Hamilton Spectator

Deaths 1885

 

January 5, 1885

 

JACKSON - Died at 27 Robert street, on Saturday, January 3, Mrs. T. Jackson, in the 51st year of her age. Funeral on Tuesday, at 1 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MITCHELL - Died at 27 Main street west, on the morning of January 4, John Mitchell, in the 85th years of his age. Funeral on Tuesday afternoon, at 3 o'clock.

By the death of Mr. John Mitchell which occurred at his residence on Main street yesterday Hamilton loses one more of the early pioneers who saw the hamlet that they settled in fifty years ago grow to the dimensions of a city. With a constancy and fidelity rare in these migratory days he never swerved in his allegiance to the place of his choice and its prosperity became identical with his own. Mr. Mitchell came to Canada from the valley of the Weir in the county of Durham in 1831, settling in the township of Nelson where he purchased land intending to settle down as an agriculturist, but for a man of his active temperament chopping in the woods became monotonous, and he came to Hamilton in 1834 and bought the land where the Dominion hotel now stands, erecting thereon what was known in its day as the Farmers' Hotel. He cut every stick of the timber required for the building and rafted it up from the Credit river himself. Mr. Mitchell sat for many years as the representative of the old St. George's ward at the Board of Aldermen and did active service in connection with such veterans as the late Dr. Hamilton during the Wellington, Grey & Bruce Railway campaign.

 

DUNSTAN - Died in this city, on January 3, Maud, beloved wife of Kenneth J. Dunstan. Funeral at 2 p.m., Monday, January 5, from 161 James Street south. Friends will please accept this intimation.

The death of Mrs. K. Dunstan, which occurred at noon Saturday, has filled many hearts in Hamilton with gloom. It is not two years since she became a wife. Both as Miss Maud Freeman and recently as mistress of her own home, she had as wide a circle of friends as any lady in the city, and few persons have become so generally esteemed and loved by reason of kindly deeds and words which make up the sunshine of life. She had indeed a disposition all of sunshine, and now that the eclipse has come, the darkness will deepen in innumerable hearts. The death of Mrs. Dunstan, following so closely on another tragic event in the Freeman family, has come as a heavy blow to the relatives of the deceased lady. Mr. Dunstan and the deceased lady's relatives will not want a host of sympathizers in this calamity which has befallen them. Mrs. Dunstan leaves a child, recently born.

 


STAFFORD - Mr. Theodore Stafford died on Saturday afternoon from cancer in the stomach from which he had suffered for a long time. Mr. Stafford was inspector of dog, butcher, billiard, and show licences and assistant inspector of wood and hay. In these positions he served the city faithfully and efficiently. "He was a competent and energetic officer", said an alderman last night who knew him well, "and saved the city thousands of dollars. It will be hard to replace him with an officer who will do his duty as well.”

 

O'TOOL - (Waterdown) Mrs. O'Tool, who has been residing at her father's, died yesterday. She has been lingering for many months. Deceased leaves a husband and three children to mourn her departure.

 

January 6, 1885

 

EAST - Died on January 5, William Charles, aged 15 months, youngest son of Henry and Susan East. Funeral will take place on Tuesday, at 2:30 p.m. from Little Wellington street, Barton. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

THATCHER - Died in this city, on January 4, Charles Albert Thatcher, aged 1 year. Funeral from his parents' residence, 156 Jackson street west, on Tuesday, January 6, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

January 7, 1885

 

WHATELEY - Died at 35 Hannah street east, this city, January 6, Henry Whateley, aged 50 years. Funeral Thursday at 3:30 p.m.

 

STILWELL - (St. Thomas) New Year's Day; Lewis Stilwell of Bayham, this county, in company with two other men, went out shooting. After a while they separated and Stilwell went off by himself. This was the last seen of him alive. Not returning home, the family became alarmed, and the neighbours formed themselves into searching parties to scour the country. The lifeless body of Stilwell was at length found in the woods, face downward, with a bullet hole clean through his head. Dr. McLay, coroner, of Aylmer, was notified. He empanelled a jury and held an inquest at Eden on Sunday afternoon, and from the evidence there given, there is no doubt but that Stilwell was most cowardly murdered. Dr. McLay adjourned the inquest until Wednesday.


January 8, 1885

 

MATTEL - (Halifax) Yesterday workmen at the blast furnace of the Acadia Iron Mills, while going into a part of the works called the dust catcher, found the dead body of a boy named Alexander Mattel. A coroner's inquest was held when it was proven that the fellow met his death while under the influence of liquor. He had crawled into the dust hole and being unable to extricate himself, he had suffocated.

 

WHITE - (Wardsville) A shooting match took place at Wardsville on Monday last for an oyster supper. Messrs Cody and Watson, the respective proprietors of the two hotels in the village were the captains, nine picked marksmen being chosen on each side. The Cody men, after keenly contested firing, succeeded in defeating their opponents by 24 points, the score standing 200 to 186 out of a possible 225. The supper was therefore held at Cody's the Victoria House last night. After the cloth had been removed and while in the midst of the festivities, James White suddenly dropped dead in his chair while playing the tambourine for the entertainment of the company. Deceased was about 48 years of age and had only resided in the village a short time where he had purchased property and was universally respected. Heart disease is supposed to have been the cause of his death.

 

JOHNSTON - (Guelph) William Johnston, of Toronto, died at the residence of James Innes, M.P., this morning. Mr. Johnston was for several years president of the Ontario Agricultural College. Resigning that position to engage in the study of law, he removed to Toronto. Here he entered the office of Blake, Kerr, Lash, & Cassels, where he remained until the time of his death. Mr. Johnston was a zealous Liberal and for some time was a leader writer on the "Globe". He was also general secretary of the Ontario Reform Association until a few months ago when he resigned that post to give his whole time to the practice of his profession. He has been engaged on the Liberal side in all the election trials of the last two years. Mr. Johnston was a member of the St. James Square Presbyterian church in the city. He was about 40 years old and leaves a wife to mourn his loss.

 

SAUNDERS - N.Y. Saunders, a veterinary surgeon, who was committed to jail from Bowmanville for vagrancy, died here to-day. He was on an extended spree which resulted in his death. (Cobourg)

 

BURTON - This week we have to record the death of an old and much esteemed resident of East Flamborough in the person of Mr. John Burton who died on New Year's Day. The deceased was born in Norfolk, England, in 1803, and had almost completed his 82nd year when he died. He, in company with his younger brother, came to Canada in 1836, and settled near Burlington.


In the following year both did duty in assisting to quell the Mackenzie rebellion. Shortly after this deceased settled on a farm in East Flamborough where he spent the remainder of his life. The deceased was a consistent member of the Methodist church which he joined in 1842, and in politics he was always a staunch Conservative. The funeral took place to the Carlisle churchyard on Saturday and was attended by a large concourse of relatives and friends. Mr. Burton leaves a family of nine, among them Messrs W. A. and John Burton of Dundas.

 

January 9, 1885

 

CURRY - (Halifax) Joseph Curry, a farmer living on the Mount Denson road, Hants, committed suicide yesterday. He was found in his barn with his throat cut and quite dead. He was 60 years old and was subject to fits of derangement. He leaves a large family in good circumstances.

 

BURKE - (Buckingham) A young man named Edward Burke was shot last night at the Little farm about twenty miles from here by a Frenchman named Dupel. As far as can be ascertained, the particulars of the shooting affray which took place at the Little farm last night are as follows. Ten or twelve teams reached the farm yesterday at three o'clock. About eight p.m. Burke went to the kitchen door and asked permission to come in. He was told by Dupel who keeps the place that he could not come in. Burke then forced an entrance. He and Dupel clinched and immediately Burke threw Dupel on the floor. When several others ran in, Dupel said "Take him away or I will shoot". Shortly after, a shot was fired. Deceased was brought to the village this morning. Deputy coroner Palmer empanelled a jury who viewed the remains and adjourned till 9 a.m. to-morrow morning to allow a post mortem examination to be made. The bullet was found to have entered the left side and passed through the heart and almost through the body. Dupel surrendered himself.

 

DUBÉ - (Montreal) On New Year's Day there was a large gathering of quarrymen in Ratelle's hotel, Terrebonne. A lively discussion took place during which a young man named Dubé, aged 21, on being provoked, struck one of the men named Bulliere. No other trouble occurred until yesterday afternoon about 3:30 when four of the men who had a grudge against Dubé and who it is said were jealous of his strength waited for him at the corner of a street near Ratelle's hotel and then and there challenged him to a fight. On his refusal to fight the whole four of them, they fell upon his and in the scuffle that followed stabbed him about the head and neck. The miscreants then ran off, leaving Dubé. It was only when some time afterward Dubé was found lying on the ground that it was discovered that he had been stabbed in several places.


He was taken home where he died four hours afterward. Bulliere and a man named Edmond were subsequently arrested and more arrests are expected.

 

MOWAT - John Mowat, formerly of the Great Western Railway, and later in the customs department here, died yesterday at his home at Chicago. Mr. Lenton Williams, a relative by marriage, received the news by telegraph yesterday, and it will cause Mr. Mowat Mr. Lumsden's friends here much sorrow.

 

HICKEY - (Dundas) An eccentric old woman, well known as Polly Hickey in the west end, was found dead in her bed on Tuesday morning by her husband.

 

TURNBULL - (Dundas) On Monday afternoon last Mr. George Turnbull, Sr., who for many years has been a greatly respected resident of Foundry ward, slipped and fell on King street opposite to Mr. Lumsden's while going to vote. He was taken into Mr. Lumsden's but did not revive from the shock he had received, and expired in a short time.

 

January 10, 1885

 

RIGNEY, MORRISON - (Kingston) Two boys, one a son of William Rigney, grocer, and the other a son of the late M. Morrison, while skating on the ice in the harbour this evening, broke through and were drowned.

 

HOWELL - (Ottawa) The remains of the late W. D. Howell, eldest son of Mr. Grant Howell, undersecretary of state, were buried this afternoon. The following gentlemen acted as pallbearers: Mr. Simpson, manager of the Ontario Bank; Mr. Burn, manager of the Ontario Bank; Mr. Hale, manager of the Canadian Bank of Commerce; Mr. W. A. Hemsworth of the department of the interior; Mr. Steele of the department of marine and fisheries, and Mr. Allan Gilmore, Jr.

 

January 12, 1885

 

CLINE - Died at Ancaster, on January 10, Frances, relict of the late Philip Cline, and mother of Joseph, George, and Philip Cline of Ancaster, in her 82nd year. Funeral on Monday, January 12, at 3 p.m., from Mr. George Cline's, Dundas road. Friends will kindly accept this notice.

 

PEARSON - Died in this city, on January 10, James Pearson, aged 36 years. Funeral from his late residence, No 33 Napier street, on Monday, January 12, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

KAVANAUGH - Died in this city, on Saturday, January 10, Francis A., son of John Kavanaugh,


aged 22 years. Funeral will leave his parents's residence, 13 Railway street, on Monday morning, at 8:30. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited.

 

HORTON - Died on Saturday, January 10, 1885, Thomas Horton, aged 32 years. Funeral from the residence of Mr. William Gardner, 363 James street north, on Sunday, January 11, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

BRENNAN - (Toronto) Mrs. Ellen Brennan of Agnes street, while walking along Terauley street yesterday afternoon, dropped dead on the sidewalk. Heart disease is supposed to be the cause.

 

DART - (London) Mr. Harry Dart, at one time a resident of this city and latterly editor of the Winnipeg "Siftings", died at Ingersoll yesterday of consumption.

 

PHILP - (Guelph) Mrs. William Philp died after a short illness.

 

PORTER - The death of Mrs. F. L. Porter in this city on Friday last was made the occasion by the Army here of a grand hallelujah funeral yesterday. The deceased, her husband and family were among the first persons to join the Army at its start here some two and a half years ago, and during the whole of that time they have been staunch supporters of the institution and well known for their earnest Christianity.

The death of Mrs. Porter was a very happy one. When told that it was not likely that she would recover, she replied, "Yes, I know. Thank God I am ready to cross the valley", and a few hours later when her end was near, she embraced her family, saying, "Good bye. I shall see you all again, by and by".

About one hundred soldiers assembled at the barracks yesterday afternoon and marched to the late residence of the deceased. Here the full Salvation Army form of worship was begun, continued along the line of march, and terminated at the grave. The service at the home began with the officers and some of the soldiers assembling beside the body upon which some beautiful floral tributed had been placed. An oration was then begun upon the Christian virtues of the deceased. A hymn was sung very softly and fervent prayers offered. Six hallelujah lasses then carried out the coffin and placing it in the hearse, marched beside it to the cemetery. The brass band, carriages and soldiers formed a procession about three hundred yards long and they marched through the main streets to the cemetery, their joyful hymns being alternated with the brass music. Had it not been for the hearse, no person would have judged the procession to be the funeral cortege as no sorrow was evinced except by personal relatives. No black pall or anything like mourning was permitted through the entire programme. On the contrary the Army colours were constantly to the front and beside the coffin, and it was impressed upon the soldiers that it was by no means an occasion of sorrow, but rather of joy as the deceased sister had just left a world of sorrow and was enjoying a world of bliss with her Saviour.


At the grave all knelt and silent prayer was offered. This was followed by a sacred duet and chorus. Then Captain Young read special scriptural passages and as the coffin was lowered into the grave he said, "As it has pleased Almighty God to promote our dear comrade, Sister Porter, from her place in the Third Corps of the Salvation Army to the mansion prepared for her above, we now commit her body to the grave, earth to earth, ashes to ashes, dust to dust, in the sure and certain hope of seeing her again on the resurrection morning". The lieutenant threw earth on the coffin at each of these words.

Captain Johnson then made an appeal to all outsiders present to decide for God on the spot. He called upon all present who were ready to die, to fix bayonets raising the right arm, and in this position they all sang, "We're Bound for the Better Land". He then called upon all the soldiers to pledge themselves before God to be true soldiers of Jesus Christ and to give up their lives to fight for Him to the last. This was done with fixed bayonets and singing "Fight for Thee"

After another prayer and the benediction the soldiers re-formed in line and marched back to the market square singing their joyful hymns all the way. The novel sight, brass music, and hymn singing on the streets naturally drew a large concourse of people and many thousands followed the precession to and from the cemetery.

At the barracks the place was again densely and most uncomfortably packed, and the doorkeepers state that thousands of people were again and again refused admission. Here again it was plainly demonstrated that no sorrow existed for the loss of their late sister. On the contrary more than usually exuberant joy prevailed. Captain Johnson led the meeting with a perfect rush of hand clapping, kerchief waving, many choruses and song, and it was only the quietude of the prayer, meeting commenced that a churchman realized a sense of religion.

 

January 13, 1885

 

CARRIER - (Ottawa) Mr. W. Carrier who was afflicted with a stroke of paralysis of the tongue, announced a few days ago, died this morning at 9 o'clock. His sense of speech was ruined for a time by the affliction, but he somewhat recovered his speech and seemed to improve for a few days. Mr. Carrier was 72 years of age. He was born in Wiltshire, England, and came to this country forty years ago.

 

MENDALL - (Belleville) Mr. W. F. Mendall, ex-collector of customs, died on Saturday evening at the age of 85 years. Mr. Mendall was superannuated about fourteen years ago and was highly respected. He was for about thirty years a resident of the city. He was a native of Scotland.


January 14, 1885

 

BUSH, COX - (Buckingham, Que) Last night John Bush, a son of James Bush, a farmer residing seven miles from here, drove into a glade about one mile above this village and was drowned. Two men, named Cox and McGuire, were with him. The former was also drowned, McGuire managing to scramble out, but was unable to save his companions or the team.

 

MUNDY - (Halifax) The death is announced to have occurred in London of Admiral Sir George Rodney Mundy, G.C.B., D.C.L, at the age of 79 years. Admiral Mundy was commander-in-chief of the fleet on the North American and West Indian station from 1867 to 1869. He had been a retired admiral since 1877.

 

January 15, 1885

 

LYNCH - Died in this city, on January 13, Margaret, wife of Timothy Lynch, aged 52 years. Funeral from her late residence, 214 John street north, at 8:30 a.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

FORTIER - (Quebec) News from St. Marie Beauce states that on Sunday last while Mr. and Mrs. Fortier were driving over the Chaudiere river the ice gave way beneath them. Mrs. Fortier was precipitated into the river and was drowned. Mr. Fortier saved himself by holding to a ledge of ice till assistance arrived.

 

January 16, 1885

 

MAGILL - Died at Winona, in the township of Saltfleet, on January 15, Henry Magill, a native of Westport, county of Mayo, Ireland, in the 81st year of his age. Funeral will take place from the G.T.R. station, this city, to Burlington cemetery, on the arrival of the train from the east at 8:30 Saturday morning, January 17.

 

SEWICKER - (Halifax) A lad named James Sewicker, between 15 and 16 years old, while crossing a frozen mill dam this morning, broke through and was drowned. The body was recovered.

 

RENWICH - (Galt) Walter Renwich, aged 72, an old resident of Hespeler, died recently.

 

HEARTWELL - Dr. Heartwell, of Dunnville, died suddenly of heart disease.

 

January 17. 1885

 

LEBLANC - Died on Thursday, January 15, at 32 Macaulay street west, infant son of


Isaac Leblanc, aged 10 days. Funeral at 2 p.m. on Sunday, January 18. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

KIRBY - (Guelph) The lifeless body of Mr. William Kirby, a farmer living in the township of West Garafraxa about four or five miles beyond Cumnock in the direction of Arthur village, was found by Messrs George Cameron and Robert Chalmers about half a mile above Ennotville as they were driving into the city Thursday morning with pork for the market. They informed Mr. John Macdonald, immediately in front of whose gate the body was found, and that gentleman went to Fergus to notify Coroner Johnson, a man in the meantime being left in charge of the body to see that it was unmolested until viewed by the coroner. Kirby was drinking in the city Wednesday and he was overturned, his wagon lying on top of him.

 

January 19, 1885

 

YALDON - Died on January 17, at 106 James street north, Richard Thomas, youngest son of Richard and Mary Yaldon, aged 11 months, and 17 days.

 

KERN - Died at Ancaster, on January 16, Jane, the wife of Christopher Kern. Funeral on Monday, at 11 o'clock a.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WYLIE - Died at Hamilton, on January 17, James Wylie, eldest Son of the late William G. Wylie, of Ramsay, aged 39. Funeral on Monday, January 19, at 3 o'clock, from his late residence, 36 Main street west.

 

BRADWELL - (St. Catharines) Thomas O. Bradwell, a highly respectable looking young man, about 22 years of age, was found dying this morning from the effects of laudanum and died before medical assistance arrived. He was stopping at the Russell House and claimed to be a member of the polo club of Toronto.

 

January 20, 1885

 

BURKHOLDER - Died at Barton, on Sunday evening, January 18, Jane A., wife of Amos Burkholder, aged 43 years. The funeral will take place at her late residence, on Wednesday, January 21 at 10 o'clock a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please receive this intimation.

Mrs. Amos Burkholder of Barton met her death in an awfully sudden manner last evening. She attended service in the Methodist church which is on the Burkholder farm and was being driven home. When within a couple of hundred yards of the house, she fell forward in the sleigh without a sigh, and when carried into the house was apparently lifeless. Dr. George Husband was sent for


and he arrived in all haste, but the lady had died some time before his arrival. Heart disease was the cause of her death. Mrs. Burkholder was well known in Hamilton and had many friends here. She was often in the city, the Burkholder farm being only about two miles over the mountain. By her death seven children, the youngest of whom is but five years old, are bereaved of a mother.

 

MCELCHERAN - Died in this city, on January 18, William H. McElcheran, aged 51 years. Funeral on Wednesday, January 21, at 2:30 o'clock, from his late residence, 56 Barton street east. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

Mr. McElcheran of Barton street is dead. The old gentleman who was nearly 60 years of age and had for about twenty-five years been one of Wanzer & Co's most trusted foremen, had a bad fall from a scaffold in their new factory, alighting on his head. The force of the fall was such as to crush his skull, driving a portion of the bone into the brain. The injured man was tenderly cared for, and Saturday morning Dr. George Husband, assisted by Dr. Vernon, performed the delicate operation of lifting the clot which had formed and which was pressing upon the brain, greatly to the aged patient's relief. Such an accident, however, was of a grave nature for even a young man in good health, and Mr. McElcheran's years, combined with his previous poor health, prevented his recovery from the shock. He died yesterday morning at an early hour.

Mr. McElcheran was one of the original members of the White Cross army and took a great interest in the work. He was never absent from the meetings where his kindly face will be greatly missed. He leaves a grown-up family, pretty well provided for.

 

RITCHIE - Died in this city, on January 19, Thomas Ritchie, aged 54 years. Funeral from his late residence, 35 Crook street, on Wednesday, January 21, at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

CARR - (Belleville) While Mrs. James Carr of the township of Huntingdon was driving down a steep hill, the buggy broke and she was thrown out, falling on her head, and receiving injuries which caused her death.

 

January 21, 1885

 

SMITH - Died in this city, on January 20, Ellen, wife of George Smith, aged 65 years. Funeral on Thursday, January 22, from her late residence, 45 Napier street, at 1 o'clock, to Dundas cemetery.


MONTGOMERY - Died in this city, on January 20, Charles, youngest son of John and Elizabeth Montgomery, aged 1 year and 3 months. Funeral from the family residence, corner of Main and Pearl streets, on Thursday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

MCKAY - (Georgetown) Between four and five o'clock this afternoon, Hugh McKay, a grocer, of this place, dropped down and suddenly expired. He was a much respected citizen and a prominent member of the Presbyterian church.

 

NELLES - (Acton) On Monday evening William Nelles, a farmer living in Nassagaweya, four miles from Acton, came to his death in a peculiar manner. He was thawing out the pump, using a short iron rod to melt the ice to try the handle. He took hold of it and bore down forcibly when the handle gave way. His feet slipped; he fell upon the back of his neck, striking the edge of the platform which at this point was considerably raised. He never spoke after. His two sons who were splitting wood a short distance from him, with the assistance of his wife, carried him into the house, and in less than ten minutes he breathed his last. Upon examination his neck was found to be broken.

 

January 22, 1885

 

GEARY - Died in this city, on January 21, Maggie, youngest daughter of Martin and Ann Geary, aged 21 years and 6 months. Funeral from her parents' residence, Main street east, on Friday, January 23, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

MURRAY - Died at 22 Hess street south, on the morning of January 21, Elizabeth Colville, relict of the late William Murray, and daughter of the late John Colville, of Saltfleet. Funeral on Saturday, at 2 o'clock. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

DALEY - (Halifax) Michael Daley, 75 years of age, fell down stairs at his residence on Birmingham street last night, and died three hours later from the effects of injuries received.

 

January 23. 1885

 

REED - Died in this city, on January 21, at the corner of John and King William streets, James Reed, aged 65 years. Funeral from the above address on Friday, January 23, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

MIGNAULT - The funeral of Madame Basile Mignault, grandmother of our Canadian diva, Madame Gye Albani, took place this morning. The deceased lady whose maiden name was Rachel McCutcheon was born in New York state and came to Canada at an early age. At the time of her death she had entered upon her 81st year.


COOK - (Milton) Last night a little girl named Cook, the adopted daughter of J. Simpson Heatherington of Omah, while getting on a sleigh, going from school, fell and received such injuries that she died before Dr. Stuart's arrival. The doctor thought an inquest unnecessary.

 

January 24, 1885

 

MORLEY - Died in this city, on January 23, at 16 Crook street, Thomas Philip, only son of Thomas and Annie Elizabeth Morley, aged 10 months and 2 days. Funeral on Sunday, January 25, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BEARD - (Toronto) Mrs. Beard, an old woman residing on Bulmer street, was found dead in bed this morning. A policeman's attention was drawn to the house by a noise, and on entering he found a man named O'Brien and two women fighting. The parties had evidently been indulging in a drunken spree. It is suspected that Mrs. Beard had also joined the fight and had received a blow that killed her.

 

LANGLOIS - (Quebec) A Mr Langlois was found frozen to death last Sunday morning near his residence in the village of Actonville on the Stoneham road. A farmer was also frozen to death from drink and exposure.

 

MCLAREN - (Guelph) Mrs. McLaren, who kept a candy store on the market square, was found dead in her house from drink and exposure.

 

January 26, 1885

 

GARVEY - Died in this city, on January 24, Kate, second daughter of the late Michael Garvey, aged 26 years.

 

EGAN - Died in this city, on Saturday, January 24, at 171 Park street north, Mary S., beloved wife of Mr. J. F. Egan. Funeral will leave her late residence on Tuesday morning at 8:45 for St. Mary's Cathedral. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

PARK - Died in this city, on January 25, Ann, relict of the late William Park, in the 93rd year of her age. Funeral from Mr. James Arthur's residence, No 20 Mary street, on Tuesday, at 1 o'clock p.m., for Ancaster. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

LAWLESS - (Toronto) John C. Lawless, bookkeeper, suicided last night by shooting himself through the heart in his rooms on King street east. Several people heard the shot and rushed into Lawless's rooms but found that the bullet had effectively done its work.


He had been out of employment for some time and felt greatly depressed in spirits in consequence. His parents reside at London, Ontario.

 

CONNORS - Died in Hamilton, on January 24, Patrick Connors, aged 68 years. Funeral from 325 Hughson street north, at 2 o'clock this afternoon. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

Patrick Connors, an old man residing at 37 Strachan street east, committed suicide by hanging himself on Saturday afternoon. For some time past Connors has been complaining of feeling ill, having acute pains in the chest and head. On one occasion he spoke of committing suicide, but his step-son, Mr. Mathew Sexton, with whom he lived, did not think he really meant anything serious.

On Saturday morning Connors appeared quite well and ate a good dinner. About 1:30 Sexton left to go to work leaving his stepfather alone in the house. When he returned at about six o'clock, he missed him and on searching for him found him hanging in the cellar, quite dead. He immediately called constable Griggs who cut down the body which was still warm. The unfortunate man had made his work very sure. He had got a new rope halter, having in all probability bought it for the purpose, and after fastening it around his neck with the clasp across the jugular vein, had evidently got upon a chair, put the other end of the rope around one of the rafters in the ceiling, and having made it fast kicked the chair from underneath him. Had he had any desire to save himself then he might have done so, for the rope was long and allowed his feet to reach to the ground. To make death certain, however, he had spread out his legs so that his weight might come upon his neck. In this position he was found, the face turned upward, and unlike most suicides an expression of calm contentedness upon it.

Connors has been employed by the waterworks department of the city to attend hydrants, ;etc. He was an industrious man. His step-son, who is a well known and highly respected young man, feels the blow very keenly as the two have lived together for a long time, Mrs. Connors being away from home under treatment for congestion of the brain. A married daughter resides near Connors and is in the habit of visiting the house regularly and keeping things in order, but she has been unwell for a few days and was not at the house on Saturday afternoon. He was 68 years of age and has been a resident of the city for many years.

Coroner Woolverton was communicated with, but having ascertained the facts of the case, deemed it unnecessary to hold an inquest.

No cause can be ascribed for committing the deed. Connors was not given to melancholy and his sickness was not sufficient to drive him to such a deed. His family relations also were pleasant and his step-son sober, honest, and industrious.


MCMILLAN - (Belleville) The boiler in Brennan's saw mill in the 9th concession of Lyendinaga, exploded yesterday forenoon, blowing the building to pieces and wrecking the machinery, portions of which were blown to a distance of three hundred yards. Engineer McMillan, who was in the lower part of the mill, was hurled fifteen feet and his head coming in contact with a beam, received such injuries that he died within two hours. Simmons, the fireman, was badly mangled about the legs and will likely die. Mr. Brennan and a workman named McHenry were in the upper part of the mill and escaped with slight hurts, though the latter was thrown a considerable distance.

 

ETTER - (Halifax) Arthur Etter, jeweller, about 50 years of age, was instantly killed by the top of a chimney falling on him.

 

LAMPKIN - (Niagara Falls, Ont) A frightful murder took place in Dietrich's grocer on South Canal street, Tonawanda, last night. A canal driver of low repute entered into a dispute with Mr. Lampkin, a well known citizen of Fulton, NY, and during the altercation the driver drew a revolver and shot him. Mr. Lampkin died in a few minutes. The greatest excitement prevails in the lumber city. Dumont is under arrest. He had been wrestling with Gilbert Lampkin in a saloon a few minutes prior to the assault and had been defeated. He followed his man vowing vergeance and fired four shots.

 

MCDONALD - (Smiths Falls) An accident occurred on the Canadian Pacific railway about six o'clock this morning. There were three cars burned, two men killed, and others badly hurt. A new water tank was also upset. One of the killed was a baggage man on the train named McDonald, and the other party is unknown. It was the Montreal express going east which broke an axle about half a mile from the junction. Two men were burned to death and another had his leg broken. The engine kept the track and had the Ottawa sleeper saved from burning. After three passenger cars jumped the track they ran against the water tank and knocked it down. The wrecking crew from Carleton came and cleared it, taking the injured and dead to Carleton Place.

 

January 27, 1885

 

MCKENZIE - Died in this city, on January 25, at 75 Locke street north, Kenneth James, only son of Evan and Maggie McKenzie, aged 9 months and 2 days. Funeral on Tuesday, January 27, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MACHIE - (Niagara Falls) Isabel, a nine-year-old daughter of David Machie who looks after the semaphores at the west end of the Grand Trunk Railway freight yards here, while on her way home from school and while crossing the tracks in the yard, was struck by some cars that were being shunted and was crushed to death, living only a few minutes after being extricated from under the cars.


January 28, 1885

 

HARRIS - Died in this city, on January 26, Jane Ann, beloved wife of Mr. W. Harris, aged 66 years and 9 months. Funeral will take place from the family residence, 55 Park street south, on Thursday, January 29, at 9:45 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WALKER - Died on January 27, Thomas F., son of the late William Walker, aged 32 years. Funeral from his late residence, 15 James street north, on Friday, January 30, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FUDGE - Died at 35 Canada street, on January 27, suddenly, George Fudge, engineer, aged 37 years. Funeral will take place from the residence, on Thursday, at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

TUPPER - (Halifax) A man named Tupper, residing at Berwick, met with an accident on Sunday evening that resulted in his death. He started alone on a shooting expedition in the morning and it is supposed that while returning home in the afternoon his gun accidentally discharged. The contents passed through his body. When his remains were discovered near the Methodist camp meeting ground it was found that the ball from the gun had entered at one side beneath his arm and come out at the shoulder at the other side.

 

QUINLAN - (Guelph) Reference was made in Friday's "Herald" to the mysterious disappearance of Daniel Quinlan, a very old resident of Salem. Mr. Quinlan left his home on Saturday, January 10, ostensibly for the purpose of collecting accounts. Not much anxiety was felt by the family when he did not return for a couple of days as they thought he had gone to stop with some friends. When, however, a week had nearly passed over and there was no tiding of the absent one, they naturally began to feel alarmed. A vigilant search was instituted and kept up with energy for several days. Not till Friday did the anxious searchers for the lost man come across his dead body in a secluded spot just outside the village of Elora. He had apparently been dead for a few days. Death was no doubt caused by exposure to the cold.

 

January 29, 1885

 

DIAMOND - (Belleville) Mr. William Diamond, a veteran of 1812, died this morning in the city where he has for some time resided in retirement, at the age of 88. Mr. Diamond was born in South Fredericksburg, and was one of the five sons of John Diamond, a U.E. Loyalist, who served in the war of 1812-14. In the rebellion of 1837 and in 1866, he commanded a company which . he raised and whose services were accepted by the government.


January 30, 1885

 

DOSSETT - Died in this city, on January 29, Joseph Joshua, third son of Mr. Joshua Dossett, aged 4 years and 3 months. Funeral from his father's residence, Ferguson avenue, between Strachan and Simcoe streets, Saturday, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

Wednesday evening, Joseph Joshua, the bright little 4-year-old son of Mr. Joshua Dossett of Ferguson avenue, stood upon a table. A chair with the arm broken off stood alongside the table. One of the rungs of the broken chair arm stood upright. In jumping from the table the little fellow was impaled upon the rung which penetrated his body nearly a foot, rupturing the abdominal viscera. The poor little fellow suffered intensely for 24 hours, death coming to his release last evening, the accident being of such a nature that it was impossible to save the boy's life.

 

KNOX - (Dundas) William Knox, a former resident of Dundas, died in Detroit last Sunday. His remains were brought here on Wednesday and interred in the cemetery.

 

February 2, 1885

 

FAULTS - Died in this city, on January 30, Mrs. Maria Faults, aged 74 years.

 

MATHIESON - Died in this city, on January 31, at No 8 Locke street south, Ellen M. O'Neil, the beloved wife of Alexander Mathieson, aged 28 years. Funeral on Monday, February 2, at 3 p.m., from her husband's residence. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

POULIN - (Ottawa) This afternoon a lad named Poulin, about 15 years of age, and residing on Murray street, was killed on a toboggan slide at Nepean Point. He tumbled off the toboggan and struck his head against a piece of rock at the foot of the hill. Death must have been instantaneous. He was taken to his residence.

 

February 3. 1885

 

SPENCE - Died on December 1, 1884, George Spence, eldest son of William Spence, of the Hudson Bay Company, Michipicoten river (near Wawa, ON.).

 

FLETCHER - Died in this city, on Sunday, February 1, Mrs. Joseph Fletcher, Sr., aged 73 years. Funeral from her late residence, 53 Bay street north, on Tuesday, February 3, at 3 00 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this Intimation.

 

CRANSTON - (Hagersville) A man named Cranston, formerly of Oneida, was killed by falling off a building in Dakota.


February 4, 1885

 

POLLITT - Died in this city, February 3, Burton Pollitt, aged 63 years.

 

DOHERTY - Died in this city, on February 2, Bernard Doherty, aged 23 years. Funeral from his father's residence, No 8 West avenue north, Wednesday afternoon, at 3 o'clock sharp. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

NORDHEIMER - (Toronto) Within the past few days Samuel Nordheimer, president of the Federal Bank, has lost his two sons, the elder at the end of last week and the other this morning. The cause of death in both cases was diphtheria, engendered by sewer gas emanating from a cess pool which received all the drainage from the house, but through the neglect of the plumber no provision had been made to prevent the return of the poisonous gas. Much sympathy is felt for the family.

 

JAMES - (London) The body of the coloured man found on the Great Western division near Newbury has been claimed for burial by friends at Chatham. It appears that the body was found on Sunday morning in a culvert about a mile west of the village, and it is believed that the man, who belongs to the wood train, was run over by a train during Saturday night. His name is Henry James, and he leaves a wife and family at Chatham.

 

February 5, 1885

 

PRATT - Died in this city, of croup, on January 3, Wilmott Albert Pratt, youngest son of Thomas H. and Emma F. Pratt, aged 5 years and 3 days. Funeral yesterday (Private)

 

BURROWS - (Winnipeg) Mrs. Acton Burrows, wife of the deputy minister of agriculture of Manitoba, died last evening after a prolonged illness.

 

ARNOLD - (Thornhill) The young man Arnold died this afternoon. Coroner Johnston is to hold an inquest to-morrow.

Stewart and Westley, who are in jail charged with the murder of the young man at Thornhill, are not known to the detectives or police. They are both hard-looking customers. Stewart is about 40 years of age, slightly built with iron gray hair, very dark complexion and about 5 feet 7 inches tall. Westley is about 5 feet 11 inches tall, a large coarse-looking man with a heavy moustache and half-grown beard. Stewart says he belongs to Montreal and Westley to Quebec. Stewart states that he and Westley and Arnold, while playing cards, quarrelled in Collins's hotel and had a fight. Arnold then went to Simons's hotel and they followed him. The fight was there renewed in the bar of the latter hotel, a rough named Hoff taking Arnold's part.


Hoff seized a piece of cordwood and struck Stewart a violent blow over the head. Stewart immediately pulled out his revolver and fired at Arnold with the result already known. He states he fired in self-defence. It is stated that all parties were more or less under the influence of liquor. Arnold came from the North-west on New Year's Day and was staying with his widowed mother. He is 24 years of age. He is very well connected and is an old Upper Canada College boy.

 

February 6, 1885

 

COOK - Died in this city, on February 5, J. B. Cook, butcher, aged 71 years. Funeral from his son-in-law's residence, 83 Bay street north, on Friday, February 6, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

In the death of Mr. J. B. Cook, butcher, Hamilton loses one of its oldest and best known citizens. The deceased gentleman was born in Nottinghamshire, England, and came direct to Hamilton fifty years ago. He has resided in this city ever since. Mr. Cook conducted himself and his business as such a manner as to make many friends. He never took much part in public affairs. In 1856 he was appointed to the magistracy of the city but declined. He leaves a widow, one son, and three daughters. He was an uncle of Mr. David Cook and Mrs. Mitchell of the Franklin House.

 

February 7, 1885

 

CRAWFORD - Died at his residence, Ancaster, on February 6, William Crawford, aged 70 years. Funeral will leave at 12:30 p.m. on Monday, reaching Dundas cemetery at 2 o'clock. Friends are respectfully invited to attend.

 

BABCOCK - (Belleville) A little girl, about 4 years old, daughter of David Babcock of this city, accidentally set fire to its clothes on Tuesday and burned so severely that death resulted yesterday afternoon.

 

February 9, 1885

 

NEWSON - Died on February 7, Ethel Ida, only daughter of William and Bella Newson, aged 2 months and 21 days. Funeral from her father's residence, 14 Pearl street north, on Sunday, February 8, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

O'LEARY - (Montreal) John O'Leary, steam fitter in the Grand Trunk depot, Bonaventure street, while doing some work on the roof of a car connected with a shunting train in the yard this morning, was by a sudden jerk of the latter in casting off a Pullman car out to a side switch, what is technically known as a flying shunt, precipitated between his car and the one in front.


He fell with his left arm and leg lengthways on the rail, the flange of one of the wheels passing over the former from hand to shoulder and the latter from foot to within four inches of his body. The unfortunate young man was removed to the general hospital where he expired in a short time.

 

MARWOOD - (London) John Marwood, the caretaker of the smallpox hospital, was this morning found dead in bed, He has been connected the institution for some years.

 

February 10, 1885

 

FRASER - Died in this city, on February 9, Thomas Fraser, in the 72nd year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, 59 Locomotive street, on Tuesday, February 10, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Thomas Fraser, an employee in the stores department of the G.T.R., was stricken with paralysis last Wednesday at his boarding house, 59 Locomotive street. He lingered in an unconscious state until yesterday morning when he died. Mr. Fraser was 72 years of age and unmarried. His only relation in this country is a sister.

 

FURNISS - Died in this city, on February 9, after a long and painful illness, Emma, beloved daughter of E. M. Furniss, aged 24 years. Funeral from No 51 York street, on Wednesday, February 11, at 3:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

NUDEL - (Toronto) J. T. Nudel, who for the past 22 years had been police court clerk here, died to-night. He was laid up for some months, but recovered sufficiently about three weeks ago to take his old place. A few days afterward, however, he had a relapse and gradually sank.

 

BARTIN - (Barrie) On Saturday last, the two-and a-half-year-old son of Mr. H. Bartin, baggage master of Allandale, accidentally fell into a pot of boiling water, scalding him so seriously that the little sufferer died to-day.

 

February 11, 1885

 

MCCULLOCH - Died in this city, on February 10, Matthew McCulloch, aged 33 years. Funeral from his late residence, 109 Market street, on Thursday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CAMERON - Died in this city, on February 10, Mary Margaret, daughter of John and Mary Cameron, aged 2 years and 2 months.


MCCULLOCH - It is not many weeks since Mr. Matthew McCulloch stood at the open grave of his only remaining brother, the late collector of customs. A day or two after the funeral, he was himself prostrated with a severe sickness, and it soon became evident that he would never recover. He suffered from a complication of diseases, the most serious being Bright's disease of the kidneys. Once, about two months ago, he rallied and was able to leave the house, but a relapse speedily followed and ever since he was confined to his bed. For a month past his relatives have been almost daily expecting his death. The end came yesterday. He passed away quietly at 7:30 a.m.

Mr. McCulloch was 33 years of age. Two years ago he married Miss Maggie Burns, the favourite singer. Mrs. McCulloch will have warm public as well as private sympathy in her present circumstances of affliction and trouble, for the public is her friend.

Mr. McCulloch was the last of a family of nine children.

