIPLEY - The wife of John Ripley, 53 Canada street, on Sunday night overlaid her little child, four months old, and it was smothered to death. Another child of Mrs. Ripley's died on Saturday after a long and painful illness, and the poor mother was quite worn out with watching and thus slept more soundly than usual. Dr. Husband was called yesterday morning and an examination found that the babe had died from suffocation. He reported the facts to Dr. A. Woolverton and crown attorney Crerar but they considered an inquest unnecessary.

 

October 20, 1887

 

MAHONY - Died in Denver, Colorado, on October 17, William F., second son of Patrick Mahoney, of the township of Saltfleet, in the 22nd year of his age. Funeral will take place from St. Patrick's church, at 10 a.m.

 

WEBSTER - Died on October 19, Elspeth, relict of the late John Webster, aged 80 years.


Funeral at 2:30 p.m. on Friday, October 21, from the residence of her son, 103 Ferguson avenue, Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

JACOBS - Died in this city, on October 18, Mrs. Flora Jacobs, aged 61 years and 2 months. Funeral will take place Thursday at 2:30 p.m. from 40 Hunter street east. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

LEITH - Died at the Asylum, on October 19, Margaret Leith, a native of Blairgowrie, Perthshire, Scotland, in the 51st year of her age. Funeral from the residence of her brother-in-law, William Lindsay, foot of Ferguson avenue, at 1 o'clock on Saturday, October 22. All friends invited.

 

QUINOT - (St. John's, Nfld) Peter Quinot, a miner, met with a terrible death at Little Bay yesterday. He fell from the top to the bottom of a shaft, 600 feet deep, his skull being fractured, his brains dashed out, and his legs, back and neck broken.

 

TERRINGTON - Alice Ellen Bray, daughter of F. H. Terrington, died in Toronto, on Tuesday. She was 22 years of age.

 

TYSON - (Dundas) A short while since Mr. and Mrs. Tyson and family, whose passage was paid to England by the town and subscriptions raised by St. James Church authorities, left for the old land. Mr. Tyson was in very bad health when he left, but Mrs. Tyson wrote friends here that he had stood the journey fairly well to Montreal and that they were resting preparatory to embarking on the steamship "Vancouver". The journey, however, proved to be too much for Mr. Tyson and when three days out from Liverpool he died and was committed to the deep.

 

October 21, 1887

 

WEIR - Died in this city, at 48 Strachan street east, on October 20, Alice, only daughter of John and Kate Weir, aged 1 year and 6 months. Funeral at 3 p.m. on Saturday, October 22. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

MONTGOMERY - Died in this city, October 20, Mrs. Mary Montgomery, wife of the late William Montgomery, market gardener, aged 52 years, 1 month, and 24 days. Funeral will take place Saturday, at 2:30 p.m. from 244 Macnab street north. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend.

 

ADAMS - Died in Glencoe, Ontario, on October 19, Julia, the wife of E. N. Adams of Glencoe, and fourth daughter of Rev. S. Kappele, of this city.

 

FOWLER - Died at 11 p.m., October 20, John Fowler, aged 72 years and six months.


The funeral will take place on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m. from his late residence, King street east, just below Wentworth street. Friends and acquaintances are requested to accept this notice.

 

LAVIOLETTE - (Montreal) A man named Laviolette, aged 36, while walking along the C.P.R. track to-night, was run over by a freight train and killed.

 

WALLBRIDGE - (Belleville) The news that Chief Justice Wallbridge had died in Winnipeg this morning created a general gloom throughout the city. The remains will be interred here.

 

INWOOD, STARMOUR - (Pembroke) Late to-day news reached Pembroke of a sad drowning accident which occurred about a mile from here. Two men named Ed Inwood and A. Starmour, in the employ of John Dunlop, were engaged in filling a water cart in the Ottawa river a short distance from the shore. It is rumoured that not finding the water quite deep enough for the purpose, they ordered the horse to back still further, and on this occasion were precipitated into a deeper part of the river as the bodies were found in a hole about six feet under the surface. All round where the bodies were found the river is not more that two or three deep.

 

October 22, 1887

 

FURLONG - Died on October 19, Margaret, relict of the late Matthew Furlong.

 

DAVIS - Died at her father's residence, 124 Main street east, on Friday, October 21, Matilda Hepzebah (Tillie), daughter of Archibald Davis, aged 27 years.

 

MCKENZIE - (Halifax) A man named McKenzie of St. Anne's, C.B., while working on the Cape Breton Railway at Luther Creek, was killed this morning by an explosion of dynamite. He lived for an hour after the accident. Another man named McCormick was badly injured. The dynamite was drying round a fire and exploded suddenly.

 

GILLIES - (Essex Centre) This morning Arthur Gillies, aged 25, a millwright of Thamesville, was ushered into eternity without a moment's warning. Mr. Gillies had been working in Bickle & Dyson's grist mill for the last six weeks and had nearly finished his job. This morning while attempting to put on a belt with the machinery in motion, he was tripped up by another loose belt lying at his feet and was immediately thrown between two large cog wheels which drew his head through their terrible grasp, grinding the back of his head into a jelly. It is then supposed that he was caught in the revolving shaft and whirled round and round until the machinery was stopped. When found, nearly all his clothing was torn from him, and the sight was a most ghastly one


to behold. The poor man's brains and parts of his skull were scattered all around the immediate vicinity of the accident.