 

SULLIVAN - (London) About 3 o'clock this morning, Mr. Lambert who lives at 188 Bathurst street reported at the police station that a neighbour of his named John Sullivan was lying dead at his house in the rear of 188 Bathurst street from the effects of poison. P. C. Guthrie was dispatched to the house and found the information verified in the lifeless body of John Sullivan lying on the bed with his mouth partly open and the features distorted from the effects of the fatal draught. The officer searched the room for any bottle, drugs, or liquor, and found an empty box labelled 'rat poison' which had evidently contained the poison known as "Rough on Rats". He also found an empty tumbler which contained the sediments of the same liquid. The articles were taken to the police station to be used at the inquest.

 

February 12, 1884

 

JAMES - Died in this city, on February 10, Joseph James, in the 72nd-year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 259 Macnab street north, on Friday, February 13, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

GWYN - Died at Toronto, on February 12, 1885, Alice, eldest daughter of the late William Beecher Gwyn, of Dundas, in her 42nd year. Funeral from her brother's residence, Dundas, on Friday, February 13, at 3:30 p.m.

 

BERNARD, alias Roberts - (Kingston) About a year ago a middle-aged man calling himself Harry Roberts arrived here and put up at the British American hotel. It was generally understood that he was a man of some means and that he had come to Canada from the United States for the benefit of his health. He was very gentlemanly in his deportment and became quite a favourite


about the hotel. In December he was taken ill and went to the hospital. On the 9th of January he died without leaving any definite information as to the whereabouts of his friends. His only statement was that the Oddfellows would look after his body. That society, however, found that he was not a member of the craft. The body was unclaimed and deposited in a vault prior to burial. So the matter rested till now.

Dr. Cluthe of Toronto, who is in the city, having heard something of the death of Roberts and the mystery regarding his antecedents, asked for a description of him, and then stated that he believed Roberts was none other than a man calling himself Bernard who was in Cluthe's employ some years. The doctor, accompanied by reporters, drove to the Cataraqui cemetery vault, when the body was identified as that of Bernard.

Cluthe says that Bernard after leaving his employ, went to Berlin and while there his history was discovered. It appears that he professed love to an innocent farmer's daughter near Berlin and proposals of marriage were made. Bernard boarded in a large house and the next room was occupied by a man who also loved the young lady. The couple were therefore rivals. One day the other fellow entered Bernard's room and found a half-written letter upon the table. Being inquisitive he examined it and was startled to learn that Bernard was a married man and that his wife was in Chicago. The rival took note of the particulars of the letter which asked his wife to meet him on a certain corner in Chicago. He related the facts to the Berlin authorities. They in turn, being desirous of learning the true character of the young man, informed the Chicago detectives and Bernard stepped into the trap. He went to Chicago and met his wife on a certain corner. The police arrested him and found that he was the man they were looking for. He was accused of murdering a Negro during a fight in New Orleans. He was jailed and while on his way with two detectives he escaped, the train running at 34 miles an hour, and nothing more was heard of him. Dr. Cluthe has interested himself in the case because Bernard, alias Roberts, has a handsome wife who is wealthy and will be relieved at the news of his death and identification. It is said that the wife was greatly attached to him and sent him money. Pictures of him are in the possession of all the detectives in the United States.

 

O'NEIL - (Toronto) Henry O'Neil, a Grand Trunk Railway switchman, who had his foot crushed to a pulp on Friday last, died at the hospital to-night.

 

BRETON - (Quebec) News has just been received that on Sunday last a special train on the I.C.R. between Beauce junction and Sherbrooke was derailed and five or six cars thrown down an embankment. A brakeman named Breton, aged 20 years, who was on the tender at the time of the accident, was knocked off and fell between the cars. The wheels of one car passed over his legs almost severing them, He also received other injuries from which he died before medical aid could be procured.


(Halifax) At the scene of the explosion at Vale colliery, the complete list of the rescued is: D. Adams, miner, uninjured; Alexander Reid, uninjured; Thomas Gathro, a lad, slightly burned; Robert Love, miner, thighs and legs severely burned; Allen Campbell, lad, slightly asphyxiated, but otherwise not injured; Hugh Lamont, shaftsman, slightly burned.

The list of the dead already brought up is: Hugh S. CAMERON, pump engine driver, leaving a wife and  children.

Phillip MCBETH, stable man, leaves a wife.

John A. CAMPBELL, deputy overman, leaves a wife and family.

Daniel KENNEDY, miner, leaves a wife and large family.

Neil MCKINNON, miner, unmarried.

Thomas RYAN, unmarried.

Patrick FOLEY,(Westville), miner, leaves a wife and seven children.

John GRANT, miner, leaves a wife and three children.

John W. FRASER, miner, leaves a wife and two children.

The remaining bodies have been found. These are:

Daniel MCNEAL, miner, leaving a wife and large family.

James HOGGART, miner, also leaves a wife and family.

James MCLEAN, miner, unmarried, said to come from Brookfield, near Truro.

John A. MCEACHERN, a lad.

Of the twenty-two, nine only were found alive. The remaining thirteen were thus instantly hurried into eternity as the victims of the melancholy catastrophe.

 

HATCHARD - Yesterday morning there died after a long illness Mrs. William Hatchard at the early age of 35 years. Mrs. Hatchard was the only daughter of Mr. Joseph Bobbins. She was married seven years ago and leaves behind her a sorrowing husband and one child, a little girl. The deceased lady was noted for her eminent piety. She was an active member of the Baptist church and took much interest in its affairs. During her comparatively short stay in this world Mrs. Hatchard made a host of warm friends, and the sincere grief at her passing away is not confined to members and intimate friends of her family.

 

SCOTT - (Waterdown) Francis Scott, who with his wife has lived in the village of Waterdown for the last thirty-five years or more, was found frozen to death last Saturday night. Mr. Scott was some 70 years of age and time had weakened his intellect so much that frequently he was quite insane. Saturday evening he went out and failed to return. His neighbours missed him on Sunday and asked Mrs. Scott as to his whereabouts, but she of course could not tell them anything, and perhaps from the infirmities of age could not give them as much information and assistance as she otherwise might have done. The neighbours searched on Sunday and Monday for the old man but failed to find him, and sent for his son who is in business in Oakville.


The son came and on Tuesday a searching party was organized and a thorough search made which resulted in their finding the old man frozen to death in the gully north of the village. He had wandered there from his house on Saturday night, and in his weak state was probably so numbed by the cold and inclement weather that he lay down amid the falling snow and never rose again.

 

February 13, 1885

 

HATCHARD - Died in this city, on February 11, Rhoda Robbins, wife of William Hatchard, in the 34th year of her age. The funeral will take place from the residence, 13 Florence street, on Saturday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CHEESEMAN - Died in this city, on February 12, George E. Cheeseman, aged 21 years and 10 months. Funeral on Sunday, February 15, at 2 p.m., from his father's residence, 330 King street west. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

JOHNSTON, SIMARD, MORENCY, ASSELIN - (Quebec) The names of the unfortunate victims of Simard the Lake Simon holocaust are William JOHNSTON, of Morencey Nova Scotia; Joseph SIMARD and Joseph MORENCY, of Asselin ST. FEROL, county of Montmerenci; and P. X. ASSELIN of St. Saveur, Quebec. No definite particulars have yet been learned as to how the accident occurred. The shanty in which the men slept was a small wooden one about ten feet by six. The men were burned to a cinder and could not be recognized. It is supposed the fire occurred last Sunday as the fire and what remains of the unfortunate men were first discovered on Monday morning by Mr. Carpenter, road master of the Quebec and Lake St. John Railway.

 

February 14, 1885

 

LEATHER - Died on February 12, at Marion, Ohio, in his 33rd year, Harry R. Leather, second son of J. C. Leather, Esq., of Portsmouth, late of Leeds, England. Funeral from 97 Market street, Hamilton, on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m.

 

February 16, 1885

 

MCHARG - Died at London, February 13, 1885, Frank Lyall, infant son of J. A. and Annie McHarg, aged 5 months and 9 days. Funeral from 285 York street, at 2 p.m., Monday.

 

SMALLWOOD - Died in this city, on February 14, Martha, beloved wife of George Smallwood, aged 64 years. Funeral will leave her late residence, 118 James street north, on Monday,


February 16, at 2:30, for the G.T.R. station to Cobourg. Friends will please attend.

 

BEST - Died in this city, on February 14, at 78 Market street, Thomas Noakes Best, in the 79th year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, at 2 o'clock on Tuesday afternoon. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

Mr. Thomas N. Best, for many years auctioneer in this city, died at his residence, 78 Market street, on Saturday. For several years Mr. Best has been in poor health and his demise was not unexpected. He was 79 years of age and his long residence in this city has won for him a large number of friends who will deeply regret his death.

 

LITSON - (Welland) Thomas Litson, a Toronto vagrant, died in jail here.

 

AYERS - (London) Mr. Ayers, a resident of Delaware Township, has received the sad news that his brother, who was a colonel in the Staffordshire Regiment now engaged in the Soudan, was killed in the battle in which General Earle was slain.

 

BLACKBURN - (London) Mrs. Josiah Blackburn, wife of the proprietor of the "Free Press" of this city, died this morning quite suddenly after an illness of but a few days. The immediate cause of her death was apoplexy, superinduced by a derangement of the liver. She leaves a family of eight children and a large circle of sympathizing friends to mourn her loss.

 

February 17, 1885

 

PIPER - Died on Sunday, February 15, at Fonthill, Elizabeth Jane Piper, aged 53 years, beloved wife of Thomas Piper, Esq. Funeral will arrive at G.T.R. station at 3 p.m., Tuesday, and proceed to Christ Church Cathedral, and from thence to the cemetery.

 

BRICKER - (Guelph) Mrs. Jacob Bricker, Sr., of Waterloo, died on Thursday night from injuries received by falling down the cellar stairs. She was 63.

 

ASHWORTH - (Brantford) Abel Ashworth, an old Englishman, was found dead on the floor of his shanty, near the city, the other day. Verdict: death from natural causes.

 

February 18, 1885

 

DICK - Died at Hamilton, February 14, Alexander Dick, a native of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, in the 58th year of his age. Funeral took place Monday, February 16, to Burlington cemetery.


WILSON - Died suddenly in this city, on February 16, Samuel Wilson, aged 81 years, late superintendent of the Hamilton Orphan Asylum. Funeral will leave his late residence, No 98 Wellington street south, Thursday, February 19, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

Samuel Wilson died peaceably at his late residence, 98 Wellington street south, Monday evening, in the 81st year of his age. He went to bed at 9:30 o'clock, apparently as well as usual. At 10:30 they found his dead. No cause beyond old age is assigned. Deceased was a Yorkshireman and an old soldier. He was in the 54th Yorkshire Regiment and saw active service in India. After returning from there he lived for a while in Ireland, finally coming to Canada. In 1848 he made Hamilton his home and accepted the position of superintendent of the Hamilton Orphans', Asylum which he retained until 1880 when failing health and old age compelled him to resign. Deceased was a devout Christian and of great integrity and sterling worth. He had a large circle of friends who will sincerely regret his demise. He leaves four children, three sons and one daughter, all of whom have reached mature age.

 

MCINTYRE - (Ottawa) A dispatch was received this forenoon from the physicians attending Mr. McIntyre, M.P., Prince Edward Island, stating that he, Mr. McIntyre, is improving from the effect of the recent exposure he sustained while crossing from the island to the mainland on his way to attend to his parliamentary duties. Much sympathy is felt for him owing to the death of his wife which happened on Monday and was brought about through her intense anxiety for her husband during his illness. Mr. McIntyre's father died a week ago.

 

AIKENS - (Seaforth) Mr. William Aikens of this town was found frozen to death in a snow bank about five miles west of this place this morning. He had evidently got into deep snow with a horse and cutter and becoming confused, lost his way as there were farm houses quite close at hand.

 

ZUBER - (Guelph) One of the most determined and at the same time the most melancholy suicides that have taken place in this part of the province, occurred in the township of Woolwich in Waterloo county on Saturday afternoon. The victim and perpetrator of the rash act was a woman, the wife of a well-to-do farmer, and the mother of a small family.

Anthony Zuber is a middle-aged man. He lives on the Elmira road about two miles from this city. His wife, a woman of about 30 years of age, was possessed of no ordinary amount of intelligence. She was a kind and obliging woman apparently, and of such a disposition as to be the least suspected of taking her own life. On Saturday afternoon Mr. Zuber left his home for the purpose of helping a neighbour to haul lumber. He had not gone long when his wife sent the two children, the eldest of which is about 12 years, to the barn to hunt for eggs. They


were absent a considerable time and on returning they could not find their mother. On searching the house the little ones were horrified to discover the dead body of their mother suspended from a rafter upstairs by a stout piece of factory cotton. She was in a crouched position, her lower extremities resting in a cradle which she had brought thither to aid her in accomplishing her design. It was evident that the suicide had been a most deliberate one as the woman must have strangled herself by pulling down on the cord as the height would not permit of the body swinging.

The children immediately ran to acquaint their father of the awful deed. He was nearby and in a few minutes the distracted husband was a grief-stricken witness of the awful scene which terminated the career of his beloved partner. The news of the melancholy affair, like all bad tidings, spread like wildfire and soon the neighbourhood was in a great state of excitement. The deceased had been known in the vicinity for years, she being a daughter of a respectable farmer named Martin Gaetz, who lives nearby the Zuber farm. It is impossible to ascribe any reason for the woman thus taking her life. She was of sound mind and appeared to get along well with her husband.

 

February 19. 1885

 

GAW - Died on February 18, at the residence of her son-in-law, George Moore, 41 Murray street west, Margaret, relict of the late Alexander Gaw, of Montreal, in the 79th year of her age. Funeral will take place on Saturday, February 21, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

CRAMP - (Montreal) Thomas Cramp, one of the most prominent citizens, died at an early hour this morning. He was sick twenty-four hours, having lectured at the Boys' Home on Monday evening, taking; sick on his return home. The cause of his death was inflammation of the windpipe. The deceased gentleman was a partner in the firm of David Torrance & Co, director of the Liverpool, London, and Globe Insurance Co, and president of the Corn Exchange.

 

HANSON - (London) Dr. Henry Hanson died this morning at the age of 61 years. He was an Englishman and commenced the study of his profession in Bath which he completed in Canada. He settled in this city over thirty years ago and from that time forth was one of its most prominent physicians. In the early days of the country, when settlers were few and professional men scarce, his practice extended from Goderich to Sandwich. He always travelled on horseback and was nearly always in the saddle. He took no prominent part in public affair's of late, but in time gone by he occasionally interested himself in parliamentary elections. He was a staunch Conservative. His professional reputation was of the very highest and as has been before mentioned his practice was large.


CHRYSTAL - For some time past Andrew Chrystal has lived in the first stone house west of the toll gate on King street west, about two miles from the city. He was a widower and lived alone, having no companion in his home but a dog. On Monday afternoon, as was his custom, he went to D. Daniels's hotel at the toll gate where he had some liquor. In the evening he started for home, having first lit his lantern. On Tuesday he did not go to Daniels's, and as he never missed calling there to and fro from the city and at other times, Mrs. Daniels became uneasy about him, particularly as she had heard him say on Monday that he had not made a fire in his house and had come to the hotel to get warm. She feared he might have been frozen and got her husband to send to his house. Mr. Daniels sent his brother-in-law who found Chrystal's body in a short walk leading from the road to his house. The body was lying at full length in the snow, the face turned upwards, the hands firmly clenched and pressed over his abdomen. The lantern which he had carried stood about six feet from where he was found. Appearances indicated that he had lain down deliberately, probably having been overcome by fatigue or seized by illness. He was frozen solid, having been almost twenty-four hours in the open air with the thermometer at times 16 degrees below zero. Chrystal was the son of a wealthy minister of the Presbyterian Church in Scotland. He had no relatives in this city, but had told Mr. Daniels that he had a cousin in Toronto or Brantford. A short time ago he received from his father a letter offering him $2500 to buy some property. He owned the place in which he lived and worked a portion of the land. He was 41 years of age. Mr. H. A. Mackelcan who was formerly his solicitor, on hearing of his death, went to the house in company with coroner Mackelcan, but as coroner Brandow of Ancaster had been notified, they took no steps in the matter.

 

February 20, 1885

 

CHRYSTAL - The remains of Andrew Chrystal who was found frozen to death near the King street toll gate on Tuesday evening were decently buried yesterday afternoon in Burlington cemetery. The unfortunate man's father is Rev. James Chrystal of Auchinloch, Ayrshire, Scotland, and J. S. Playfair, of Bryce, McMurrich, & Co. of Toronto, is his cousin. Rev. D. H. Fletcher conducted the funeral service.

 

AMBROSE - Died on February 19, George Edward, second son of the late Charles T. Ambrose, in the 28th year of his age. Funeral will take place from his late residence, 47 Walnut street, on Saturday, February 21, at 2:30 p.m. Friends are invited to attend.

 

STEWART - Died in this city, on February 18, Harry Orton Stewart, aged 6 years, 11 months, and 10 days. Funeral from his parents' residence, 48 Napier street, on Friday, February 20, at 12 noon. Friends will please accept this intimation.


GRIFFITH - Died on February 18, at Quebec, Jane, wife of Henry Griffith, of the firm of William Griffith & Co of this city.

 

FLOWERS - (London) Andrew Flowers, of Westminster, died on Monday from the effects of an accident which happened to him a short time ago. The deceased fractured one of his fingers in cutting a box, which terminated in lockjaw.

 

WATSON - (London) The death of James Watson of the late firm of Watson, Young, & Co, fancy goods dealers, took place yesterday afternoon.

 

RAYCROFT - T. L. Raycroft, a Welland shoemaker, took carbolic acid to end his life. He had been despondent for some time.

 

February 21, 1885

 

RENDALL - Died in Barton, on February 21, John Rendall, in the 28th year of his age. Funeral will leave his father's residence, Lot 5, 4th concession, Barton, on Monday, February 23, at 10:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will attend without further notice.

 

RODDY - (Toronto) Robert Roddy, ex-city clerk, died last night after a long and painful illness. He had been twenty-seven years in the service of the city, being city clerk since 1876. He resigned a few months ago.

 

WEATHERHEAD - (Halifax) At an antimony mine at Rawdon, Hants county, a scaffold on which loose rock is thrown, gave way, and of three men working under it, Thomas Weatherhead was crushed to death. His brother and J. W. Ward were seriously injured.

 

Toultouce - (Chatham) At Paincourt, a short distance from Chatham, as Foster Jarvis was loading a log on a sleigh, the hook slipped off and the log, rolling down, struck a young lad named William Toultouce, crushing and instantly killing him.

 

February 23, 1885

 

MCDONOUGH - Died in this city, on February 21, Mary, relict of the late Morgan McDonough, a native of the county of Galway, Ireland, in the 54th year of her age. Funeral from the residence of her son, 18 Augusta street, at 2 p.m., Sunday, February 22. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

REFFEL - (Toronto) H. W. Reffel, manager of the Upper Canada Furniture Co, fell downstairs in the Richardson House where he boarded and died from concussion of the brain early this morning. He came from Bowmanville about six months ago. His remains were taken there this afternoon for interment.


WRIGHT - (Belleville) Last week as George Wright of Foxboro was heaving logs in the woods north of Madoc, a hook that attached his horse to the chebogan broke and the tug on the lines which followed pulled him forward to the ground in front of the sleigh. He fell upon his back in the road and before he could recover himself the chebogan, loaded with twelve logs, ran over the lower part of his body and pinioned him to the ground. The teamster of the sleigh which followed was unable to give him any assistance unaided. He unhitched his team and rode to the camp, a distance of two miles, when help was secured and the unfortunate man liberated after being held a prisoner and suffering the greatest agony for two hours. He has since died.

 

MCCANCE - (Drayton) While chopping in the woods this morning, Alexander McCance of the township of Peel, was almost instantly killed by a falling limb. He lingered a short time but never regained consciousness. The case is particularly sad owing to the fact of his wife's dying only a few months ago, leaving a large family of young children.

 

O'NEIL - Mrs. J. O'Neil, Hannah street east, has been unwell since the birth of a child a couple of months ago. She rose from her bed a few days after childbirth and caught a severe cold which rapidly developed into a fever. The fever kept up. She grew hysterical and frequently delirious. Saturday she was very weak. Early in the afternoon a film gathered over her eyes. She could not see. She lay raving incoherently, knowing or recognizing none of those about, who spoke to her. Later in the afternoon her sister, who was nursing her, left the room for a moment. During her absence Mrs. O'Neil managed somehow to secure her husband's razor from a bureau drawer and cut her throat. When the sister returned she found the sick woman lying on the bed with blood streaming from a deep gash immediately under the chin. Dr. Gavillon was summoned but when he reached the house Mrs. O'Neil was dead. Those in the house had made every effort to stop the flow of blood, but in her enfeebled state the shock was too great for her to stand. There is no doubt that the act was committed in a moment of insanity. Dr. Mackelcan, the coroner, was notified. He considered it unnecessary to hold an inquest.

Deceased was only 23 years of age. She was a bright intelligent woman and had a large circle of friends who will sincerely regret her terribly sudden death.

 

February 24, 1885

 

O'NEIL - Died in this city, on February 21, Bridget, wife of John O'Neil, in the 25th year of her age. Funeral will leave her husband's residence, 58 Hannah street east, at. 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.


BREMMER - Died at Pittsfield, Mass., Ada Crysler, the beloved wife of Edric Bremmer, aged 27 years and 2 months.

 

BUCHANAN - (Brantford) Mr. Buchanan, who ran a splinter into his hand, died from blood poisoning.

 

MCMURRAY - (Guelph) A child of Mr. N. McMurray, Rockwood, fell into some hot water and scalded its arms, and although expectations of recovery were entertained, yet on the second day it died.

 

February 25. 1885

 

RICHARDS - (Exeter) A fatal accident happened about half a mile south of this place this afternoon. As David Richards was up in a straw stack cutting a piece of it off, his wife came near the stack, when the piece fell on her. Mr. Richards immediately harnessed his team and drew the piece off, but did not get it off before life was extinct. It is thought she was killed instantly as it was a very large piece of frozen straw and ice. She leaves several small children.

 

FAGAN - (Picton) Edward Fagan, a shoemaker living in Picton, was found dead this morning on the ice, frozen stiff on the Bay of Quinte, five miles east of here.

 

February 26, 1885

 

BRICK - Died in this city, on February 25, Malissa, wife of Thomas Brick, in the 35th year of her age. Funeral will leave her husband's residence, 22 Cherry street, at 2:30 p.m., on Friday. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

Many readers of the "Spectator" will regret to learn of the death of Mrs. Thomas Brick which occurred yesterday evening at her husband's residence on Cherry street. Deceased was a daughter of the late Mr. Forshee, for many years a respected resident of Stoney Creek. She had been suffering from an incurable disease for a couple of years past and in a measure her demise was expected, but it was none-the-less severely felt when it came. She was a true Christian and bore up under her severe affliction with great fortitude. All who knew her respected and loved her deeply. Besides her husband she leaves a family of six, none of whom have yet reached mature years.

 

HUTON - The death of Mr. Robert Huton in Simcoe, Ontario, will be mourned by a large circle of friends in this city. Deceased was a brother of Mr. Charles Huton, merchant tailor of this city.

 

CAUCHON - (Quebec) Private intelligence received here to-day announced the death of Ex-Lieutenant Governor Cauchon, by paralysis at Whitewood, near Winnipeg.


The sad intelligence of the death of Hon. Joseph Cauchon has cast a gloom over the whole city. His remains will be brought here for interment next week.

 

February 27, 1885

 

FAWCETT - Died at Flesherton, on February 21, of inflammation of the lungs, Amelia Margaret, beloved wife of Robert a. Fawcett, proprietor of the "Advance " newspaper, and sister of Joshua G. and Caleb H. Buchanan, of the "Hamilton Times" office.

 

MAHON - (London) Henry Mahon, a young man who has been for the last few months employed as a switchman in the Great Western division yard here, this morning slipped and fell on the icy track. The yard engine was pulling out of the siding at the time and the unfortunate man, before he could escape, was caught and dragged some distance and then thrown beneath the engine with the result that both the left leg and arm were broken and the back of his head cut open in such a manner that the. brains protruded, besides which he was severely bruised and crushed. He was conveyed to the hospital, but succumbed to his injuries within a few hours.

 

February 28, 1885

 

WOLFE - Died in this city, on February 27, Lucy M. Victoria, youngest daughter of Patrick and Mary Wolfe, aged 5 months and 1 week. Funeral will take place at 2 p.m. on Saturday from her parents_ residence, 32 Simcoe street east. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

ARNOTT - Died in this city, on February 27, Joseph Arnott, aged 50 years, a native of Coventry, England. Funeral from his late residence, No 4 Greig street, on Sunday, March 1, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

MOBERLEY - (Collingwood) Last night at 9 o'clock while tobogganing on the mountain, four miles from here, John E. Moberley, son of George Moberley, barrister, was almost instantly killed by his toboggan striking a stump.

 

LANE - (St. Catharines) George Lane, working at the Adams quarry, was crushed to death by stones falling on him.

 

March 2, 1885

 

MURRAY - Died on February 27, William Murray, aged 75 years. Funeral from his late residence, 115 Jackson street west, on Tuesday, March 3, at 3:30 p.m.


SWEENEY - Died in this city, on Saturday, February 28, Elizabeth Catherine, daughter of M. Sweeney. Funeral from the family residence, 113 Bay street north, at 8:30 a.m., Tuesday, March 3. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

PHELAN - Died in this city, on March 1, Elizabeth, wife of James P. Phelan. Funeral on Tuesday afternoon, March 3, at 3:30 p.m. from No 66 Catherine street north. Friends are respectfully invited to attend.

 

KNOTT - Died in this city, on February 28, Thomas Knott, aged 72 years. Funeral from his late residence, 58 Bay street north, on Tuesday, March 3, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LAMBERT - Died in Hamilton, March 1, Maggie Lila Lambert, infant daughter of Charles and Maggie Lambert. Funeral from 28 Magill street, at 3:30 this afternoon. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

TREBELCOCK - (London) This morning Mrs. William Trebelcock died suddenly. About two weeks ago she met with an accident by falling from a landing place down several stairs, but as no bones were broken and she did not complain of internal injuries, the doctor did not anticipate any serious results from the fall.

 

BUCKLAND - (Toronto) Professor Buckland, late Deputy Minister of Agriculture, was seized with a fit on Yonge street last night. A policeman not knowing him took him to the police station where he died about one o'clock this morning.

 

MERCIER - (Quebec) Hubert Mercier of St. Raphael de Bellechase was accidentally drowned on Thursday night while engaged in working at the enlargement of a canal which feeds his flour mill.

 

FOSTER - (Guelph) The funeral cortege of the late Nellie Foster, vocalist, was the most imposing seen in Guelph for many years.

 

DeWitt - Jonathan DeWitt, a son of George DeWitt, of Tapleytown, an old and respected citizen, contracted a severe cold some time ago which settled in his lungs, and in spite of that could be done the disease proved fatal and he died on February 16. Deceased leaves a young widow and one child to mourn his loss.

 

TRUESDALE - Mrs. George Truesdale, daughter of Russel Olmsted, Mount Albion, died at Tapleytown on February 23 and was buried at Trinity.

 

March 3, 1885

 

HALLEWELL - Died on Friday, February 27, in this city, at the Aged Women's Home, Mrs. Mary Hallewell, aged 83 years.


BEASLEY - Died in this city, on March 3, after a long and painful illness which was borne with Christian fortitude and patience, Sarah Gillesby, wife of R. S. Beasley, in the 60th year of her age. The funeral will take place from her late residence, 103 Main street east, on Wednesday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

One of the oldest residents of Hamilton, Mrs. R. S. Beasley, died last evening at her residence, 103 Main street east. Mrs. Beasley was the daughter of the late Thomas Gillesby. She was born in Cumberland, England, but came to Hamilton with her parents when a child in 1832 and saw the small settlement gradually expand into a flourishing city. She was a woman of Christian character and her death will be regretted by all who knew her. She is survived by her husband and three sons, two of whom, Thomas E. and Maitland C. Beasley are conductors of the N. & N.W. railway. Mrs. Beasley was throughout her life a consistent member of the Church of England.

 

CUMMING - (Stratford) Last evening while the family of William McBride, headmaster of collegiate institute, were at church, Mrs. Cumming, mother of Mrs. McBride who had been left in charge of the house, accidentally fell into an open cistern in the back shed and was drowned.

 

March 4, 1885

 

HILDER - Died in this city, on March 3, Edwin Hilder, of Seaford, Sussex, England, late of the P.C.O. Rifle Brigade, aged 47 years. The funeral will take place from his late residence, 39 Inchbury street, on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

Mr. Edwin Hilder who died yesterday at his residence, 30 Inchbury street, was a British soldier, having come to Hamilton with the P.C.O. Rifles at the time of the Trent affair. When the Fenians invaded the country Mr. Hilder joined the ranks of the volunteers, was wounded at Ridgeway, and lay ill of his wound for several months at the residence of the late Hon. Isaac Buchanan. A widow and several children survive him.

 

HUSSELY - (Toronto) The five-year-old son of William Hussely, cabinet maker, Nelson street, swallowed a copper tack which stuck in his windpipe. The child died in a few minutes in great agony.

 

LEVESQUE - (Quebec) George Levesque, aged 18 years, was killed by a falling tree on Thursday last at Port aux Quilles.

 

LABELLE - (Montreal) This afternoon an accident occurred to a French-Canadian named Antoine Labelle, 60 years of age. He was driving down St. Sulpice street on a load of bags of


 grain when the sleigh suddenly slipped to a side and pitched him against the stone wall of the building where the grain was to be delivered, killing him instantly.

 

MURRAY - The late William Murray was one of our oldest citizens and one who was well known and much respected. He came to Hamilton about fifty years ago, has lived here ever since, and has seen the city grown from a village to its present size. Mr. Murray married a daughter of the late John Drake and was employed as librarian to the Mercantile library association for several years until its amalgamation with the Mechanics Institute. For some years past he had been in feeble health and had been collector for the St. Andrew's Society and the board of trade. Being a lover of entomology and geology a good deal of his time was occupied in collecting specimens of natural history and he has left a valuable collection of insects and minerals. The deceased was of a quiet and retiring disposition and much esteemed for his amiable Christian character.

 

March 5, 1885

 

MEIKLE - Died at Mitchell, suddenly, on March 3, James Meikle, in the 31st year of his age, only son of the late James Meikle of this city. Funeral from his mother's residence, 23 Maria street, Hamilton, On Friday, at 3 p.m.

The remains of the late James Meikle, who died at Mitchell on Tuesday, arrived here last night and were conveyed to the house of the young man's mother on Maria street. Mr. Meikle's death was very sudden and was caused by the bursting of a blood vessel in the brain. He was a young man of good abilities, sterling character, and much promise. He occupied a responsible position as manager of the hardware establishment of "Thomas Macdonald, Mitchell ". Before leaving Hamilton he was in the employ of John Bain, and Wood & Leggat.

 

DALY - (Stratford) Thomas Mayne Daly, an old resident of this county, died this morning. He represented the county in the House of Commons some years ago, and also at one time represented North Perth in the Provincial Legislature, and for a number of years has occupied the civic chair as mayor and reeve of this town. Mr. Daly had a stroke of paralysis a few weeks ago from which he partially recovered. He was 57 years of age.

 

RAYMAND - (Quebec) A woman named Raymand, an inmate of a house of ill fame, died suddenly here to-day of heart disease. There is some reticence on the part of the jurors to serve at the inquest.


March 6, 1885

 

MCDONALD - Accidentally killed in this city, on March 5, Alexander McDonald, in the 69th year of his age. Funeral on Sunday afternoon, at 3:30. from his late residence, 4 Wellington street north. Friends will please accept this intimation.

A terrible accident occurred shortly after 7 a.m. yesterday at F. W. Fearman's pork factory on Rebecca street whereby A. McDonald, of Wellington street north, lost his life. For some time past Mr. McDonald, his son and partner, William, and a number of men have been engaged in pursuance of a contract in making repairs to Mr. Fearman's establishment, and yesterday they were at work putting a floor in the ice house which is separate from the main building and in which there was nobody but themselves. A ten by twelve beam, twenty feet long, was being put across the centre of the building. It had been raised by packing cases on either side, and another beam of the same size had been run up from the floor to support it while the packing cases at one end were being removed. Four men were holding the upright, Mr. McDonald and his son being two of them. The cross beam was heavy and when the packing cases were removed it began to oscillate. The four men tried to steady it but could not succeed. Three of them, seeing it was futile to stay it, let go their hold and ran off. One of them had to dodge under the upright to escape. But Mr. McDonald stuck bravely to it and tried to hold it with his shoulder. It was a useless effort. The huge beam came down and carried him with it. A piece off one of the beams lay on the floor. The top of Mr. McDonald's head struck this and the huge upright fell over with crushing force, smashing his skull into jelly. The beam was at once removed but the man was dead. Coroner Biggar was summoned. He declared an inquest unnecessary. Death was instantaneous. The body was taken to Blachford's undertaking emporium when the head was sewed up and the corpse prepared for burial. The funeral will be on Sunday afternoon at 3:30.

Deceased had nearly reached the allotted span of human life, being 69 years old. For his age he was a remarkably strong and vigorous man. His life has been a busy one. He was born in Thurso, Caithness, Scotland, and has lived in Hamilton over forty years. He was a builder by trade and for the past fifteen years has been in business lor himself. He has been identified in the building of many of Hamilton's finest edifices. He took a leading part in the erection of the Mechanics' Hall and the Wesleyan Ladies' College, the Anglo-American hotel it was then, and one house he built is the oldest east of Wellington street that, is now in existence. He leaves a widow, four sons and three daughters. Robert, one of the sons, is in Brooklyn, and George is in Chicago. William and Alexander are in this city, the former having been in partnership with his father in the building business. One of the daughters is married and lives in Toronto.


The others are at home. Mr. McDonald had a vigorous intellect, was of kindly courteous nature and manners, and had many warm friends who will sincerely mourn his sudden and unexpected demise.

 

BENNETT - (Montreal) Charles G. Bennett, 45 years of age, a native of London, England, and at one time moving in a good position and wealth, committed suicide last night by hanging himself. Drink was the cause of his troubles.

 

SEATTLE - (Dundas) George Beattie, a healthy young man, while being shaved two weeks ago Saturday night, got a slight cut from the razor. Blood poisoning resulted and the poor fellow died a dreadful death on Tuesday night.

 

March 7, 1885

 

OLIVER - Died in this city, on March 5, Anne, the beloved wife of Thomas Oliver, aged 55 years and 10 months. Funeral will take place from her late residence, 122 Bold street, on Saturday, March 7, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FAIRBANKS - (Toronto) On Saturday last, John Fairbanks, an old man, while attempting to eject Martin Malone from a house on Jarvis street used as a small store, was struck on the head with a heavy weight by Malone. Fairbanks was removed to the hospital where he died to-day. Malone was arrested at the time on a charge of assault and was remanded. He will now be charged with a more serious crime. An inquest will be held to-morrow. It was in the same house the Aiken-Hackett fatal shooting affray took place about a year ago.

 

GRONZEBACH - (New Hamburg) Henry Gronzebach, aged 20 years, was killed this morning in the bush while felling a tree. His father is a well known and highly respected farmer in this vicinity.

 

BOND - (Galt) Mr. John Bond, druggist, formerly of Goderich but for the past year engaged in the drug business here, died suddenly on Friday of heart disease. Deceased was about 70 years of age.

 

MCGINNIS - (Toronto) An inquest was held this afternoon on the body of a female child of Annie McGinnis, found dead after birth under suspicious circumstances Wednesday morning last. The jury returned a verdict that the child came to her death through culpable negligence of the mother. A warrant will be issued for the girl's arrest. She is seriously ill and will be kept under police surveillance till sufficiently recovered to be removed to the jail. She belongs to Peterborough and worked in a brush factory here.


March 9, 1885

 

GULLY - Died on March 7, at 41 Sheaffe street, Thomas Francis, second son of Thomas and Annie Gully, aged 3 years and 5 months.

 

WEBSTER - Died on Saturday, March 7, Robert Land, eldest son of James F. and Annie E. Webster, aged 12 years and 9 months. Funeral from his father's residence, Wentworth street north, at 2 p.m., on Tuesday, March 10. Friends will kindly accept this intimation.

 

LAVALLEE - Died on March 7, after a long and painful illness, Captain D. P. LaVallee, in the 50th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, No 297 Janes street north, on Monday, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Many "Spectator" readers will have read with regret the record of the death of Mr. Dominique P. LaVallee who resided in the northern part of the city for nearly a quarter of a century. He was born in Berthier, Quebec, in 1825, and during his earlier years he occupied several responsible positions on the lake and river steamers. In 1855 he was mate on the "American", running between this city and Ogdensburg, and later he filled a similar position on the "Zimmerman", Captain Masson, between Hamilton, Lewiston, and Toronto. Subsequently he built several vessels, among which are the tugs "Young America", "Hero", and "Ontario", the schooner "Undine" perhaps the fastest trading vessel on the lakes at the present time, also the yacht "Sea Gull", well remembered by the yachtsmen. His last work was that of inspecting the building of the large Great Western Railway car ferries at Windsor in 1875. Since that time a painful disorder of the spine rendered him gradually helpless. In all his dealings he was noted for his uprightness and integrity, and those friendships he formed were of that kind that endure while life lasts. He leaves a widow, two sons and four daughters to mourn his loss.

 

March 10, 1885

 

BROWN - Died at his residence, in Binbrook township, on March 7, William Brown, in the 54th year of his age. Funeral on Tuesday, March 10, at 10 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SMYTH - Died in this city, at 24 King William street, on March 9, Robert Smyth, aged 50 years. Funeral will take place from his residence on Wednesday at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

PETERKIN - (Ottawa) William Peterkin, an engineer in the Russell House, met with a sad death between 9 and 10 o'clock this forenoon. He was engaged on the baggage elevator at the hotel, attending to some defect in the gas pipe which followed the hoist towards the roof of the house.


How he met his death will ever remain a mystery as no one saw the accident or knew how it occurred.

 

BENSLEY - (Toronto) Robert Bensley, while working in a cellar on Broadview avenue on Friday, fell and was so seriously injured that he died yesterday. He will be buried to-morrow by the Salvation Army of which he was a member.

 

March 11, 1885

 

SPECK - Died in East Flamborough, on February 18 last, William, second son of Robert and Martha Speck, aged 10 years, much regretted. Died also in East Flamborough, Ella Irene and Thomas H. Speck, daughter and son of the above, respectively 5 years and 6 months, and very deeply regretted, and thus leaves the bereaved parents with only one little infant. They have the sympathy of the entire neighbourhood.

 

GOULDING - (Toronto) Miss Goulding, a young lady residing at 120 St. Patrick street, while riding home on a street car from Parkdale last night, fell forward and almost immediately expired. She had been suffering from heart disease and it is supposed her chase after the street car before she overtook it accelerated the fell disease.

 

HUGHES - (Toronto) Harry Hughes, a carpenter, while working at his bench in the Credit Valley work shops this morning, dropped dead. Apoplexy is supposed to be cause.

 

QUIGLEY - (Ottawa) A young woman named Emily Quigley, residing on Division street, fell downstairs and broke her neck, life being extinct when she was picked up.

 

HOGG - (Chippewa) At Finch & Sons roller mills yesterday morning a young man named James Hogg, while assisting to adjust a belt, was drawn into the cogs, receiving injuries which resulted in his death last night.

 

March 12, 1885

 

ANGUS - Died on March 10, at 35 Jackson street west, Robert Angus, in his 76th year. Funeral on Friday, March 13, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MCKAY - Died at 95 Hess street north, Clara, youngest daughter of Clara and William McKay, conductor G.T.R., aged 9 months. Funeral on Friday at 2 p.m. from the above address.

 

ELLENBAULM - (Haysville) About 2 o'clock this morning the house owned and occupied by William Ellenbaulm, was totally destroyed by fire. The charred remains of himself and wife were found this morning. Ellenbaulm has lived in the village about forty years and married his third


wife about six weeks ago. The origin of the fire is unknown, but it is supposed to have caught fire by the pipe through the roof. Coroner Bowlby of Berlin will hold an inquest this afternoon.

 

ANGUS - The news of the death of Mr. Robert Angus will be received with much regret by a large number of Hamilton merchants and those who in former years were associated with him in business walks. Probably throughout western Ontario no business man was more generally known or more highly esteemed. His death was very sudden, occurring at his residence, 36 Jackson street west on Tuesday night. He has not been in good health for some time past and has been under the care of Dr. Mullin who intimated to his family that death night occur at any minute. Tuesday, however, he seemed to be in slightly improved health and was able to be out of the house in the evening. He returned to his room about 10 o'clock and was seized with paralysis in a very few minutes. Deceased was a native of Cupar, Fife, Scotland. He came to Canada in 1835 and went into business in London, being the senior partner in the firm of Angus, Birrell, & Co. Subsequently he went to St. Catharines and then came to Hamilton, in 1850, to accept a position in the firm of D. Mclnnes & Co. He remained with that firm for twenty-nine years, at the expiration of which time he retired from active business. In mercantile circles he was known as a man of sterling qualities and in private life he was a true friend and one against whom no reproach could be brought. He had reached the advanced age of 75 years. He leaves a widow and large family, having two sons in Toronto, Messrs W. M. and George Angus, and one son in Montreal, and two in the city. The funeral will take place on Friday next.

 

March 13, 1885

 

ENRIGHT - Died in this city, on March 11, Maurice Enright, in the 46th year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence 25 Simcoe street west, on Saturday, March 14, at 8:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SWANNELL - Died in this city, on March 12, Alice Kathleen, infant daughter of Frederick and Mary Swannell, aged 4 months and 10 days. Funeral will take place from her father's residence, 44 Hannah street west, on Saturday, March 14, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MOFFATT - (Toronto) Col. Kenneth McKenzie Moffatt, commissioner of the Canada Co., died here yesterday. He was for many years in command of the Royal Canadian Rifles.

 

SMITH - (Brantford) Edwin Smith, deputy sheriff and governor of the jail, died this afternoon.


Unnamed abandoned child - (Dundas) One of the most cruel and heartless cases of child desertion ever recorded took place here on Thursday night, March 5, and has been the all-absorbing topic of conversation since. About 10:30 of Thursday night a neighbour passed the house of Robert Clelland, about two miles from Sheffield, heard a child crying very hard, but thinking it was one of Mr. Clelland's children, made no inquiry. On Friday morning about nine o'clock some of Mr. Clelland's family had occasion to go around to the front of the house and were horrified at finding a child lying in the snow where it had been for about eleven hours. It was taken into the house and every attention possible given it, but it was so badly frozen that it died on Saturday morning about six o'clock. It was a smart, healthy-looking male child and but poorly clad in short dresses, with no shawl, and nothing on its hands. Mr. Clelland was away from home and Mrs. Clelland is very deaf and the fact that the child was left at a door seldom used in the winter accounts for its being so long unnoticed. Arrangements were made to bury the child on Sunday afternoon and the funeral ceremony was in progress when Dr. Smith arrived at the scene and very justly demanded that an inquest be held. The funeral was accordingly postponed and Dr. Walker, coroner, was notified on Monday morning, and an inquest was called for to-day, Tuesday, at 10 o'clock before Drs. Walker of Dundas and Smith of Sheffield, at which some light was thrown on the subject by one woman swearing that she could identify the child. The inquest was adjourned.

 

March 14, 1885

 

FREEBORN - Died at 22 Napier street, this city, after a short and painful illness, Mary Ann, beloved wife of Thomas Freeborn, in her 46th year. Funeral from above address on Sunday, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please take notice.

 

REMMY - (Toronto) A lady named Elizabeth Remmey, 50 years of age, residing with her sister on Gauld street, was found dead in bed this morning. She had robust health and retired last night as well as ever. Apoplexy was the cause of her death.

 

MANOGUE - (Peterborough) a young man named James Manogue was killed at Otonabee, a few miles from this place this afternoon, by a tree falling on him.

 

COOK - (Milton) Mr. Samuel Cook of Waterdown, formerly lessee of the Thompson House here, had sustained a sad bereavement in the death of his little five-year-old son which occurred on Friday. Mr. Cook lost another little son before leaving Milton, and is now childless.


March 16, 1883

 

CUENER - Died in this city on January 26, John, infant son of John and Maggie Cuener. Also on Saturday, March 14, James Ellias, a twin brother of the above. The funeral of the latter will take place to-day, Monday, March 16, from the family residence, No 96 King street east. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HELLAN - (Toronto) The body of the man found on the railway track near Oakville about two weeks ago has been identified as that of George Hellan, a printer of this city, who was returning from Detroit walking all the way. He had apparently sunk and died on the track from exhaustion. The remains will be re-interred here in the spring.

 

WILKINS - (Halifax) The death is announced of L. M. Wilkins, an ex-judge of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia. It occurred at his residence in Windsor this evening. Judge Wilkins in his time was one of the most widely known and popular politicians in the maritime provinces and in the House of Assembly and on the bench, well known as 'the stately bird'. The deceased, who was in his 80th year, had been ill only a few days with inflammation of the lungs.

 

March 17, 1885

 

BURNISTONE - Died in this city, on March 16, William Burnistone, in the 71st year of his age. Funeral from 97 Elgin street on Tuesday, March 17, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CALDER - Died at 98 Hughson street south, on Saturday, March 14, of diphtheria, Wilfred Douglas, the sixth son of John and Sara Calder, aged 4 years and 2 months. Private funeral took place on the following Sunday.

 

FREEMAN - Died in this city, at his late residence, 16 Grove street, on March 16, P. W. Freeman, aged 25 years. Funeral from the above address, on Tuesday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

RYAN - (Toronto) John Ryan, a teamster on the Kingston Road, fell from the top of his wagon on Thursday last and died yesterday from the injuries received.

 

MAILLOUX - (Montreal) A sad drowning accident occurred on Saturday at Hochelaga. Two small boys were sliding on the bank of the river and the sledge ran into a hole in the ice. One of the boys named Mailloux was swept away by the current. The body has not been recovered.


FORONG - (Thessalon) a furious storm from the east set in on the 14th and continued all the next day. Seven men on their way from Cockburn's Landing to Bruce Mines were caught in it. They managed to reach a fisherman's hut four miles from the latter place on the morning of March 15, but three of them were so exhausted they had to remain while the rest proceeded to Bruce Mines for assistance. The relief party on their return found. two of them, Robert and Simon VanNorman badly frozen but they will recover. The other man named George Forongo, of Mount Forest, was so badly frozen that he died a few minutes after their arrival. It is still drifting and blowing furiously from the west. The roads are all blocked.

 

LUNDY - (St. Thomas) a fatal accident occurred in the Michigan Central yards here last night, resulting in the instant death of Robert Lundy. The deceased was engaged in cleaning out the cinder pit and an engine in passing over the pit struck Lundy in the right side of the head, crushing it to a jelly.

 

March 18, 1885

 

STONELAND - (Toronto) Victor, the six-year-old son of Samuel Stoneland, proprietor of a restaurant on King street west, was drowned in the bay at the foot of Bay street this afternoon. The boy was playing on the ice with a companion when he stepped into a hole in the ice. Before assistance could be procured life was extinct. The boy's companion ran and told some men that young Stoneland was drowning but they laughed at him.

 

JOHNSON - (Aylmer, Ont) George Johnson, a highly respected farmer of New Sarum, county of Elgin, while returning home with a load of lumber and when about one mile west of Aylmer was suddenly killed by the upsetting of his load owing to a sloping place on the road.

 

March 19, 1885

 

CALDER - Died at 98 Hughson street south, on Wednesday, March 18, of diphtheria, Bertram Harvey, seventh son of John and Sara Calder, aged 1 year and 5 months. Private funeral the same day.

 

BURNS - Died on March 17, Elizabeth, relict of the late John Burns, native of county Carlow, Ireland, in the 90th year of her age. Funeral from the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Mary Allan, 84 John street north, on Thursday, at 9 a.m. Friends and acquaintances are cordially invited to attend.

 

CHEESEMAN - Died in this city, on March 18, John William, infant son of Thomas and Edith Cheeseman, aged 13 months. Funeral from Macklin's survey, King street west, on Thursday, March 19, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


SHIELDS - Died on Wednesday, March 18, Mary Jane, relict of the late Charles Shields, aged 60 years, 10 months, and 11 days. Funeral will take place from her late residence, No 52 south Catherine street, on Friday morning, March 20, at 8:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances respectfully invited to attend.

 

TRUSCOTT - Died on March 18, at 35˝ Lower Cathcart street, Charles Albert, Truscott, aged 8 years and 2 months. Private funeral March 18 at 3 o'clock.

 

FLEMING - (Toronto) Andrew Fleming, for many years grand secretary of the Orange order, died at his residence here to-night. He was 66 years of age and came to Toronto fifty-eight years ago from the county of Tyrone, Ireland. He took part in the Mackenzie rebellion of 1837 in defence of the government and also in the Fenian raid of 1866.

 

FITZGERALD - (Quebec) Yesterday afternoon an elderly gentleman named Fitzgerald of Sillery Cove was proceeding up a neighbour's stairway. He fell a distance of three steps, breaking his neck. He died almost immediately.

 

BENSON - Senator Benson of St. Catharines died at the Russell House, Ottawa, yesterday at the age of 78 years. Senator Benson was descended from an Irish family of English extraction that came to Canada in 1815 and settled at Kingston. He had been connected with commercial pursuits in mills and vessels for many years. He entered public life in 1867 when he was returned by acclamation for the Niagara district. He sat for Lincoln in the House of Commons from the general election in 1867 until called to the senate, March 14, 1868. He was a Reformer.

 

March 20, 1885

 

LUTZ - Died in this city, on March 19, Charles Frederick, youngest son of John and Elizabeth Lutz, aged 15 years. Private funeral on Friday, March 20, at 10 a.m. from 66 Pearl street south.

 

CASSIDY - (Montreal) A man named Cassidy, employed by the gas works at Hochelaga, lost his life by falling into a tank of melted tar. Before he could be extracted he was smothered.

 

BRUCE - George A. Bruce, excise officer in Waterloo, is dead.

 

March 21, 1885

 

ALLAN - Died at Canborough, on March 20, Martha, beloved wife of James Allan. Funeral on Sunday, March 22, at 1 o'clock.

 

BUDGEN - Died in this city, at 265 James Street north, Mabel Sarah, daughter of O. And M. Budgen, aged 17 days.

 


MACKAY - Died in this city, on March 19, of heart disease, James G. Mackay, in the 38th year of his age. Funeral from his mother's residence, 138 Mary street, on Saturday, at 3:30. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend.

Many there are who will learn with regret of the death of James G. Mackay which occurred through heart disease at his late residence on Mary street, Thursday afternoon. Deceased was born in Toronto thirty-eight years ago and came to Hamilton after spending the first fifteen years of his life there. He early developed decided artistic tastes and the happy faculty for outlining a man's face and general appearance with a few rapid strokes of his pen. It was through his drawings and cartoons that he was best known to the public.

He was connected at various times with the "Canadian Illustrated News", " Grip", "The Jester of K—on", and the "Mirror" of this city, and besides drawing cartoons and sketches for these publications did a great deal of work that would lose much of its point outside of Hamilton. Many of these happy bits of his are treasured by people in this city and will be treasured for many years to come. He was witty and humourous, good-natured and kindly, and blended these qualities so that while his wit was keen and incisive, it would never hurt anyone's feelings. Of late years he had almost totally abandoned his artistic work and had devoted his undoubted talents to the engraving of gold, silver, etc.

For a month past he has been unable to work steadily and frequently complained of feeling unwell. A week ago he gave up all attempt at work. His heart was affected and Thursday afternoon he quietly expired. His death was not expected. His remains will be interred this afternoon.

 

CHAPMAN - (Toronto) The wife of George Chapman, machinist, of Taylor street, took a dose of oil of tansy late last night and expired shortly afterward after suffering intense agony, She was about 30 years of age and leaves five children.

 

ROBERTS - (Quebec) Charles Roberts, aged 50 years, a bachelor, formerly a resident of St. Saveur, died in the police station this morning under somewhat suspicious circumstances. He was last night brought to No 5 police station by three men who left him at the door and ran away. The police took him in and found the man to be in an advanced state of intoxication and his face black and bruised as though he had been fighting. This morning he was removed to No 1 station and the sergeant in charge there seeing that the man was evidently ill, medical assistance was summoned but Roberts expired just as the doctor arrived.

It seems that he had been for the past three weeks living with one Guillet who keeps a tavern on Madelaine street which possesses an unsavoury reputation. Guillet was recently running a shanty in the ice bridge when Roberts procured a licence for him on the understanding that he was to


 share the profits. The house on Madelaine street has been taken and poor Roberts, it is supposed, has been kept more or less under the influence of liquor ever since. All the inmates of the tavern have been arrested pending the coroner's inquest which takes place to-morrow.

 

March 23, 1885

 

MERIN - Died in this city, on March 21, Patrick Merin, aged 30 years. Funeral will take place on Monday, May 23, at 8:30 a.m. from his late residence, corner of Bay and Ferrie streets. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

SMITH - Died at her late residence, 21 Main street west, Sarah A., relict of the late John L. Smith, late of Her Majesty's customs. Funeral at 2:30 p.m. on Monday. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

O'BRIEN - At St. Joseph's Convent, Park street, on March 21, Catherine O'Brien, known in religion as Sister M. Angela, of the institute of St. Joseph, departed this life in the 44th year of her age and the 20th of her religious life, fortified by all the rites of Holy Church and surrounded by her devotedly attached and sorrowing sisters. Funeral from St. Joseph's, Park street, at 9 a.m. on Monday.

 

HORSNELL - Died at Walkerton, March 21, of consumption, John Horsnell, of Hamilton, in the 41st year of his age. Funeral in Walkerton, March 24th, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

LEVESQUE - (Montreal) At Assametquaghan station below St. Plaire on the Intercolonial Railway, while a special engine with a plough was attempting to clear the line, the engine jumped the track and precipitated into the river beneath, causing a big smash-up and killing fireman Levesque. On account of indirect telegraphic communication, the extent of the damage or loss of life cannot be fully ascertained at present.

 

YATES - (Guelph) Edward Yates, a barber, who has been in the city for only a few weeks, was found dead in his bed this morning. Apoplexy was the cause of his death. The deceased leaves a wife and two small children.

 

March 24, 1885

 

EVANS - Died at his residence, London, Ontario, on Saturday, March 21, Richard Evans, father of Robert Evans, seed merchant of this city, aged 65 years and 9 months. Funeral Tuesday, March 24, at 2 p.m.


MALLOCH - Died on March 23, Margaret Elizabeth, infant daughter of Francis Stewart and Mary Stewart Malloch. Remains to be taken to Brockville.

 

SMILEY - Died at his father's residence, Burlington Plains, on March 23, Robert C, infant son of John and Elizabeth Smiley, aged 1 month and 3 days. Funeral on Tuesday at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

March 24. 1885

 

EVANS - A well known resident of London has passed away in the person of Mr. Richard Evans who died on Saturday evening in his 66th year. Mr. Evans came to Canada from Ireland in 1847 and resided in Hamilton for eleven years after which he moved to the state of Wisconsin where he carried on farming operations until twelve years ago when he purchased a farm three miles north of London. Owing to failing health he gave up this in 1883 and became a resident of the city. Though in a weakly state for some time past his death was somewhat unexpected and will be a surprise to many. The deceased leaves a wife and family of six sons and two daughters, all of whom are adults, the eldest son being Mr. Robert Evans the well known seed merchant of Hamilton while two are members of the local pianoforte Manufacturing firm of Evans Bros and Littler. The funeral is announced to take place to-morrow at Woodland cemetery.

 

MERRIN (Merin) - The funeral of the late P. Merrin who had charge of the Macnab street weigh scales took place yesterday. Mr. Merrin had an incurable disease of the leg which was amputated last Friday, but his system was too weak to withstand the shock and he died on Saturday.

 

HORSNELL - Mr. John Horsnell, for many years foreman of the "Times" news room, died at Walkerton on Saturday. For many years the deceased has been ill of consumption and death had been expected on many occasions. He was an exceedingly popular and good-natured young man and has hosts of friends in this city who will hear of his death with sorrow. Mr. Horsnell was formerly connected with the Lev; York "Sun" and left that paper to take the foremanship of the "Times" with which paper he remained until ill health rendered it necessary about three years ago to give up all work. He will be buried at Walkerton. Mr. S. E. Townsend, brother-in-law of the deceased, with other relatives, left for Walkerton yesterday morning.

 

March 25. 1885

 

GOMPF - Died in this city, on March 23, Henry, only son of John and Minnie Gompf, aged 2 years and 2 months. Funeral private from 360 John street north.


EMERSON - Died on March 23, Ellen M. Aird, wife of Thomas Emerson, Esq., of Nelson village in the 42nd year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, Thursday, March 26, at 10 o'clock. Friends will please attend.

 

BURKE - Died on March 24, at the City Hospital, Annie Burke, aged 22 years, late of Newport, County Mayo, Ireland. Funeral from Blachford & Son's, 70 King street west, at 10 a.m. on Thursday.

 

PROVAN - (Quebec) The inquest on the late Mr. John Provan took place to-day at the Jeffry Hale hospital. The jury rendered a verdict of death from gangrene and bedsores, the result of old age and want. The doctor was of the opinion that his death was hastened by the gnawing of rats.

 

GRIFFITH - (Parry Sound) A boy named Griffith, while standing on a toboggan slide last night, was struck by a toboggan and probably fatally injured.

 

TURNBULL - (St. Catharines) Mrs. John Turnbull was found dead lying by her stove. She lived alone.

 

March 27, 1885

 

LATHAN - Died in this city, on March 26, Elizabeth, wife of Shepherd Lathan, in the 69th year of her age. Funeral will leave her late residence, 11 Crooks street, on Saturday, March 28, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

YOUNG - Died on March 25, at Waterford, suddenly, William Young, Michigan Central Railway, formerly superintendent G.T.R. shops at Kingston, aged 54 years, brother of Mrs. Richard Pray of this city. Funeral from his brother-in-law's residence, 80 Hughson street south, on Saturday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

 

TENBROECK - (St. Catharines) A farmer named Tenbroeck, 45 years of age, living in the township of Grantham, two miles from this city, met with his death during a quarrel with his young farm hand, William Tuttle by name, who is not yet 21. They had been to spend the evening at Port Dalhousie and returned about midnight. On their arrival at the farm they were heard quarrelling by Tenbroeck's son, Alfred, aged 17, who ran out to the farmyard. He saw his father strike at Tuttle with a piece of board. Tuttle wrestled it from Tenbroeck and struck the latter a murderous blow which felled him to the ground. After lingering in a half-stupified condition until 1 o'clock to-day he expired. Two of his children survive, a boy aged 17, and a girl aged 11. Tenbroeck was a widower. He is a prominent man and a member of the township


 council. The cause of the quarrel is attributed to jealousy on the part of Tuttle who, it is believed, thought Tenbroeck was on terms of undue intimacy with his wife. Both parties were under the influence of liquor at the time.

 

March 28, 1885

 

LANAWAY - Died in this city, on March 27, Marian Alice, the beloved wife of Mr. Robert Benjamin Lanaway, in the 22nd year of her age. Funeral on Sunday, March 29, at 2 p.m., from 111 West avenue north. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Davis Died at the residence of his son-in-law, John a. White, of Windsor, on March 26, in the 80th year of his age, Major Thomas Davis. Funeral on Sunday at 1 p.m. from Winona to Burlington cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

N.B. Funeral will arrive at corner of Main and Wentworth streets about 3 p.m.

 

HAMPSON - Died on March 27, at No 69 Victoria avenue north, Herbert Harding,, eldest son of J. E. and Mary Hampson, aged 4 years. Funeral private.

 

POITRAS - (Quebec) The news of a most revolting and atrocious murder at Matane on the south shore of the St. Lawrence below Rimouski has just been received. A few days since, it was discovered that a regular cannibal named Poitras who resides there had literally torn the body of his wife to pieces with his nails and teeth. As soon as the crime became known the utmost excitement and indignation prevailed and there was talk of lunching him, but he beat a hasty retreat to the woods where he still is hiding, and despite the efforts of the whole community cannot be captured. He is a brother of the Poitras who ten years ago murdered & cut up two of his children to use their flesh for baiting traps in the woods.

 

GIBSON, ARNOLD, MERITON, NAPIER, BAKELY, ELLIOTT, MIDDLETON, MCKENZIE, MCPHAIL, NEWITT, ANDERSON, FISHER - A Battle Fought by Mounted Policemen and Louis Riel's Half-breed Rebels

(Ottawa) The following telegram from Lieutenant-Colonel Irvine to the Right Honourable Sir John a. Macdonald, dated at Fort Carlton near Winnipeg,

March 27, 1885, was read by the Premier after recess to the house. "The party under my command has just arrived. When near Fort Carlton I found that Major Crozier with a party of one hundred went to Duck Lake to secure a large quantity of supplies there stored. They were met by some hundred rebels who held an advantageous position at Beardy's Reserve and endeavoured to surround the police and civilians. The rebels fired first when it became general.  Major Crozier, owing to the disadvantage at which he was taken retreated in an orderly manner, arriving at the fort at the same time as my party.

 

 


 

Ten civilians of Prince Albert and two policemen were killed and four civilians and seven constables wounded. The number of rebels killed is not known. The police and civilians acted with the greatest bravery under a heavy fire."

List of the killed: Policemen, Reg. No 1008, Constable T. J. Gibson; Reg. No 1005, Constable G. P. Arnold.

Civilians: Capt. John Meriton, W. Napier, James Bakely, S. Elliott, Robert Middleton, D. McKenzie, D. McPhail, Charles Newitt, Joseph Anderson, Alexander Fisher.

 

VALE - (Guelph) Captain Vale, of Guelph township is dead.

 

ARMSTRONG - A second tragedy occurred at No 3 police station last evening about half past seven o'clock. On June 21 of last year William Dunn of Ancaster, an Ancaster farmer who was confined in the cells for drunkenness hanged himself by his. belt to the door of his cell. Last night Thomas Armstrong adopted the same method of shuffling off his mortal coil only he used his handkerchief instead of his belt.

Armstrong was an Englishman, about 35 years of age, unmarried, apparently without relatives in this country, and of decidedly disreputable character. He was formerly employed at the Franklin House, but for the last year he had lived at the public expense in the provincial and county prisons. In February of last year he was convicted of obtaining goods by false pretences and was sent to the Central prison for a year. His served his full term and on February 24 last he was released and came back to Hamilton, reaching here in the afternoon. But before night he got drunk and was again arrested and next morning he was sent to jail for thirty days in default of payment of his fine. Yesterday Armstrong breathed the air of liberty again, but once more he celebrated his freedom by getting drunk, and shortly after seven o'clock he was arrested by Constable Walsh and run in. while being searched he struggled so violently that it was necessary for two constables to hold him while a third ransacked his pockets. He glared fiercely at Constable Walsh and said in an ominous tone, "You'll never again have the pleasure of bringing me here". Before the operation of searching was finished Armstrong with a sudden effort wrenched his left hand from Constable Moore and clutched himself by the throat and so desperate was his grip that he was nearly strangled before the officers could tear his fingers away. After being placed in the cell he appeared to quiet down and contented himself with uttering maledictions on the police force, Constable Walsh in particular.

Constable A. Campbell was the officer in charge of the station. Though it is common for drunken prisoners to act in the way that Armstrong did Campbell feared that the man would attempt to do himself injury, and three times he crept softly to the cell to watch him. But on none of these occasions did Armstrong show any signs of suicidal intent. Old Mary McGraw, the vagrant,


was in the cell next to him and the time he did not spend in promising himself to be avenged on Constable Walsh he devoted to abusing poor old Mary. When Constable Campbell last visited the prisoner he was standing in a careless attitude with his back to the door, contentedly talking to himself. Campbell returned to the main office, but in two or three minutes he was seized with a strange desire to go back to Armstrong's cell. He did so. His worst fears were confirmed. Before he reached the door he saw Armstrong hanging by his handkerchief to the top bar of the cell door. Campbell shouted to Constables Vanatter and Moore and the three rushed in to cut the man down. It was too late: he was already dead. He had tied the ends of the handkerchief to the bar, drawn the loop over his head, turned his back to the door, and deliberately strangled himself. To suspend himself by the neck it was necessary for him to draw his feet from the floor and he was in that position when cut down.

The body was removed to the morgue. An inquest will be held this afternoon by Coroner, Dr. White.

No blame can be attached to Constable Campbell in connection with the unfortunate affair. He is a careful officer and took all the precautions that any officer would deem necessary.

 

March 30, 1885

 

SCOTT - Died at 50 Ferguson avenue, Willie, son of James and Evaline Scott, aged 1 year and 2 months.

 

MONTGOMERY - Died in this city, on March 28, William Montgomery, aged 66 years, a native of the County Armagh, Ireland. Funeral from 64 Emerald street north.

William Montgomery, of 64 Emerald street north, died Saturday and the news will be read with regret by many. He was a native of Armagh County, Ireland, and was in his 66th year. Thirty-two years ago he left Ireland and came to this city where he has been in business as a market gardener. He was a quiet industrious man and a good husband and father, and these qualities won for him the respect and regard of all who knew him. He has nine children, all of whom are living in this city.

 

BAUER - Died at the residence of William Leanes, No 149 Ferguson avenue, J. M. Bauer, aged 28 years, 2 months, and 5 days. Funeral from the same place on Tuesday, March 31st, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mr. J. M. Bauer, proprietor of the Walker House, corner of King street and Ferguson avenue, died yesterday of inflammation of the lungs. He had been ill for three weeks. Mr. Bauer was a native of Carleton, New York state, and came to Hamilton about four years ago. For two years he was in possession of the Walker House. He leaves a wife and one child. Mr. Bauer had


a very jovial and friendly disposition. He was an Oddfellow, a member of A.O.U.W., and of the St. George's Society. Several years ago he was brakeman on the Grand Trunk Railway and lost a leg in an accident.

 

BILTON - Died at Elmira, on March 28, Henry W. Hilton, in the 46th year of his age. Funeral will leave the residence of his wife, 62 Cannon street east, on Tuesday, March 31. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mr. Henry W. Bilton, for many years a resident of this city, died on Saturday at Elmira. Deceased was well known and highly thought of in this city. He was for a long time a manufacturer of soda water here and was subsequently succeeded by his sons. The funeral will take place from the residence of his wife, 62 Cannon street east, to-morrow afternoon.

 

March 31, 1885

 

MCGREGOR - Died at Waterdown, on March 29, Archie, eldest son of Dr. McGregor, aged 4 years, 4 months, and 23 days. Funeral on March 31, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will meet at the old church instead of at the house.

 

STEWART - Died in this city, on March 30, David D. Stewart. Funeral on Tuesday, March 31, at 4 p.m., from 295 King William street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

ANDERSON - Died on Sunday, March 29, at the residence of his father, 69 Queen street north, Wallace John, son of George and the late Margaret Ann Anderson, of paralysis of the brain, aged 2 years and 5 months. Funeral on Tuesday, March 31, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

April 2, 1885

 

MCCARTY - Died at West Flamborough, on April 1, at his mother's residence, James McCarty, in the 25th year of his age. Funeral on Friday, April 3, at.2 p.m., from above address, to Waterdown cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

BRASBIE - (Guelph) Rev. D. L. Brasbie, who resided here, is dead.

 

April 3, 1885

 

STRATHERN - Died in this city, on April 2, Mary Ann Strathern, Aged 62 years. Funeral from 30 Hughson street south.


TRUMAN - Died in this city, on April 1, Alice Eliza, infant daughter of George and Mary Truman. Funeral from 221˝ King street east, on Friday, April 3, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WILLIAMS - Died in this city, on April 2, Elton, only child of George and Eliza Jane Williams, aged 9 years and 4 months. Funeral from 16 Baillie street, on Friday, April 3, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MESSMER - Died in this city, on April 2, Christina J., beloved wife of Daniel Messmer, in the 70th year of her age. Funeral from Mr. Leo Blatz, her son-in-law's residence, corner of Hannah and Cherry streets, on Sunday, April 5, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

APPLEGARTH - (Guelph) Mr. George R. Applegarth, one of the farm instructors killed in the Indian uprising, was a former resident of this city. He spent the years of his boyhood in Guelph and left for the Northwest about five years ago. His mother still resides on the Eramosa Road.

 

April 6, 1885

 

POWELL - Died in this city, on April 4, Mary Powell, aged 75 years. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, R. C. Cuff, 300 York street, on Monday, April 6, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

GROFF - (Simcoe) Henry Groff, manager of the Federal Bank, died here last evening. Mr. Groff has also been treasurer of the County of Norfolk for the past thirty-five years and was universally respected.

 

PATOIN - (Quebec) James Patoin of St. Anne la Pocatiere was killed a day or two ago by a load of wood falling on him which he was drawing from the bush.

 

STRATFORD - (Brantford) Mrs. Stratford, widow of the late Dr. William H. Stratford, was found dead last evening at her residence on Albion street. Mrs. Stratford had not been seen for two days and some of her friends became alarmed, and Mr. C. Biggs obtained an entrance through an upstairs window and descended to the front door, opened it, and admitted some friends, and a search through the house was made. In a bedroom off the dining room marks of blood were found on the carpet and a basin of water coloured with blood. Proceeding upstairs to a front bedroom they found the deceased lying on the floor with her face submerged in a bath tub of water. On the sideboard was a bottle labelled "Laudanum, poison" in which but a few drops were left. It is supposed that the deceased lady had taken an overdose of laudanum which caused the flowing of blood. An inquest is being held.


April 7, 1885

 

MCINTOSH - (St. Thomas) A coroner's Jury was empanelled this morning to inquire into the circumstances in connection with the murder of Alexander McIntosh who was shot yesterday by Edward Mitchell of 26 Isabella street. After viewing the body the coroner, Dr. Gustin, at the urgent request of C. MacDougall, counsel for the prisoner, decided to adjourn the inquest until 7:30 o'clock Thursday evening. Dr. Tweedale performed the post mortem examination on the body of McIntosh this afternoon. Public sympathy is strongly in favour of Mitchell who it is believed committed the rash act under strong provocation.

 

FULLER - (Halifax) By the burning of a building on Tower Water street, belonging to the estate of William Macdonald, at half past two this morning, a shoemaker named James Fuller, lost his life. The place was occupied by Joseph Penny, a liquor store and sailors' boarding house. The fire started in the taproom and soon cut off escape by the passages. Seven fisherman sleeping in the upper storeys jumped from the window to the arm of the telephone pole and slid to the ground. Fuller who was a widower is supposed to have been somewhat under the influence of liquor when he went to bed. Nobody missed him until some time after the fire broke out and then the portion of the building in which he slept was a mass of flames. Fuller's body had one leg burned off when found in the ruins after daylight, and an inquest held in the afternoon when a verdict in accordance with the facts was rendered.

 

CURREN - (Halifax) The two-year-old daughter of David Curren, a stone mason, living on Gerrish street, was scalded to death this morning by a pot of boiling water falling over here. The body was terribly injured.

 

PHILLIPS - Died in this city, on April 4, Michael Joseph Phillips, aged 19 years and 6 months. Funeral from his mother's residence, 54 Ferrie street east, On Thursday, April 7, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

April 8, 1885

 

ROLSTIN - Died .suddenly, Alexander Rolstin, aged 80 years. Funeral on Wednesday, at 1:15 p.m. from the residence of his son-in-law, Dr. Dillabaugh, 18 Gore street, to the Northern and Northwestern depot, thence to Caledonia cemetery.

Alexander Rolstin, one of the oldest residents of this district, died suddenly on Monday. He was a native of Tyrone county, Ireland, where he was born 80 years ago. In 1830 he came to Canada and settled in Trafalgar township and from there went to Oneida township where he superintended the working of a large farm for upwards of half a century. The deceased was the


 father of a large family, seven of whom are living, four sons and three daughters. Two of the sons own extensive stock farms in Missouri, one practises medicine, and the fourth, Mr. William Rolstin, lives in Caledonia. Mrs. Dr. Dillabough, and Mrs. J. D. Dillabough of this city and Mrs. E. J. Thompson of Wingham are the daughters. The remains will be interred in Caledonia.

 

APPLEGARTH - A dispatch from Swift Current says that Applegarth, farm instructor, who was supposed to have been killed by Poundmaker's braves near Battleford, is alive and well. He escaped from the Indians during an attack on the stores, but they cut off his retreat in the direction of Battleford and he made tracks southward, reaching Swift Current with all his hair on. He knows nothing of the Battleford garrison.

 

April 9, 1885

 

ASHTON - Died on April 1, William A. Ashton, aged 44 years. Funeral took place from his late residence, 33 Locomotive street, on Friday afternoon, April 3, for Sharon, Pa.

 

GOMPF - Died in this city, on April 8, Annie, daughter of John and Minnie Gompf, aged 4 years. Funeral on Thursday, April 9, at 2:30 p.m., from 300 John street north. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

FORD - Died in this city, on April 8, James, son of James and Mary Ford. Funeral at 8:30 Friday morning, April 10, for St. Mary's Cathedral, from 269 John street north. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ALLES - (London) A sad event occurred on No 5 express just as it was entering the city. A man named George Alles, of London, England, who was coming on a visit to a daughter-in-law living near this city, suddenly died, and on examination it appears the unfortunate man had been suffering from an inflamed arm consequent upon a vaccination operation performed before he set sail, thus producing blood poisoning.

 

MOODIE - (Toronto) Mrs. Susannah Moodie, the celebrated Canadian authoress, died this afternoon at the residence of her son-in-law, J. J. Vickers, at the ripe age of 82. She arrived in Canada with her husband in 1832, settling in Douro township, and the story of their struggles for seven years is graphically described in her books. Besides "Roughing It in the Bush", she wrote "Life in the Clearings", "Flora Lindsay", and "Mark Hurdlestone".

 

BAWY - (Ottawa) Some cases of smallpox have taken place in the vicinity. Dr. Robillard, physician at the Board of Health, does not think there need be any apprehension of the disease


spreading. A young man named Bawy succumbed to the dread disease this morning. He was buried shortly afterward.

 

WEBB - Henry Webb, bookkeeper for Brayley and Dempster, hardware dealers and manufacturers, was taken suddenly ill about midnight Friday night and died two hours afterward. The cause of his death was probably heart disease as he was troubled two or three years ago with heart affections. On Saturday he complained of soreness about the chest but nothing serious was apprehended as he was at work on Monday and Tuesday. A wife and several children survive him.

 

April 10, 1885

 

KIRKPATRICK - Died at 17 Pearl street, this city, on April 9, Mary Kirkpatrick, relict of the late Hugh Fitzpatrick, aged 66 years. Funeral from the above address on Saturday at 9 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

RAPHAEL - The funeral of the son of Isaac Raphael will take place from 96 John street south at 2 o'clock this afternoon. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

CAMDRON - (London) Mr. Duff Camdron, surveyor of customs at this port, died to-day after a month's illness.

 

GRANT - (Ottawa) Donald W. Grant, chief of police at Ottawa,, who died in New York yesterday evening, was a native of Inverness, Scotland, coming to Canada at an early age and for thirty years was justice of the peace in the county of Carleton. Since 1884 he has resided in Ottawa, at that time Bytown. He leaves a wife and two sons to mourn his loss. His remains will be conveyed to Ottawa.

 

April 11, 1885

 

SCHELEFFE - (St. Catharines) An old lady named Scheleffe was killed on Monday while walking on the G.T.R. track, four miles west of Port Colborne. Her home is near Sherkston. She had been to Buffalo and by mistake got off at Ridgeway and while walking was struck by a west-bound train.

 

MCDIARMID - A little son of D. McDiamid of Beverly was killed by being spun around the shaft of a straw cutter.

 

ROLOELSKI - (Berlin) Gustave Roloelski, working at the Bloomington furniture factory, was instantly killed by a stick thrown from a saw striking him in the stomach.

 

CAMPBELL - (Quebec) Mary Jane Campbell, an old vagrant, died this morning in the jail where she had been sent last week from the recorder's court. She was then in a state of exhaustion.


April 13, 1885

 

DONALDSON - Died in this city, on April 11, Margaret, the beloved wife of John Donaldson, aged 21 years. Funeral from her husband's residence, No 41 John street south, on Monday, April 13, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

LANCEFIELD - Died on Sunday, April 12, Agnes Sarah, relict of the late Charles James Lancefield, in the 68th year of her age. Funeral on Tuesday, at 3:30 p.m., from her late residence, 105 York street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

April 14, 1885

 

SHOULDICE - Died at Waterdown, on April 13, of inflammation of the lungs, Mary E. Shouldice, aged 18 years. Funeral from Mr. Yake's residence at 1 p.m. on Wednesday, April 15. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BLAIR (Halifax) Private Blair, of the Royal Irish Rifles, committed suicide this morning by shooting himself while on sentry duty at the dockyard.

 

RYAN - Died in this city, at his residence, No 23 Elgin street, after a lingering illness, Thomas Janes Ryan, a native of Guernsey, Channel Islands. Funeral will take place on Thursday, at 2:30. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FRALICK - (St. Catharines) John Fralick, an old resident, died at Lockport on Sunday.

 

April 16, 1885

 

WATSON - Died on April 15, at No 30 Walnut street, William Andrew, only son of Andrew and Elizabeth Watson, aged 1 year and 2 months. Funeral on Thursday, April 16, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MUIR - Died on Friday, March 20, at Grimsby township, Ellah Rose, the beloved daughter of Henry and Mary Muir, aged 3 years, 10 months, and 25 days.

 

MCLENNAN - (London) A young man named Alexander McLennan of this city going west on the Pacific express last night had both his legs cut off below the knee in attempting to board the train for Chatham. He died this morning at 2 o'clock.


April 17, 1885

 

HARRISON - Died in this city, on April 14, Catharine, beloved wile of James Harrison, aged 53 years. Funeral from her husband's residence, 40 Pearl street south, on Friday, April 17, At 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

JACKSON - Died in this city, on Thursday, April 16, Alice M. Jackson, daughter of James and Louie Jackson, aged 2 years and 4 months. Funeral Friday at 2 o'clock from 172 East Avenue north.

 

FISH - (Caledonia) A son of William Fish while hunting accidentally shot himself and died next day.

 

April 18, 1885

 

RUTHERFORD - Died at her late residence, 144 James Street north, Catherine Stuart Rutherford, widow of the late Captain L. Rutherford. Funeral on Monday, April 20, at 3:30 p.m.

 

CHARTERIS - Died at Chatham, Ontario, on April 14, Helen Charteris, relict of the late Alexander Charteris, Esq. of Chatham. Deceased was a native of Haddington, Scotland.

 

GRACE - Died in this city, on Friday, April 17, 1885, Thomas Henry, youngest son of Thomas and Matilda Grace, aged 4 years and 8 months. Funeral private.

 

GARRICK - Died in this city, on Friday, April 17, Ann Maria, relict of D. J. Garrick, aged 72 years. Funeral on Sunday, April 19, at 2 p.m. from 146 King street west. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BOWYER - (Bracebridge) Mrs. Bowyer, wife of H. Bowyer, saddler, of this place, poisoned herself at one o'clock to-day by taking strychnine which her husband kept in a drawer upstairs for safety and used as a medicine for horses, he being a local veterinary surgeon. She died in half an hour after taking the dose.

 

RUTHERFORD - Mrs. Rutherford, widow of the late Capt Rutherford, died at her residence, 144 James street south, at a late hour Thursday night. She had been ill for about three weeks but her death was unexpected and sudden. The deceased was a highly estimable lady and death will be learned with profound regret by her wide circle of friends. She is survived by a large family. Two of her sons are in business in this city - Andrew, a member of the firm of Garland & Rutherford, and George, a partner in Winer & Co's large business. A third, Joseph, carries, on a provision business in Toronto, and the youngest, David, is engaged in the iron trade in San Francisco. There are also four daughters.

 


April 20, 1885

 

CROFTON - Died in this city, on April 18, Elizabeth Irene, infant daughter of Thomas and Jennie Crofton, aged 3 months.

 

SPRINGSTEAD - Died in this city, on April 18, John Springstead, in his 82nd year. Funeral on Monday, April 20, at 9:30 a.m. from the corner of Wellington and King William streets, to Tapleytown. Friends will please accept this notice.

One of the oldest residents of this part of the province has passed away in the person of Mr. John Springstead who died in this city. at the good old age of 81 years. The deceased gentleman was born at Tapleytown and lived there continuously on the same farm until about three years ago when he removed to this city. He distinctly remembered the circumstances of the war of 1812. During; the rebellion of 1837 Mr. Springstead was at the front with the military and did good service for his country. He was a councillor of Saltfleet for many years and at one time occupied the reeve's chair. He was postmaster at Tapleytown for some time.

For over fifty years he was an active and prominent member of the Episcopal Methodist Church. In politics he always was a staunch Conservative. He leaves a widow, five sons, and five daughters. Of his sons, Jacob and Simon live in the city, where also reside two of his daughters, Mrs. James Jackson and Mrs. Henry Williams. During his long life he was much respected for his upright conduct, consistent piety, and many excellent qualities of both heart and head. His death was caused by a decay of nature that old age brings, probably accelerated by a recent operation for cancer.