 

DOYLE - (Halifax) What is supposed to be a murder is reported from Lower Musque, Qudoboit. A farmer named Peter Doyle who went on a shooting excursion last Sunday and has been missing since was found at the side of an unfrequented road this morning. He had been shot in the back and his body lay in a pool of blood that had flowed from the wound. His gun was found lying on the ground a short distance ahead of the body and both the weapon and the wound showed almost conclusively that the man had not shot himself either accidentally or intentionally. His powder horn and pipe were lying at his side. The whole affair is shrouded in mystery, but suspicions are expressed involving a family living near where the remains were discovered. The man's wife, it is said, has made conflicting statements respecting the disappearance of her husband. Doyle was over 50 years of age, but was married only six years. He has two children.

 

October 24, 1887

 

GEIGER - Died on October 22, Louisa, beloved wife of Henry Geiger, aged 53 years, 6 months, and 3 days. Funeral at 2 p.m. on Monday, October 24, from the corner of King and Queen streets. Friends will please accept this intimation.

The sudden death of Mrs. Henry Geiger is announced. Mrs. Geiger had been ailing for some time, but during the past week was much better and retired on Friday night in good spirits. While rising she was taken with a choking sensation and died almost at once. Mrs. Geiger leaves five sons and one daughter, to mourn their loss. Four of her sons are in business and are much respected. Mrs. Geiger was a faithful, affectionate wife and mother, and a true friend. Her sudden death will be keenly felt by those who knew her best. The deceased was a native of Uhrbach, county Schomdorf, Wurtemburg, Germany.

 

HARRISON - (Toronto) George Harrison, shoemaker, who was run over by a street car on Yonge street on Friday afternoon, died at the hospital last night.

 

OWEN - (Toronto) Jack Owen who boarded at the Dufferin hotel was passing through the stables attached to the hotel yesterday afternoon when he was kicked in the stomach by one of the horses. He was conveyed to the hospital where he died last night.

 

MORAN - (Quebec) The dead body of a man named Moran was found on St. Andrew's wharf this morning with a cut on the back of the head, another on the upper part of the forehead and nose, and an arm broken. Cries of murder had been heard in the vicinity.


A party of drunken sailors are put down as the perpetrators of the crime. Moran was a man of 45 years of age, married, and had four or five children. He was engaged as a guardian in the immigration department.

 

LANGEVIN - (Quebec) A child, four years old, named Langevin, was killed from the kick of a horse at Laval yesterday.

 

LOGIE - (London) Rev. John Logie, Tilbury East, formerly of Exeter where he presided over two Presbyterian congregations for over thirty years, died the other day of typhoid fever.

 

October 25, 1887

 

ROWAN - Died in this city, on October 24, Christine May, youngest daughter of Anthony Rowan. Funeral on Wednesday, October 26, at 2:30 p.m. from 64 Young street. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

FILGIANO - Died in this city, on October 24, at his residence, 286 James street north, Theo Lep.  Filgiano, in the 64th year of his age. Funeral on Wednesday, at 9 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

Good old Dr. Filgiano is dead. Many hearts will be saddened by the news, for during his residence of nearly forty years in Hamilton he had endeared himself to very many people by his hearty, genial disposition and friendly ways. The doctor's name was Theophilus Lep. Filgiano. He was born in Montreal in May, 1824, and was educated in the college of St. Sulpice in that city. After the death of his father in 1837, the family moved to Toronto where young Filgiano studied dentistry. In 1847 he came to Hamilton to practise his profession and since that time, with the exception of a few years in the states and in Paris, Ontario, be had lived in this city. Dr. Filgiano was a man of wide and active sympathies. Possessing an energetic nature he was an exceedingly active politician twenty or thirty years ago, and took a leading part in local politics. He was a Liberal-Conservative from conviction and always proved himself to be a staunch supporter of Conservative principles. Years ago he was chairman of a division for Hon. Isaac Buchanan in more than one political fight, and even in the last dominion election he came many miles to Hamilton to vote and use his influence for the Conservative candidate. Dr. Filgiano was justice of the peace and served as an alderman for No 5 ward in 1883. He was widely known as a singer. In his early manhood he was one of the finest tenor singers in the country and used often to appear with Hamilton's musical mayor, Hutchinson Clark, on the concert platform. Even in recent years the jolly old gentleman could sing a good song and was always pleased to do it among friends. The doctor had a simple confiding nature that sometimes made him the subject of practical jokes, but he was not by any means a man to be despised. He had a sense of honour that was as sensitive


as a mirror to any breath of meanness, and was always ready to stand up stoutly for what he thought was right. In religion Dr. Filgiano was a devout and consistent Roman Catholic.

Apoplexy was the immediate cause of his death. He was taken very ill about a week ago when out of the city and was brought home. He recovered, however, and last night seemed to be quite well and in good spirits. This morning about 7 o'clock he was found dead, kneeling in the attitude of prayer.