 

FRASER - Died at her late residence, No 9 Little Peel street, in this city, on April 19, Ann, the beloved wife of Donald Fraser, tailor, a native of Dundee, Scotland, in the 85th year of her age. Funeral on Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MILLS - Died in this city, on Sunday, April 19, Mary Ann Mills, late of the village of Indiana, Haldimand county, in the 74th year of her age. Funeral on Tuesday, April 21, at 3:30 p.m. from the residence of her son, William Mills, Esq., 286 King street east, to Burlington cemetery. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

GRAVEL, LEZOTTE - (Quebec) The inquest on the little victims of yesterday's Point Levis fire resulted in the following verdict: That Joseph Gravel, Adelaide Gravel, and Rosanna Lezotte were found burned to death. There is no truth in the report that the door of the Gravel residence was locked.


HORNBECK - (Kingston) George Hornbeck, employed as a yard switchman by the Kingston & Pembroke Railway, was instantly killed to-day in the city. The Kingston & Pembroke and the Grand Trunk tracks run closely together, and Hornbeck while switching a Kingston & Pembroke train slipped back on the Grand Trunk track and was struck by a locomotive and knocked down and beheaded. He was a young man and not married. His father is a farmer living near Mervale.

 

MCMAHON - (Simcoe) Thomas B. McMahon, judge for the County of Norfolk, died at his residence here this afternoon after a sickness of about three weeks' duration. His death will be greatly deplored by the town and county as he had the esteem of the entire community.

 

April 21, 1885

 

WILSON - Died in this city, on April 19, Ella Marian, infant daughter of Charles and Stella Wilson, aged 2 months and 8 days. Funeral took place this afternoon.

 

ORR - Died on April 20, at 102 Main street east, Joseph Hamilton, third son of William and Mary Orr, aged 2 years, 4 months, and 17 days. Funeral took place this morning.

 

FRENCH - Died in this city, on April 19, Charles French, aged 32 years. Funeral from 18 Mill street, in rear of 88 Hess street, on Tuesday, April 21, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MONTGOMERY - (St. Catharines) Esther E. Montgomery suicided by drowning in the new canal.

 

PELCHER - (Mount Forest) Eleven weeks ago, Sarah Pelcher, a simple-minded young woman, 28 years of age, left her home, the residence of James Elliott, this town, and although her friends searched diligently for her no trace of her whereabouts could be discovered. As the girl was in the habit of stealing away without sufficient clothing to protect her, it was feared then that she had perished from the cold which was so severe at that time. As the spring advanced and the snow began to disappear, the lost girl's friends commenced searching through the fields and woods for her. On Thursday a large party was out scouring the country in the vicinity of the town when word came from Holstein that the body of the unfortunate young woman had been accidentally discovered in a field on P. Leslie's farm near Holstein by two young men. When found she had neither shoes nor hat on, but had both tied up in a bundle with some other things which she had with her. The night after she was missed one of those severe storms which were so common this winter set in, and having discarded her hat and shoes, the cold overcame her and she sank to rise no more again. Dr. Jones, coroner, examined the remains which were in a fair


 state of preservation, but deemed an inquest unnecessary. The funeral took place on Sunday from her former home and was attended by a large concourse of sympathizing friends and acquaintances.

 

April 22, 1885

 

BLAND - Died in this city, on April 21, Robert, only child of Isabella and Robert Bland, aged 8 months and 18 days. Funeral will leave his parents' residence, 68 Cherry street, on Thursday, April 23, at 2 p.m. Friends will please attend.

 

LESLIE - (Toronto) James Leslie, one of Toronto's oldest pioneers, died at his residence, Eglinton, on Sunday, aged 83. The family came to Canada from Dundas, Scotland, seventy years ago. The. deceased was a member of the first city council here and was a warm personal friend of W. Lyon Mackenzie. He took a prominent part in the politics of his time and was editor and proprietor of the "Examiner", the old Radical paper.

 

STARLING - (Toronto) A painful sensation was caused in the Grand Opera House to-night. Shortly before the curtain rose, C. J. Starling, coal contractor, Belleville, who was seated in an orchestra chair, was seen to fall suddenly forward as if in a fit. He was carried out of the theatre into the manager's office where he immediately expired, it is supposed, from heart disease. The body was taken to the Queen's Hotel where it now lies.

 

April 23, 1885

 

HAMMILL - Died In Brantford township, on April 21, James Hammill, in the 84th year of his age. Funeral on Friday, April 24, at 10 a.m., from his son's residence, Robert S Hammill, near Alberton, to St. John's Church, Ancaster. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

QUINLAN - (Elora) Daniel Quinlan, shoemaker of Salem, Ontario, who was lost on January 10 last, floated down the river past the village yesterday and the body was recovered to-day about three miles from here. It is supposed that he stumbled over a high bank into the water while walking between here and Fergus.

 

April 24, 1885

 

DAVIS - Died at Chicago, on April 22, Mary Jane, beloved wife of Lyman B. Davis, daughter of the late Thomas Griffin of Hamilton, aged 23 years. Funeral from the residence of her mother, 48 West avenue north, at 2:30 p.m. on Friday, April 24. Friends will please accept this intimation.


PHILLIPS - Died at 231 Wellington .street north in this city, on April 23, Thomas R. Phillips, second son of Margaret and Martin Phillips, aged 23 years and 7 months. Funeral will take place from the above address on Sunday, April 26, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

FLETT - Died at his late residence, 36 Bleeker street, Toronto, on April 22, after a long and painful illness, Capt. William Flett, in the 54th year of his age, a native of Orkney, Scotland. Funeral from his late residence on Friday, April 24, at 11:15 a.m. sharp for Union depot to be interred in Hamilton on arrival of the 1:53 p.m. train.

 

MCFARLANE - Died at Binbrook, on April 22, Andrew McFarlane, farmer, native of Renfrewshire, Scotland, aged 51 years, and 9 months. Funeral from corner of Locke and Concession streets, this city, on Saturday, April 25, at 12:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

April 25, 1885

 

HENDERSON - George Henderson, a middle-aged man residing with his wife at the residence of Mrs. Dowse near the west end of Napier street, was found dead in his bed about three o'clock yesterday by his wife. He had been suffering from lung troubles for some time but had not been attended by any physician. When his death was discovered, coroner Philp was notified. After examining the body he concluded that it was unnecessary to hold an inquest. He gave as his opinion that death was caused by his lung troubles, accelerated by habits of intemperance and insufficient care.

 

April 27, 1885

 

SHEEHAN - Died in this city, on April 26, John Sheehan, in the 74th year of his age, a native of Kilbride, county Wexford, Ireland. Funeral will leave his late residence, 124 Catharina street east, on Monday, April 27, at 8:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

DOYLE - Died in this city, on April 25, Mr. John Doyle. Funeral will leave his late residence, 27 Railway street, at 3 p.m. on Tuesday for St. Mary's Cathedral. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

BALLAND - (Ottawa) A man named John Balland was drowned to-day in the Rideau river near Beckett's bridge. He was out in a canoe trying to save some rails when the canoe filled with water and sank.


April 28, 1885

 

HALSON - Died at her residence, 30 Robert street, on April 25, Mrs. Robert Halson, aged 54 years. Funeral on Tuesday, at 1 o'clock, to Ancaster.

 

MACMILLAN - Died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Robert Osborne, Beamsville, Ontario, April 26, Nancy Woodburn, relict of John MacMillan, of Brockloch, Carsphairn, Scotland, in her 86th year. Funeral will take place on Tuesday, April 28, at one o'clock.

 

April 30, 1885

 

O'REILLY - Daniel O'Reilly and William Cooley, two men of Troy, a village in Beverly, eighteen miles from this city, left home together for Brantford on Saturday morning. The same evening they started for home, both it is alleged the worse of liquor. Cooley returned alone and all that could be gathered from him was that the wagon had been upset. He did not know what had become of O'Reilly. On Sunday a party went in search of the missing man and late in the afternoon his dead body was found on top of a bank near the road. He had evidently been injured in the upset, had crawled to this spot, and being too weak to go further or call on passing travellers for assistance, had died there alone. The body was found by one of the dead man's sons.

 

May 1, 1885

 

MICHIE - William Michie, an old settler of Esquesing township, is dead.

 

LONG - (Milton) William Long, merchant, died on Saturday of inflammation of the lungs.

 

DEAN - An accident occurred last night at the corner of York and Ray streets, resulting in the death of James Dean, son of John Dean, labourer, of 7 Little Wellington street. The boy, who is nine years old, left his father's house at about 7:30 o'clock to follow the Salvation Army which went down Pearl street towards York. At the corner where the accident occurred Dean was seen to run into the road and endeavour to pass a street car which was then coming along the street. He, however, fell or was pushed right in front of the horse, and before the car could be stopped, the horse and car had passed over him. Some who were near at the time sty that a member of the Army pushed the boy and caused him to fall, but it is generally believed that he stumbled and fell. Constables Johnston and Hawkins were nearby and picked up the insensible boy, carried him to a neighbouring house. Dr. Stark was summoned, but his services were not required; the boy was dead. He had lingered only a few minutes in a state of unconsciousness.


He was removed to his home and Coroner Mackelcan notified. He deemed it unnecessary to consult the county crown attorney as to the necessity of holding an inquest which most of those who saw the accident thought advisable. At the time of the accident the street car was being driven at a very moderate rate and no blame seems to be attached to the driver. One of the horse's hoofs struck the child in the head, besides which he had a leg and arm broken and other injuries. Those injuries, however, would not have caused death had there not been some internal injury.

 

May 2, 1885

 

SMITH - Died in this city, on Thursday evening, April 30, at 290 Catherine street north, Clara Barrett, wife of William S. Smith, aged 22 years. Funeral on Sunday, May 3, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

DEAN - Died in this city, on April 30, James, youngest son of John and Mary Dean, aged 8 years and 11 months. Funeral from his parents' residence, No 7 Little Wellington street, on Sunday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

PEARSON - Died in this city, on Friday, May 1, at 113 York street, Maggie Morphy, beloved wife of Henry Pearson, aged 29 years. Funeral on Sunday, May 3, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

BRADLEY - J. Bradley, tailor, Streetsville, got drunk, walked on the track, and was killed.

 

SWINFORD - (Guelph) Lieutenant Swinford, of the 19th Battalion, who died of his wounds on Thursday, was formerly a resident of Guelph. He was an exceedingly popular young man.

 

May 4, 1885

 

POWELL - Died in this city, on May 1, at 70 Wellington street north, Alma Laura, aged 10 years, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Powell. Funeral private.

 

STUART - Died on Saturday, May 2, at the residence of her parents, 129 Hunter street east, Minnie, third daughter of Paul Stuart, aged 19 years, 5 months. Funeral on Monday at 10 a.m. sharp. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

BEZEAU - (Quebec) The district coroner to-day held an inquest at the Beauport Asylum on the body of Napoleon Bezeau, aged 24 years, an inmate. The deceased was placed in the asylum


in June, 1879, being then an orphan with the Sisters of Charity. A verdict of death from an attack of epilepsy was returned.

 

WARD - (Winona) There was found this morning on the lake shore opposite Mr. J. W. Willson's residence the body of a young man, apparently an Englishman, about 25 or 30 years of age, fair complexion, five feet six inches in height, medium build, and respectably dressed. The left side of his face near the eye was very badly bruised. On his person was found a small piece of paper with the names George Dieghton and Maggie Albert, West Toronto Junction. There was also found in his pockets a carpenter's pencil and rule, a pocketbook, a stone, and some hard clay. On his handkerchief and collar was the name E. W. Ward.

 

May 5, 1885

 

ANDERSON - Died on May 4, Thomas Anderson, in his 74th year. Funeral will leave his son's residence, 'Fairview', King street east, Hamilton, on Wednesday, May 6, at 3:30.

 

KENNEDY - (Ottawa) A cable-gram received here says that Colonel Kennedy of Winnipeg, one of the Nile voyageurs, died of small pox in London, England.

Colonel Kennedy, who commanded the Winnipeg contingent of the Canadian voyageurs, died to-day. The deceased, who is 46 years of age, contracted smallpox at Suakim while in discharge of his duties and succumbed to the disease.

Hon. William N. Kennedy was a son of the late Lieutenant Colonel Kennedy of Peterborough, Ontario. He went to Fort Garry in 1870 with the first Red River expedition, being a lieutenant in the First Ontario Rifles. He subsequently became a member of the Northwest council and was appointed Registrar of Selkirk. In 1876 he was mayor of Winnipeg. He was the promoter and commander of the Winnipeg Field Battery, now at the front under General Middleton, and was on his way home to join his command when stricken down with disease. General Wolseley remembering his service in the first Red River expedition, asked Colonel Kennedy to raise a force of voyageurs at Winnipeg for service on the Nile in the Soudan campaign. Colonel Kennedy went to Egypt in command of this force and did excellent service, and when the term of enlistment of the voyageurs had expired he remained with others for further service. Colonel Kennedy was a popular officer, a good citizen, and a consistent member of the Methodist church, being especially active in promoting the interests of Grace Church, Winnipeg.

 

FANNING - (Lindsay) Some excitement was occasioned here on Sunday morning by the reported murder of a resident of the township of Ops, named James Fanning, who lived near Janetville, about eight miles from Lindsay. Dr. Poole, coroner, and Chief of Police Bell


drove out to the locality during the morning and found the report was correct. On the roadside in a pool of blood lay the body of James Fanning, who having staggered from the house where he was shot and falling on the roadside, had died from loss of blood.

The facts surrounding the case are in brief as follows. Fanning had married as his second wife a daughter of A. W. Pogue of Ops. Reported have been current for some time that Fanning ill treated his wife, and finally she left him and went to live at her father's house. Fanning went, to see her several times and tried to induce her to return and live with him. Several disturbances ensued and much hard feeling was generated and finally Pogue warned Fanning to keep off the premises or he would shoot him. On Saturday Fanning was in town and was noticed to be the worse of liquor. About dark on Saturday he went to Pogue's house and demanded to see his wife and was warned off by Pogue. Hot words ensued and Pogue threatened Fanning with his gun. A scuffle ensued according to Pogue's story during which the gun was discharged, the charge tearing the flesh and sinews from the side of Fanning's right leg from the knee to the thigh. The unfortunate man made his way out to the road where he died. The neighbours a short distance off heard the shot and cries of murder, but fearing they would be mixed up in the affair, did not go to his aid. Pogue admitted his act in the shooting and has been lodged in the Lindsay jail until Monday. The county attorney has decided that an inquest should be held and the necessary steps taken to hold one.

 

May 6, 1885

 

ADDISON - Died at No 15 Charles street, on May 5, after a long and painful Illness, Isabella Robertson, beloved wife of Robert Addison, in the 45th year of her age. Deeply regretted by a large circle of friends. Funeral on Thursday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances respectfully invited to attend.

 

SECORD - Died at Winona, on May 5, Mary A. Williams, beloved wife of Walter K. Secord, merchant, Winona, aged 50 years. Funeral from her husband's residence on Thursday, May 7, at 2 p.m. to Grimsby cemetery. Friends will please accent this intimation.

 

MASON - Died in his city, on Tuesday, May 5, Mary Louisa Mason, second youngest daughter of the late Edward Mason and Margaret Mason, aged 6 years and 4 months. Funeral from her mother's residence, 114 Locke street north, on Thursday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WAUGH - Died at Stratford, April 30, Newton Cresswell, aged 19 years, son of George J. Waugh, druggist, and grandson of Mr. John Waugh, Bay street, Hamilton.


SMITH, JONES - (Toronto) The body of William Smith, the driver of Fulton, Michie & Co., who mysteriously disappeared January 7 last, was found floating in the bay to-day. Hugh J. Jones, a printer, disappeared on the same day and it is supposed that he has also been drowned as the two men were seen to drop into an airhole in the ice on the bay on the afternoon of that day.

 

May 7. 1885

 

HANNON - Died in this city, at 205 James street north, on Wednesday, May 6, Jane Freeborne, relict of the late Robert Hannon, of the county of Donegal, Ireland, aged 86 years.

 

TOMLINSON - (Listowel) A fatal accident occurred here this morning. Jonathan Tomlinson, a retired farmer, formerly of the township of Maryborough, went to the stable as usual to look after his horses, and some of the family thinking he was waiting longer that usual went out and found him lying in a stall under one of the horses, so terribly bruised and cut about the head and face that he lived only ten minutes after being taken out. He never recovered consciousness.

 

(Clark's Crossing, NWT, near Winnipeg) Battleford news to-night says Colonel Otter's force met Poundmaker's band on Saturday last and defeated them with great loss. The Indians were driven from their camp and part of the camp was burned. Otter's loss was eight killed and thirteen wounded. The Indians' loss was not positively ascertained, but it is known to be in the neighbourhood of one hundred. The battle lasted from five o'clock in the morning till noon.

The following men were killed

Private ARTHUR DOBBS. Battleford Rifles

Private JOHN RODGERS, Governor-General's Foot Guards

Private ASGD, Governor General's Foot Guards

Bugler FAULKNER, Infantry School Corps

Corporal LOWRY Northwest Mounted Police

R. B. SLEIGH, Northwest Mounted Police

Bugler PATRICK BURKE, North west Mounted Police

Teamster WINDER, of Regina

 

REGAN - (Montreal) Honora Regan, a vagrant, was admitted to the police station last night drunk & said she wanted a long sleep. She was found dead this morning.

 

May 8, 1885

 

LANGLOIS - (Quebec) A young man named Langlois of Crane Island was drowned last Saturday while crossing with the mails to St. Thomas, Montgomery.


May 9, 1885

 

NICOLSON - Died on May 8, at his late residence, 89 Rebecca street, Mr. Edward Nicolson, in the 59th year of his age. Funeral on Sunday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly attend.

Mr. Edward Nicolson died from pneumonia at his residence on Rebecca street at an early hour yesterday morning and his familiar face and figure will be missed from the James Street market where for over twenty years he has been in business as a speculator in untanned skins. Mr. Nicolson had been in Hamilton about thirty-two years. Originally he came from England and spent a few years in the States before locating in Canada. He leaves a large family and many friends who will hear with regret of his demise.

 

CASSIDY - (Halifax) A coloured woman named Rebecca Cassidy died at Dartmouth to-day in her 115th year. Up to a week ago she was active and visiting her neighbours. She was an escaped slave from the southern states.

 

STUART - James Stuart, senior partner in the firm of Stuart Bros., wholesale grocers, this city, committed suicide yesterday by hanging. About 10 a.m. he asked for the keys of the old warehouse of Simpson, Stuart, & Co, now unoccupied, telling his younger brother, Lewis, that he wished to get some papers out of the vault. He did not return and about noon young Stuart went to the warehouse in search of him. The key was in the door but the young man could not find his brother. When this was learned Mr. Stuart's relatives became alarmed and the building was searched from cellar to garret. In the elevator shaft, dimly perceived in the darkness, the body of the unfortunate man was found hanging by the check rope which was attached to the cross bar of the railing in the second floor. The body was immediately cut down, but there was no hope of resuscitation, for the man was already dead. There could not have been a fall of more than three feet, but the neck was broken.

The cause assigned for Mr. Stuart's suicide is nervous prostration, brought on by overwork and business anxieties. While a member of the firm of Simpson, Stuart, & Co., he was so prostrated by the same cause that he was twice obliged to seek rest and recuperation in trips to Europe. He was a volunteer during the Fenian troubles and at Ridgeway was severely wounded and taken prisoner by the Fenians. His nervous system never completely recovered from the shock it received at that time and there is little doubt that Mr. Stuart's mind became unbalanced as the result of his nervous disorder.

Mr. Stuart was 38 years of age and eldest son of Mr. Alexander Stuart, our esteemed city chamberlain. He is survived by a widow and six children. The circumstances of the sad affair being plain, no inquest was deemed necessary.


May 11, 1885

 

KENNEDY - Died at Ancaster, Saturday morning, after a lingering illness, Bella, second daughter of David Richardson, and beloved wife of William Kennedy, Bank of British North America, Hamilton. Funeral from her father's residence to St. John's Churchyard, on Monday, at 3 p.m.

 

TOUT - Died in this city, on May 9, suddenly, of heart disease, Mary Snell, beloved wife of William Tout, in the 56th year of her age. Deceased was a native of Devon, England. Funeral from her husband's residence, 313 Barton street east, at 3:30, Monday, May 11. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

STUART - Died on May 8, James M. Stuart, in the 38th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 92 James street south, on Monday, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

FLETCHER - Died in this city, John Fletcher, a native of the county of Leicester, England, aged 66. Funeral on Monday, at k o'clock, from 30 Simcoe street east. Friends please attend.

 

MCKEE - Died on May 9, William McKee, in the 39th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 73 Hunter street east, on Monday, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

Between 2;30 and 3 a.m. on Saturday, William McKee, a moulder residing at 73 Hunter street east and employed by the R. M. Wanzer Co., was run into by a freight train on the Northern & Northwestern Railway and received injuries which caused his death. The driver of the train which leaves for the north about half past two, noticed the man as the train was just on him, but was powerless to prevent the accident. Aid was immediately summoned and constables Harris and Coulter conveyed the man to the city hospital. Dr. Cochrane examined him and found that he had sustained frightful fractures of both ankles and that his face bones were terribly splintered and torn. He was apparently under the influence of liquor and quite unconscious. Dr. Cochrane had no hope of his recovery from the first, but did all in his power to relieve him. He died at about 9 o'clock Saturday morning without having recovered consciousness. He had been unwell for some days and was not able to do the usual amount of work. Friday afternoon he spoke to some of his fellow workmen about going fishing Saturday. He left his house about 7 o'clock Friday evening and was not again heard of by his family until word was sent from the city hospital that he was dead. He had a wife and three small children in poor circumstances. He was 39 years of age. The accident occurred north of the Barton street bridge.


An inquest will be held on the body of William McKee, killed Saturday morning on the Northern & Northwestern Railway, at 11 o'clock at his residence, 73 Hunter street east. Coroner Woolverton will conduct the inquest. There is some suspicion of foul play.

 

FERGUSON - (Brantford) Alexander Ferguson of the 90th Battalion of Winnipeg, who was killed in the Fish Creek fight and who was buried in Winnipeg last week, is the Alexander Ferguson, a son of a former Grand Trunk Railway station master in Brantford.

 

BARKER - (Toronto) The first boating accident of the season occurred in the bay yesterday afternoon. Charles Barker, a steam fitter, lost his life. He and a companion went out in a row boat, but had not proceeded far when the boat capsized. Both clung to the boat, but Barker sank, his chin catching on the gunwale and the pressure on his windpipe caused his death before assistance arrived.

 

HOLLAND - About 2:30 o'clock yesterday afternoon Thomas J. Holland, residing at 47 Mary street, left his home to go to Sunday school. Shortly afterward his wife went out, leaving three small children alone in the house, she intending to be gone only long enough to see a funeral leave a neighbour's house. While she was away the children, it is supposed, drew a coal out of the self-feeder which was in the room. The clothing of the youngest child, a girl only one year, became ignited, and no one being near to render aid, the child was frightfully burned. Mrs. Johnston, residing next door, saw the smoke issuing from the door and window, and with other people, did all that was possible to relieve the child whose clothing was almost entirely burned off its body, being blistered and charred from head to foot. Dr. Vernon was called in, but was unable to save the child's life as the flames had apparently burned her internally. She died before 5 o'clock after suffering terribly for fully an hour and a half. The floor and carpet around the stove where the child was found sitting were burned and one door of the stove was found a little open. Mrs. Holland was away from her home only about thirty minutes.

 

May 12, 1885

 

TRUSCOTT - Died in this city, on May 11, Lilliam Ruth, daughter of James and Mary Truscott, aged 3 years and 7 months. Funeral from her parents' residence, 66 Cathcart street, on Tuesday, May 12, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

DILLABAUGH - Died on May 9, Mrs. Mary Dillabaugh, aged 38 years. Funeral on Tuesday, May 12, at 1:15 o'clock, from the residence of her brother-in-law, Dr. E. H. Dillabaugh, to N. & NW Railway, thence to Caledonia. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.


CLAYTON - Died in Toronto, on May 10, at the residence of her father, 43 Homewood avenue, Trottie, eldest daughter of John Hirst, and wife of Harry G. Clayton, of Hamilton. Funeral will leave for Mount Pleasant cemetery, on Wednesday, May 13, at 3 o'clock p.m.

 

FITZGERALD - Died at the residence of H. D. Parkes, 266 Campbell avenue, Chicago, Ill., on May 10, George Edward, third son of William and Charlotte Fitzgerald, of 29 Bay street north, this city, aged 24 years. Funeral will take place from 29 Bay street north at 3:30 Wednesday afternoon.

 

POTTS - (Brantford) Sarah Holland, wife of Ald. Potts, is dead, aged 43.

 

SMITH - (Galt) A sad drowning accident occurred here this afternoon. A little son of William Smith, builder, had been in the habit of going to school by way of the railway track, and to-day fell into the race which runs under the track at Hume's dam. The body was discovered by one of the train hands and pulled out, but life was extinct.

 

May 13 1885

 

PHILIPS, MOORE - (Clark's Crossing, NWT) A messenger who arrived here last night says fighting has been going on since Saturday morning and was commencing for the third day when he left at 6 o'clock on Monday morning. Up to that time two men and sixteen wounded. Besides Philips of A Battery, Private T. Moore, No 3 Company, Grenadiers, Toronto, was killed Sunday night.

 

May 14, 1885

 

CARROLL - Died after a short and painful illness, Delia P., beloved wife of T. J. Carroll, in the 33rd year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, 104 Rebecca street, on Friday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

 

(Ottawa) There is intense excitement in the city over the taking of Batoche. At noon to-day the Minister of Militia issued at the entrance of his office a corrected list of the killed and wounded. Killed:

Captain FRENCH, commanding the Scouts

Lieutenant FITCH, of the 10th Grenadiers

Captain BROWN, of Boulton's Scouts

Private M. M. KIPPEN, of the surveyor's scouts

Private WHELER. of the 90th Battalion

 

LOHE - (Halifax) About midnight on April 25, while the barquentine, "Laura", Capt. Otter, was about twenty-five miles 0ff Cranberry Island, making for Canso, Herman R. Lohe,


a seaman, 21 years of age, fell overboard and was drowned.

 

May 15, 1885

 

GRAHAM - (Toronto) The body of a man about 60 years of age was found in the Don this morning. It was afterward identified as that of John Graham, a wealthy farmer near Newmarket. It is supposed he accidentally fell into the river.

 

May 16, 1885

 

HALLIDAY - Died on May 15, of convulsions, Freddie, infant son of William and Eliza Halliday, aged 5 days. Funeral from 131˝ Main street east, at 3 p.m., Saturday, May 16.

 

O'REGAN - (Halifax) Timothy O'Regan, 26 years of age, was found drowned this evening in the dock at the foot of Cornwallis street. He was missing since last night and how he got into the water is a mystery. An inquest will be held to-morrow.

 

BLYTH - (Ottawa) This morning on Walter street a little girl, four years old, daughter of Mr. Blyth, was playing in the yard in rear of her father's house when a cupboard which was standing there fell on her, killing her.

 

May 18, 1885

 

WORRAL - Died on May 16, of diphtheria, Gustav, fifth son of William and Susanna Worral, aged 12 years, 3 months, and 5 days. Funeral private from 6 Hunter street east.

 

SCANLON - Died in this city, May 17, Patrick Scanlon, aged 62 years. Funeral will leave the residence of Mr. James Doffy, 50 Cathcart street, on Tuesday, May 19, at 8:30 a.m. for St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

HARPER - The funeral of the late Robert J. Harper took place from his residence, 113 Caroline street south, yesterday afternoon. Deceased was a member of the lodge of Prentice Boys, and fifty members of that order walked in the funeral procession to the cemetery. The pall bearers were Messrs Daniel Jarvis, George Small, Archibald Wilson, R. Hinds, N. Boggs, and T. Love, members of the order. The burial service was performed by Rev. A. C. Crews, assisted at the grave by J. Wilson, chaplain of the lodge of which deceased was a member.

 

HARPER - (Brantford) Frances Harper, whose friends live near Canfield, was accidentally shot by her brother, aged 13. The girl died.


May 19, 1885

 

COOK - Died on Monday, May 18, at her husband's residence, Waterdown, Annie, beloved wife of Samuel Cook, aged 28 years, 2 months, and 18 days. Funeral will leave Waterdown, on Wednesday, May 20, at 12 o'clock noon.

 

ANDERSON - (St. Catharines) Gilbert Anderson, aged 82, died from injuries received by a runaway.

 

WATSON - (St. Catharines) Private Watson of the 90th Battalion, Winnipeg, whose death is just reported in the hospital at Saskatoon, was fatally wounded in the fight at Batoche. The Watson family came here from Toronto a number of years ago and resided in the east end of Niagara street. About five years ago the father, who is a carpenter, and the eldest daughter and the deceased settled in Winnipeg. The mother and one or two daughters and a son reside in the city, the young man being employed in McCalla's store. Deceased is said by those who knew him to be a fine young man and well liked. His sad death is a heavy blow to the family, he having been the eldest son and the pride of the family. Their loss is indeed a sad one. It is melancholy to contemplate that valuable lives like that of young Watson and many other equally precious have been sacrificed at the shrine of that inhuman and cowardly murderer and traitor, Riel.

 

MILLER - (Longford Mills) A lad named James Miller, about 15 years old, was feeding the jack ladder with logs at the large mill of the Longford Mill Co when he accidentally slipped off the log into about ten feet of water and was drowned. His body was recovered by the workmen who dived after him. Everything possible was done to restore life, but all failed. His parents reside near Campbellford, Ontario.

 

May 20, 1885

 

THOMPSON - Died on May 18, at the residence of her son-in-law, Charles Davidson, Glen Road, Rosedale, Toronto, Mrs. C. M. Thompson, aged 59 years. Funeral from the residence of J. B. Young, corner Park and Hannah streets, Hamilton, on Wednesday, May 22, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

CROSBY - (Guelph) Robert Crosby, a married man about 48 years of age, disappeared suddenly about two weeks ago. No trace of him could be obtained until to-day when his body was found in Goldie's mill dam. When last seen alive he was under the influence of liquor. It is supposed he fell into the river while in that state. He leaves a family of grown-up sons and daughters.


May 21, 1885

 

GREENAWAY - Died in this city, on May 20, at 66 Hughson street north, James, second son of Thomas Greenaway, aged 4 years. Funeral from the above address on Thursday, May 21, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

LEBESC - (Montreal) Mois Lebesc, a joiner by trade, while repairing the roof of the Grand Trunk locomotive sheds at Point St. Charles, to-day, fell a distance of 40 feet to the ground and was instantly killed.

 

PERRY - (Toronto) Capt Charles Perry, well known in steamboat, endurance, and curling circles, died to-day, aged 58.

 

PLUMB - (Toronto) Thomas S. Plumb, barrister, died suddenly to-night in convulsions. He had been slightly ailing since Sunday. He was 35 years of age and the son of Senator Plumb. He leaves a wife and two children.

 

CROWE - (Guelph) On Monday the body of George Crowe, son of John Crowe of Paisley, was found in Fisher's mill dam. The deceased attempted to pass over Stark's mill dam in a boat on April 25, but the boat upset and he was drowned.

 

May 22, 1885

 

HINES - Died on May 20, of inflammation, Horatio H. Hines, eldest son of Henry and Margaret Hines. Funeral from his late residence in Barton to Burlington cemetery on Friday, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

LUCAS - Died on Wednesday, May 20, 1885, George Ernest, infant son of Thomas Oliver and Sarah Jane Lucas. Funeral from their residence, No 40 Catherine street north, Friday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this Intimation.

 

JUSTICE - There seems to be hardly a doubt that Thomas Justice, who boarded with John Simmons of Wood street, has been drowned in the bay. In Monday's "Spectator" he was reported as missing and as having been seen on Mackay's wharf on Sunday evening by a lad named Connely. When the boy saw him he was sitting near the end of the wharf. He had a bottle of whiskey by him and appeared to be considerably under the influence of liquor. It is probable that he went to sleep and waking up in a dazed condition, walked off the edge of the dock. Tom Cross and several others of that locality have been grappling for the body at intervals ever since, but so far without success though yesterday afternoon they found the dark cloth cap he wore when he left Simmons's at noon on Sunday.

Justice was a quiet man about 30 years of age, addicted at times to heavy drinking. But he was always well behaved and appears to have been well liked by all who knew him.


For three months past he has been out of work and sober. Although he owed a pretty heavy board bill he did not feel depressed or out of sorts because he expected to get work on the "Southern Belle" when she started running again. For that reason the idea of suicide in not entertained. He was born and brought up in Hamilton and has a sister living in the city. It is alleged that he met a gang of young men Sunday afternoon who had several bottles of liquor. They got him intoxicated and the end came.

What little doubt there was yesterday as to the fate of Thomas Justice was dispelled about 8 o'clock last night when the body was found by Stephen Dunn and a number other men who were grappling for it. An outgoing propellor, leaving the west side of Mackay's wharf, probably stirred the body up because it was not at the bottom of the bay when discovered shortly after the propellor left. The patrol wagon was telephoned for and the remains were taken to the morgue at the city hospital. An enquiry will likely be held. The body was very little if at all bloated. Across the temple and side of the head there was a deep horrible gash and the skull was broken. In all probability this was caused by a blow from the propellor's screw, as blood was flowing freely from the wound when the body was taken from the water. If he had been struck by a sharp instrument and knocked into the bay from the wharf, no blood would have come from the wound after this long immersion. Justice has no relatives in the city beyond the sister previously mentioned.

 

May 23, 1885

 

LEES - Died in this city, on May 21, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. R. E. Williams, 327 York street, Mrs. Ann Lees, aged 78 years. Funeral from the above address on Sunday, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.

 

JUSTICE - Drowned in this city, on May 17, Thomas Justice. Funeral on Saturday, at 10 a.m.

 

GRIFFIN - Died on Friday, May 22, John W. Griffin, son of George D. Griffin, aged 18 years. Funeral from his father's residence, 516 Jarvis street, Toronto, on Monday, May 25, at 10:30 to Union station, thence to family burying ground at Waterdown.

 

TILLY - Died on May 22, the wife of George Tilly, aged 38 years and 5 months. Funeral from 71 Caroline street north, at 2 p.m. on Saturday, May 23. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BATTERSBY - Died in this city, on May 22, Harriet, relict of the late William Battersby, in the 64th year of her age. Funeral from the residence of George Land, Stinson street east, on Sunday, May 24, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


CAMPBELL - (Belleville) Lieutenant-Colonel A. A. Campbell, formerly commander of the 15th Battalion, and brother of the Minister of Justice, died at his residence in this city last night.

 

May 25, 1885

 

DILLON - Died in this city, on May 22, Michael, eldest son of John Dillon, aged 27 years.

The funeral of the late Michael Dillon took place from the residence of his father, John Dillon, 150 Bay street north, yesterday afternoon. Dillon was only 27 years of age, but for a man so young he was held in the highest esteem by all who knew him and he was well known. The 13th Battalion band of which deceased was a member attended the funeral in a body, heading the cortege. Deceased was also a member of the Emerald Beneficial Association, and about seventy-five of the members of branches 1 and 16 attended, the pall bearers being selected from its members. The burial service at St. Mary's church and the cemetery was performed by Rev. Father Hamel. Between 60 and 70 conveyances carried the friends to the cemetery and returned with a lot of truly mournful people.

 

BATEMAN - Died at 71 Wellington street south, Sunday, May 24, Thomas Edward, only son of Patrick and Ellen Bateman, aged 1 year and 3 months and 13 days. Funeral Monday at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GAUTHIER - (Montreal) Yesterday in honour of the Queen's birthday a number of persons had a picnic to St. Vincent de Paul on the steamer "Beauharnois". In consequence of the water being very low in the river, the steamer was unable to proceed so far; so the pleasure seekers were not landed. The majority of them, however, had plenty of liquor with them and got half tight. One man, named Oliver Gauthier, aged 21, an upholsterer by trade, working in the Pullman shop of the Grand Trunk Railway, was leaning against the rail on the hurricane deck telling a story to a friend when he overbalanced and fell into the river, his head being struck by the paddle wheels. The engines were at once reversed, but the unfortunate man sank, and the body has not yet been recovered.

 

May 26, 1885

 

BLUBERE - (Mitchell) A very severe thunderstorm passed over here yesterday at 3 o'clock. The lightning struck the barn of John Thompson of the 7th concession of Logan, firing the same destroying the contents and killing his hired man named William Blubere.


SHADDOCK - (London) A young man fishing Saturday on the river opposite a small island saw the body of a girl lying on the bank of the island which proved to be the body of Emma Shaddock who was playing with Thomas Home's grandson before he was drowned. The face and hands were decomposed, but the clothes and shoes were still on the body. The unfortunate girl's father was informed of the discovery and he immediately removed her to his house. The general supposition is that one of the children fell into the water and the other tried to assist and so both met that fate.

 

WELSH, FARMER, HARPER - (Toronto) The Queen's birthday celebration here was marred by two drowning accidents on the bay, both occurring about 4:30 during the sudden squall which sprang up. Two young lads named James Welsh, plumber, and William Hozack, while rowing home, were caught in the squall and the boat was capsized. Before assistance arrived, Welsh was drowned, but Hozack retained his hold of the capsized boat and was rescued.

Another boat containing three young men, William Tarlton, George Randall, and John Harper, and two girls, Etta Farmer and Jennie McEwen, was caught in a squall when opposite the new fort and capsized. Tarlton, Randall, and the girl, McEwen, succeeded in catching hold of the capsized boat. The girl, Farmer, threw her arms around Harper and they both sank and never rose again. Private Middleton of C Company, infantry school, jumped into a boat and succeeded with great difficulty in rescuing the other three, the girl McEwen, being unconscious. All three were properly looked after at the fort and speedily recovered.

 

May 27, 1885

 

CANT - Died at Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, on May 14, Rev. Andrew Cant, formerly minister of the English Presbyterian church, Tweedmouth, aged 69 years, father of Mr. J. Cant, Bank of British North America.

 

GIBSON - Died at Grimsby, on Tuesday, May 26, 1885, Malcolm Duncan, youngest son of the late R. L. Gibson, Esq., in his 4th year. Funeral from the family residence on Thursday, May 28, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

WILLIAMS - (St. Catharines) Capt Williams, a well known resident of this city for many years, was found dead in his bed Saturday last with a bottle partially filled with laudanum at his side. He had been in the habit of taking narcotics to produce sleep and whether he took an overdose by accident or design is not known.


WETHERALL - (Belleville) James Wetherall, an employee of the stove factory, fell from the upper deck of the steamer "Heron" into the bay near Bath last night and was drowned.

 

May 28, 1885

 

SYMINGTON - Died in this city at the residence of Mr. Coulson, 40 Catherine street north, May 27, R. S. Symington, late of Glasgow, Scotland. Funeral Friday at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend.

Mr. R. S. Symington, formerly electrician of Glasgow, Scotland, died suddenly in this city of apoplexy. He came to Hamilton with his family about two years ago.

 

CHICHESTER - Died in this city, on May 27, Sarah Chichester, relict of the late Arthur Chichester, aged 73 years. Funeral from her late residence, No 181 King William street, at J:30 p.m. to-day.

 

May 29, 1885

 

WARNER (Toronto) William Warner, the young lad who had his skull fractured yesterday by being struck with a fragment of a broken pulley, died in the hospital this morning.

 

May 30, 1885

 

PEER - Died in this city, on May 29, Benjamin Peer, in the 60th year of his age, a native of the County Cork, Ireland. Funeral will leave A. Dillon's residence, corner of John and King William streets, on Saturday, May 30, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

MACOOMB - (Niagara Falls) About noon to-day, Thomas C. Macoomb, who has made the town of Welland his home for some years past, jumped over the river bank near the new Suspension Bridge, falling a distance of about fifty feet, striking with his face on a fallen tree, and rolling down some twenty feet. When he was reached about twenty minutes after the fatal leap, he was dying, and lived only a few minutes. He came here from Welland last Monday, the Queen's birthday, to give an entertainment in the town hall, and has been drinking heavily ever since, and this tragic freak is attributed to that cause. He is well known throughout the frontier counties, having always taken a deep interest in the drama and of late years given dramatis plays in different towns with his little troup known as Macoomb's Merry Musicians.

 

June 1, 1885

 

ANDERSON - Died at Queen street south, on the morning of May 30, Allan, only son of A. A. Anderson, aged 9 years and 4 months. Funeral private.


FAIRBANKS - Died in this city, on May 30, after a long and painful illness, Henry Fairbanks, a native of London, England, aged 75 years. Funeral from his late residence, York Street, Burlington Heights, on Monday, June 1, at 4 p.m. Friends will please attend.

 

MALONEY - (London) The remains of the young man found at Delaware about two weeks ago have been identified by his mother as those of Edward H. Maloney, son of Mr. John Maloney of Bathurst street. He lost his life a year ago last February while trying to rescue his dog on the ice.

 

ELDRIDGE - (Halifax) A short time ago Capt. George Eldridge of the ship "N. B. Lewis" left his ship in New York and came to Yarmouth. He went to Richmond, a near town, and was taken ill. As fifty-five of his crew had been taken with the smallpox, it was supposed that he was suffering from the same. This proved true and this disease was of so virulent a type that he died last night. He came home via St. John and Digby and was in town for some days so that there is no knowing how generally the disease may have spread.

 

GAUTHIER - (Buckingham, Que) A shocking accident occurred in Ross Bros, turning shop. Basil Gauthier, aged 16, went alone into the shop to grind an axe and was caught by the machinery and horribly mangled. His lifeless remains were discovered by one of the blacksmiths shortly after the accident occurred.

 

BAUM - (Chatham) Francis Baum, who has been in jail here awaiting extradition, died at one o'clock to-day of heart disease. He had been ailing for some time but was thought to be recovering. An inquest will be held.

 

June 2, 1885

 

PUGH - Died after a long and painful illness of heart disease and dropsy, Willie H. Pugh, eldest son of William and Anna Pugh, aged 15 years and 7 months. Funeral from his parents' residence, 139 Barton street east, on Tuesday, June 2, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

NOONAN - Died in this city, on May 30, at 397 Macnab street north, Patrick Noonan, aged 85 years, a native of county Limerick, Ireland. Funeral from the above address on Tuesday, June 2, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

HARNEY - Died at Cote St. Antoine, on May 29, Edward Harney, late of Harney Bros., manager Royal Sewing Machine Company of Hamilton, Ontario, of Montreal, aged 42 years. RIP


June 3, 1885

 

JENNINGS - Died in this city, at 236 Cannon street east, on June 1, Willie, only son of John and Annie Jennings, aged 8 years and 10 months. Funeral from the above address on Wednesday, June 3, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.

 

HUTCHINSON - Died in this city, at the residence of his brother-in-law, Mr. Matthew Meek, 88 Macnab street north, on June 1, Joseph Hutchinson. Funeral from the above address on Wednesday, June 3, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

NICHOL - Died in Binbrook, on May 30, Isabella, beloved wife of Robert Nichol, in her 54th year, of consumption of the lungs, a native of Westmoreland, England.

 

June 4, 1885

 

HENERY - Captain John Henery, Barton street jail, died June 2, aged 50 years. Funeral Friday afternoon at 4 o'clock.

 

KENNEDY - (Caledonia) Mrs. Hugh Kennedy died at Chatham.

 

June 5, 1885

 

HENRY - Died in this city, on June 4, John Harold, only son of John and Lizzie Henry, aged 2 years, 8 months, and 14 days. Funeral from parents' residence, 40 West avenue north, on Friday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. Private.

 

LIVARY - (Montreal) A brakeman named Livary while coupling cars on a freight train at St. Lambert's junction this afternoon, fell and slipped under the cars and was instantly killed, his legs being severed from his body.

 

WIGHT - (Galt) Adam Wight, one of the pioneers of Beverly, died at his residence near Clyde on Thursday last, aged 81 years.

 

MCARTHUR - (Guelph) James McArthur, an old resident of Hillsburg, died suddenly on Tuesday.

 

June 6, 1885

 

GEARY - Died in Barton, on June 5, Martin Geary, in the 65th year of his age, a native of the county of Waterford, Ireland. Funeral will leave his late residence, King street east, on Sunday, June 7 at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


FLYNN - Died in this city, on June 5, William Timothy, youngest son of Daniel Flynn, aged 2 years and 8 months. Funeral from 23 Stuart street, on Sunday, at 9:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

PASSMORE - Died in this city, on June 5, at 105 Catherine street south, C. W. Passmore, in the 63rd year of his age. Funeral from the above address, on Sunday, June 7, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SCALLION - (St. Thomas) A sad accident occurred at the Canada Southern station here about 11 o'clock this morning, resulting in the death of James Scallion, an engineer on the Michigan Central Railway. Deceased was crossing the track when he was run over by a passing engine and instantly killed. He leaves a wife and two children.

 

June 8, 1885

 

PHILLIPS - Died in this city, on June 6, at 110 Bold street, Sarah, beloved wife of H. Phillips, aged 47 years. Funeral from the above address on Monday, June 8, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

MASON - Died in Brantford, on June 6, John James Mason, MD., M.R.C.S.E., in the 75th year of his age.

 

ROACH - (Niagara Falls) This morning at 10:30 a lad about 16 years, named John Roach, son of an engine driver, James Roach, of the Grand Trunk Railway, was shot dead by another lad named Charles Baige, about the same age. The two boys with two others who all work at Webb's brick yard went into Mr. Webb's house to get their week's salary, and Baige picked up a shotgun that was standing in the room which Mr. Webb had loaded for the purpose of shooting cats that had been annoying him by running over the bricks before they were properly dry. Baige, pointing it at young Roach, not thinking it was loaded, pulled the trigger. The contents struck Roach in the left cheek, killing him instantly. When Roach saw what he had done, he nearly went crazy and ran all the way down to the police station and gave himself up.

 

WONCH - (Barrie) Last night the wife of J. Wonch and his four children were burned to death in bed. Wonch escaped by jumping out of the window after a great but vain effort to rescue his wife and children, his shirt being burned off him in the attempt. Wonch is crazy with grief.

 

BRYANS - (Garden Hill) During a violent thunderstorm this morning, S. Bryans, a farmer, about 30 or 35 years of age, living about half a mile east of Garden Hill, was struck by lightning and instantly killed.


HALLIGAN - (Toronto) Daniel Halligan, a jockey, went for a sail on Ashbridge's bay Thursday. He has not been seen since and it is thought he has been drowned. The boat and his hat were found near Woodbine.

 

GALERNEAU - (Quebec) A scaffold, some seventy feet high, gave way this afternoon on the steeple of St. John's Roman Catholic church. Three men were precipitated to the ground. Louis Galerneau of Beauport was instantly killed. Joseph Savard is dying and Elziar Cardinal received internal injuries which may prove fatal.

 

June 9, 1885

 

FOX - Died at 149 Main street east, on Sunday, June 7, George James, only son of James Fox, aged 5 years and 9 months. Funeral from the above residence, on Tuesday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

LAIDMAN - Died in Binbrook, on June 6, Marmaduke Laidman, aged 71 years. Funeral from his late residence on Tuesday, June 9, at 1 p.m.

 

DALTON - Died in this city, on June 8, Airs. Elizabeth Dalton, aged 70 years, 8 months, and 21 days. Funeral from the residence of her son, 59 Robert street, on Wednesday, June 10, at 2 p.m. Friends will please attend.

 

BALMER - Died on June 8, 1885, Helen Dickson, wife of Stephen Balmer, in the 73rd year of her age, a native of Roxborough-shire, Scotland. Funeral from her late residence, 41 Peter street, on Wednesday, June 10, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

HENDRIE - (Montreal) The body of John Hendrie, one of the young men drowned at Lachine about eight days ago, was found opposite the city to-day by one of Joseph Vincent's employees.

 

ST.PIERRE - (Ottawa) A hotel keeper, named St.Pierre, aged 30, dropped dead from heart disease on York street to-day.

 

SAVARD - (Quebec) Edward Savard, one of the victims of Saturday's scaffold accident at St. John's Church, has since died from his injuries.

 

GILCHRIST - (Hespeler) This morning a man named Gilchrist, about 60 years of age, was found dead on the road about a mile from this place. Upon examination it was found that death was caused by apoplexy.

 

DUNCAN - (Port Rowan) Robert Duncan, a well-to-do farmer near this village committed suicide by hanging himself this afternoon in a barn. Insanity was the cause.


BOURGET - (Montreal) His Grace Mgr Bourget, Roman Catholic archbishop, died this morning.

 

BENSON - (Ottawa) Word has been received here of the death of Mr. Benson, M.P. for South Grenville, which occurred at his home at Cardinal this morning at 5 o'clock. The deceased gentleman was in his place in the House during the most of last week and appeared in his usual health. He left here on Thursday last for home with the intention of going on to New York to meet his son who is returning from England where he had gone for his health. Deceased was 57 years of age and was an Englishman by birth.

 

MINERS - (St. Catharine) An infant son of A. Miners fell into a cistern and was drowned.

 

PASSMORE - By the death of Christoper W. Passmore, Hamilton loses an excellent citizen and a good man. Mr. Passmore came to Hamilton from Plymouth, England, in 1850, and engaged in the paperhanging business. About 25 years ago he was considered one of the best alto singers in the country, and his fame as a vocalist went far and wide. He had three brothers residing in Brantford. Within eight months two died suddenly and Mr. Passmore remained in Brantford with the third brother until last Thursday when he returned home. On leaving the train here he was seized with apoplexy and died on Friday. The funeral which was very largely attended took place on Sunday. Service was held in the Church of the Ascension and the burial was made at Burlington cemetery. The pallbearers were Thomas Platt, J. H. Carmichael, Charles H. Egg, Charles Wilson, J. G. Buchanan and Stephen Searle. Among the mourners were the brother and three nephews of deceased, from Brantford, and a son-in-law from Montreal. The sudden death of Mr. Passmore is deeply regretted by a very large circle of warm friends. The deceased gentleman was well-informed on a multitude of subjects, was a staunch Conservative, and a thorough Englishman. He leaves four sons and two daughters, all grown-up.

 

June 10, 1885

 

MAGILL - Died at his father's residence, No 28 Liberty street, Hamilton, June 9, Morris I. Magill, only son of George Magill, late of Saltfleet, and brother of Mrs. George Long of this city. The funeral will take place from his father's residence, on Thursday, at 12:30 o'clock p.m. and will proceed from thence to Trinity Church, Glanford. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

June 11, 1885

 

BROWN - Died in this city, at 22 Cherry street, on June 9, Mrs. Isabella Brown, aged 65 years. Funeral from the above address on Thursday, June 11, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.


BILLINGS - (St. Thomas) Mr. G. Billings, a prominent farmer of Yarmouth who was in the city yesterday, was seized with violent pains in the stomach about 12 o'clock last night and died at o'clock this morning.

 

FLEMING - Burnett Fleming, the young man who was injured on the Northern and Northwestern Railway while trying to board a moving train, and who has been in the city hospital ever since, died there yesterday morning. Deceased did not rally although his injuries seem slight. The day after the accident he remarked to a companion who had called to see him, "Oh, It's only a little bruise. I'll. be out in a week" Little he thought that his words would come true in such a way. He will be buried on Friday, from his late residence, 23 Stuart street. He was formerly an officer of the Emerald Beneficial Association and that order will attend the funeral in a body.

 

June 12, 1885

 

FLEMING - Died in this city, on June 9, Bernard Fleming, in the 38th year of his age. The funeral will leave his late residence, 23 Stuart street east, on Friday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend. Members of branches 1 and 16 of the E.B.A. will meet at 1:30 to attend the funeral.

 

RYAN - (Montreal) A boy named Rudolph Ryan, aged 2 years and 9 months, died of glanders.

 

HOWELL - (Cobourg) Last night the body of Thomas Howell of Kendall, Ontario, was found in the factory creek in this town. He is supposed to have been drowned a week ago as he has been missing that length of time.

 

BUCK - (Brantford) The remains of the young woman found in a swamp near Waterford have been identified as those of Miss Buck of Caledonia, long since missing.

 

June 13, 1885

 

COLVILLE - Died in this city, on June 12, William Colville, second son of the late John Colville, Saltfleet. Funeral from his late residence, 22 Hess street south, at 3:30 o'clock on Monday, June 15. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

JOHNSON - (London) Mr. B. Johnson, of the Grand Trunk Railway, of London East, lost a little girl who was drowned in a cistern last night.

 

HOWELL - John Howell, a farm hand working for Stephen Speck of Waterdown, died at an


 early hour yesterday morning from internal injuries received from a kick by a horse. He was driving a team of horses belonging to Mr. Speck Thursday evening. One of them was decidedly frisky and in attempting to soothe her, she kicked him in the abdomen. His fell to the ground almost senseless. Help came and he was taken to his employer's house. Dr. McGregor and his brother were sent for. The two physicians did all that they could for the unfortunate man, but their efforts were unavailing. He lingered in great agony through the night. The kick left no external marks, but he was probably ruptured.

He was born and brought up around Waterdown. He was a young man, not more than 25 years of age, steady, respectable, and well thought of.

 

June 15, 1885

 

REID - Died in this city, on June 13, James Reid, son of William Reid, late of Hamilton, now of London. The funeral will leave his brother's residence, No 8 Cherry street, at 3 o'clock on Monday, June 15. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

PUTNAM - (Smithville) Two sons of Lorenzo Putnam were drowned near here this morning while bathing.

 

EWING - (Walkerton) This afternoon a number of high school students were swimming at Saugeen when one of their number named John Ewing suddenly cried out and sank to rise no more. He was 21 years of age and an expert swimmer. His parents live near Wiarton. The body was recovered.

 

ROONEY - (Ottawa) A young man named Rooney was killed at Eddy's lumber yard, Hull, on Saturday, by a stick of timber falling on him.

 

HUNTER - (Guelph) Mr. John Hunter, who carried on business a few years ago in the store now occupied by Mrs. Pass, died in Ottawa on Thursday.

 

June 16, 1885

 

WEBSTER - Died in this city, on June 14, Russell Alexander, youngest son of Edward and Annie Webster, aged 2 years and 2 months. Funeral will leave the parents' residence, No 46 Cannon street east, on Tuesday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CAMPBELL - Died in this city, on June 14, Lizzie, youngest daughter of Kenneth Campbell, of Puslinch, aged 22 years and 9 months. Funeral on Tuesday, June 16, at 9 a.m. from 152 James street north for Morriston cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


ALLEN - Died in this city, on June 13, John Allen, aged 28 years and 2 months. Funeral from his late residence, 55 Hunter street east, on Tuesday, June 16, at 9:30 a.m. to Rock Bay cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

FARRELL - Died on June 15, Katie Farrell, third daughter of James Farrell. Funeral from her late residence, 222 Hughson street north, at 2 o'clock on Wednesday. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

JARVIS - Died in this city, on Monday, June 15, Samuel Jarvis, of Bedford, England, aged 40 years. Funeral from No 2 Augusta street, on Wednesday, at 3 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Mr, Samuel Jarvis, for a good many years a citizen of Hamilton and sexton of Macnab Street Presbyterian Church, died yesterday at his home, No 2 Augusta street, after a lingering and distressing illness. For many months past he suffered intensely from an abscess in the brain which resulted in paralysis and finally death. The deceased had many good qualities of mind and heart. He will long be affectionately remembered by his friends. The funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon.

 

VANALLEN - Died in this city, on June 15, Isabella, wife of Eli VanAllen, aged 46 years. Funeral on Wednesday, at 3 p.m., from her husband's residence, No 5 Bay street south. Friends will please accept this intimation.

There are many in Hamilton who will be saddened by the news of the death of Mrs. Eli VanAllen which occurred yesterday at the family residence, 5 Bay street south. The deceased lady exemplified in her life many of the graces which distinguish the Christian character, and her influence was widely felt for good, directly and indirectly, both by personal example and practical earnest effort. Her death will be a great loss to the Ladies Aid Society of the Centenary Methodist Church of which she was a prominent and active member. But the genuineness of her spiritual life was most plainly shown by the patience and fortitude with which she bore an unusually painful illness. Mrs. VanAllen was a truly good woman, and her memory will be kept green in the hearts of all who knew her well. The funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon from the family residence.

 

CHOATE - (London) Mrs. William Choate of Ingersoll, while labouring under a fit of mental depression, threw herself in front of the Atlantic express from the west yesterday and was instantly killed.

 

SINCLAIR - (Quebec) yesterday morning David Sinclair, a sailor, while assisting some of his companions who were intoxicated to board the vessel, fell over the wharf and was drowned.

 


June 17, 1885

 

MEREDITH - Died on June 14, at San Diego, California, of consumption, Dr. William Notman Meredith, of Detroit, formerly of Hamilton.

 

BAMPFIELD - Died at Niagara Falls, on Monday, June 15, 1885, Clara, wife of Mr. James Bampfield, aged 32 years. Funeral on Wednesday, June 17, at 2 o'clock p.m., from the residence, River Front, to Fairview cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GUILMETTE - ( Quebec) A boy named Guilmette, 11 years of age, while playing on some booms at South Quebec, fell into the river and before assistance could reach him was drowned.

 

ELLIOTT - (London) The funeral of the late Skeffington Connor Elliott took place this afternoon with military honours. It was headed by the band of the Seventh Battalion and attended by the members of the police forces, companies of the Seventh Fusiliers, cavalry, artillery, Foresters, the Board of Education, the Board of Aldermen, members of the law association, a deputation from the Huron Synod, and a long list of citizens. A vast crowd lined the way of the procession for a couple of miles.

 

June 13, 1885

 

MARTIN, SOMERVILLE - (Mattawa) On the 7th instant, seven men working for Waldie & Co at the head of the Temiscomingue were towing a lumberman's boat when they upset at the head of the Quinze rapids and all were drowned. The only names yet known are Robert Martin and two Somervilles.

 

SOMERVILLE - (Toronto) Alexander Somerville, the Whistler of the Plough, died this afternoon at his boarding house on York street. His funeral takes place on Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock. He was well known throughout Canada as a contributor to the press and had many friends.

 

BROWN - (Toronto) Walter Brown, about 9 years of age, fell off a log at the Credit Valley wharf and was drowned. His father is a storekeeper on Elizabeth street. The body was recovered about an hour afterward.

 

RINGFRET - (Montreal) F. O. Ringfret, an advocated member of the law firm of Geoffrion, Ringfret, and Douin, died to-day, aged 34. He was for many years a partner of Sir George Cartier.


WHEELER (Brantford) The girl Wheeler, who was mangled by falling at the cotton mills, died in hospital.

 

June 19, 1885

 

SMITHERS - (Montreal) A ten-year-old boy named James Smithers fell into the canal near St. Gabriel docks and was drowned.

 

BROWN - (London) Walter J. Brown, a Toronto boy, was playing on a raft at the foot of Simcoe street when a large Newfoundland dog jumped aboard and knocked him into the water. The dog followed him and started to swim to the shore. The boy grasped the dog's tail and would in all probability have been towed safely in, had not some one thrown a stone which attracted the dog's attention and he made a plunge after it. The boy let go his hold and sank to the bottom. The deceased was eight years old and an only son.

 

COWLEY - (Galt) The widow of Mr. William Cowley died on Thursday last.

 

NEAR - (Lynden) Last Sunday afternoon an unmarried woman, Hester Near, aged about 25 years, committed suicide by drowning herself in a pond on the farm of Mr. Robert Manning, about two miles south of Harrisburg. Shortly after dinner she left the house of Mr. John Taylor accompanied by her three-year-old daughter to go across the fields to a neighbour's house. When they got to the pond, she sent the little girl back to Taylor's for a drink. Some person then returned with the child and discovered the suicide. The deceased had taken off her shoes and stockings and folded up her sunbonnet, putting it is a conspicuous place. She had previously taken poison which failed to accomplish the work but made her very sick without however arousing suspicion. No definite reason is assigned as to why she should commit so rash an act.

 

June 20, 1885

 

GILROY - Died at Holstein, on June 18, Joanna Honeycomb, beloved wife of G. R. Gilroy, and sister of Mrs. William Hancock, in the 41st year of her age.

 

WATSON - (Toronto) The body found floating in the bay yesterday has been identified as Charles Watson of this city. The brother who identified him says he went fishing on Tuesday last and has not been heard of since. The brother took the corpse for burial. No inquest was held.

 

KILGALLEN - (Montreal) An old woman named Annie Kilgallen was found dead when the police went to call her from one of the cells in No 5 station this morning. She had applied for protection during the night. The coroner held an inquest and returned a verdict of death from syncope of the heart.


STEWART - (Montreal) A farmer's child named Harvey Burton Stewart attempted to climb upon the wheel of a wagon standing at the door of a farmhouse yesterday, and the driver, not noticing the little fellow, started the horses when the child fell head foremost upon the hard ground, breaking his neck and killing him instantly.

 

BENNETT - (Brantford) Charles Bennett, section foreman of the Brantford and Tillsonburg Railway, was drowned in the Grand River below the dam last night. Bennett, leaving some companions on the river bank, walked about half way over the dam and commenced fishing. No person being close enough to tell how the accident happened, it is supposed that Bennett must have been moving about the slippery boards of the dam, and slipping, fell into the river.

Being a good swimmer he made for the shore, but a strong current gradually carried him down towards the railroad bridge near which he sank to the bottom. Parties on the shore gave the alarm, but he sank before assistance could reach him. His body was not recovered until about noon to-day. Deceased was about 45 years of age, a member of the I.O.O.F at Niagara Falls, and also a Mason. He leaves a wife and three children. The funeral on Sunday will be conducted by the Oddfellows.

 

MADDOCKS - (London) Herbert Maddocks, 15 years of age, son of Thomas Maddocks, living on Maitland street, was drowned this afternoon while bathing in the river above Saunby's mill.

 

HACHIE - (Ottawa) A young man named Hachie, a clerk in the post office of the House of Commons, was drowned in the Ottawa river this evening.

 

June 22, 1885

 

DAVIES - Died in this city, at his late residence, 81 John street north, on June 20, Warren Davies, formerly of Millfrod Haven, Pembrokeshire, England. Funeral from the above address on Monday, June 22, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.

 

MCDERMOTT - Died at 38 Barton street, on Friday, June 19, Maggie, second daughter of James McDermott, in the 30th year of her age. Funeral will leave the above address on Monday, at 11 o'clock to the G.T.R. station and thence by train to Port Credit. Friends accept this intimation.

 

GROVES - Died on Sunday, June 21, James Alfred, youngest son of Samuel and Eliza Groves, aged 1 year and 3 months. The funeral will take place to-day at 3 p.m. from 125 East avenue north. Friends and acquaintances are requested to accept this intimation.


CARTER - (Toronto) William Carter suicided here last night by taking a dose of Paris green. He had been living apart from his wife for some time and it is believed his domestic troubles and excessive drinking of late have been weighing heavily on his mind.

 

WATSON - (Waterdown) The infant son of Rev. Mr. Watson was taken sick on Thursday with diphtheria and died very suddenly on Friday morning. In connection with this disease some other throat complaint set in and the two soon wrought their work. In consequence of the contagious nature of the disease the body was interred in the evening of the same day.

 

June 23, 1885

 

PEARSON - Died at the city hospital, of consumption, C. Pearson, in the 30th year of his age. Funeral from the residence of W. Aitchison, 23 Bay street north, on Wednesday afternoon, at 4 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.

 

CADE - The announcement of Edward Cade's death on the Grand Trunk Railway near London yesterday morning was made in last evening's "Spectator". He was a Grand Trunk Railway brakeman and lived on Bay street north in this city. The unfortunate man alighted in order to pull out a coupling pin, and while walking on the track caught his foot in a frog. He was unable to extricate it in time to get out of the way of the approaching train. The cars struck him from behind, throwing him on his face right across the track, and the whole train passed over his body, tearing off his legs at the thigh and mangling him terribly. He was placed on a car and brought to the depot, but died on the way. Cade was a brakeman on No 26, a mixed train which had reached London from Chatham at 12:35 and at 1:30 was proceeding east when he lost his life. He was between 29 and 30 years of age and leaves a widow and two children. The remains reached Hamilton yesterday afternoon and were accompanied by his sorrowing comrades.

 

June 24, 1885

 

LAND - Died on Monday, June 22, at her late residence, 159 Main street west, after a long and painful illness, Ellen, widow of the late William Land, in the 75th year of her age. The funeral will take place from the above address at 3 o'clock on Wednesday, June 24. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

OXLEY - (Toronto) It is believed by the police that a woman named Mrs. Oxley was outraged and murdered at the York street station, four miles from Toronto, last night, but the affair at present is shrouded in mystery. At midnight a G.T.R. employee named Howarth heard screams for help in a woman's voice near the dumping house and upon running to the scene found a half-naked woman struggling in the grasp of two men, one of whom held a revolver at her breast.


On his appearance the men pointed pistols at his head and threatened to blow his brains out if he did not leave. He left. This morning he visited the scene and found a dress, petticoat, one shoe, a hat, and chemise, marked Mrs. Oxley, H. C. which was stained with blood. He reported the case to the city detectives who are investigating.

 

NEWTON - (Gravenhurst) During the gale which blew steadily all day here, a tree standing beside the Musqull Road near the railway crossing, was blown down, instantly killing a man named Richard Newton who was walking along the road at that time. Newton leaves a family of two.

 

June 25, 1885

 

MEREDITH - The funeral of the late Dr. W. N. Meredith will leave the G.T.R. station, Dundas, at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 25. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BRENNAN - Died in this city, on June 24, Frances T. Brennan, aged 23 years. Funeral from No 5 Market Square, on Friday, June 26, at 8:30 a.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BRUNT - Died on June 24, Samuel Brunt, aged 54 years. Funeral from the residence, No 7 George street, on Saturday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MILLS - Died on Monday, June 22, at St. Ignace, Michigan, Mary Matilda, wife of Samuel Dillon Mills, and eldest daughter of Dr. Alfred Morson, late of Hamilton.

 

LABELLE - (Montreal) Louis Labelle was killed on the steamship "Lake Huron" of the Beaver line to-day by a bar of iron falling on his head from a sling while being hoisted.

 

FROST - (Halifax) A young man named Charles Frost was drowned this morning in Fanning's lake, Carlton, Yarmouth county, by the upsetting of a boat in a squall.

 

June 26, 1885

 

ELLIOTT - (Ottawa) Coroner Robillard this afternoon empanelled a jury in the case of the death of young Elliott, and the jury, after viewing the body, decided that a post mortem examination was necessary, and adjourned till 8 o'clock to allow the doctors time for the autopsy. Pinelli, the Italian who dealt young Elliott his death blow, is now in the cells. He evinced little concern when told of his victim's death.


MCINNES, MAGHER - (Halifax) At the old Sydney mines Colliery this afternoon, Neil McInnes, aged 59, and Thomas Magher, aged 42, were knocked down by the cars and instantly killed as they were approaching the bottom shaft. They had just finished their day's work and were about to go above ground.

 

CASE - (Dundas) On Thursday last Patrick Case died at his residence in the west end of town. He had been in delicate health for a number of years and it was to one of his attacks of serious illness that he finally succumbed. Mr. Case was a native of Ireland and came to Dundas some thirty years ago. He was a quiet, unassuming man and always highly respected as a citizen.

 

June 27, 1885

 

HATT - Died at Dundas, on June 26, Thomas Hatt, Sr., aged 71 years. Funeral from his late residence, on Sunday, June 28, at 2 o'clock p.m., to Ancaster cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GIBSON - Died at Scarborough, on Thursday, June 25, Mr. George Gibson, in the 50th year of his age. The funeral will take place on Saturday, at 3 o'clock.

 

LAWSON - Died at his late residence, No 55 Macnab street south, at 3:15 p.m., Friday, June 26, Alexander Lawson, aged 46 years and 9 months. Funeral from his late residence, Sunday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock.

 

BREEMAN - (Chatham) Yesterday afternoon a little boy about 3 years old, the son of John Breeman, was killed by being run over by his father's wagon.

 

WILLIAMSON - (Toronto) Thomas Williamson, a young man, was drowned to-day at Hanlan's Point. He was bathing in the Waterworks cut where the water was not more that seven feet deep when he was seized with cramps and sank. The body was recovered. Deceased leaves a wife.

 

June 29, 1885

 

MCCRIMMON - (Wingham) A deaf and dumb lad named Duncan McCrimmon, aged 16, was drowned in the river Maitland here this afternoon while bathing. The body was recovered.

 

MOODY - (Beamsville) Charles Moody, a labourer, was last night killed on the track about one mile west of Beamsville. When found he was quite dead, both legs being cut off by a passing train, another victim, it is supposed, to intemperance.


FARLEIGH - (Gananoque) The village was startled this morning by an alarm on the fire bell and it was soon made known that Mrs. Dr. Farleigh and her baby were missing from the house. Yesterday the doctor was away at Napanee and arrived home about daylight this morning. On entering the house he could not find his wife nor child. Becoming alarmed he roused the neighbours and a general search was made. About six o'clock Mrs. Farleigh's body was found in a stooping position partly lying in the water at Squaw Point. She was quite dead, and had evidently walked from the house to where she was found. The baby has not yet been found, but search is still being made, and it is certain that the body is somewhere in the water. The doctor's grief is heartrending. The child has been sick ever since it was born last October and needing anxious care. The long and anxious watching seems to have affected Mrs. Farleigh's mind.

 

ATKINSON - Joseph Atkinson, a young man of respectable parentage, a painter by trade, was very drunk when P. O. Hallisy met him on Friday. The constable took him to the cells, and on Saturday morning he was sent to jail for forty days in default of paying a $4 fine. The liquor had had a bad effect on him. He was shaky and nervous and his whole system was wracked and aching from the effects of his debauch. He had a sort of fit almost immediately after he reached the jail. Finally delirium tremens grappled him, and though his jail physician did all in his power for him, the young man's system was not equal to the strain and last evening he died. Coroner White was notified and an inquest will be held at the jail at 11 o'clock this morning. Atkinson was about 26 years of age. He was a good-natured young fellow and was his own worst enemy. He had plenty of friends in the city who will regret to hear of his terrible end.

 

June 30, 1885

 

BARKER - Died in this city, at 57 Burlington street, on Monday, June 29, Jessie, beloved wife of Daniel Barker, aged 41 years and 4 months. Funeral from the above address, on Wednesday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

HARGROVE - Died in this city on June 29, at 94 Emerald street north, Henry, aged 11 years and 2 months, only son of Henry and Catherine Hargrove. Funeral to-day. Private.

 

BERRY - (Toronto) For the past three weeks Fred Berry, a well educated and well connected young man, has been living chiefly on whiskey, taking almost nothing in the shape of food. He was turned out of his situation last week at Lemay's Hotel. He went to McKay's tavern on Saturday, and this morning he was found dead in the water closet.


MARTIN - (Montreal) The coroner held an inquest on the body of the man found in the river yesterday, when a verdict of suicide was returned. Mr. Martin, residing at 143 Champlain street, went to the morgue to-day and by a gold watch chain and other articles found on the body he recognized it as that of his son, Solomon. Disappointment in love was the cause of the act.

 

MCKILLOP - Mrs. McKillop, who formerly kept a candy store on James street north, died at the city hospital on Sunday.

 

MORRISON - We are not without daily reminders of the common lot of humanity. Not a day passes in which the mourners do not go about the streets and bring home to us the solemn fact that death is common and that all men must come to dust. But it seldom occurs that in one household two persons are compelled to obey the dread summons in one evening. This sad event occurred last night at 132 Hughson street north, the residence of Mr. A. R. Morrison. Mr. Morrison's eldest son, a young man about 29 years of age, and an invalid, having suffered from heart disease for two years past, returned home from a visit to St. Thomas only two or three days ago. Last night about 9 o'clock he was in the yard in rear of the house alone. He was seen to reel and fall to the ground. Loving arms bore him into the house and medical assistance was immediately sent for.

But the young man had received his death stroke and expired a few minutes after being taken into the house and before the arrival of the physicians. Among those who had hastened to his assistance was his mother. Naturally of a delicate constitution, the shock of her son's death proved too severe for the poor lady, and she was seized with a paroxysm of the heart which defied the skill of the medical attendants. Within twenty minutes after her son's lifeless form had been borne into the house, Mrs. Morrison had followed him into the silent land. The remaining members of the family, which is a highly intelligent and cultivated one, do not lack the sympathy of many warm friends in this sad and sudden bereavement. Mother and son will be buried together to-morrow afternoon.

 

July 1, 1885

 

MORRISON - Died in this city, on June 29, at 132 Hughson street north, Jane Campbell, beloved wife of Alexander R. Morrison, aged 55 years. Funeral from the above address on Wednesday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

MORRISON - Died in this city, on June 29, at 132 Hughson street north, Archibald C, aged 29 years, eldest son of Alexander and Jane Campbell Morrison. Funeral from the above address, at 2 p.m. on Wednesday. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.


FORREST - Died in this city, on June 30, James Forrest, aged 62 years. Funeral from his father's residence, No 143 Park street north, Wednesday, July 1, at 3:30 Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

DALLAS - Died in this city, on June 30, after a long and painful illness, Annie, youngest and beloved daughter of Charlotte and Donald Dallas, aged 22 years and 20 days. Funeral to take place from her father's residence, 172 York street, on Thursday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

TYSON - (St. Catharines) Orvin Tyson, aged 10, fell into lock 2, and was drowned.

 

July 2. 1885

 

OTTER, BOLTON - (Toronto) Another lamentable boating accident occurred here this afternoon. Frank Otter, a draughtsman, and Minnie Bolton of Riverside, along with two sisters, were in a small sail boat on the bay when a strong wind sprang up and blew their boat three-quarters of a mile into the lake. The boat capsized and Otter and Miss Bolton were drowned, the others being rescued.

 

HARDY - (Port Perry) Three young men named Thomas McBrien, Isaac Vipond, and Martin Hardy, all of Brooklyn, Ontario, were out on Lake Scugog this morning in a small boat, and when near Scugog Island, about three-quarters of mile from here, one of them made a mis-stroke of the oar and the boat capsized. Vipond and McBrien clung to the boat and drifted ashore. Hardy, being unable to swim, was drowned. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

MORRIS - William Morris, market gardener of Wentworth street, lost his life by drowning in the bay last evening. He was with a companion named Kinraid in a small row boat and when about a mile out of Dynes's it capsized. Kinraid clung to the boat and was rescued by three men named Hedley, Smith, and Arthurs, who saw the accident from the shore and put out with all possible speed, but they were too late to save poor Morris. His body was recovered and brought to land, and Coroner Dr. Mackelcan was notified by telephone. The doctor, however, declined to act until he had received further particulars of the accident.

 

July 3. 1885

 

ELLICOTT - Died on July 2, of congestion of the lungs, at the residence of his brother-in-law, Joseph Philp, 15 Barton street east, William H. Ellicott. Funeral from the above address on Saturday, July 4, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.


BOYCE - Died on July 2, at 52 Bay street north, John, youngest son of F. D. Boyce. Funeral at 2 p.m. on Saturday. Friends please accept this intimation.

 

MURPHY - (Toronto) An adjourned inquest on the body of Maurice Murphy, found in the Rosedale ravine last Friday, was held to-night. Evidence was given that Murphy had a considerable sum of money in his possession when last seen alive, and that everything pointed to murder being committed. The jury brought in a verdict of wilful murder being committed. The jury brought in a verdict of wilful murder against a party or parties unknown.

 

HUGHES - (Quebec) William Hughes, a sailor on board the barque "Tivoli", fell from the mast yesterday. He was instantly killed.

 

July 4, 1885

 

SMITH - Died at Mountain Hall, the residence of his son, E. D. Smith, Sylvester Smith, in the 63rd year of his age. Funeral at 2 p.m., on Monday, July 6. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

WILLIAMS - (Ottawa) There is universal regret here over the sad news of the death of Lieutenant-Colonel Williams, M.P. while with his regiment in the Northwest. No man in the House was more generally respected than the deceased gentleman. It will be remembered that it was he who made an offer to the home authorities to organize a picket regiment from the Canadian volunteer militia to go to the Soudan. Later when the Northwest trouble broke out he went to the front in command of six companies taken from the battalion of which he is Lieutenant-Colonel, the 46th East Durham, and with them he led one wing of the charge at Batoche. He was a farmer, was educated at Upper Canada College and at the Edinburgh University, was chairman of the Port Hope harbour commission, president of the Midland Loan and Savings Co., a director of the Midland Railway, and commanded the Wimbledon team of riflemen in 1880. He was first returned for East Durham to the Ontario Legislature in 1867 and re-elected by acclamation in 1871, was first elected to the Commons in 1878 and again in 1882. He was 48 years of age.

 

GILROY - (Toronto) John Gilroy while excavating in sand pits on Bloor street was fatally injured by the sides of the pit in which he was working caving in. He died four hours after being extricated.

 

SMITH - (Toronto) Thomas Smith, a boarder at 240 Wellington street west, was found dead this evening in a bath which, however, was empty. It is supposed he had been stricken down by heart disease while in the bathroom and had fallen forward into the bath. He was 26 years of age and much addicted to drink.


CHISHOLM - (Halifax) John Chisholm, mate of the ferry steamer "May Flower" in Pictou harbour, yesterday dropped dead on the deck of the vessel while at work.

 

HENRY - (Halifax) William Henry, a young man belonging to Musquodobois, was accidentally drowned at Sheet's harbour last night.

 

DOOLEY - (London) Mrs. Ann Dooley, formerly on Mount Mellick, Ireland, died at the Mount Hope Orphanage yesterday at the age of 104 years.

 

RANGLE - (Stouffville) About 4 o'clock this afternoon, Henry Rangle and George Cline were hoeing corn at Mr. D. B. Hoker's farm on the 6th concession of Markham. Mr. Hoker, seeing a thunderstorm approaching, left his men and took his horses to the stable some 60 rods distant. About five minutes later, there was a flash of lightning and Mr. Hoker saw the two men suddenly fall. On going to them, Mr. Rangle presented a terrible sight. His hair was completely burned off his head, his clothes and boots torn to shreds and burned. The hoe he was using was broken and thrown some distance away. Death must have been instantaneous. Mr. Cline was stunned, but in about five minutes was able to rise and walk to the house. Dr. Sangster was summoned and pronounced Cline in a critical condition. Rangle was in the prime of life and leaves a wife and three children.

 

July 7, 1885

 

SUTTON - Died in this city, at 129 Queen street south, on July 5, Henry Sutton, aged 40 years and 6 months. Funeral from the above address on Tuesday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.

 

GRIFFITHS - Died in this city, on July 5, Margaret, widow of the late Evan H. Griffiths, in the 88th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, 12 Upper Cathcart street, on Tuesday, July 7, at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

KRETSCHMANN - Died at Toronto, on Sunday, July 5, Henry L. Kretschmann, in his 51st year. Funeral will leave the G.T.R. station on arrival of the 1:55 train, Tuesday afternoon. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

BANCROFT - Died at her husband's residence, St. Johns, PQ, on July 6, after a long illness, Mary, beloved wife of James Bancroft, Esq., late manager, Merchants Bank, Hamilton.

 

POWER - (Toronto) Rev. Father Power, chaplain of the House of Providence, died early yesterday morning and will be buried this afternoon. The deceased priest came to Canada about seven years ago and was for some time assistant parish priest at St. Catharines.


BRUTON - A dispatch from Buffalo announces the death by drowning of H. A. Bruton of that city. Mr. Bruton and Frank J. White left Dunkirk on Thursday in a cat-rigged yacht and were not heard of again till Sunday night. Two longshoremen reported that they saw the yacht capsize Thursday afternoon off Stoney Point, five miles from Buffalo on the lake shore in a gale. Mr. Bruton was for years secretary of the Young Men's Christian Association of this city, and was also manager of the Hamilton Gymnasium and teacher of swimming at Charlton's swimming baths. He went to Buffalo from this city about a year ago and was connected with the Young Men's Christian Association and a gymnasium there. He was an expert at swimming. He has relatives and many friends in this city.

 

July 8, 1885

 

WALKER - Died in this city, at 65 John street north, on July 6, John Walker, a native of London, England, beloved son of John and Caroline Walker, aged 21 years and 10 months. Funeral from the above address, on Wednesday, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

ROBINSON, KASAUBE - (Dunnville) At noon to-day, a sad drowning accident occurred on the Grand River about a mile above this place. Sanford Robinson and Albert Kasaube towed a sail boat down and were rowing back when the boat ran upon a stump, and in pushing it off it is supposed the boat upset and both were drowned. The bodies were recovered.

 

DENNIS - Colonel J. Stoughton Dennis, late Deputy Minister of the Interior, died this afternoon at his home at Lake Kingmore, a few miles out of the city. Colonel Dennis resigned the position of Deputy Minister of the Interior two years ago and accepted the office of Surveyor-General which position he held for some time. His name is well known in connection with public lands and administration for many years past, and his death is deeply regretted. (Ottawa)

 

TABER - (Brantford) Mrs. S. Taber of Dallas, Texas, eldest daughter of Mrs. Workman of this city, died at her home in Texas on Sunday of typhoid fever.