He is survived by a family of four sons and three daughters. His wife, who has been dead some years, was a sister of M. Barton, barrister.

The funeral will take place on Wednesday morning.

 

GREER - At Clearwater, N.B., during the hurricane of Friday night, the dwelling of a family named Greer caught fire and the widowed mother, aged 50, her son William, aged 24, and an adopted daughter, aged 9 years, were cremated. John Greer who escaped the holocaust says that when the family went to bed there was a fire in the kitchen stove. He was awakened during the night by a dense smoke in his room. He roused his brother William and discovered the house in a blaze. Both brothers made a rush for the rooms of the mother and sister, but were driven back by the flames. John then jumped out of the window, but William made a second attempt to save his mother, and all three were burned to death. The fire was seen from a lumber camp half a mile distant and help was soon on hand, but the heat was so intense that they could do nothing but stand and watch the bodies being cremated.

 

October 26, 1887

 

COOK - Died on October 25, Charles William Cook, aged 39 years. Funeral from his late residence, 10 Concession street, on Thursday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

William Cook, the labourer who had several ribs broken by a sandbank caving in on him Monday afternoon, died at an early hour yesterday, He leaves a wife and three children.

 

October 28, 1887

 

JACKSON - Died on October 27th William Alexander, son of Thomas and Margaret Jackson, aged 5 years and 2 months. Funeral from his parents' residence, 101 George street, on Friday, October 28, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BRITAIN - (Brantford) Mary Ann Britain, aged 16 years, living on Marlborough street, was found last evening by her father at the bottom of their well. Life was extinct. The well is an old-style type drawing the water by means of a long pole. It is supposed that the girl went for a pail of water and reaching over the box to draw the water up, overbalanced herself and fell head first and was drowned.

 

GAHAGAN - (Dundas) On Tuesday there died in Dundas another old settler in the person of Mrs. Gahagan, relict of the late John Gahagan.


She came here with her husband, who died some five years ago, over fifty years ago and leaves a family of four sons and a daughter in Dundas, Waterdown, and Hamilton to mourn her loss.

 

OILLE - James Oille, reeve of South Grimsby and warden of Lincoln county, is dead aged 68 years. He was a brother of Dr. Oille, the railway man.

 

FERGUSON - Little Annie Ferguson, 12 years old, daughter of Angus Ferguson of Glen Williams, was struck by a Northern & Northwestern Railway train a few days ago and instantly killed.

 

THOMAS - A few days ago a little child of Stephen Thomas, living a few miles north of Burford, while playing in a chair that had the back pulled off, fell, running one of the rounds of the chair back up his nostril with such force as to cause it to come into contact with the brain. Medical aid was at once summoned, but the little sufferer was past help, and he died shortly after.

 

October 31, 1887

 

SUTHERLAND - Died on October 28, Henry S. Alban, youngest son of Rev. Canon Sutherland, rector of St. Mark's, aged 4 years. Funeral from the church, Monday, October 31, at 10 a.m.

 

SULLIVAN - Died on October 27, Jeremiah, son of John and Margaret Sullivan, aged 12 years and 11 months.

 

MORAN - Died on October 28, at 228 King street west, Michael Moran, in the 17th year of his age.

At the burning of Butler's home and stables on Pearl street two weeks ago, a young man named Michael Moran did splendid work in rescuing the horses from the burning stable and removing the household goods. Some of the boards from the fence were torn off and lay upon the ground with the rusty nail points upwards. On one of these Moran stepped and the nail pierced his foot, inflicting a nasty wound. Symptoms of lockjaw soon after set in and on Tuesday last he was taken to the city hospital for treatment. But in such cases little can be done and after suffering terrible agony he died on Friday last.

 

CLEW - (Montreal) A brakeman named Clew fell between the cars of the G.T.R. at Coteau and was killed yesterday.

 

HAWKINS - (Montreal) A case of suffocation by smoke occurred at Miss Ocation Tenny's, Beaver Hall Square, some time during last night. Two waiting girls named Ida Hawkins and Annie Flynn slept in a room near the furnace and through which the smoke pipe entered the


chimney. This morning when the man in charge of the furnace went to look to it he rekindled it and it would not burn, there appearing to be no draft. He knocked at the door of the girls' room but getting no answer, burst open the door when the girl Hawkins was found lying on the floor dead and the other girl lying on the bed unconscious. It is thought that Annie Flynn will recover as she has been partially restored to consciousness. It is believed that the girls, finding the room too hot, turned the damper in the pipe and the room filled with smoke, suffocating them as the damper was found turned off.

 

TORRANCE - (Toronto) Four young man, John Torrance, James Lawson, John Downs, and George Mortimer, quarrelled late last night with Barney McKenna, keeper of an eating house on Adelaide street. Torrance pitched a large stone through the window of McKenna's home. This so enraged McKenna that he picked up a butcher knife and rushed at Torrance, stabbing him in the thigh. He also stabbed Downs in the neck but not seriously. Torrance's wound, however, is looked upon as dangerous and his ante mortem statement was taken at the hospital this morning. McKenna has disappeared, but the detectives hope to arrest him before he gets out of the city.