 

July 9, 1885

 

ZOELLER - Died in this city, on July 8, John Zoeller, aged 27 years. Funeral from his late residence, 109 James street north, on Thursday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

MAYHEW - Died in this city, on July 7, Vernon, only son of John Mayhew, aged 2 years and 3 days. Funeral from his father's residence, 152 King street west, on Thursday, July 9, at 2 p.m.


ROCICOT - (Montreal) Mrs. Louis Rocicot, aged 49, wife of a farmer of LaPrairie, while taking herself into a wagon at Hochelaga last night, was thrown on the sidewalk by a horse being startled by a locomotive whistling. Concussion of the brain ensued and she died shortly afterward.

 

MURROL - (Ottawa) John Murrol, aged 50, was to-day working at McClement's mill on a lumber carriage's track, thirty feet above the ground. He complained of feeling unwell but continued to work. Presently the workmen noticed him reel as if dizzy, and before assistance could reach him, he fell to the ground and was picked up dead.

 

GAGE - (Ottawa) Louis Gage, a Montreal peddler, entered Mrs. Blair's house in Winchesterville this evening and complained of pain in the region of the heart. In five minutes after, he was dead.

 

ASHBY - (Toronto) Arthur Ashby, 10 years of age, son of Charles Ashby, Hayter street, was drowned while bathing in the river Don this afternoon. The body was recovered about two hours afterward.

 

PERRY - (Fergus) A ten-year-old son of Mr. R. H. Perry, druggist of this place, was bathing in the Grand River to-day. He got beyond his depth and sank. The body was not recovered until after two hours' search when life was extinct.

 

MALONEY, STUTT - The West Flamborough paper mill is a substantial stone building situated in Crooks Hollow in West Flamborough township about eight miles from Hamilton. It is owned by James Stutt and sons who also carry on the business. Yesterday afternoon at 4:30 this place was the scene of a terrible accident. The boiler and engine house, a substantial stone building, stood some fifteen or twenty feet from the main building. The mill, being run by water power as well as steam, the boiler had not been used for several months and it was repaired recently to get it for use again. It was decided to get up steam yesterday afternoon. In starting up, the dome did not work properly and the flues became red hot before the water began to flow through them. Almost immediately after the water entered the flues the boiler burst. It was completely demolished and hurled out of the building. The dome was blown 250 yards into a swamp. Some of the pieces were picked up 300 yards away down by the old Brock road. A stick of timber from the roof of the boiler house flew high into the air over the tops of the houses and landed 75 yards away. In falling it was driven straight into the ground and still remains there, standing upright, a proof of the terrific force of the explosion. Not only was the boiler house unroofed, but the roof of the main building was also torn off and shattered and the debris scattered in every direction.

But these were not the most curious results of the explosion.


Two men were killed and one seriously injured. Ed Maloney, the fireman, was firing up at the time. He was blown fifty feet and fell upon a stack of straw. When found, his body was entirely nude and almost every bone in it was broken, the skull being smashed into an unrecognizable mass.

John A. Stutt, a member of the firm, was standing quite near the boiler when it exploded. He was instantly killed. There was a serious scalp wound in the back of the head. It is probable that he was struck by a stone or a piece of iron and died immediately from concussion of the brain.

Samuel Adams was in the bleach house some distance from the boiler. The roof of the bleach house was smashed to atoms and came tumbling down on Adams who was working in a bleach tub. Pieces of the roof struck him and when he was extricated from the wreck and carried home, it was found that five of his ribs were broken and that his body and limbs were covered with bruises. His injuries would kill a weak man, but he is strong in constitution and will probably recover.

Mr. Stutt was an estimable young man and his death is deeply mourned by the people of the neighbourhood. He was married and leaves a widow and four small children. Maloney was a young unmarried man.

Dr. Shaver of West Flamborough arrived very soon after the accident and attended to Adams's injuries. The total loss is estimated at $8000.

It is not likely that an inquest will be held, the cause of the accident being well ascertained.

 

July 10, 1885

 

DUFF - Died at her residence, Ancaster township, on July 9, Mrs. Adam Duff, in the 83rd year of her age. Funeral will take place from her late residence to Ancaster, on Friday, July 10,

at___. Friends will please accept this intimation without further notice.

 

WALKER - Died in this city, on July 10, of diphtheria, ___ ,second son of Benjamin and Sarah E. Walker, aged ___. Funeral private.

 

MURPHY - (Morriston) A horrible murder was committed here about seven o'clock last night. Two men named John O'Donnell and Joseph Murphy began quarrelling on their way from work. Words led to blows when O'Donnell struck Murphy several times on the head with a plasterer's hod, fracturing his skull. Medical aid was of no avail as the man died within three hours. The murderer made his escape in the confusion and although search parties are out in all directions he has not yet been found.

 

NEAUBOR - (Morriston) A drowning accident occurred on the farm of Michael Neaubor, second concession of Puslinch. Mr. Neaubor's son, a lad of 8 years, was watering the cows at a pond on the farm. Tempted by the warm weather, he went in for a wash.


Getting beyond his depth and being unable to swim, he was drowned before assistance arrived.

 

July 11, 1885

 

HILLS - Died in this city, on July 10, Maggie M., beloved wife of Charles M. Hills, in the 24th year of her age. Funeral will take place from her late residence, 142 Mary street, on Sunday, July 12, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ENRIGHT - Died in this city, at No 6 Greig street, on July 10, Edgar, infant son of James and Margaret Agnes Enright. Funeral on Saturday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

HARLEY - (Lucan) Robert Harley, a farmer living on the 1st concession of McGillivray, was struck by lightning and instantly killed yesterday evening. He was returning home from work to his house and carried a hay fork on his shoulder.

 

TASCHEREAU - (Quebec) The body of an unknown man was found drowned yesterday at St. Laurent, Island of Orleans. It is supposed to be that of Jean Baptiste Taschereau, a sailor, who was drowned on Friday last while bathing.

 

BRISVERT - (Quebec) During a violent thunderstorm yesterday at Lot Biniore, Victor Brisvert, aged 18, while working on his father's farm, was struck by lightning and killed. In the same parish a large barn containing 6000 bundles of pressed hay was struck by lightning and burned to the ground. There were two horses killed in the barn by the lightning at the moment.

 

MORENCY - (Fenelon Falls) To-day a boy, 10 years old, named Morency, while playing on saw logs near McArthur & Thompson's mill, fell into the water and was drowned.

 

July 13, 1885

 

BOGART - Died at the city hospital, on Friday, July 10, D. A. Bogart, aged 46, of Little Rock, Arkansas, formerly of Hamilton. Funeral from the Masonic hall, James street, on Sunday, July 12, at 3 o'clock.

 

FOWLER - Died in Barton, on July 12, Ellen Gertude, second daughter of Mr. William Fowler, aged 4 years and 4 months. Funeral this (Monday) afternoon, private.

 

WYNN - Died in this city, on July 11, at his parents' residence, 36 Colborne street, John, third son of John and Catherine Wynn, aged 18 years and 9 months. Funeral from the above address on Monday, July 13.


CLAIRET - (Montreal) Francois Clairet, a coachman, was drowned while bathing in the Riviere St. Pierre.

 

NURSE - (Montreal) A private telegram received here to-day states that Frank J. Nurse, 27 years of age, was drowned in Lake Megantic on Thursday. The deceased was the youngest son of J. L. Nurse, upholsterer, of Toronto.

 

GAGNON - (Montreal) Henri Gagnon, a shoemaker, of this city, went over to Longeuil yesterday on a fishing excursion and was drowned to-day.

 

BECHER - (London) A cablegram received by Mayor Becher of this city announces the sudden death in England of his father, Mr. H. C. R. Becher, Q.C. , who had for some time past been there, accompanied by Mrs. Becher. At the time of his death, Mr. Becher was in his 68th year.

 

HILL - (Wellesley, Ont) As Mr. Henry Hill of this village, with his family, were on their way to church, the horse suddenly took fright at an embankment, wheeled short, going down about twenty feet of the bank, throwing the occupants out, breaking the woman's neck, causing instantaneous death.

 

TRACY - (St. Catharines) A son of Mr. Thomas Tracy, on the Western hill, aged 12 years, got a piece of glass in his foot a few days ago. Lockjaw resulted and his death followed.

 

July 14, 1885

 

WILLIAMSON - Died at his residence, 296 James street north, Richard Williamson, Sr., ice merchant, aged 67 years. Funeral from the above address on Wednesday, at 8:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

HANNAFORD - Died in this city, at 100 Robinson street, on Sunday, July 12, Caroline, beloved wife of Alfred Hannaford. Funeral on Tuesday at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

ROBINSON - Died in this city, on July 13, James Robinson, aged 21 years. Funeral will take place from his late residence, 39 Picton street west, on Wednesday, July 15, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

LAING - Died at 79 Bay street north, Hamilton, in her 81st year, Isabella Barnett, relict of the late Mr. George Laing, of Aberdeenshire, Scotland. Funeral on Wednesday at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MCCONACHIE - (Welland) Charles McConachie, a very promising young man and nephew of Dr. McConachie, was drowned while bathing in the Welland river here yesterday.


HODD, CHRISTIN, MARTIN, LONGLIER - (Mattawa) Six men who have been working for Mr. A. Lumsden on the steamer "Argo" on Lake Timiscamingue were coming down, and while running the Calf rapids, four miles from here, they ran into the cellar of it and were upset. Four of them hung on to the boat. The other two swam ashore. The four on the boat floated down to the Demicharge rapids half a mile from the Calf, and were washed off the boat and drowned. Their names are George Hodd, William Christin, Philip Martin, and George Longlier. They were drowned yesterday evening. None of them have yet been found.

 

BRUNET - (Quebec) Dr. Brunet of Deschambault accidentally poisoned himself last week and died after six hours of horrible suffering.

 

MCDONALD - (Brantford) Peter McDonald, an inmate of the hospital since the beginning of the month, made up his mind to leave on Thursday with the intention of going to the House of Providence , Dundas, and proposing to walk rather than take the cars, he wandered around in the country a little distance north of the city, sleeping in sheds and barns. On Sunday morning he was found on the Paris road about a mile and a half north of the city, lying on the road in a dying condition. A constable was notified and proceeded to where the old man was lying, but found him dead. He was taken to the dead house where an inquest will be held to-night. He was about 80, and stated that he was a lumberman.

 

HOFFMAN - (Scotland) While Russell, son of Paul Hoffman of Northfield Centre, was driving on the road two miles north of this place with a load of cheese boxes, the lightning struck the load, instantly killing him and one of the horses.

 

July 15, 1885

 

MCINNES - Died on Tuesday evening, July 14, Hugh Hamilton, third son of the late Hugh Mclnnes, Esq., aged 20 years and 5 months. Funeral from his mother's residence, 37 Jackson street west, on Thursday, July 16, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

HOARE - (Toronto) About noon to-day a Sunday-school picnic party at Victoria park came upon the body of a man dangling from the lowest limb of a pine tree. The man had hanged himself by a handkerchief which was fastened around the bough and encircled his neck. The county constable was notified and cut the corpse down. In the pockets he found a silver watch and wallet containing $60 with the name Richard Hoare, Grenville, P.Q., written inside the pocketbook. The deceased is about 35 years of age, was dressed in a dark brown tweed suit, and appeared to be a farmer. He had evidently made two attempts as the handkerchief had been broken in two,


and then tied together with a shoe lace. The remains will be interred to-morrow unless claimed.

 

ELYWARDS - (Toronto) John Elywards, a yardman of the Northern Railway, while engaged in shunting this evening, attempted to jump on an engine in movement, but missed his hold and fell underneath. He was almost instantly killed, his head being frightfully crushed. He was a young unmarried man and resided with his parents on Denison avenue.

 

STURGEON - (St. Thomas) Mr. Sturgeon, a prominent citizen, while driving a mowing machine on his farm a few miles from the city this morning, the team became frightened and he was thrown off and terribly cut and mangled. He died a short time after.

 

WITHERS - (Halifax) Edward Withers, a clerk in the Halifax custom house for several years, shot his daughter and then himself at his residence in the Quinpool Road this morning. They are both dead. The daughter was about 18 years of age. Withers has not been considered of sound mind by many of his acquaintances for some time past.

 

LAYCOCK - (Brantford) Walter Laycock, who has been in California for some time, was killed by an accidental shot from a revolver.

 

July 16, 1885

 

CASEY - (Winnipeg) A dispatch from Medicine Hat announces a terrible tragedy there on Monday, July 13, arising out of a dispute over the result of a horse race. The parties were a cowboy named Hale and Robert Casey, a cripple whose brother keeps the American Hotel there. Casey, it seems, won a large sum of money from the cowboy upon the result of a horse race and some hard words followed as well as threats. Hale subsequently left town and Casey started in pursuit. They met four miles out and in an encounter, Hale killed his adversary who was literally riddled, four bullets entering his body. Hale appropriated his victim's horse and has not since been seen. He is believed to have escaped into the United States.

 

ELLIS - (Trenton) Mrs. Ellis, 80 years of age, was killed this morning on the Central Ontario Railway track by being struck by the rear end of a Northern passenger train. Deceased was somewhat deaf and did not hear the train approaching.

 

CASEY - (Winnipeg) A dispatch from Lasalle station on the Canadian Pacific Railway announces the death by drowning of Mr. William Casey, agent of that station. He was taking a bath in the river and from all accounts he must have been seized with a cramp and went to the bottom. His brother is agent of the Grand Trunk at Berlin, Ontario. Deceased was 24 years of age and a native of Shakespeare, Ontario.


HOARE - (Toronto) John C. Sheppard, brother-in-law of Richard Hoare who suicided in Victoria Park, arrived here to-day and identified the body. Hoare had been running a tannery and store in Grenville, Quebec, but gave them up and went into farming. He was not doing well in his new venture. He leaves a wife and seven children, and was on the way to visit his eldest daughter of California. Sheppard is of the opinion that financial trouble was the cause of his rash act. He left with the body by to-night's Canadian Pacific express.

 

BARBER - (Ottawa) Ex-Alderman E. C. Barber, aged 50, a prominent Mason and member of the Orange Order, died to-day suddenly of heart disease.

 

July 17, 1885

 

WILLIAMSON - Died on Thursday, July 16, at the family residence, 266 Hughson street north, John Thomas, son of Thomas and Caroline Williamson, aged 5 years, 3 months, and 18 days. Funeral from the above address on Friday at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

DILLON - Died in this city, on July 16, Annie, only daughter of Mary and William Dillon, aged 15 months and 13 days. Funeral will leave her parents' residence, 46 John street south, on Friday, July 17, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

HANNON - Died at Rochester, NY, on July 15, Nettie, beloved wife of C. D. Hannon, of Rochester, formerly of Hamilton, aged 23. The funeral will take place on Saturday, July 18, at 4 p.m. from the residence of the deceased's father, A. Bennett, Dundas.

 

July 18, 1885

 

FRANK - Died on July 17, after a long and painful illness, Friedricke, the beloved wife of Charles Frank, in the 60th year of her age. Her end was peace. Funeral from her late residence, Catherine street north, at 2 o'clock on Sabbath afternoon.

 

CONNORS - (Winnipeg) John Connors, the Moose Jaw murderer, was hanged at Moose Jaw this morning for the murder of Henry Mulaski on the 6th of April last. The execution took place at daylight. At an early hour Rev. Mr. Urquhart called on Connors and attempted to draw him out on religious topics, but he flew into a rage and would not listen to any spiritual advice.

 

VALIQUETTE - (Montreal) The remains of Sergt. Valiquette, who died at Fort Pitt while on duty in the Northwest, arrived in the city by the C.P.R. this morning, and were taken to his home in St. Cunegonde. Two companies of the 85th Battalion met the remains at the station


 and together with the old members of the 65th Battalion escorted the body to his home.

 

BALLARD - (St. Thomas) Mrs. G. G. Ballard, wife of Rev. G. G. Ballard, rector of Trinity Church in this city, died this afternoon from injuries received by a fall a few days ago.

 

FOURNLEY, ALLARD, DUCLOS, GIGUERE - (Quebec) A letter has just been received giving an account of a terrible drowning accident at St. Alexis, Desmond county, Maskinonge. On Saturday last a number of young men went to visit a friend at the above place. During the evening three of them, named Fournley, Allard, and Duclos, accompanied by a young lady named Giguere, got into a boat with the purpose of crossing the river at this point, when a strong current carried them off, and the boat striking some object in the middle of the river, upset throwing all four occupants into the river who were drowned in view of a number of persons on the shore who were unable to render them any assistance. The body of young Duclos has since been found.

 

CHAGAIS - (Ottawa) Flags on the parliament and departmental buildings were hoisted at half mast to-day on receipt of the news of Hon. Senator Chagais's death, which occurred at the general hospital shortly before noon. Four days ago he was seized with a malignant form of intestinal inflammation, and his recovery was despaired of from the first.

 

TAGGERT - (Thorold) Mrs. Taggert, an elderly lady, well known in Thorold, received an injury to her leg some time ago from a fall. She was taken to the hospital for treatment, but died on Tuesday.

 

WALDEN - (Galt) Dr. J, Walden of Waterloo who went insane has just died.

 

July 20, 1885

 

ORR - Died on July 19, at her late residence, 45 Catherine street north, Anne Orr, relict of the late William Orr, and mother of John A. Orr, of this city. Funeral on Tuesday, July 21, at 2:30 p.m., from her late residence. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CRANKSHAW - Died on Sunday, July 19, Edith Florence (Dunny), second daughter of William and Ellen Crankshaw, aged 13 years. The funeral will take place on Tuesday, July 21, at 3 p.m., from the corner of Mulberry and Macnab streets. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCKENZIE - (Toronto) About 7 o'clock last night, William McKenzie, a printer, while, fooling with two or three other young men on the front platform of the Spadina Avenue car,


fell off and the wheels passed over his body. He was taken home and died about half an hour after. No blame was attached to the driver.

 

PHELPHS - (Toronto) George Phelphs, an old man from Richmond Hill, was brought to the hospital here last night to have his injuries attended to which he had received in a fight. During the night the nurse missed him from his bed, and on search being made, it was found that he had wandered on to the open parapet connecting the hospital with the eye and ear wing and fallen over to the ground. He was carried to his bed and died a few hours afterward.

 

CRAIG - (Halifax) A boy named William Craig while bathing in the lake on the outskirts of Dartmouth this afternoon was seized with cramps and drowned. The body was recovered shortly afterward.

 

MCINTYRE - (Niagara Falls) The body of Mrs. McIntyre, the lady from Welland who fell from the bridge on Bath Island last Wednesday during the opening of the International Park and went over the falls, was found by a boy named Isaac Pawley this afternoon near Swift Drift, a point about a mile north of the new Suspension bridge on the Canada side where it was wedged between two rocks. The only clothing left on her person was a white jacket, part of a chemise, shoes and stockings, a kid glove on the right hand, and a gold chain around her neck. A large cut on the back of her head was the only mark on her body. The body was taken in charge of by Ontario policeman McMicking who with assistance conveyed it to undertaker Morse's rooms where it now lies awaiting the decision of the coroner.

 

KNETCHEL - (Waterloo) Philip W. Knetchel, a farmer of Wallace, while visiting his son-in-law, Louis Weaver, near Heidelherg, met with his death almost instantly. His son-in-law was raising a barn and Mr. Knetchel assisted. One bent was raised and was insufficiently braced. While raising the next bent, the first fell inward among the men, striking Knetchel, breaking his skull and causing almost instant death. Deceased was 60 years old and leaves a wife and family.

 

CASTICK - (Merritton) This afternoon a lunch basket was found hanging to the gate of lock 15, old Welland canal, and a hat floating in the water. The canal being searched, the body of a boy about nine years of age was found which proved to be that of James Castick, a young English lad who had been sent to the cotton mill with his brother's dinner at noon and who had accidentally fallen in and been drowned.

 

HERGOTY - (Waterloo) Matin Hergoty, a young farmer, living four miles from here, was, along with his father, brothers, and uncle, fishing in .a small lake near his place. He got beyond his depth and was drowned before his relatives could render him any assistance.


July 21, 1885

 

BISHOPRIC - (St. Catharines) On Saturday night last a young man named George Bishopric, aged 30 years, was found lying unconscious at the foot of a staircase on King street. He was picked up and carried to a police station nearby where it was found that he was suffering from what at the time appeared to be only a black eye. A doctor, however, was called who took the same view of the case and recommended that he be conveyed home. This was done, but he never regained consciousness and died about 8 o'clock on Sunday morning.

As some of the circumstances of the case seemed to demand an investigation Coroner Goodman ordered a post mortem examination to be held. A coroner's inquest was held this morning. The evidence taken showed that the deceased had gone up to the top of the stairs where a Mrs. Wilson and her two daughters live and enquired for the girls. On being told they were not in, he turned to go down again when being somewhat under the influence of liquor, he stumbled and fell to the bottom, fracturing the left temporal bone and causing an effusion of blood on the brain, about two ounces of clotted blood being found in the brain, which came from an artery on the inside of the temporal bone which had been fractured.

 

July 22, 1885

 

CROOKS - Died in this city, on July 21, Bernice, infant daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Crooks. Funeral on Thursday at 10:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BENNETT - Died in Dundas, on Tuesday, July 21, George W. Bennett, merchant. The funeral will take place on Thursday, July 23, at 3:30 p.m.

Mr. George W. Bennett, one of Dundas's most successful and most highly respected business men, died last evening. He has been ailing for a few months, but no one anticipated that death was so near, and the sudden event has saddened a large circle of friends. Deceased was formerly with R. T. Wilson & Company, grocers, but since assumed proprietorship of the business and has conducted it most successfully. He was a comparatively young man and had resided in Dundas upwards of thirty years. He was a member of the Canadian Order of Oddfellows. By everyone he was known as a true friend and thorough gentleman. The funeral will take place on Thursday.

 

STEWART - Died on July 21, Arthur Willard, infant son of Charles and Elizabeth Stewart, at 150 King William street. Funeral on Thursday at 3 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.


MELLOW - Died in this city, on July 21, Cecelia Mary, eldest daughter of the late John Mellow. Funeral will leave her mother's residence, No 19 Liberty street, on Thursday at 3 p.m. Friends please accept this intimation.

 

July 23, 1885

 

DOHM - Died in this city, at 15 Harriet street, on July 21, Mrs. Mary Dohm, aged 68 years. Funeral from the above address on Thursday, at 8:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this notice.

 

HENNINGS - Died in this city, on July 22, at 182 James street north, Lamartine, infant son of Lamartine and Harriet Hennings. Funeral on Thursday, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GREEN - (Montreal) A Mrs. Green, having been taken suddenly ill in a yard off Main street, was being removed to the hospital but died on the road. Her body was then taken to the morgue.

 

SEVEROS - (Dickson Landing) On Monday last an Italian named Paetro Rich shot and killed another Italian named Severos, the ball passing through the heart. The row was apparently over six dollars which Severos owed Rich. Rich is still at large.

 

BUCHAN - The funeral of the late Principal Buchan of the Upper Canada College, Toronto, took place yesterday afternoon and was very largely attended. The pall bearers were Hon. G. W. Ross, Minister of Education; W. Muloch, M.P.P. Professor Landin; J. M. Gibson, M.P.P.; Dr. Ellias, president of Canadian Institute; S. Woods, M.A., of Ottawa; Professor Vandermissen; J. B. Smith, Benson University; Dr. Mullin, Hamilton, and John Catho. The remains were interred in Mount Pleasant cemetery.

 

July 24, 1885

 

LLOYD - (Belleville) Mrs. Lloyd, near Flinton, suicided to-day by taking Paris green.

 

DOUGHERTY - (Toronto) Frank Dougherty, aged 15, was drowned in the bay to-day while bathing. He got caught in the weeds and sank.

 

July 27, 1885

 

CRANKSHAW - Died on Sunday, July 26, Joseph Thackeray, fourth son of Ellen and William Crankshaw, aged 11 months. The funeral will take place at 3 p.m. to-day from corner of Mulberry and Macnab streets. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


BONSKILL - Annie Bonskill of Harriston was drowned in Toronto bay.

 

MAHONEY - Saturday afternoon Mr. Dennis Mahoney, shoemaker, 5 Tom street, received from Detroit a telegram announcing the death by drowning of his son William that morning. William Mahoney left this city a short time ago and was employed on a lake steamer. The particulars of the accident were not received. John Mahoney, brother of the deceased, left by the first train to assist in the recovery of the body. No word has yet been received from him concerning the drowning.

 

July 28, 1885

 

MILLER - Died in this city, on July 27, Catherine Horwood, widow of the late Andrew Miller, in her 67th year. Funeral from her late residence, 18 Ferguson avenue, on Tuesday, July 28, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation without further notice.

 

BERRYMAN - Died in this city, on July 26, William J., only son of William John Berryman, aged 7 months. Funeral from his parents' residence, 22 Guise street, on Tuesday, July 28, at 2 o'clock. Friends please accept this notice.

 

DARLING - (Toronto) Two drowning accidents occurred here, the victims in both instances being boys. Yesterday afternoon George Darling was bathing along with some companions in the Humber when he got beyond his depth and sank. His body was recovered shortly afterward but life was extinct. His parents reside on Dundas Road

 

JOHNSON - This afternoon, Bertie, a nine-year-old son of T. H. Johnson, painter, was bathing in the Don when he sank and was drowned. His body was recovered in about four feet of water. The boy's companions say a man was standing on the bank at the time and being appealed to refused to go to the drowning boy's assistance.

 

GOODMAN - (Ottawa) Information was received here that John Goodman, an Ontario County farmer, who was a passenger from here by the Canadian Pacific express Saturday night, jumped from the train as it was passing Burketon station, the wheels of the sleeping cars passing over his left arm, severing it from his body. His head was also badly cut. Two physicians were summoned but he died yesterday morning. It is supposed that Goodman was in ignorance of the fact that the express did not stop at Burketon.

 

MALONE - (Montreal) Constable Malone who was so seriously assaulted by a man named Considine while in discharge of his duty about eight days ago and who appeared to be recovering from the effect during the last few days, took for the worse during last night and died this morning.


VAUCHENE - (Montreal) A young man named Vauchene was drowned at Lachine, but his body has not yet been recovered.

 

KERR - (Quebec) A terrible tragedy occurred on the eastbound Intercolonial Railway express train shortly after she left Levis this morning. A young man named Robert Kerr, a passenger on his way to New Richmond, Quebec, was closely followed and watched by a man named Kehoe, representing himself as a Chicago detective on some special charge of which Kerr was accused. Kerr was interviewed by the latter in a second-class car shortly after the train left Levis station. Kehoe says that after the interview Kerr asked him to go into the first-class car to talk matters over. To go into the first-class car it was necessary to pass through the passage of the postal car. Kehoe says he was in advance and just as he reached the middle of the car two shots from a revolver were fired which he thought were aimed at him. Upon investigation Kerr was found dead in the passage of the postal car with two bullet wounds in his head. Kehoe has been arrested, but suicide is strongly suspected. There were no witnesses.

 

MAHONEY - On receipt of the news here that William Mahoney had been drowned at Detroit, his brother John immediately hastened to that city where he found William alive and well. The vessel upon which he had been sailing was driven ashore at Sand Beach, Lake Huron, and crew, missing Mahoney, naturally supposed he had been lost, and a telegram to that effect was sent to his people here. (See page 108)

 

July 29, 1885

 

BURNFATHER - Died on July 28, at 93 Barton street east, Mary A., beloved wife of W. C. Burnfather, aged 47 years and 1 month. Funeral on Thursday, at 3 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MILLS - (Bath) Three brothers, Cornelius, Arnold, and Frank Mills, of this village, were out fishing on the bay this afternoon. Their boat capsized and the two eldest, Cornelius and Arnold, were drowned. Frank saved himself by clinging to the boat until help came. Both the bodies of the drowned were recovered.

 

QUINN - (Ottawa) Detective James P. Quinn died suddenly last night after a struggle with a rowdy in lower town.

 

FEELEY - Mr. Cornelius Feeley died at Montreal, July 23, and was buried at Brockville where his widow now resides. Mr. Feeley was for a number of years connected with the G.W.R. of Hamilton and resided at Waterdown.


July 30, 1885

 

MARSHALL - Died in this city, on July 29, the beloved wife of John Marshall, in the 53rd year of her age. Funeral will leave her late residence, No 39 Caroline street north, on Thursday, July 30, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

SMITH - Died on July 28, at the residence of Mrs. Thomas Baillie, London, Ontario, Charles Edward, aged 3 months, youngest son of William S. Smith and the late Clara Smith of this city. Funeral will leave G.T.R. depot, Hamilton, at 2 p.m., on Thursday, July 30. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

COPP - (Woodstock) Yesterday, Mrs. Copp, wife of David Copp, an employee of Hay & Co., living in the east end, hung herself by a cord to a rafter in the kitchen of her home. She left one child. Temporary insanity is supposed to be the cause of her rash act.

 

WARDEN - (Toronto) J. C. Gibson, hotel keeper, corner of Berkley and King streets, was arrested this afternoon on a very grave charge. John Warden, a salesman, accompanied by Peter and George Berden, visited Gibson's saloon on Monday evening, and after playing several games of pool left without paying. Feeling ashamed of their conduct they returned when hot words ensued between Gibson and Warden, ending in the two fighting. Warden was knocked down, and it is alleged that Gibson kicked him several times when down . Warden was taken home by the Berdens whom he was with yesterday morning. He was found to be insensible and died this morning after vomiting a large quantity of blood, never having regained consciousness. Several bruises were found on his body and on the right side of the temple. Warden was about 28 years of age and married. An inquest will be held to-morrow.

 

SHARPE - (Kingston) The body of J. Sharpe, a quarryman, was found drowned at Portsmouth this morning. He had been on a spree for several days.

 

August 1, 1885

 

WURST - Died in this city, after a long and painful illness, Dorothea Kerner, the beloved wife of Frederick Wurst, aged 52 years. The funeral will take place from her late residence, 145 King William street, at 3 o'clock on Sunday. Friends are invited to attend.

 

HARRIS - Died in this city, on July 30, David Harris, son of John and Hannah Harris, aged 5 years and 2 months. Funeral will take place from 250 James Street north, at 2 o'clock, on Saturday. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this invitation.


COLVIN - Died in this city, on July 31, Patrick Colvin, in the 69th year of his age. The funeral will take place from his late residence, 340 Hughson street north, on Sunday, August 2, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

An old citizen of Hamilton, Mr. Patrick Colvin, died yesterday at his home, 340 Hughson street north. Mr. Colvin was a native of County Donegal, Ireland, where he was born 69 years ago. He came to Hamilton in 1844 and for fifteen years sailed the lake with Captain Zealand. Afterwards he established himself in the grocery business which he carried on successfully until about ten years ago when he retired from trade on account of failing health. Mr. Colvin leaves a widow and a family of four sons and 2 daughters.

 

IRWIN - Died in this city, on Friday evening, July 31, Richard Irwin, in the 51st year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, Victoria Hotel, King street east, on Monday, August 3, At 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

The widely known and respected proprietor of the Victoria Hotel died last night. Mr. Irwin was a  native of Sligo, Ireland. He was brought to this country when very young and was reared in the family of his brother-in-law, H. Henderson, of Welland county. In his early manhood he went to Ancaster and marrying Miss Pritchard, launched into the hotel business. He afterwards managed the hotel at the tollgate on the Ancaster road and in 1875 moved into the city, having bought the Shakespeare Hotel on Market Square. About six years ago he sold out and moved into the Victoria Hotel. Mr. Irwin was 50 years of age. His wife and two children, a son and daughter, survive him. He was a prominent and valued member of the Orange order and was also connected with other societies. The funeral is announced to take place on Monday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

 

BARLOW - A boy named Barlow of Levis, aged 15 years, was accidentally drowned at this place while bathing. (Quebec)

 

WARD - (Petrolia) About 2:30 this morning a little son of William Ward, aged 16 months, the youngest child, during the temporary absence of the hired girl upstairs, the mother and father being from home, fell into the cistern and was drowned before his absence was discovered.

 

PARRSETT - (Toronto) Charles H. Parrsett, who was until recently clerk in the St. James Hotel, died suddenly in the train at Brampton yesterday under very sad circumstances. The young man, who was 28 years of age, had consumption and was on his way to his mother's home in Ellsworth, Kansas. The deceased had been in poor health for some time past, and Mr. Felitz, a relative, persuaded him to start for home. The train was detained until the young man's body could be removed from the car. The remains were sent back to the city.


August 3, 1885

 

PEARCE - Died in this city, on August 1, Frank, only son of John and Elizabeth Pearce, aged 16 years. Funeral at 3:30 this (Monday) afternoon from his parents' residence, 44 Wellington street north. Friends will please accept this intimation.

Frank Pearce, a tall good-looking boy, aged 17, committed suicide at 7 o'clock this morning. He was the only son of John Pearce of 44 Wellington street north. The boy was usually bright and cheerful around the house, but Saturday morning he seemed to be somewhat melancholy. He got out of bed earlier than usual and asked his mother what time Mr. Parked who boarded in the house, wanted to be called. Mrs. Pearce said 7 o'clock. "It's 7 o'clock now, mother", he said.

Mrs. Pearce went upstairs, woke Mr. Parker, came down again, and got her son's breakfast. The boy had just finished when Mr. Parker came down. As he was getting up from the table, a whistle blew shrilly and Mrs. Pearce asked what it was. "Seven o'clock", said Mr. Parker.

"Why, Frank, you told me it was 7 o'clock a while ago", said Mrs. Pearce.

"I must have made a mistake", the boy responded. He went out of the room. Mr. Parker finished his breakfast and had gone into the kitchen to pull his boots on when there was a dull crackling report upstairs, followed by a shriek in a woman's voice. Mrs. Pearce and Mr. Parker both ran upstairs. In Mr. Parker's room they found Frank lying full length on the floor, a revolver by his side. His sister, who had been sleeping in the next room and who was roused by the report, was weeping over him. He was living, but unconscious. He lingered for about fifteen minutes, but did not speak again.

He had placed the muzzle of the revolver over his right breast and the ball had gone diagonally across the chest. The revolver was a .32 calibre Smith and Wesson. The boy must have been very determined for the trigger did not work at all easily and it requires a very strong pull to get the hammer down. That his mind was fully made up was evidenced by the pains he took on securing the revolver that was sure to do the work. It belonged to Mr. Parker and was locked up in a bureau drawer.

The key was in Mr. Parker's pocket. A smaller revolver lay in an open drawer and could have been got at without any difficulty, but the boy was evidently afraid it would not be effectual, and by some means secured a key to open the bureau drawer and get at the big one.

The cause for the rash act lies in the fact that he quarrelled with a young girl who had succeeded in winning his boyish heart.. He felt so miserable over the disagreement that Friday he said to Dave Murray, a chum of his, "I don't care whether I live or die, Dave. I wish I was dead".

The plaintive words struck the keynote of the sad and terrible tragedy that followed.


An impressionable boy of strong feelings he could not bear to have his heart strings wrung, and in despair he took his own life. He was a smart intelligent boy, lively and cheerful as a rule, beloved by his family and with hosts of friends. He was employed in the freight office of the G.T.R. and was highly thought of there.

Coroner Woolverton viewed the remains and decided it was unnecessary to hold an inquest. Pearce belonged to the Juvenile Foresters. The funeral will be to-day.

 

RICE - (Montreal) A woman named Elice Rice died at a late hour last night under suspicious circumstances. She fell sick a day or two ago and her sickness has been aggravated through drink. She was 40 years of age, and a man named Patrick Sheners said she was his wife, but this is doubtful. The house in St. Henry street where she was found was destitute of furniture and the woman herself had very little clothing on. Sheners, who was intoxicated, was found kissing her and imploring her to come back to life. Sheners had been arrested on a charge of being an inmate of a house of ill fame.

 

MCLAUGHLIN - (Halifax) While two boys named Smith and McLaughlin were bathing in the river at Lower Stewiacke yesterday afternoon, one of them, son of Joseph McLaughlin of that place, was drowned. He undertook to swim across the breakwater and encountered a number of eddies which carried him under. He was about 14 years old. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

PEARSON - (Chatham) Joseph Pearson of Merlin committed suicide by taking three ounces of laudanum. He had received news of the loss of property in England which is the supposed cause of t he act.

 

CLARK - (Rodney) Robert Clark of St. Thomas, a brick mason, was drowned this afternoon while bathing.

 

FELLOW - (Halifax) An old man named Joseph Fellow, 93 years of age, was drowned at Canning yesterday in a barrel of water.

 

August 4, 1885

 

ROBINSON - Died on Monday, August 3, Harriet Alice Robinson aged 6 months and 16 days. Funeral from 148 John street north, on Tuesday, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited.

 

WILLIAMS - (Newburgh) W. B. Williams, a traveller for Mills & Hutchinson, jumped from a train here this morning and was fatally injured. His skull was badly smashed.


WALSH - (Toronto) A man was knocked down this morning by a Midland train on the esplanade and almost instantly killed. The body was taken to the morgue to await identification.

The body of the man killed on the railway track this morning has been identified as that of Michael Walsh, an old army pensioner. He was crossing the track and being somewhat deaf did not hear the approaching train.

 

EDWARDS - In Dundas a family of brothers and sisters named Edwards, who recently came to this country from England, live. Up to Friday night there were four girls and two boys. Their parents are dead. One of the girls, Jennie, worked in Lennard's knitting factory. On Friday evening she received her week's wage and took it home. It seems that her sisters wished her to put the whole of the money into the common household fund, but Jennie wanted to retain some of it for her own private uses. A quarrel ensued and words were used which so wounded Jennie's feelings that she threatened to drown herself. Little attention was paid to the threat at the time, but when the girl did not return home on Friday night and nothing was seen of her on Saturday, the family grew alarmed and on Sunday they began searching for her. The hat which the poor girl had worn when last seen alive was found floating in the canal. The discovery confirmed the fear of the family and the search was continued. Yesterday morning the dead body of the girl was taken out of the canal by Mr. Norton. She was only 17 years old.

 

NEVILLE - Charles Neville, formerly of this city and Stony Creek, a year ago ran away with and married a daughter of C. J. Whitney of Detroit, manager of the Grand Opera House in this city. He was sent to prison for bigamy. He is dead.

Report from Columbus, Ohio: A noted convict died in the state prison here to-day. His name, or rather the name under which he was sentenced, is Charles Neville. He was sent from Toledo in December last for seven years for bigamy. His father was an Englishman and his mother a Russian countess. He entered the Russian army on obtaining manhood, but that was too dull for him and he secured a commission in the English army through his father. Dissatisfied again, he ran away and came to America. He was a young man then, and he was not long in this country, but nevertheless he married fourteen different women. The last one was a daughter of Charles J. Whitney, a wealthy resident of Detroit, with whom he eloped to Toledo. His usual practice was to persuade a minister to marry him in some illegal manner, and in this last case he urged that as a defence, but the court would not allow it. He won the affections of Miss Whitney while employed as her father's coachman. He had been sick for about two weeks with intermittent fever, and a few days ago told the warden this his real name was Charles Edward Neville Censivieski, his Russian title being count. He always claimed he had but one wife and was always true to her. She lives at Peterborough, Ontario, and the warden has telegraphed to her the news of his death.


August 5, 1885

 

MCCOMB - Died in Chicago, on August 1, Victoria, wife of James McComb, and daughter of the late Rev. Gideon Shepard, in the 30th year of her age.

 

PRESTON - (Bethany, Ont) A frightful accident occurred about four miles west of here. Mr. R. J. Preston, a farmer, was working with a team, and while in the yard stepped on the wagon tongue. The team took fright and ran away, killing Mr. Preston instantly.

 

MCKENNY - Mrs. Mary McKenny, one of Brantford's oldest and most respected citizens, died last Sunday, aged 90 years.

 

MCGILLIVRAY - There are few business men in the city who did not know John McGillivray, bookkeeper of the G.N.W. telegraph company in this city, and all who knew him will be grieved to learn of his death which occurred in Orillia on Sunday. Though only 24 years of age, Mr. McGillivray had been bookkeeper for the Dominion Company, and after the amalgamation, for the G.B.W. Company, for thirteen years, having entered the office of the Dominion Company when only eleven years of age. For several months past his health has been failing and on Tuesday of last week he went to Orillia to recuperate. Only last Friday he sent word to his friends here that he was stronger, and the news of his death was a heavy blow to them. The deceased was a young man of steady habits, upright character, and gentle disposition, faithful to his employers, and courteous to everyone. He leaves a wife and one child. The body was brought to the city last evening and the funeral will take place this afternoon at 2 o'clock from No 46 East avenue north.