John Torrance, whose ante mortem statement was taken at the hospital yesterday morning, died last night. His murderer, Bernard McKenna, is still at liberty... Both he and the murdered man belonged to a tough gang of youths who infest the city. (John Torrance, who was fatally stabbed in Toronto last Friday night, was the same young man who accidentally killed the coloured boy, Taylor, in Hamilton last May by squeezing him too hard while they were playing together. See page 79)

 

November 2, 1887

 

GIBSON - Died on October 31st, William Davidson, only son of William and Jennie Gibson, aged 7 months. Funeral from the G.T.R. station on arrival of the Pacific train at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LOUISEAU - (Montreal) A man named Louiseau, who is subject to fits, went into his stable at the outskirts of the city yesterday to feed his horse when he fell down in a fit. His horse became alarmed and trampled him to death.

 

MOORE - (Niagara Falls) Archibald Moore's five-year-old boy was accidentally killed to-day. While the father and son were going down the Clifton House hill on a wagon, one of the wheels dropped into a rut. The load upset and a barrel of cement fell on the boy, killing him instantly. One of Moore's legs was badly injured.

 

NICKLE (Kingston) A Kingstonian, named Nickle, was shot in the leg in New York on Friday,


 the gun accidentally discharging in the hands of his companion while fowling. Nickle would not submit to amputation and died of loss of blood.

 

November 3, 1887

 

MILLS - (Peterborough) To-day Constable Craig found George Mills in a stable near his house hanging by the neck dead. It was a clear case of suicide of a determined character. It appears he had first tried rat poison. That not working fast enough, he shot himself but not fatally, and the rope put an end to his life. The support of the rope was so low that the feet had to be drawn up to allow the body to be suspended.

The deceased was at one time a manufacturer, but lately was a dissipated character, and several times lately had made threats of suicide. He made an attempt on his life some twenty years ago by nearly cutting his throat while in a blacksmith shop where the post office now stands. The deceased was 60 years old. Dr. Bell, coroner, considered an inquest unnecessary.

 

POWER - (Peterborough) Last night Miss Ellen Power retired to her room in the little Windsor Hotel about seven o'clock. She said she had some sewing to do and asked to be called if she slept late. Not coming down this morning she was called, but no response was made. Becoming alarmed the inmates of the hotel looked through the window of her room and discovered Miss Power sitting on the floor with her head hanging inside her trunk, her neck resting on the front edge of it. The door was forced and it was found that she was dead. The contents of the trunk showed that they had been turned as if the deceased had been looking for something at the bottom of it when she was struck with a fainting fit. Deceased was subject to attacks of heart disease and had a serious illness last summer.

 

HAMILTON - (Stratford) James Hamilton, JP, one of the oldest and most respected residents of the Huron district, died here this morning at his residence, aged nearly 72 years. Mr. Hamilton came to Stratford in 1846, but previously carried on business in Markham. He was the father of J. R. Hamilton, M.D.; W. H. Hamilton, M.D., surgeon of the Canadian Pacific Railway and Indian Reserve at Fort William; Rev. E. B. Hamilton, rector of St. Joseph's Church, Detroit; Rev. J. B. Hamilton, of Prince Edward Island; and T. Hamilton, of the firm of Parker & Macadams, Hamilton; and four daughters.

 

GIBBONS - Mrs. Gibbons, who died in London recently, was a member of the first Methodist 'class' started in London.

 

EDWARDS - Died in this city, on November 2, Willie Harvey, only son of Charles and Maggie Edwards aged 7 months. Funeral from his parents' residence, 255 Barton street east, at 3:30 o'clock Friday, November 4. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.


November 4, 1887

 

BURGESS - Died on November 3, at his late residence, 83 Hunter street east, in his 91st year, John Burgess, formerly of Devonshire, England. Funeral on Saturday at 3 p.m. Friends will please attend.

John Burgess, one of the oldest men in the city, died yesterday at his residence, 83 Hunter street east. He was 91 years old, having been born in 1796 in Plymouth, England. His father was a British soldier and was serving with his regiment in Plymouth when he was born. Mr. Burgess was reared in the service and served a sufficient number of years to entitle him to a pension. He was a bandsman and was with the regiment at the battle of Waterloo. Naturally musical, he was from his youth an earnest student of music, both theoretical and practical, and soon became an accomplished musical scholar.

He played in the orchestra of the Italian Opera House in London, England, early in the century and took part in the first performance of the opera "The Barber of Seville", the rehearsals of which were conducted by the great composer himself, Rossini. The old gentleman had a retentive memory and was full of dramatic and musical reminiscences extending back more than seventy years, and up to the last, few things pleased him better than to relate some anecdote concerning the great men of the past he had known and the art which he so dearly loved, to some appreciative and congenial listener.

Nearly fifty years ago he crossed the ocean and lived for a short time in the United States. But he was too staunch a Britisher to assimilate easily with our republican neighbours, and so he came to Canada, settling in Hamilton when it was still a very small town. For many years he kept a music store on the corner of Catherine and King streets where the electric light company's works are now. Mr. Burgess was a musical pioneer in Hamilton and a successful one. He conducted the first performance of "The Creation"ever given in the city, It took place in St. Mary's Cathedral and was up to that time the most ambitious musical effort that the Hamilton people had heard.

He was a competent and successful teacher of his dearly loved art. Many Hamiltonians have been his pupils.

Mr. Burgess was a thoroughly manly man. Though kind in heart he was ruggedly strong in his opinions and even in his prejudices. Canada did not contain a stauncher or more devoted member of the Conservative party. At the Dominion elections this year he went to the polls with all the weight of his 90 years upon him to vote for the Conservative candidates and was the oldest voter in the city that day. And one of his last utterances was an earnest wish that Dr. Montague would carry Haldimand in the approaching contest.

He retained his mental faculties to the last and died in peace. His end was a fitting close to the long and useful life that he had lived. A numerous family of children and grandchildren mourn the death of the good old man. He will be buried to-morrow at 3 o'clock.


MOORE - (Toronto) The body of James Moore, labourer, was found alongside the Grand Trunk track near the Don station this morning. Moore returned from Michigan on Wednesday where he had been working all summer. An empty box labelled Rough on Rats was found lying close to the corpse and it thought he had swallowed a dose.

Next day; The inquest on the body of James Moore, labourer, found on the Grand Trunk Railway track yesterday morning, was held to-night when the jury returned an open verdict. Foul play is suspected as Moore was known to have had $50 in his possession when last seen alive, and only 45 ¢ were found in his pocket.

 

O'CONNOR - (Cobourg) The Hon. Mr. Justice O'Connor, who was holding the assizes here, died to-day about 1 o'clock p.m. at the Arlington House. His lordship opened the court on Monday although feeling very poorly after his illness at Cornwall, and on Tuesday he had court all day, being apparently in good spirits and feeling much better, but during that night he was seized with haemorrhage of the stomach and lost blood very copiously. On Wednesday morning he was very weak and Dr. Walters who was attending him felt great uneasiness about him. Judge Benson at the request of Judge O'Connor took the court yesterday and to-day. Judge O'Connor continued to weaken until 11 o'clock to-day when he fell into a state of collapse from which he did not rally. Mrs. O'Connor was with her husband, having come down last evening. Drs. Aikens and Richardson of Toronto, who were here as witnesses in a trial, were also in attendance on the late judge.

 

DEAN - Another unfortunate has taken the short cut to eternity. Her name was Johanna Dean, and she hanged herself in a small shed in the rear of her house at 78 Bold street about daylight yesterday. She was the wife of James Dean, at present living in Columbus, Ohio, but is separated from her husband, and has been supporting his two sons and an old demented father for the last few years. She owns the house she lived in and lately rented the rear rooms to a family named Carroll. Yesterday morning at an early hour she stepped out of the house while partially dressed and made her way to a small coal shed in rear of the premises and there committed suicide by hanging herself to a beam in the roof with an ordinary clothes line. The body was discovered by Mrs. Carroll when she got up yesterday morning and went out to get wood to light the fire with. It was in a kneeling position on some trunks which the deceased had piled up in order to enable her to adjust the rope. The body was left hanging there until Dr. White arrived and when examined by him some warmth still remained in the body, showing that she could not have been dead very long. The deceased was a woman of about 32 years of age and must have married Dean when very young, for her eldest son is over fourteen. She has been separated from Dean for a number of years. When a reporter visited the house at noon, the body was lying on the lounge with


the rope still around her neck, in the front room. The face was evidently that of a woman who had been handsome before dissipation and hard work left their impress upon her features. The father, an imbecile old man in his second childhood, was mourning pathetically over the body and speaking to it as if his daughter was still a little girl.

 

November 5, 1887

 

KAPPELE - Died in this city, on Friday, November 4, Ida Elizabeth, the fifth daughter of the Rev. S. Kappele, aged 21 years and 15 days. Funeral from her father's residence, 17 Nelson avenue, on Saturday, November 5, at 2 p.m.

 

BEAN - (Carlton Place) Between 1 and 2 o'clock this morning, a fireman, named Joseph Bean, on a freight train coming from Ottawa, was killed about a mile and a half east of here. He was going to examine one of the boxes of the tender, and it is thought missed his footing and fell, striking his head and shoulders against the timbers of the small bridge over Lavalee's creek. His body was brought to the junction and an inquest by Coroner Burns of Almonte will be held.

 

LECLAIRE - (Montreal) J. E. Leclaire, wholesale drygoods merchant, St. Paul street, died to-day. Since the death of his brother he has been the leading partner in the firm of F. & J. Leclaire & Co. He is said to leave property valued at over $400,000.

 

November 7, 1887

 

BRENNAN - Died in this city, on Friday, November 4, John Brennan, aged 42 years, a native of Dublin, Ireland. Funeral from his late residence, 2 Emerald street north, on Monday, November 7, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

FORBES - Died in this city, on November 5, Margaret Rutherford Forbes, in the 78th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, 181 Wellington street north, on Monday, November 7, at 3 o'clock. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

MORAN - (Quebec) Francois Moran was fatally injured yesterday by a chimney falling upon him while at work demolishing the same.