 

HORNSHAW - (Toronto) Mary Rebecca Hornshaw, about 10 years of age, daughter of George Hornshaw, blacksmith, while washing a Scotch terrier in the bay this afternoon went beyond her depth and was drowned. The body was recovered shortly afterwards.

 

JUDD - (St. Thomas) Mr. Joseph Judd, who was so badly injured by the collision with the railway train at Niagara street crossing of the Welland road a few days ago, died at 11 o'clock on Wednesday night from the injuries he received. The yard lad Nagle who was injured at the same time is improving.

 

August 6, 1885

 

MURTY - At six o'clock yesterday morning a C.P.R. ballast train, consisting of an engine and twenty flat cars, eastward bound, collided with a westbound freight train at a point between Cooksville and Streetsville. The freight train was going at the rate of about 25 miles an hour, and the trains collided with great violence. Most of the hands on both trains as far as could be learned jumped for their lives. Michael J. Murty, conductor of the ballast train, was found lying on the


tender of the freight, dead. His spine was broken and death had been instantaneous. Murty was a young single man and resided at Paris, Ontario. His body was sent to his friends there. John Dake, engine driver of the same train, received severe internal injuries, the extent of which is hardly known, and was prostrated by the shock. He is a married man and lives with his father-in-law, Robert Abbe, grocer, Queen street, Parkdale. John Hand, fireman of the same train, received a severe scalp wound and is also suffering from nervous prostration, caused by the shock, and he was taken to his home in Parkdale. The other hands escaped without serious injury. The conductor of the freight train also escaped. The driver, Donaldson, a man who has already had three narrow escapes from death in railway accidents, escaped with a dislocated arm and was taken to his home in West Toronto Junction. Murphy, O'Neill, and Kino, brakemen on the freight train escaped without any injury worth mentioning.

 

August 7, 1885

 

TILLEY - (Toronto) Francis Tilley, a four-year-old boy, whose parents reside on Farley avenue, was this morning run over and killed by a farmer's wagon. The boy was running alongside the wagon which was loaded with straw when he stumbled and fell under the wheels. The wagon was driven by Richards, a farmer of Port Credit.

 

MCCARTHY - There was consternation on a street car that was proceeding up James street north yesterday afternoon when one of the passengers, a young woman, fell forward with blood oozing from her pallid lips. A blood vessel in her lungs was ruptured. She was carried into a house nearby and died a few minutes afterward. The unfortunate young lady was Miss Mary Ann McCarthy, daughter of Mr. McCarthy, carter, of Burlington street. She had been suffering from pulmonary consumption for some time.

 

August 8, 1885

 

MCCARTHY - Died in this city, on August 6, Mary Ann McCarthy, daughter of Mary and Thomas McCarthy, in the 15th year of her age. Funeral will leave her parents' residence, 32 Burlington street east, on Sunday, August 9, at 2:30. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

HUGHES - Died on August 7, Nellie, only daughter of William and Jessie Hughes, aged 4 months and 14 days. Funeral from 14 Magill street, on Saturday, at 2 o'clock. Friends are invited to attend.

 

BURNS - Died in this city, on August 7, at the residence of her son, John Burns of the "Spectator" and William Burns of the G.T.R. shops, Margaret Burns, aged 65 years,


a native of the county of Wicklow, Ireland. Funeral from 96 Elgin street, on Sunday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

STANLEY - (Quebec) At Piles mills, Three Rivers, on Monday, Robert Stanley fell on a large revolving saw and was cut in two. A slice was taken off the heart and death was instantaneous.

 

PARTRIDGE - (Halifax) Thomas Partridge, a marine belonging to the flagship "Northampton", fell into the water while on sentry duty near his ship on the dock yard last night and was drowned.

 

RIBBLE - L. H. Kemp came to Hamilton yesterday morning from Oakville and identified the remains of the man who was killed on the Grand Trunk Railway on Thursday as those of Jacob Ribble, his brother-in-law, who lived at Oakville for many years past with his mother. He had been away from home for some four or five days past and is supposed to have been under the influence of liquor when hurt. He was not as a rule an immoderate drinker but would occasionally get under the influence. He was 43 years of age. Coroner Woolverton viewed the remains and considered it unnecessary to hold an inquest.

 

DEMPSEY, SANDERS - A dispatch from St. Thomas, Ontario, received here last evening conveyed the following terrible intelligence. A horrible accident took place this afternoon at the L. & P.S. Railway crossing near the fairgrounds whereby three persons lost their lives: Mr. J. C. Dempsey, of Hamilton; his sister, Mrs. Fred Sanders, wife of Mr. Fred Sanders, lumber merchant of this city; and her little six-year-old son. A train coming from Port Stanley struck their buggy and knocked it into splinters. Mrs. Sanders's body was found lying twenty yards from the crossing with the head completely severed from the body, and the child was taken from the cowcatcher of the engine, dead. Mr. Dempsey's body was found some seventy-five yards from the crossing. Life was extinct, but the body was not badly mutilated.

Mr. Dempsey and Mrs. Sanders were son and daughter of Mr. George Dempsey of this city. Mrs. Sanders, with her little son, had been on a visit to her parents and left Hamilton for St. Thomas on Thursday afternoon, accompanied by young Mr. Dempsey. She was brought up and educated in Hamilton and had many friends here. About seven years ago she was married to Mr. Sanders and her only child was the boy who perished with her.

Mr. Dempsey was a fine manly young man and was widely known and well liked in the city. He excelled in manly exercises, especially in rowing, and was a member of the Leander Rowing Club, distinguishing himself several times in the aquatic arena.


Mr. Dempsey was 28 years of age and unmarried. He was born in Milton, but the family moved to Hamilton when he was very young and he received the greater part of his education here. When 15 years old he received an appointment in the city post office and remained in the service ever since. Latterly he was engaged in the forwarding department. Three weeks ago he went off on his annual vacation and was to have returned to work next Monday. Poor fellow he was at the regatta on Wednesday with his friends and keenly enjoyed the competition which few could appreciate better than he.

The family received intelligence early last evening that a fatal accident had occurred, but it was quite late before intelligence reached them of the full extent of the terrible calamity. Several members of the family left for St. Thomas by the early train this morning.

 

August 10, 1885

 

WILLIAMS - Died in this city, on Saturday, August 8, Hugh Williams, in the 50th year of his age. Funeral on Tuesday, August 11, at 3 o'clock p.m. from his late residence, No 107 Bay street north. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

LOSTHEURS - (Montreal) Rev. Father Lostheurs is reported to have been drowned while bathing in the lake of Two Mountains.

 

PAQUETTE - (Ottawa) About 9 o'clock this morning a man named A. T. Paquette, who was employed at French's woollen factory at New Edinburgh, dropped dead at work. The unfortunate man came to work apparently in good health and about 9 o'clock was noticed to stagger a few steps and fall, a doctor was summoned and attributed the cause of his death to heart disease.

 

JONES - (Halifax) A dispatch from Wolfville says Aubrey Jones, aged 16, the second son of Professor R. N. Jones of Acadian College, was drowned this morning in a creek near Wolfville while bathing alone.

 

MATHEWSON - (Montreal) The little girl named Mathewson who was burned so badly a few days ago while playing with matches has died from the effect of her injuries.

 

EVERHARDT - (St. Catharines) Robert, son of Jacob Everhardt, was drowned by falling out of a boat at Port Colborne.

 

MCCARTHY - (St. Catharines) James McCarthy, assistant lock tender at lock No 7, new canal, died on Friday afternoon after an illness of one week.


August 11, 1885

 

CASE - Died in this city, on Monday evening, August 10, Frederick Case, barrister, second son of H. N. Case, postmaster, in the 31st year of his age. The funeral will take place on Thursday, August 13, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Few deaths in Hamilton of late years have caused as much genuine and general, sorrow as will be occasioned by the death of Mr. Fred Case, so untimely and unlooked-for was it, and so widely known and liked was he. Mr. Case died last night a few minutes after 10 o'clock. He was perfectly conscious up to within a few moments of the end and conversed calmly with those who stood near his bedside. About two weeks ago he was taken ill and gradually grew worse until last Saturday when there was a slight change for the better. Yesterday morning, however, alarming symptoms were again developed and he steadily sank during the afternoon and evening.

Mr. Case was born in Hamilton 31 years ago and when he was quite young the family moved to Sarnia. He was educated at Upper Canada College. On leaving this institution he studied law with Hon. T. B. Pardee, in Sarnia, and when the father was appointed postmaster at Hamilton and the family moved here, he continued his studies with Mackelcan, Gibson & Bell, of this city. About three years ago he passed his final examinations with credit. To most people the deceased was a pattern of gentlemanly deportment and a personification of courtesy and good breeding, but his near friends esteemed him for high and more sterling qualities than these. The funeral is announced to take place on Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

 

TAYLOR - (Montreal) A woman named Taylor was found dead in a house on Pea Lane this evening. The coroner ordered the body to be taken to the morgue. Her husband cannot be found and foul play is suspected.

 

SHEAHAN - (Toronto) Ex-Detective Phillip Sheahan died yesterday from consumption. He was one of the oldest and best known officers on the force and was superannuated about six months ago owing to ill health.

 

SMITH - (Brantford) John Smith, sheriff of the county of Brant, was taken down yesterday while sitting at the breakfast table with an attack of apoplexy. He died at 8 o'clock this morning. Funeral Wednesday afternoon.

 

ALLISON - (Waterdown) With feelings of sympathy we announce the death and funeral of the late Mrs. George Allison who died on Sunday afternoon and will be buried on Tuesday at 1 o'clock. Deceased had been sick but a short time, little more that a week. Inflammation in one or more of the various forms was the cause of death. She leaves a husband and one child to mourn her loss.


August 12, 1885

 

STINSON - Died at Cottage City, Mass., on August 11, Sarah B., widow of the late Ebenezer Stinson. Funeral from the G.T.R. station on the arrival of the train from the east at 3 o'clock p.m. on Thursday, August 13.

 

COX - (St. Catharines) An inquest was held to-day in the town hall, Merritton, by Coroner Goodman on the body of the late Thomas Cox who was killed in the railroad accident there yesterday.

(London) The funeral of the late T. Cox, the engineer killed at Merritton, will take place to-morrow afternoon under the auspices of the brotherhood of locomotive engineers.

 

CONGER - (Toronto) When Esplanade property owners were concluding their remarks on the new street project in the civic executive room this afternoon, Mr. P. D. Conger was asked to speak. He rose from his seat on a side bench and put his views on the question into a five-minute address. Concluding he said, "The new street would not advance the value of my property. If the citizens desire it, let the work go on, but it is only fair that owners should be compensated for the valuable property they would lose by the change in the frontage line".

"Oh", said Ald Hall, "some of the valuable property Mr. Conger refers to is on the street".

Laughter followed the sally and Mr. Conger smiled as he turned away and resumed his seat beside general superintendent Whyte of the C.P.R.. The next moment he gave a convulsive moan and clutched at Mr. Whyte's shoulder. He was unconscious and when placed in a recumbent position on the floor, his laboured breathing excited alarm. Dr. Canniff was quickly summoned. Before his arrival the bystanders tried to give Mr. Conger relief by bathing his face and loosening his necktie. when the doctor reached the room he pronounced Mr. Conger's condition most critical. He endeavoured to revive the patient but Mr. Conger gradually became feeble and at 3:40, about eight minutes after he was attacked, Dr. Canniff pronounced the patient dead. The ambulance was summoned and the body of Mr. Conger was removed to his residence, No 51 Murray street. Several members of Mr. Conger's family are at present in Europe.

 

DENCE - (Morrisburg) This afternoon a son of Alfred Pence, aged 6 years, was drowned while bathing in the river. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

CLOUGH, DIXON - Two more lives were lost in the Dundas canal Monday night. John R. Clough, foreman to Dixon Bros spinning mill, and Robert Dixon, assistant packer at the cotton mills, came to Hamilton together to spend the civic holiday and were at Dundurn Park all afternoon. At night they started to row back to Dundas and had in the boat with them a Dundas painter, William Mattocks. As they drew near Dundas, the three men rose in their seats to change


 their position and in doing so the boat tilted and all three were precipitated into the water. The boat, though half full of water did not capsize, and the three men clung to it for several minutes. Then it suddenly turned bottom upwards. Mattocks regained his hold, but the other two men were either unable to find the boat in the dark of were too exhausted to get to it. Mattocks heard them both struggling in the water for several moments and then all was still.

With the tenacity of despair Mattocks clung to the boat for over an hour. Then a young Hamilton gentleman and lady came along in a skiff and with a great deal of difficulty Mattocks was rescued by them and put ashore. The bodies of Clough and Dixon were taken out of the canal a little before noon yesterday. Clough was a native of Bradford, England, and was 40 years of age. Dixon was 20 years old and came to Dundas from Edinburgh about four years ago. Both men were unmarried. Clough had no friends in this country, but Dixon's mother and sisters live in Toronto.

The funeral of both will take place this morning at 10 o'clock from the Dundas town hall. Dixon was a member of the 77th Battalion and will be buried with military honours.

 

August 13, 1385

 

CARSON - Died in this city, on August 12, Ananias Carson, in the 68th year of his age. The funeral will leave his late residence, 115 King William street, on Friday at 10 a.m. for Waterdown. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SEMMENS - Died in this city, on August 11, 1885, Margaret, relict of the late John Semmens, in the 75th year of her age. The funeral will leave her late residence, No 86 Florence street, on Thursday, August 13, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

GIRARD - (Quebec) A deck hand of the barge "Lepine", named Joseph Girard, was drowned on Monday evening at Dubiel's Cove. His body was found yesterday.

 

AUDET - (Quebec) The body found drowned yesterday at Les Escureuils was identified as that of one Audet, a seminary student who was drowned several days ago while bathing at Cape Laroche.

 

August 14, 1885

 

O'BRIEN - Died on August 12, at his residence, 8 York street, Hugh O'Brien, merchant, aged 65 years. Funeral on Friday, August 14, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends will please attend.


MACKAY - Died in this city, on Thursday, August 13, Jane Coates Turner, wife of R. O. Mackay, in the 29th year of her age. Funeral on Sunday, August 16, at 2:30 p.m. from her husband's residence, 17 Wood street east. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend.

A large circle of friends will deeply deplore the early death of Mrs. Mackay, wife of R. O. Mackay. Mrs. Mackay was formerly of Toronto and was married about a year ago in England, returning to Hamilton after an extended visit. A short time ago she was seized with typhoid fever which caused her death yesterday. She was of an amiable disposition which made her beloved by all who knew her and which will increase their sorrow and the bereavement of her relatives.

 

LEARY - (Brampton) Edward Leary, son of Mr. John Leary, a wealthy farmer living at Britannia, a hamlet in Toronto township about six miles south of here on the Centre Road, died last evening from injuries received in the morning by falling from a barn. Young Leary was assisting the farm hands to lift a load of wheat sheaves from the wagon to the upper mows of the barn, using a recently introduced patented horse fork for the purpose. Two loads had been raised into the building and the third and last was elevated to the beam when the deceased reached forward to pull it towards him, and in so doing he accidentally missed his footing, falling heavily to the ground, a distance of nearly twenty-five feet, alighting on his head.

When picked up he was unconscious and though the best medical skill in the county was immediately procured, the unfortunate young man never regained consciousness. He died about nine o'clock last night. A post mortem examination of the remains showed that the skull had been fractured, a couple of fragments of crushed bone penetrating the brain, causing death. The bereaved parents have the sympathy and condolence of the entire neighbourhood in their hour of deep affliction.

 

BERRY - (St. Thomas) A Grand Trunk brakeman named William Berry was badly crushed while coupling cars in the Grand Trunk Railway yard here this morning. He died a short time after.

 

FAULDS - (London) In the township of Delaware last Sunday, Miss Faulds, daughter of Mr. Thomas Faulds, when jumping out of a buggy on her return from church, broke her leg above the knee, and falling forward, the broken bone entered her abdomen, causing death.

 

MCVICAR - (Ottawa) A report of the fatal poisoning of two children has just been received from Pakenham. It appears that on Friday last two young children of Mrs. McVicar, who lives about six miles from Pakenham, went into the garden and picked some poppy blossoms. They ate a quantity of the seeds and were soon deathly sick. One of the little ones died in the course of


a few hours, and on Saturday night when the person brought the report, the case of the other child was pronounced hopeless.

 

CLARK - (Dundas) A few days since, a young man named Donald Clark in the Badenoch settlement near Morriston, Brock road, fell dead while working in a mow of wheat in the barn. The cause of death was a rupture in one of the valves of the heart.

 

CARROLL - James Carroll, an Irishman, who lived in the southwest part of the city, put an end to his existence by jumping from an upstairs window in the city hospital Wednesday night. He had been a day patient in the hospital for a couple of weeks, his trouble being alcoholism which speedily developed into delirium tremens. Carroll was placed in the upper male ward. At first in his paroxysms he had to be placed in a straight jacket, but gradually grew quiet, if not quite recovered. Wednesday night he went to sleep quite early. About 10:30 the nurse left him to receive another patient. When she returned he was gone. A search being instituted, he was found lying dead on the ground immediately below a window which looks out from the bathroom in the east end of the building. Just how it happened it is hard to say.

There is no doubt that he fell from the bathroom window, but whether he was attracted by the cab bringing the other patient through the east gate, looked out, and lost his balance; whether he was temporarily insane; or whether he was trying to escape, it is hard to say. Dr. Cochrane was not in the hospital at the time, but he returned in a few minutes after the discovery of the body. He notified Coroner Mackelcan who had a jury summoned and an inquest was held in the hospital at noon yesterday...

Carroll has resided in the city for many years and owned considerable property here. He was married and had several children. No post mortem examination being held, the exact cause of his death is uncertain, but it is probable that he broke his neck.

 

August 15, 1885

 

STUART - Died at the residence of her parents, 120 Hunter street east, on Friday, August 14, Jessie Stuart, aged 11 years and 1 month. Funeral at 2:30 on Sunday afternoon. Friends and acquaintances please attend.

 

LAUTHIER - (Montreal) A young man named Lauthier, while working in a saw mill at St. Telesphore a day or two ago, had his leg caught in a strap and was drawn into machinery and badly crushed. His skull also was fractured. He was killed almost Instantly.

 

SOLOMON - (Halifax) Two soldiers, one the warden of the Melville Military prison named Solomon, and the other a corporal of the Royal Irish Rifles named McKeown, were on the Northwest arm in a sailboat this afternoon when a squall hit them and upset the boat.


McKeown managed to reach the shore by swimming, but Solomon was drowned before help could get to the scene

 

PARKER - (Belleville) Last night a young man named Reginald Parker who resides in Trenton was drowned in the harbour here. He had come down from Trenton in the yacht "Enid" to witness the regatta and the yacht put in here and remained during the night. Parker went uptown to visit his parents and as his hat was found on the deck of the yacht this morning, his companions concluded that he had been drowned. The body was found close to the wharf where he had evidently fallen in,, in stepping on board during the night, as the watchman saw him on the wharf about 11 p.m. The deceased who was 21 years of age was a member of No 4 company of the Midland Battalion and served during the campaign.

 

COTE - (Ottawa) A boy named Louis Cote was killed this morning at the St. Lawrence & Ottawa Railway station by being run over by a coal car. He was stealing rides while the cars were being shunted and fell under the wheels.

 

SCHRADER - (Quebec) Rev. George Justus Schrader of Renfrew, son of Archdeacon Schrader, formerly of Pondsbridge vicarage, England, died suddenly last night. An inquest was held and a verdict returned of death from rupture of a blood vessel at the base of the brain.

 

August 17, 1885

 

MYERS - Died in this city, at 132 Catharina street, on Thursday, August 13, Charles Myers, aged 7 years and 10 months, grandson of Robert McLennan. Funeral took place last Friday at 9 a.m. Private. His death is deeply regretted.

 

HARWOOD - (Toronto) A young man named Harwood, of Lippincott street, fell into the river Humber this morning. He was pulled out almost immediately afterward, but the efforts to restore animation proved unavailing. It was afterward found that he had received concussion of the brain in his fall. He was 18 years of age.

 

PEUKER - (Toronto) J. G. Peuker, a hotel keeper of Parkdale and well known secret society man, (editor’s note AKA Episkopon) was found dead in his bed this morning, having been suffocated by gas. It is supposed he had accidentally left the gas partially turned on after extinguishing the light and retiring last night.

 

WALKER - (Toronto) Richard Walker, a Grand Trunk yardman at the York Street station, while coupling cars in motion in the yard there this afternoon, fell between them and several cars passed over his legs. His right leg was amputated in the hope of saving his life, but he died a few minutes after the operation. He was 26 years of age and recently married.


GISBORNE - (Toronto) Henry P. Gisborne, manufacturing chemist and agent for Reed & Cormick of New York, was drowned in the bay about 10 o'clock to-night. He was, in company with three others, in the act of stepping on the platform of the boat house at the foot of York street to get into a boat to row over to the island when in the darkness he missed his footing and fell into the bay. He was not seen to rise again. His body was rescued about half an hour afterward. His wife and family are spending the summer in Muskoka. He is a brother of Mr. Gisborne, superintendent of the government telegraph lines, Ottawa.

 

METCALFE - (Kingston) Dr. Metcalfe, superintendent of the Rockwood Asylum who was stabbed by a lunatic on Thursday, died this (Sunday) afternoon.

 

MCGREGOR (Chatham) Bessie, aged eight years, daughter of W. G. McGregor, surveyor and civil engineer, was instantly killed at noon to-day by falling from a swing, the rope in some manner getting round her neck, breaking it.

 

August 18, 1885

 

BARNES - Died in this city, on August 17, Charles William, only son of W. H. Barnes, aged 19 years. The funeral will take place on Wednesday, at 3:30 p.m., from No 140 King William street. Friends and acquaintances are requested to accept this intimation.

 

DERBY - Died in this city, after a long and painful illness, Elizabeth, beloved wife of Joseph William Derby, in her 47th year. Funeral from her husband's residence, 113 West avenue north, on Tuesday, August 18, at 4 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

SLOAN - (Tara, Ont) As the Saturday afternoon express train, going north, was about eight miles north of this place, James Sloan, aged 60, was instantly killed with his horse at a crossing. The locomotive and eight or ten cars were over the crossing when the horse, coming along the concession road, ran against the hind passenger coach. The man was thrown over the cattle guard and the horse on top of him.

 

WALKER - (Blenheim) A very sad and fatal poisoning accident occurred about two miles from here to-day. The sons of David Walker found some wild parsnips which they mistook for spignett, and ate. The oldest, William, about 24 years old, died in a few hours. The other two, aged 17 and 15, are very low, but the doctor has hopes of their recovery.


BENARD - (Montreal) Charles Benard, a butcher, of this city, went down to Longue Point, a few miles below the city, on Sunday for a day's sport, and was drowned while bathing in the river.

 

HARRIS - (London) William Harris, aged 20 years, son of William Henry Harris, of lot 20, concession B of North Dorchester, went to cut grain this Monday morning. It is supposed he put the cradle over the fence and stumbled upon the scythe, inflicting an awful gash on his right thigh. He fainted, and on recovery cried aloud, which drew the attention of his people. When they reached him, they supposed he had been attacked with cholera morbus, but the poor fellow had lost so much blood that he became unconscious. Dr. Graham was quickly summoned and did all that medical skill could do under the circumstance, but the efforts were of no avail. He lived about five hours after the accident.

 

August 19, 1885

 

JOYCE - Died in this city, August 18, John M., the only child of Mary and Thomas Joyce, aged 4 months and 20 days. The funeral will take place on Wednesday, at 3:30 p.m., from 23 Queen street north. Friends and acquaintances are requested to accept this intimation.

 

CLINE - Died in this city, on August 18, 1885, Emily, beloved wife of Arthur Cline, aged 43 years 4 months. Funeral on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. from No 135 Locke street north. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

FAIRBANK - (Guelph) A son of W. J. Fairbank was drowned in the Speed river.

 

August 20, 1885

 

REID - Died in this city, at 82 Jackson street east, on August 17, Eliza, widow of the late John Reid, aged 68 years. Funeral from the above address, on Friday, August 21, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HINCKS - (Montreal) Sir Francis Hincks died of smallpox at 7:30 p.m. this evening.

Sir Francis Hincks was the youngest son of the late Rev. Dr. Hincks, Professor of Oriental Languages in the Royal Belfast Institution. He was a brother of the late Rev. Edward Hincks, D.D., formerly Fellow of Trinity College, Dublin, and afterward rector of Killylea, who was well known for his writings on subjects in connection with Egyptian, Persian, and Assyrian archeology. The Irish family is a branch of one long settled in Chester, England.


The deceased was born in the city of Cork on December 15, 1807. He was educated at the Royal Belfast Institution. In his seventeenth year he left school and evinced a strong inclination for commercial pursuits, and he entered a prominent mercantile house in Belfast and remained there five years. He then decided to emigrate and sailed from Belfast for Demarara. On his way he touched at Barbados, the residence of the governor-general of the Windward. Islands. Twenty-six years afterward he again went ashore at Barbados, but this time as governor-general of Barbados and the Windward Islands.

A quarter of a century had effected a vast change in the fortunes of Francis Hincks. After visiting Demarara and Trinidad, the deceased made his way to Quebec and thence journeyed to Upper Canada. He stayed some months at York and returned to Ireland. A year afterward he again came to Canada and definitely settled at York, now Toronto. He first opened a small warehouse on Yonge street and quickly gave evidence of good business ability. In a few years he became cashier of a bank and rapidly grew into local repute as a financier of no mean ability. In 1830 he married Martha Anne, daughter of Alexander Stewart of Ligenfel, near Belfast.

His political reputation began to grow with his improved circumstances and by the important aid he rendered Wm. Lyon Mackenzie he gained sure footing as a public man. In 1834 he printed and published the Toronto Examiner, continuing to be editor for several years. At the first election after the Union he was returned to parliament for the County of Oxford. He was a member of the Executive Council and Inspector-General of Canada from June 1842 to November 1843 when the famous rupture with Sir Charles Metcalfe occurred and he resigned with all his colleagues except Dominick Daly. In the following year he went to Montreal and established the Pilot. At the next general election he was defeated at Oxford and remained out of parliament until 1847 when he was again returned by his old constituents. In the following March the second Lafontaine-Baldwin government was formed and he again became Inspector-General when Baldwin retired from political life in 1851. The deceased in conjunction with Hon. A. N. Morin formed the Hincks-Morin administration. The administration lasted until the autumn of 1854 when it resigned office.

He visited Washington on several occasions for the purpose of conferring with the British minister on the subject of commercial intercourse between Canada and the United States. He was chosen by the Earl of Elgin to accompany him as representative of Canada when he negotiated the reciprocity treaty of 1854.

He was a delegate in the maritime provinces in 1852 on the subject of the Intercolonial Railway and during the same year went as a delegate to the Imperial Government to urge the appeal of the clergy reserves act and the grant of guarantee for the Intercolonial Railway. During the visit he made preliminary arrangements for Messrs Petz, Brassey, and Jackson for the construction of the Grand Trunk Railway by English capitalists. As before noted he was made


 Governor-General-in-Chief of Barbados and the Windward Islands in 1855, and continued to discharge the duties of this position until 1861. From the latter date to 1869 he was Governor of British Guiana. He was created a Companion of the Order of the Bath (civil) in 1862 and a Knight Commander of the Order of St. Michael and St. George in 1869. In this year deceased returned to Canada and shortly after his arrival was offered by Sir John Macdonald the position of Finance Minister in successor to Sir John Ross who was about to take up his permanent residence in England.

He accepted the office on October 1868, and was at once elevated to parliament as member for North Renfrew. This seat he had until the close of parliament and he was returned for Vancouver for which constituency he sat until his final retirement from political life in 1874. During his occupancy of the position of Finance Minister he devoted himself to the work of readjusting the currency and also prepared and carried through parliament an important banking act.

His first wife died in 1874, and on June 14, 1875, he married Emily Louisa, relict of Hon Justice Sullivan of Toronto. After his retirement from politics he continued to devote himself to financial matters, for some time serving as president of the City Bank of Montreal. He was the author of pamphlets on religious endowments in Canada & our political history from 1841 to 1854, and various other subjects. He also published a short time ago a volume of Reminiscences, a valuable contribution to political history of his time. In 1878 he was chosen in the room of Hon. L. A. Wilmot, deceased, to be one of the three arbitrators to pass upon the question of the Ontario borders. This may be described as his last public act.

 

CLARK, KENNEDY - (Port Dalhousie) Manley Clark, aged 19, son of the late collector of this port, and Miss Kennedy, of Toronto, were drowned near lock 3 of the Welland canal about 9 o'clock this evening. Miss Kennedy and her mother were visiting here, and Clark and Miss Kennedy drove into St. Catharines early in the evening and were returning by the road running along the canal bank. The night was dark and the road narrow, and on turning out to pass another rig Clark's horse and buggy went over the edge of the road and into the canal. The buggy was a covered one with the top up and both the occupants were held fast and drowned. The bodies were recovered in a very short time but too late to save their lives.

 

WILLIAMSON - (Toronto) James Williamson, a carpenter, fell down the hold of the steamship "Rupert" last week and died at the hospital from the injuries he received.

 

SPACKMAN - A dispatch from Toronto last night announced the death of Bright's disease of J. R. Spackman, one time manager of the Grand Opera House in this city, and an actor well known in theatrical circles in Canada and the United States. Mr. Spackman leaves a young wife and three small children who will have the sympathy of many friends in their affliction.


August 21, 1885

 

BAKER - Died at No 4 Duke street, on Thursday morning, August 20, William Robert, aged 12 years and 6 months, the only son of the late John Baker, formerly of the Great Western Railway. Funeral private.

 

LOUGHREY - Died at 74 Carling street, London, on August 18, Irene May, aged 3 months and 16 days, only daughter of Emily P. and Samuel S. Loughrey, of Hamilton.

 

LLOYD - Died at Cleveland, Ohio, on August 18, George, eldest son of James and Sarah Lloyd, aged 20 years. Funeral from his father's residence, 13 Greig street, on Friday, August 21, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

WOODCROFT - Died in this city, at the residence of his grandmother, Mrs. R. Rowe, corner of Hannah and Caroline streets, on August 19, Walter B. Woodcroft, aged 11 months. Funeral on Friday, August 21, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

THUS - (Trenton) Alfred B. Thus, of Picton, fell off the steamer "Varuna" when coming into Picton this morning. Capt Porte backed the steamer to the spot but before assistance could be rendered, he was drowned. The deceased leaves a wife and six children.

 

LAPPA - (Montreal) At Lachine yesterday afternoon, four young boys were bathing in the river when Alphonse Lappa, 15 years of age, seeing that his brother was in danger, succeeded in rescuing him and conveying him to a safe place, but at the same time was himself carried away by the current. He disappeared before assistance could be rendered by his companions. His body was recovered an hour afterward.

 

MACDONALD - (Toronto) Dr. W. H. Macdonald, a young and rising physician, was found dead in bed this morning. He spent last night at a friend's house, leaving there in excellent spirits shortly after midnight. His death is attributed to heart disease. Deceased was about 30 years of age and was a gold medallist of Trinity College. His parents reside in Acton.

 

LEWIS - (Guelph) Mrs. F. G. Lewis (Miss Minnie Husband) is dead at Birtle, Manitoba. She was ill when married here on June 10.

 

August 22, 1885

 

MINES - (London) Mr. James Mines, a young man of. Mount Brydges, was so severely injured


on Monday last by a thrashing machine that he died at 10 o'clock on Tuesday morning. The funeral on Wednesday was one of the largest seen in Mount Brydges for a long time. He was a young man who was well known and highly respected by all who knew him.

 

BRADY - (Ottawa) James Brady while driving a load of shingles this morning near Black Bay, county of Ottawa, fell from the load and the wheel of the wagon passed over his head, injuring him badly. He died within two hours after the accident.

 

GREGG - Yesterday afternoon the following dispatch was received and published in the "Spectator:

Weston, Ontario: A young man named Thomas Gregg, employed by James R. Dixon of Etobicoke, yesterday slipped into a thrasher and had his legs fearfully mangled. Dr. Savage amputated the injured limb but the poor fellow lived only three hours. He is a stranger here. His friends are said to live in the old country.

Jeremiah Gregg, a labourer, who lives at the corner of Wentworth and Wilson streets, on reading the paragraph was convinced that the unfortunate young man was his son. Thomas Gregg left home in the early part of the week with the intention of going east and working his way around the country. He was of a wandering disposition and Mr. Gregg believes he must have started to work at Etobicoke to raise money to take him along. Another son of Mr. Gregg left last night to ascertain if the belief is correct.

 

August 24, 1885

 

KEEGAN - Died in this city, on August 21, Isabella, daughter of William Keegan, aged 2 months. Funeral will take place from her father's residence, 94 Macauley street east, on Sunday, August 23, at 3:30 p.m. Friends will please attend.

 

OLLENDORFF - (Toronto) A boy named Ollendorff was crossing Yonge street yesterday and was knocked down by the horses attached to a street car, the wheels of the car passing over his legs. He died to-night.

 

August 25, 1885

 

JACKSON - Died on August 19, at 42 Markland street, Joseph George, fourth son of George and Mary Ann Jackson, aged 9 years and 2 months.

 

HENNIGAN - (Halifax) Rev. J. G. Hennigan, senior Methodist clergyman in the Maritime provinces, died at Canning to-day, aged 81.

 

ROBERTS - (Montreal) For some time past a farmer of St. Laurent, named Roberts, has been in


rather a low mental condition, owing to his land being mortgaged and not being able to take up the mortgage. Yesterday he was found drowned in a well on his farm. It is supposed to be a case of suicide.

 

TOBIN - (Ottawa) The two girls killed on the Canada Atlantic Railway bridge near this city on Saturday were named Minnie and Maggie Tobin and aged 14 and 11 each. The two girls with a younger brother and another little boy had gone across the river to pick berries and were on their way home about 3 o'clock when the accident occurred. when about half way across the railway bridge a freight train from Montreal came round a curve on the other side of it. The children at once started to run in order to get off the bridge before they were overtaken. Seeing the train was gaining on them rapidly and that it would be impossible for all four to be saved, the eldest girl, Minnie, with a self-sacrificing heroism seldom seen, seems to have determined to rescue her companions regardless of her own life. She jerked the little boys, who were running along the track, to a place of safety at the extreme outer edge of the bridge. She retuned to the centre of the track and had her hand upon her little sister in the effort to save her when both were struck by the train and must have been killed instantly as the bodies were crushed and mangled beyond recognition.

 

BRUCE - (Belleville) George Bruce, a stonecutter, was drowned in the Murray canal while bathing. His body has been recovered.

 

August 26, 1885

 

TEETZEL - Died on August 25, at Sparta, Ontario, Elizabeth, relict of the late J. N. Teetzel, and mother of J. V. Teetzel of this city.

 

MONTEITH - (Montreal) News was received in the city this morning of a murder which occurred on the lower Lachine road between the city and Lachine last evening. Four men from the city were trespassing and stealing fruit on the grounds of Thomas Monteith, a farmer. His youngest son, William David Monteith, 17 years of age, went to order them off when without provocation one of them who carried a shotgun seized the gun by the barrel and brained the young man. His older brother seeing the affair came to his assistance and another of the group drew a large knife and threatened to kill him if he came near. He then went to get his father and when they came back the men were gone. The young man died about two hours afterward.

 

WYLIE - (Toronto) Alexander Wylie, a painter on Grosvenor avenue suicided to-night by cutting his throat with a razor. About three years ago Wylie's wife deserted him and went to live with another painter. Wylie met this man shortly afterward in the street and fired at him three times.


He was arrested, tried, and acquitted. Since then he took to drink and has been despondent. Fortunately they had no family.

 

August 27, 1885

 

FREEMAN - Died in this city, at 87 Elgin street, on August 25, Willie, infant son of W. A. Freeman. Funeral from the above address, on Thursday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

DONNELLY - Died at 49 Cherry street, on August 26, Jane, the beloved wife of John Donnelly, of the township of Maryborough, county of Wellington, aged 65 years.

 

BAUCHER - (Quebec) Theogene Baucher, one of the members of the 65th who did campaign duty in the Northwest, accidentally fell off Crawford's wharf yesterday and was drowned. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

HOGG - (London) An accident of a shocking nature occurred at the works of the McClary Manufacturing Company this morning whereby one of the employees named Joseph Hogg, aged about 16, lost his life. The unfortunate young man who has only been out from England about two months and lived with his aunt, Mrs. May, on Horton street, had been in the employ of the company about six weeks and was very handy about the work assigned to him. He was asked to go to the fifth storey of the building for some fire brick and ascended by the hoist. A short time after, he was noticed lying on the bottom of the hoist at the third storey, having fallen down the open doorway of the hoist. He was at first thought to be insensible, and was removed to the office of Dr. Hutchinson who examined the remains and pronounced life extinct. The supposition is that in the fall his neck was broken. Only one slight abrasion was noticed on the side of his face. It appears that in the flat to which he was sent there is not a semblance of light, and the supposition is that he stumbled in endeavouring to seize hold of the ropes and fell about 25 feet. An inquest will be held this evening to enquire into the circumstances attending the death of the unfortunate young man.

 

August 28, 1885

 

WELLS - Died at her husband's residence, Ryckman's Corners, on August 27, Almedia S., wife of Capt. William Wells. Funeral on Sunday at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

JARDINE - Died on Thursday evening, Dora Joan, eldest daughter of Ellen and J. W. Jardine, aged 1 year and 10 months. Funeral from her father's residence, Saltfleet, on Saturday, August 29 at 2 o'clock p.m.


MAYNARD - (Princeton) Moses Maynard, a farm labourer, employed by David Bastedo, one mile north of this village, at 5 o'clock this evening was in the barn unloading barley with a patent hay carrier when owing to the breakage of the tight rope he lost balance, falling backward from the top of the load, breaking his neck, causing instant death. He was about 48 years of age and unmarried.

 

WARD (Toronto) Mrs. Ward, for many years employed on the northern Railway, went down the yard to clean out some passenger cars. In jumping off it she alighted in front of a moving freight train, the engine of which struck her, and the wheels passing over one of her legs severed it from her body. She was taken to the hospital but no hopes are entertained of her recovery.

Mrs. Ward who was struck by a Northern Railway train this morning died at the hospital this evening.

 

August 29, 1885

 

SCULLY (Halifax) John Scully, a miner, was instantly killed in the east slope of the Spring Hill  coal mines this afternoon by being struck by a descending cage.

 

RITCHIE - (London) A very peculiar fatal occurrence took place last evening at the residence of Mr. Andrew Ritchie, 316 Grey street. It seems that Mrs. Ritchie had been washing and left a pail of suds standing on the floor while she went to the garden to gather vegetables for dinner. She was not absent more than three minutes but on her return she found her 11-month-old child head first in the pail. She lifted it out and thus rescued it from drowning. But the child was ill and continued so till near midnight when it expired. The doctor in attendance gave it as his belief that the child had swallowed some of the suds, the action of the lye causing death.

 

WORTS - (Toronto) This morning the men employed in clearing away the debris from the site of the sugar refinery came across a mass of charred bones with patches of burned flesh attached, all that remained of the body of the ill-fated watchman. The remains were found under a pile of bricks beneath the stairway leading from the office. It is supposed that Worts had descended the stairs intending to make his exit from the building, but was overcome by the smoke and flames before he could get to a place of safety.

 

LYONS - (Toronto) Rev. Mr. Thomas, pastor of Jarvis Street Baptist Church arrived home the night before last from a three-months trip to Europe. To-night the congregation of the church met to welcome him. Deacon James H. Lyons arose to deliver the address of Welcome. After speaking about five minutes he suddenly fell froward on the platform, off which he rolled to the


floor and was dead before he could be picked up. Heart disease was the cause. The deceased is a well known wholesale druggist and was almost 70 years of age.

 

August 31, 1885

 

CARROLL - (Quebec) A sad case of drowning occurred at Maple avenue last night. The victim was Arthur, son of Mr. James Carroll, president of the press association of Quebec. It appears that the little fellow was playing hide-and-seek with some companions when he fell into an uncovered well on the property of Mr. Burroughs, and before the body could be recovered, life was extinct.

 

JACK - (Toronto) Andrew Jack, aged 30 years, living with his mother at 256 Farley avenue, went to bed drunk at 10 o'clock last night. He was found dead in bed this morning with blood issuing from his mouth. Death was evidently caused by suffocation, his collar being very tight.