 

November 8, 1887

 

WALSH - Died in this city, on Sunday, November 6, John Walsh, aged 68 years, a native of Mayo county, Ireland. Funeral will leave his late residence, 198 King street west, on Tuesday morning, at 8:30. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.


STIPE - Died at his late residence, No 300 Barton street east, on November 6, Walter Jacob, second son of S. P. Stipe, Barton, aged 23 years and 9 months. Funeral Tuesday at 2 p.m. Interment in Burlington cemetery.

 

BOLAND - (Quebec) Mrs. Boland, living at Cape Rouge, near this city, went to call upon a neighbour this morning leaving her three young children alone in the house. While she was absent the youngest child, a boy of three years of age, amused himself by lighting chips at the stove when his clothing caught fire and before his mother returned he was so badly burned that he died a few hours after suffering the most fearful agony.

 

REED - (Ottawa) The death yesterday of Captain Joseph Reed, an aged steamboat captain, disclosed a sad case of distress. When the neighbours called, they found that the family had gone supperless to bed the previous night, not having eaten a bite for twenty-four hours. A collection in aid of the widow and her seven children, the eldest of which is 10 years old, is being taken up.

 

November 9, 1887

 

DEWEY - Died on Tuesday, November 8, 1887, Daniel Dewey, in his 90th year. Funeral Thursday, at 2:30, from 11 Caroline south.

Yesterday Hamilton lost one of its oldest citizens in the death of Daniel Dewey which occurred at his residence, corner of Caroline and George streets, at 7:30 a.m. Mr. Dewey sustained severe injuries by being run over on King street a couple of weeks ago and has since been in an unconscious state with the exception of a short time last Thursday when he recovered sufficiently to recognize his family. But faint hopes were entertained of his recovery owing to the serious nature of his injuries and the fact that he had nearly attained the age of 90, but that wonderful vitality which kept him to his latest years a clear-headed and shrewd business man was not easily overcome and he lingered on for many days.

Mr. Dewey was born in Lebanon, Conn, on March 18, 1789, and came to Canada in 1816 and lived in Kingston until 1828, but subsequently came west to this county, and after spending a few years at Ancaster, St. David's, and Lewiston, he finally settled in Hamilton in 1831 and lived here ever since. He was then in the boot and shoe business. About 1840 he built a log icehouse and commenced storing ice during the winter for his private use, and this was the commencement of the ice business in Hamilton. It was a new thing among the townspeople then and they used to come to Mr. Dewey in the long hot summers to get some of the cooling material that he had providentially stored up in the winter. His business in this line continued to enlarge with the growth of the city until he became the largest dealer in this part of the country. The old gentleman leaves two sons and a daughter: Daniel R. Dewey and John Dewey of this city, and Mrs. Elizabeth VanNorman of Walton, Mass.


November 10, 1887

 

CUMMER - Died on Wednesday, November 9, 1887, Charlotte Evelyn, only daughter of William L. and Louise Cummer, aged 1 year and 9 months. Funeral from 123 Bay street north, on Friday, at 3 o'clock.

 

HOOVER - (Thorold) George Hoover, an old resident of Thorold township, committed suicide last evening by cutting his throat with a butcher knife in his barn. He had been despondent for some months.

 

HEATON - (Chatham) Arthur Heaton, aged 21 years, a miller by trade and belonging to this place, committed suicide in Detroit this evening by shooting himself in the head. When dying he murmured that he had no money and was tired of life.

 

November 11, 1887

 

HILL - James Hill of Beverly died last week in his 70th year. He was a native of Aberdeen, Scotland, and came to this country some fifty years ago, settling upon the farm on the 6th concession of Beverly where he resided until his death.

 

November 12, 1887

 

MCCARTHY - Died in this city, on November 10, Dennis McCarthy, aged 85 years. Funeral from 128 Park street north on Saturday, November 12, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

NEVILLE - Died in this city, on November 11, Elizabeth Hill, wife of Joseph Neville, in the 56th year of her age. Funeral from 24 Inchbury street north, on Sunday, November 13, at 3 o'clock Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

WYLIE - The following dispatch from St. George concerning the man who died in the city hospital here on Thursday afternoon was received last night. The man, William Wylie, killed near Copetown yesterday had been in the employ of J. A. Lorimer, butcher of this place for the last two months. He was a turner by trade and was an excellent workman. He was badly addicted to drink and left here Sunday night for Galt and spent the time there drinking, returning here Wednesday night. He stayed at the Commercial hotel overnight suffering from delirium tremens. He left in the morning intending to go to Woodstock where he had secured work in Karn's factory. He was well educated, having taught school at one time. It is believed he had a married sister in New York.

 

PEARSON - (Buffalo) William Pearson, a switchman, who was run over at the West Shore yard in East Buffalo this morning, died at the homeopathic hospital this afternoon, He has a wife and family residing in Hamilton, Ontario.


MCMASTER - (Windsor) Joseph McMaster, a switchman on the Canada Southern was killed near Russell yesterday. It is not known how the unfortunate man met his death but it is thought he fell between the cars. His body was frightfully mangled. He was a resident of Windsor, 21 years old, and married. His remains were brought to Windsor for interment.

 

November 14, 1887

 

JEFFREY - Died in this city, on November 12, Isabella, wife of John Jeffrey, aged 76 years. Funeral from the family residence, 39 Cherry street, Tuesday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCCOY - Died at Brantford township, John McCoy, late of this city, in his 68th year. Funeral from his son's residence, 44 Victoria avenue south, on Tuesday, at 3:30 p.m.

 

SMITH - Died on November 12, Alfretta Jane, youngest daughter of the late Peter and Marietta Smith, aged 17 years and 10 months. Funeral from the residence of Joseph H. Wilson, 111 Hess street north, this afternoon, at 2:30 p.m.

 

RUSSELL - (Toronto) George W. Russell, carpenter, was arrested last night for drunkenness and locked up in the Agnes street police station. Shortly afterward he was found in his cell suspended by the neck from the window bars by his handkerchief. He was dead. He had been on a prolonged spree.

 

November 15, 1887

 

BLAIR - Died in this city, on Sunday morning, November 13, Sarah Ethel, youngest daughter of Robert and Mary Blair, aged 4 years and 11 months. Funeral took place Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

 

ALLES - Died on November 14, Lillian Maud, youngest daughter of James and Julie Alles, aged 5 years and 11 months. Funeral from her parents' residence, 80 Bay street north, at 4:30 o'clock on Tuesday, November 15. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

YEAGER - Died in this city, on November 13, Hazel Pearle, infant daughter of J. H. and M. C. Yeager, aged 6 months and 4 days. Funeral from her father's residence, 90 West avenue north, at 2 o'clock p.m. on Tuesday, November 15. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

 

AINSLIE - Died in Edinburgh, Scotland, on October 31, Colonel William Bernard Ainslie, C.B., of the 93rd Highlanders and fourth son of the late Colonel Ainslie of the Hon. E.I.S.C.


The death is announced of Colonel William Bernard Ainslie, C.B., who died in Edinburgh, October 31, at the age of 75 years. The deceased officer was a brother-in-law of Mrs. Ainslie of this city. Colonel Ainslie was stationed in Canada during the rebellion of 1837 and commanded the 93rd Highlanders at the battles of Alma and Balaclava during the Crimean war. He distinguished himself in the repulse of the Russian cavalry and in the charge of the light brigade.

 

HATHERLY - (St. Thomas) As Thomas Hatherly, blacksmith, a resident of Middlemarch, near Fingal, was driving home from St. Thomas on Saturday night, he passed three strangers who hailed him and asked for a ride, and soon after taking them in, they turned the horses' heads towards the ditch, upsetting the wagon and throwing Hatherly upon the ground, and jumping upon him, commenced to beat him with sticks and stones and would undoubtedly have murdered him on the spot but for the approach of a farmer named Howard. Upon seeing Howard, the robbers tore his clothes and snatched what money they could find upon the victim's person and ran. Hatherly was taken to his home, bleeding and insensible and after terrible suffering died at 5 o'clock this morning. The murderers succeeded in getting about $9 but overlooked $60 which Hatherly had in an inside pocket. Three tramps, supposed to be the murderers, have been arrested and lodged in the St. Thomas jail. Dr. Gustin, coroner, will hold an inquest upon the remains to-day.

 

HOPKINS - (Kingston) A shocking accident occurred at the quarry of the Chicago granite company, Grindstone Island, on Saturday afternoon. A blast did not explode and Foreman Hopkins returned and while attempting to force a secord dynamite cartridge into the hole, an explosion occurred and he was blown into the air fully twenty feet and killed instantly. His body was not mangled.

 

ENGLISH - A female inmate of the Hamilton Asylum for the insane, Bridget English by name, committed suicide last Thursday by hanging herself to a water pipe. She was about 55 years old and came to the Asylum from the vicinity of Owen Sound.

 

November 16, 1887

 

TANN - Died in this city, on November 14, Elizabeth Tann, aged 65 years. Funeral will take place from the residence of her daughter, 128 Wood street east, on ----- afternoon, at 3:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BERLINGHOFF - Died in this city, on Tuesday, November 15, Charles Berlinghoff, aged 54 years. Funeral from his late residence, ----------, on Thursday, November 17, at-----. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


November 17, 1887

 

GREENAWAY - Died in this city, on November 13, Agnes, daughter of Thomas and Agnes Greenaway, aged 4 years and 15 days. Funeral from the parents' residence, 80 ------ street east, on Thursday, November 17, at --- o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

LAWRIE - (St. Catharines) John Lawrie, one of the oldest residents in the county, and for many years reeve of Port Dalhousie, died last night.

 

CAIN - (St. Catharines) Arthur Cain, a lock tender on the new canal, accidentally fell into lock No 10 last night, and was drowned.

 

November 19, 1887

 

GODIN - (Montreal) This morning Jean Godin, aged 33, an employee of the Canadian Pacific Railway, was walking along the track on his way to work when he heard a locomotive behind him, but mistaking the track on which the engine was coming, instead of remaining on the track on which he was safe he walked over to the track on which the engine was approaching, and a second later was crushed to death.

 

SCHUCH - (Berlin) G. Schuch, who came to Berlin from Hamilton about eight years ago and has lived quietly here ever since, died on Sunday in the 62nd year of his age. He was a man of a retiring disposition and generally respected in the community. His funeral took place on Wednesday afternoon and was largely attended. The Landwehr, Verein, and Concordia Muennercher of which societies deceased was a member turned out in full force.

 

November 21, 1887

 

RYMAL - Died on November 19, Margery, beloved wife of Milton Rymal, aged 23 years and 8 months.

 

MCCARTHY - Died on November 18, Sarah, beloved wife of Daniel McCarthy. Funeral will leave the residence, 232 Catherine street north, at 8:30, Monday, November 21. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

MURRAY - Died in Barton, on November 18, John Murray, in the 80th year of his age.

 

O'CONNOR - (Ottawa) A body was found in a small stream near Chaudiere junction this morning. It was brought to the railway station and was recognized as the remains of a railway contractor named Fergus O'Connor. The dead man had been missing for a few days. He was aged about 35 years and was unmarried.


SMITH - (Belleville) An elderly fisherman named George Smith, who lived at North Port, is supposed to have been drowned in the bay as his hat was found in the water.

 

MOORE - Last evening Dennis Moore passed away peacefully about 9 o'clock, surrounded by the members of his family and several near friends. The cause of death was pneumonia. Dennis Moore was born at Grimsby on August 20, 1817, and consequently had passed the allotted span of three score and ten years. He came to Hamilton in 1831 while yet a boy and entered the employment of the late Edward Jackson. His diligence and business abilities soon won the confidence of his employer and he was steadily advanced until he became a member of the firm, and on the retirement of Mr. Jackson became the head of the firm which was thenceforth carried on under the style of D. Moore & Co. Since that time he prosecuted his business with energy and success, and also identified himself with many of the banking and manufacturing enterprises in the city. Some idea of the extent to which his capital was sunk in institutions of this kind may be gained from a list of the principal corporations in which he occupied the position of director. They are: The Canada Life, Bank of Hamilton, Bridge and Tool Co, Hamilton Iron Forging Co, Ontario Cotton Co, Traders' Bank, Landed Banking and Loan Co, and president of the Burn-Robinson Manufacturing Co.

He was a consistent member of the Methodist church from boyhood, and at the time of his death was a trustee and class leader of Centenary Church. He manifested a deep interest in the educational work of the Methodist church, contributed liberally in support of Victoria University, and held a position on the Board of Regents of that institution. His liberality was not, however, confined to his own church, as he was always ready to help forward every good and benevolent enterprise which claimed his support. In 1882 he was induced by his friends to become a candidate for election to the Dominion parliament in the interests of the Reform party in company with A. T. Wood, but was defeated.

His wife survives him and he leaves four daughters and one son, Mrs. Charles Black, Mrs. W. A. Robinson, Mrs. George T. Glassco, Miss Moore, and Edward J. Moore, all of whom are living in the city. His family was present when he breathed his last, together with Rev. Drs. Hunter and Burns, S. F. Lazier, Dr. Rosebrugh, and Dr. Dewart of Toronto.

The funeral will take place at 2:30 on Wednesday afternoon.

 

November 22, 1887

 

MOORE - Died on Sunday, November 20, Dennis Moore, in the 71st year of his age. The funeral will leave his late residence, 12 Hannah street east, on Wednesday, November 23, at 2:30 p.m., for the Centenary church where the funeral service will be held.


ROSA - Died on November 21, Melbourne, youngest son of John and Nellie Ross, aged 1 year and — months. Funeral from his parents' residence, No 263 Wellington street ----, on Wednesday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

DORAIS - (Montreal) A sad accident took place at Longue Point last evening. The little daughter and only child of A. Dorais, hotel keeper, was choked by getting a screw nail into her throat and died before anything could be done for her.

 

MOODY - (Montreal) Matthew Moody, Sr., of Terrebonne, died very suddenly to day at his residence there. Mr. Moody commenced manufacturing agricultural implements in the town, forty-two years ago. He retired some years ago. He was a staunch Conservative.

 

DALTON - (Belleville) On Saturday, a little girl, five years old, named Dalton, whose parents live on Wharf street, was terribly burned while taking a stick of wood out of a stove. She died on Sunday morning.

 

November 23, 1887

 

HAYES - Died on November 22, Bridget, beloved wife of John Hayes, York Road, West Flamborough, in her 72nd year, a native of County Tipperary, Ireland. Funeral at 2 p.m. on Thursday, November 24. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BANGS - (Toronto) Mrs. Bangs, the wife of James Bangs, formerly proprietor of the Brantford Telegram, swallowed a dose of rat poison at her residence, Markham street, last night, and died about 1 o'clock this morning. She had been despondent for some time.

 

BLACKWELL - (Thorndale) Blackwell, the old man who was so severely kicked a few days ago by Annett, died this morning at 4 o'clock.

 

SAVAGE - (Quebec) Hon. Mr. Savage, late legislative councillor, is dead. Mr. Savage resigned his seat last session to make room in the cabinet for Hon. D. A. Ross, protestant minister.

 

November 24, 1887