 

GRANT - (Halifax) Archibald Grant, brother of Rev. Dr. Grant, principal of Queen's College, Kingston, died suddenly of paralysis in a hotel at New Glasgow this morning. The deceased resided at Stellarton, Pictou County. Principal Grant is at present on a visit to Halifax.

 

September 1, 1885

 

HANNON - Died at 17 Greenwood avenue, Rochester, NY, on Sunday, August 30, William Alfred Bennett, infant son of Charles D., and the late Nettie Hannon, aged 8 weeks and 3 days. Funeral will take place from the residence of Mr. Alfred Bennett, Dundas, this (Monday) evening, at 5 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

POWERS - (Brantford) An old man named Powers, and his wife, were found dead Saturday morning in their home near Watts flour mills. It is supposed that both died from weakness and recent dissipation, but the coroner took charge of the case.

 

BAGSAN - (Brooklin, Ont) On Sunday morning, Mr. John Bagsan, an old sailor, who has been drinking hard of late, went to a stable in rear of the house where he had been living and hanged himself.

He was found by his wife soon afterward, but too late to save his life

 

VARY - Last Saturday Mr. Levi Vary of Niagara was seized with spasms of the heart while passing out of the front door. He fell down the steps and his head fell against the gate post, causing concussion of the brain and paralysis which resulted in Mr. Vary's death on Sunday. The deceased was a very old resident of Niagara and greatly respected. He was 68 years of age.


Several of his relatives live in Hamilton. Charles Vary, his son, was with the Queen's Own in the Northwest and was wounded in one of the engagements.

 

September 3, 1885

 

MICHAEL - (Edmonton) An Indian, named Michael, of Alexis Lac St. Anne band, was killed on Saturday, August 1, while hunting moose near the Athabasca River by two grizzly bears. He went out alone and as he did not return. He was followed by his companions. The body was found where he had been killed, the flesh eaten off the bones and a knife grasped in his hand. His gun was broken and the ground and bushes around showed that a fierce fight has occurred.

 

September 4, 1885

 

JACKSON - (Toronto) Edward Jackson, an employee of the city corporation stables, was kicked by a horse on Tuesday night and died from his injuries to-day.

 

CRABTREE - (Ottawa) Mr. John Crabtree of the firm of Robertson & Crabtree, builders, died at his residence at 4 o'clock this morning from the effects of a nail penetrating his great toe some ten days ago. Yesterday the amputation of the toe took place but without improving the symptoms. From the moment lockjaw set in he suffered the most intense agony from tetanus convulsions. Mr. Crabtree was 44 years of age and leaves a wife and five children who have the sympathy of the community.

 

EASTERBEE - (St. Catharines) The body of Alexander Easterbee, the husband of Leafy Easterbee, the murdered woman, was found Wednesday about noon. An inquest was held to-day. The jury after about half an hour's deliberation returned about 10 p.m. with the following verdict that Alexander Easterbee came to his death on or about October or November, 1884, at the hands of John Easterbee by cutting Alexander Easterbee's throat and that the said John Easterbee is guilty of wilful murder.

The prisoner refused to make any statement before the jury. The inquest on Leafy Easterbee, wife of Alexander, will be continued on Tuesday night when it is expected some further light will be thrown on this terrible crime.

 

September 5, 1885

 

REHDER - Died in this city, on September 4, Henry Victor, youngest son of Christian and Mary Rehder. Funeral will leave at 2 p.m. on Saturday, September 5, from 34 Little William street. Friends are respectfully invited to attend.


MCMILLEN - Died in this city, on September 4, James McMillen, aged 55 years and 7 months. Funeral from his late residence, 39 Catherine street south, Sunday, September 6, at 2 p.m. Service at St. James Reformed Episcopal Church. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

LAWRENCE - (Brantford) Capt. Lawrence, an old man and much esteemed citizen, who was struck by a locomotive a few days ago, died yesterday from his injuries.

 

SCHOMBERG - (Montreal) A boat containing two men capsized in the river below Indian Cove this afternoon and one of the occupants, a Norwegian named Schomberg, was drowned. The other man was picked up by a passing yacht.

 

ARCHIBALD - (Belleville) Mrs. Mary Adams, of the Township of Huntingdon, a woman of easy virtue, who assaulted Martin Archibald, a well-to-do farmer in her neighbourhood, with an axe on Sunday last, was arrested on Thursday, together with her son, Charles Adams, have been bound over for trial at the fall assizes. Archibald died from the effects of his wounds on Friday evening.

 

CLARK, SIMMONS - (St. Thomas) On Wednesday afternoon as James Clark, son of the postmaster of Middlemiss, and John Simmons, adopted son of Mr. George Simmons, blacksmith of that village, were engaged with several others in removing clay from a clay bank to the brick machine in F. Wade's yard, the embankment gave way and a large mass of the earth fell upon Clark and Simmons, entombing them alive. When Clark was taken out life was extinct. Simmons's leg was broken and he also received internal injuries which terminated in his death two hours later. The accident happened about 4 o'clock and was witnessed by some parties in the vicinity. Efforts were at once put forth to rescue the unfortunate lads, but fully twenty minutes elapsed before they could be reached. When found Clark was dead, having been instantly killed. Simmons was still alive and Dr. Sinclair of Melborne was sent for and did everything possible for the injured youth, but he had received, mortal injuries and died two hours afterward. Simmons was brought to notice as a witness in the Wilcox murder case, he being the party who swore that Albert Wrightman gave him the portion of a mask to burn. The funerals of the victims will take place this afternoon.

 

WARD - (Amherstburg) This morning about 7:30, as the steam barge "Cleveland" with her consort in tow, bound down Lake Erie with a heavy sea running, was about to turn and run into Pigeon Bay, the water bottom of the boiler blew out and the escaping steam scalded a deck hand named John Ward who was burned in the fire hold so badly that he lived but a short time. He was heard groaning but it was impossible to reach him, and he had been dead some time when the crew were able to get him out. A fireman named Edward Dennis was severely scalded but


managed to get out. The engineer, John E. Robertson, escaped with his legs and ankles slightly scalded. The cook named Mollie Plager, of Port Huron, is slightly scalded. The damage done to the hull was slight, but a number of pipes in the engine room and boiler are burst and the pony engine is badly damaged. The propellor "Wocaken " bound up, picked up the "Cleveland" and her consort off Point au Pelee, and towed her to this port.

 

MORTON, SIMONS - (Peterborough) By a wagon load of dynamite exploding near Lakefield this morning, two men named Morton and Simons and a team of horses were blown to pieces. The shock was felt for miles around the surrounding country and it was thought there was an earthquake. Both victims belonged to the village of Tweed.

 

MAHONEY - (Church Falls, Ont) Charles Mahoney, a Caledon township farmer, was run down by an eastbound C.N.R. freight train a short distance south of here on Wednesday evening. His right leg was severed from his body. The railway authorities summoned medical aid and did all in their power for the sufferer, but he never rallied and died yesterday afternoon. The train hands seem to have taken every precaution to prevent the accident.

 

SHORT (Sort) - William Short came to this city with his wife a little over a year ago from Winnipeg whither he had gone from Montreal. He was a machinist and easily obtained employment at the Ontario Sewing Machine works. Six weeks ago he and his wife went to board with Mr. and Mrs. Jackson, Walnut street south. Short and his wife did not live happily together. Though married only five years, Mrs. Short had once left her husband, being unable to stand his abuse. On Tuesday, August 2, Mrs. Short left him again after one of their common quarrels. Short was apparently much grieved. He was naturally a kind man except when incited by jealousy, and appeared much distressed about his wife's departure. He went to Toronto in search of her but being unsuccessful, he returned. She, in the meantime, had gone by coach to Guelph and there procured a ticket for Detroit. Short learned that she had gone to Guelph and went there but could find nothing of her. On Thursday, August 27, he received a letter from her. The letter written in a plain neat woman's hand opens with the announcement that unable to stand his tyranny and abuse she has decided to leave him and hopes never to see him again. In it she accuses him of having spread many false reports about her and with having asked her to drown herself so that he would be rid of her. On Wednesday Short figured in a police court case as complainant against a fellow workman.

He did not return to his boarding house on Thursday night nor Friday, but spent two days wandering from hotel to hotel drinking. Yesterday he went into the Allison House, corner of Bay and Stuart streets and called for a drink. Mr. Allison, who had known him for a year, noticed that


he had been drinking heavily and advised him not to drink, also refusing him anything but a glass of native wine. Short paid for his drink and for one for which he owed and asked to be given a quiet room, saying that it was about family trouble that, was ailing him. He took off his gold watch and chain, and producing $27 in cash from his pocket, gave them to Mr. Allison for safekeeping. He then went to a room on the third floor. A short time afterward a servant girl, passing the door, saw smoke coming through a fanlight, and told Mrs. Allison who proceeded to the room to ascertain what was wrong. On pushing open the door, she saw a pool of blood in the middle of the room and Short lying on the floor. Thinking it to be a haemorrhage she went to his assistance but found him dead, a revolver lying by his side and blood proceeding from a wound in his face and another about the body.

Dr. Woolverton and the police were called. On examination it was found that he had fired only the two shots. One bullet entered under the chin and made its exit from under the lip. The other entered under his lower ribs and caused death. On his person were found several letters, including the one from his wife already mentioned, and one which he had written in the house before going up to his room. The latter was a short scrawly note and stated simply that he was a brother of Sort Bros, of Winnipeg, that his wife had run away a month ago with a prominent young, business man of this city. It was signed W. R. Sort. He had on different occasions stated that his wife had run away with a member of Buffalo Bill's company.

Dr. Woolverton decided that it was a clear case of suicide and that an inquest was unnecessary.

On enquiry being made, it was ascertained that Mrs. Short had left the city alone and was in Detroit. Mrs. Gilbert, 57 Walnut street, received a letter from her yesterday. She is living at 21 Elizabeth street west and states that she intends suing for a divorce.

The remains of the unfortunate man were removed to the city hospital and a telegram sent to his brothers in Winnipeg for directions. From all that can be learned he was in comfortable circumstances and very well-connected. He always went by the name of "Short", his signature to the note being the only evidence that it was anything different.

 

September 7, 1885

 

WADDELL - Died in this city, on September 6, Mrs. Agnes Waddell, aged 80 years, sister of Major Glasgow. Funeral will leave her brother's residence, No 65 Vine street, Tuesday, September 8, at 2 p.m., for Waterdown. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GREY - Died in this city, on September 5, William Henry Grey, native of the Isle of Wight, aged 30 years. Funeral from his late residence, 118 King street east, at 4 p.m., on Monday, September 7- Friends will please attend without further notice.


GILBERT - (St. Catharines) A young man named Gilbert, who worked in a furniture factory in Thorold, was found dead in his bed at Mr. Frobister's boarding house there on Monday morning. He came from Tonawanda.

 

September 8, 1885

 

WHITE - Died on September 7, at 48 Pearl street south, infant son of Abraham and Lucinda White, aged 3 days. Funeral on Tuesday, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

KERR - Died in this city, on September 7, 1885, Elizabeth Kerr, relict of William Kerr, native of Roxboroughshire, Scotland, in the 72nd year of her age. The funeral will take place from her son's residence, gate of the Crystal Palace, at 3 o'clock p.m., on Tuesday, September 8. Friends are invited to attend.

 

KNOX - Died in this city, on September 7, Ross Robertson, infant son of John and Annie Knox, aged 2 months. Funeral will leave his parents' residence, 351 James street north, Tuesday, September 8, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited.

 

GAMMON - (Halifax) Richard Gammon, a farmer of Gammon Settlement, was killed by being gored by a bull.

 

ELLIOTT - (Guelph) The body of an old man named Elliott, missing from the Homewood Retreat, was found in the river. He belonged to Montreal and was very old.

 

JOHNSTON - (Brantford) Alexander Johnston, bandmaster at Scotland, on Thursday accidentally took an overdose of chloral and when his daughter tried to waken him, he was found to be dead.

 

JOHNSTON - Alfred Johnston, one of the oldest and most highly respected firemen on the Great Western Division of the Grand Trunk Railway, was killed yesterday morning in the yard here. He was on the yard engine with driver Morris in the west end of the yard. A brakeman was engaged in coupling a car loaded with lumber to the yard engine, but could not get at the pin as the lumber projected over the end of the car. Johnston left the engine and went out to see what was the matter. It is believed that he stood upon a foot-wide platform which surrounds the engine, and leaning forward to watch the brakeman, got his head between the engine and the car, not thinking that the lumber was projecting far enough to catch him. The car and engine coming together at that moment caught the unfortunate man's head in their merciless grip and crushed it. Driver Morris was told of the position Johnston was in and drew his engine from the car. Johnston was picked up unconscious and died in a few minutes before Dr. White, who was immediately


summoned, could arrive. He was driven to his house, 49 Park street north. Deceased had been a fireman for the Great Western Division over fifteen years and was a steady, highly respected man. He was about 45 years old and a widower with four small children, the youngest only about two years old. He lived with his brother, a commercial traveller, and was a member of one of the Oddfellow lodges.

 

September 10, 1885

 

MARK - (Stratford) The body of a man named William Mark was found by the section man about 7 o'clock this morning lying beside the Grand Trunk track one and a half west of this city. The deceased was a labourer and a resident here. He left his house at 5 o'clock this morning to work on a farm. It is supposed that he was struck by the No 1 express going, east, due here at 5:30 a.m. He leaves a wife and large family.

 

SMITH - (Brantford) Lawrence Smith, who was the victim of a serious accident on Friday evening last, died Tuesday at his home on Northumberland street. The injuries were sustained by tripping over a semaphore wire near the gas works where he was employed. His age was 65 years.

 

September 11, 1885

 

KENYON - (Montreal) A lad named Herbert Kenyon, aged 6 years, was drowned in the canal basin this afternoon.

 

GAUTHER - (Belleville) Yesterday afternoon the infant daughter of P. Gauther set her clothing on fire with matches she had secured to play with during its mother's temporary absence. The right side of the child from hip to the crown of her head was burned into the flesh before its clothing could be stripped from her body. The little sufferer was only 4 years old and suffered fearful agony. The child died this afternoon.

 

HARVEY - (Halifax) Fred Harvey, a brother of Charles H. Harvey, commission merchant of Halifax, was drowned at Windsor this afternoon in the Avon river by the upsetting of a canoe. His body will probably be recovered when the tide ebbs.

 

HOUGH - (St. Catharines) The body of Chauncey Hough was taken out of the river below the falls on Tuesday evening. Hough came from Batavia where he resided. He was 25 years of age. Before committing suicide he sent his money and valuables to a young lady in Batavia to whom it is said he was engaged. The cause of the rash act is a mystery. The body was taken to Batavia, NY.

 

COOLEY - Mr. Mat Cooley, formerly one of the most popular young men of Ancaster,


died recently at Batavia, NY, of typhoid fever. He was taken sick while on his way to visit his relatives in Ancaster.

 

PARRY - Oscar Parry, the 12-year-old boy who shot himself in Philadelphia last Sunday, was a grandson of Mr. Thomas Parry of this city.

 

September 12, 1885

 

MYRICK - Died in this city, on September 11, William Roy, infant twin son of James H. and Martha C. Myrick, aged 2 months and 10 days. Funeral from parents' residence, 107 James street north, on Saturday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

TAYLOR - Died at her sister's residence, 163 King William street, on September 11, Mrs. Capt. Taylor, late of Peterhead, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, aged 69 years. Funeral on Monday, September 14, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

JACKSON - Died on September 10, near Ancaster, David Jackson, of Caistor, aged 75 years. Funeral from his late residence, Woodside Farm, to Kerr's church, on Sunday, September 13, at 11 am Friends will please attend.

The dead body of the old man found near Ancaster village on Thursday has been identified as that of David Jackson, an old and respected resident of Caistor Township. Mr. James Jackson, a son of the deceased who works at Meakins Brush Factory recognized the description of the remains and especially the watch and chain which appeared in yesterday "Spectator" and immediately started for Ancaster. The body as he expected was that of his father and he brought the remains back to the city.

The deceased was one of the oldest, best known, and most respected resident of Caistor. He was a native of Blairgowrie, Perthshire, Scotland, where he was born 75 years ago. In 1832 he came to Canada with his young wife and settled in Caistor where he lived all his life. His wife died nineteen years ago but four of his children are living, two sons and two daughters. The deceased lived with his son, John Jackson, the well known sheep breeder, about eighteen miles from Hamilton. Three or four years ago he was prostrated for a long time with typhoid fever and ever since he has been mentally weak. Last Tuesday morning he started from home to visit a relative who lives a mile and a half from the house. He did not return during the day and an enquiry being made, it was discovered that he had not been there at all. Then it was thought that he had gone on to the city to visit his son here. He was traced as far as Rymal's corners, but it was thought unnecessary to go any farther as the searchers felt sure he had gone to Hamilton and would be


 safe. On Thursday, however, James Jackson learned that his father had started from home to visit him and he grew alarmed at his non-arrival. Some search was made through the surrounding country but no trace of the old man could be found. Then the account of the finding of the body was seen and the recognition of the remains followed in the manner that has been described. The old man had no doubt lost his way and had been wandering about the country roads for two days through the rain. On Thursday morning, worn out by hunger, exposure, and fatigue, he had simply lain down and died.

Mr. John Jackson has been attending the London fair. He was telegraphed to and arrived last evening. The remains will be taken to Caistor to-day for burial.

 

PELZ - (Galt) The body of Mrs. G. W. Pelz, who lived with her husband near Preston, and has been missing from her home for over a week, was found under the dam in the Grand river here early this morning. Mrs. Pelz was subject to occasional fits of mental aberration and doubtless wandered into the river while suffering from one of these attacks.

 

MORIN - (Montreal) Rosithe Morin of Three Rivers, while sailing up the Richelieu river near Sorel, was struck by the bow which broke and knocked overboard and drowned.

 

DAWSON - (Montreal) A little 3-year-old daughter of George Dawson died this morning from injuries received by falling into a tub of scalding hot water.

 

FLATT - (Toronto) J. C. Flatt, Canadian Pacific Railway train dispatcher, fell dead at his work about 5 o'clock to-night from, it is supposed, heart disease. He was 32 years of age, married, and leaves a wife and three children. He was formerly a dispatcher on the Grand Trunk service.

 

MCINNES - (Brantford) Mrs. William McInnes of Paris took Paris green and died. She was a victim to domestic trouble brought on by visitation of God.

 

September 14, 1885

 

MAYES - (Toronto) Night watchman Peter Mayes, not feeling well, left for home shortly before midnight last night, but on the way he fell down and bled to death in a few minutes from haemorrhage of the lungs.

 

WARD - (Toronto) Mrs. George Ward, of Cumberland street, was thrown from a buggy on Queen street yesterday, receiving injuries from which she died last night.


September 15, 1885

 

KNOTT - Died in this city, on September 12, Ivy Rosselle, only daughter of Edward and Agnes Knott, aged 4 months and 5 days. Funeral from 18 Barton street east, on Tuesday, September 14, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

AYNSLEY - Died in this city, on September 13, at 153 King street east, J. J. Aynsley, in his 79th year, born in Durham, England. Funeral on Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. to the Reformed Episcopal Church. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

HERBERT - (Montreal) Isaiah Herbert, a barber, while attempting to board a La Prairie boat to-day, fell into the river and was drowned.

 

REMINGTON, TAYLOR - (Toronto) There is no doubt that H. S. Remington of this city and John Taylor of Oakville, who went for a sail on the lake on Sunday, 6th instant, have been drowned as the boat was found on Saturday last midway between Port Credit and Lorne Park. Remington's coat and hat were also found on the beach near Oakville.

 

AUBREY - (Ottawa) The woman Aubrey from Montreal, who was admitted to the hospital suffering from smallpox, died on Saturday night. Lauson, the other patient, is recovering.

 

MCKINNON - (Halifax) A young man named Neil McKinnon while sailing on Sydney, NB harbour this evening was drowned by the boat being capsized by a heavy squall. A companion was rescued with difficulty by boats from the shore.

 

SEERS - (Kingston) On Saturday Frederick Seers, son of Robert Seers, was accidentally shot by his brother, George, while hunting in the vicinity of Cataraqui. The shot took effect in Frederick's thigh, severing all the arteries. On Sunday the leg was amputated and he died shortly afterward.

 

MAHONEY - (Guelph) Cornelius Mahoney, for two years section foreman on the C.P.R. at Garafraxa, was run over by the engine on Wednesday night. One of his legs was cut off. He died from loss of blood shortly afterward. He was under the influence of liquor.

 

MICHIE - About 11 o'clock last night Mr. Robert Michie of Esquesing was found in the Stewartown pond beneath the Northern and Northwestern Railway bridge. His body was terribly bruised and mangled, and notwithstanding the earnest efforts of Dr. Todd, the unfortunate man died in a few hours. He was in Georgetown during the afternoon slightly under the influence of alcohol, and it is supposed that in making his way homeward in the darkness on the railway track


 he made a misstep and fell off the bridge into the pond, a distance of 54 feet. A wife and several children mourn his sudden death.

 

September 16, 1885

 

ROBERTSON - John Robertson, one of the oldest residents of Ancaster, died yesterday aged 91. Mr. Robertson was one of the pioneers of the district and much respected by all who knew him. He was father-in-law of Mr. S. Briggs of this city. He will be buried at Ancaster on Friday.

 

September 17, 1885

 

MCCAMUS - Died at 236 Macnab street north, Margaret, wife of Arthur McCamus, aged 51 years. Funeral on Thursday, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

HINCHEY - (Brantford) News has been received by friends here that Mr. Robert Hinchey, Sr., formerly of this city, but of late years a resident of Broadview, NWT, was accidentally shot on the 7th instant. He was shot in the leg and survived only a few hours.

 

LETFORD - (St. Catharines) Tuesday, Mrs. J. Letford, who lives near the railway station at Port Dalhousie, sent her daughter, a girl about 10 year of age, to Mr. Jones's store to get some groceries. She was found in a pond, drowned.

 

September 19, 1885

 

FITZGERALD - Died in this city, on September 18, Alice, second daughter of James Fitzgerald, aged 13 years. Funeral from her father's residence, 179 Bay street north, on Sunday, September 20, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

MORPHY - Died in this city, on September 18, after a long and painful illness, Mrs. T. L. Morphy, aged 58 years. Funeral will leave the residence of her son-in-law, Henry Pearson, 113 York street, on Sunday, September 20, at 2 p.m., to R. E. Church, corner of Hunter and Park streets, thence to the cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MCDONALD - (Hagersville) Yesterday afternoon some children were going home from school. One of the boys set fire to some waste that they found lying on the Michigan Central Railway track. It was soon in a blaze and caught on the clothes of a little girl named McDonald, between 8 and 9 years of age, daughter of a section boss. She was burned so badly that she lived only a short time.


ALEXE - (Montreal) Frank Alexe, formerly a saloon keeper in Montreal, has just been poisoned at St. Louis, Mo., by a girl named Julia LeFay who lived with him as his wife. She suspected him of infidelity and in a fit of jealousy poisoned him. She will be tried for murder.

 

HALLIGAN - (Toronto) John Halligan, who has been master of the hounds here since ever the hunt club was organized nearly 20 years ago, died early this morning after a brief illness. He was known throughout the whole province and possibly the Dominion, and was well liked by all who knew him.

 

FLEMMINGS - (Norwich) This evening about 5 o'clock a brakeman named Thomas Flemmings, associated with the Port Dover Railway from its earliest history, was killed while coupling cars on the switch at the Port Dover station here. While in the act of coupling a lumber car to another in motion, his head was struck by protruding lumber and forced against the rear of the other car. While his mate was lifting him from the ground, he endeavoured to speak, but could not, and a few minutes afterward all pulsations of life ceased. Flemmings was highly esteemed on the road. He had been married only three weeks and lived at Stratford. No inquest.

 

SOMLINSKI - (Berlin) C. Somlinski, labourer, fell from a scaffold at Breithaupt & Co's new building and died from his injuries.

 

September 21, 1885

 

FENWICK - Died at Kingston, Ontario, on Thursday, September 17, George Worrell Fenwick, in the 68th year of his age, father of E. J. Fenwick.

 

ROACH - Died in this city, at 216 Victoria avenue north, on September 19, Ellen, beloved wife of Richard Roach, and daughter of D. McCarthy, aged 21 years, 5 months, and 3 days. Funeral from the above address on Monday, September 21, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accent this intimation.

 

PAULIET - (Quebec) While a party of three men named Joseph Pauliet, Celestine Nadeau, and Jean Thoreaux, were fishing in Lake Etchemer, their boat accidentally capsized. Pauliet was drowned and the other two rescued with great difficulty by people on the shore.

 

DEVEY - (Halifax) W. E. Devey, formerly a sergeant in the 62nd Regiment and well known throughout the province as an infantry drill instructor, accidentally shot himself and died last evening. He was working with some rifles when one of them which was loaded was discharged in some unknown manner and the charge entering his mouth penetrated the back of his brain.


 When found by his wife who heard the report in an adjoining room he was in the agonies of death. The deceased was 51 years of age and obtained his discharge from the 62nd Regiment nearly twenty-five years ago.

 

WATKINS - (Forest) John Watkins, living in the township of Plympton near Hillsboro post office, shot himself to-day near his dwelling, the shot entering his chest and passing over behind the right shoulder. He was an old pensioner. It is supposed to be a case of suicide.

 

THOMPSON - One of the most prominent residents of Haldimand County, A. W. Thompson of Hagersville, was killed on the Northern and Northwestern Railway on Saturday near the top of the mountain near this city. It is supposed that when on the way to Hamilton in the morning he fell from the train, alighting on the back of his head and was instantly killed. He was discovered . by the engineer of the afternoon train returning, but not in time to prevent the engine and one car from passing over him. The train was stopped and the body was identified and brought to Hagersville.

Mr. Thompson was one of the best known and respected citizens of Hagersville. He was for some years the popular president of the Conservative Association of the county of Haldimand and in the two last elections to the legislative assembly contested the riding in the Conservative interest. No man was better known throughout Haldimand owing to the untiring interest he always manifested in benevolent and public affairs. He had served as warden of the county and was for many years reeve of Oneida township.

 

September 22, 1885

 

HASKET - Died in this city, on September 21, Annie, beloved wife of Harry Hasket, in the 21st year of her age. Funeral will take place from No 10 Market street, Tuesday, at 2:30. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

POWIS - Died on September 21, at the Grange, Barton, Ophelia Mary (Tottie), in the 16th year of her age, eldest daughter of William Powis, and grand-daughter of Capt. W. H. Nicolls. The funeral will take place on Wednesday afternoon, September 23, leaving the residence of Capt. Nicolls, at 2 o'clock, and proceeding to the family burying ground at St. John's Church, Ancaster. Friends are invited to attend.

 

MULLIN - Died in this city, on September 21, George R. Mullin, in his 15th year. Funeral from his father's residence, 233 Macnab street north, on Tuesday, September 22, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


STEVENS - (Quebec) Mrs. James Stevens, wife of the highly-respected cashier of the Quebec Bank, died yesterday.

 

GARTON - (Toronto) William Garton, a labourer, accidentally fell from a bridge near Wellington avenue yesterday, receiving internal injuries from which he died to-day.

 

September 24, 1885

 

CAMPBELL - Died on September 23, Christibella, relict of the late John Campbell, in the 56th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, 98 Jackson street east, on Friday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

ANGUS - (Toronto) The old man, Charles Angus, of Scarborough, who was run over by the Grand Trunk express yesterday, died at the hospital this morning.

 

MATHEWS - Died at the residence of her parents, 37 Victoria avenue south, on Wednesday evening, September 23, Annie M. , third daughter of James and Sarah Mathews, aged 25 years and 17 days. Funeral on Friday, September 25, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend.

 

GRIFFITHS, NAPIER, JOHNSON, STRAYBORNE, CLARK, ARMSTRONG, SCRIBNER, DALEY - (St. John) A great gloom prevails in St. John to-night over the disaster at Wallace Ledge near Grand Manon. The steamer, "St. Hermacas" which was wrecked there several weeks ago was blown off the rocks and sank, taking down, it is believed, twelve or fifteen persons belonging to this city or the neighbouring city of Portland. It is possible they were taken off by a schooner but this is not considered likely as a severe gale came up during the night and caused the disaster.

So far as we can ascertain the following persons were on board the schooner when she went down : James Griffiths, who was one of the purchasers of the hull, has a wife but no family and belongs to St. John's; James Napier of Portland, wife and five children; Robert Johnson of Portland, wife and grown-up family; James Strayborne of Portland, wife and one child; James Clark of Portland, wife and several children; Bartholomew Armstrong, of Portland, wife and four or five children; Alexander Scribner of Portland, wife and two children; Jeremiah Daley, unmarried.

It is possible that there may one or two others. The "Hermacas" was a Spanish steamer of 1650 tons and while on a voyage from the West Indies to this port went ashore on the Wallace Ledge during a thick fog. She was abandoned by her crew after repeated attempts had been made to work her off.

 

RUDD - (Guelph) George Rudd dropped dead in the Central Hotel.


September 25, 1885

 

BETCONE - Died in this city, on September 24, of cancer, Margaret, the beloved wife of William Betcone. Funeral from 45 Walnut street, on Saturday afternoon, at 3:30.

 

LYNAN - (Montreal) The man Lynan, who fell down the hatchway of the "SS Lake Champlain" last night, died from his injuries to-day.

 

WRIGHT - (Montreal) For some time past Dr. Alfred Wright, dentist, has been in the habit of taking small doses of chloroform as a cure for headache. He lived in his house alone except for a housekeeper, an old lady, who has not seen him since Tuesday. When growing alarmed she called on Dr. Beers next door, and he with another gentleman, entered the house to-day and proceeded to Dr. Wright's bedroom. On finding the door locked, they broke it open. Dr. Wright's body was discovered stretched on the bed quite dead with his coat off and a bottle of chloroform at his nostrils.

 

KAY - (Galt) A son of Isaac Kay near Preston was kicked by a colt and died from his injuries.

 

BAIN - Mr . James Bain, the Seneca farmer who was gored by a vicious bull on Tuesday, has died of his injuries.

 

CATCHPOLE - Mr. John Catchpole, assistant superintendent of the letter carriers, died yesterday of consumption. Mr. Catchpole was a comparatively young man and was a general favourite of a large number of personal friends. He leaves a widow and three children. The funeral will take place on Sunday and will be in charge of the Oddfellows, Mr. Catchpole having been a member of Unity Lodge.

 

September 26, 1885

 

FRELAU - (Quebec) At one o'clock to-day a man named Frelau, of Levis, was drowned while stepping on the Levis ferry. He lost his foothold while attempting to get on the ferryboat which was about leaving the wharf.

 

KRATZ - (St. Catharines) Mr. A. Kratz, a pioneer farmer, well known and much respected, dropped dead at his residence near Jordan on Monday evening, aged 80 years.

 

FULLMER - (St. Catharines) A child, 13 months old, of Mr. J. N. Fullmer, pulled a tea steeper off the stove, emptying the contents over itself. It was so severely scalded that it died.


September 28, 1885

 

WILLSON - Died in Collingwood, on September 26, Clara C. Willson, only daughter of Henry R. Willson, Esq., of Winona, aged 32 years. Funeral from her father's residence, Winona, at 10:30 a.m. on Tuesday, September 29. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

RENWICK - Died in this city, on Saturday, September 26, at the residence of his grandparents, 37 Bold street. William Bickle, only child of Thomas and Mary Renwick, of Winnipeg, Manitoba, aged 3 months and 4 days. Funeral on Monday at 3 p.m.

 

MEAGHER - Died in this city, at 213 Hughson street north, on September 26, Anne, beloved wife of Thomas Meagher. Funeral on Monday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HOLLER - (Ethel, Ont) A young man named Conrad Holler, while driving a load of lumber into the Grand Trunk Railway station yards yesterday, fell backward off the load and dislocated his neck, causing death in thirty minutes.

 

FOLEY - (Halifax) James Foley, aged 42 years, committed suicide to-day at the provincial and city hospital by cutting his throat with a razor while temporarily insane. The deceased was a most brilliant writer and at one time contributed largely to the newspaper press.

 

September 29, 1885

 

GILL - Died in this city, at 39 Robinson street, on September 27, Mrs. M. King-Gill, mother of F. W. King. Funeral at Auburn, NY, on Tuesday, September 29.

 

KIRKENDALE - Died at 44 Hunter street east, Norris Harold, only son of the late Norris A., and Lyall Kirkendale, aged 1 year and 11 months. Funeral Tuesday at 3:30 p.m. Friends welcome.

 

Unnamed man - (Burford) As No 5 train of the Grand Trunk Railway, Brantford and Tillsonburg division, was running between Norwich and Springfield about 2:45 to-night, the engine struck and killed an unknown man who was walking on the track. It is supposed that he did not hear the train approaching until too late to get out of the way. His body was taken back to Norwich crossing by the train and the Norwich authorities notified.

 

HAZELTON - (Brantford) Alonzo Hazelton was found dead in his stable - apoplexy.

 

HUDSON - (Brantford) Major W. H. Hudson was found lying dead on the floor of his own room - apoplexy.


ANDERSON - (Halifax) Arthur Anderson, a well known grocer of this city, died suddenly this morning while dressing himself.

 

September 30, 1885

 

DUNKERLEY - Died in this city, at 69 Queen street north, on September 28, John Dunkerley, in his 68th year. Funeral on Wednesday, September 30, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BRANTON - Died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Williams, Winona, on September 23, the wife of the late William Branton, Devonshire, England, in her 83rd year.

 

HANNON - Died in this city, on September 29, Nancy, wife of the late Henry Hannon, aged 82 years. Funeral from her daughter's residence, Mrs. E. B. Shaw, 18 Grove street, on Thursday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Mrs. Henry Hannon, who died last Monday, was probably the oldest resident of Hamilton at the time of her death. Her maiden name was Nancy Depew. Her father was a U.E. loyalist, who having had all his property in the new American republic confiscated because he remained loyal to the British Crown, came to Canada and received from the Canadian government a tract of land about a mile east of the city. Here Nancy was born on September 11, 1808, and all the 82 years of her life was passed on the farm and in Hamilton. Mrs. Hannon was married quite early in life and reared a large family, only two of whom however survive her. These are Mr. William Hannon of Rochester, NY, and Mrs. E. B. Shaw with whom the old lady passed the last years of her life and from whose home, 18 Grove street, her remains will be taken for burial to-day. Mrs. Hannon was for thirty years a member of the New Connexion church, but of late she attended St. John's Presbyterian Church. There are now very few persons who have seen as Mrs. Hannon has the principal manufacturing city of the Dominion grow out of the wild forest.

 

October 2, 1885

 

COOPER - (Milton) Mrs. Cooper, an old lady residing with her son, Mr. W. Cooper, of the 5th line, Esquesing, was engaged in letting down a pasture fence when she accidentally fell backward, a rail falling heavily across her abdomen. Internal injuries were received from which she soon afterward died.

 

JONES - (Galt) On Tuesday last Mrs. T. F. Jones received a letter from her brother-in-law in Liverpool confirming the reported suicide of her husband, cable from London on September 15. The deed was committed near Liverpool on September 14, and the remains were identified by his


 brother-in-law and other relatives. The deceased was evidently suffering from temporary insanity, and at the inquest a verdict was rendered to that effect. Mr. Jones was highly respected by those who knew him and his widow and family have the sympathy of our townspeople in their lamentable bereavement.

 

October 3, 1885

 

KELLY - (Ottawa) A fatal drowning accident occurred last evening on the Ottawa river near the Queen's wharf. A 10-year-old son of Capt. Kelly of the American barge "Robinson" fell overboard and was drowned. The body was shortly afterward recovered.

 

RUTLEDGE - (Georgetown) Richard Rutledge of the Northwest Mounted Police died at the police hospital, Winnipeg, a few weeks ago of malarial fever after a very long confinement to bed. He was buried here.

 

STERLING - (Galt) William Sterling is dead. October 5, 1885

 

MCKEAND - Died in Montreal, on Sunday, October 4, James McKeand, Esq., late of this city, in the 71st year of his age. Funeral from the Grand Trunk Railway station, Hamilton, on Tuesday, at 1 p.m.

 

HEYWOOD - (Petrolia) A shocking accident occurred here to-day to Miss Alice Heywood. It appears the young lady was going for a pail of water and had to cross some machinery that was used in jerking oil wells, and in doing so her clothes came in contact with a revolving wheel which completely wound her around and severed her arms from her body. The poor girl lingered for about two hours in intense pain and then death came to her relief. She was to have been married on Monday.

 

HISCOX - (London) Thomas Hiscox, an old resident of London, died at his residence, Queen's avenue, to-day aged 75 years. Deceased at his death was probably the oldest inhabitant in London and was one of the largest owners of real estate.

 

HIGGINSON - (Quebec) A man named Higginson died at the marine hospital this morning from smallpox. He had recently arrived from Montreal.

 

October 6, 1885

 

HENDERSON - Died at 59 Herkimer street, on October 5, aged 11 years and 14 days. Also on October 5, Mary Georgina, aged 9 years and 3 months, children of Dugald and Jeanie Henderson. Funeral private.


LEBRUN - (Montreal) The body of a man named Levere Lebrun, 55 years of age, was found in the canal this morning. It appeared as if the body had been in the water four or five days. The deceased's son states that his father left his residence on Cadieux street to visit his son-in-law in St. Cunegonde and had not been seen about. It is surmised that he attempted to cross the locks and fell into the water.

 

SAMUEL - (Montreal) An inquest was held to-day on the body of Dr. Samuel who was accidentally shot by his comrade, Private Rodden of the Victoria Rifles last night. It was adduced from the evidence that while the men were on sentry duty, Private Rodden asked Private Dobbins whether the rifles were to be carried loaded or not. Dobbins replied that, he was not sure, but was loaded anyway. Dobbins then walked down his beat, but upon learning that the rifles were not to be loaded, he unloaded his. It was upon returning towards Rodden's beat that he heard a rifle shot. After about a quarter of an hour's deliberation the jury returned the following verdict: that the said John Samuel came to his death by the accidental discharge of a rifle which had been loaded through the misinterpretation of an order.

The remains of Dr. Samuel were conveyed this afternoon to his father's residence in Cote St. Antoine. From thence a private funeral will take place to St. Paul's church. To-morrow the remains will be escorted from St. Paul's church to their last resting place with full military honours.

 

WALKER - (Toronto) Robert Walker, Sr., of the firm of R. Walker & Sons, one of Toronto's best known and oldest merchants, died to-day aged 77. He came here in 1827 and commenced business in 1835, retiring about fifteen years ago. He ranked among the oldest members of the Methodist communion in Canada.

 

ROSENBURGER - (Guelph) Jacob Rosenburger, aged 25, teamster for the Merner Agricultural Works, New Hamburg, who was accidentally thrown from a vehicle on Thursday week, succumbed to his injuries on Sunday night. His spinal column was broken a little below the neck.

 

October 7, 1885

 

FARRELL - (Toronto) A young man named Henry Farrell of Oshawa put up at the Albion Hotel last night and this morning was found dead in bed. The coroner was notified but decided not to hold an inquest as he found that death resulted from natural causes.

 

October 8, 1885

 

WARREN - Died in this city, Aggy, daughter of Patrick and Mary Warren, aged 6 years,


2 months, and 6 days. Funeral from her father's residence, No 98 Strachan street east, at half past two o'clock, on Friday. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

COFFEE - (Toronto) The inquest on the body of James Coffee who died from the effects of injuries inflicted by Edward Emmett was opened to-night but adjourned till to-morrow night after one witness had been examined.

 

October 10, 1885

 

FIELDING - Died suddenly of apoplexy on October 9, James Fielding, a native of Oldham, England, aged 68 years. Funeral will leave the residence of his brother, Joseph Fielding, 79 King street west, on Sunday next, at 3 p.m.

 

TOWNS - (Toronto) Charlie Towns, a well known coloured resident of St. John's Ward, was last night found dead in bed with every indication of having been poisoned. An inquest will probably be held.

 

LANG - (Toronto) James Lang, carpenter, who fell from a scaffolding on Grenville street about a week ago, died at the hospital to-day from his injuries.

 

WATSON - (London) The many friends of conductor John Watson, more familiarly known as Jack, of the G.W.R. division, will regret his untimely death by drowning in the Detroit river near Amherstburg while fishing. He was a resident of this city for many years prior to his removing to Windsor, and was one of the oldest and most popular employees in the service.

 

October 12, 1885

 

LOWE - Died at her residence, 208 Macnab street north, October 10, Margaret, relict of the late Thomas Lowe, of Ancaster. Funeral on Monday, October 12, to Dundas. Friends are invited to attend.

 

KERR - (Galt) The body of Robert Kerr, who has been missing from this place over a week, was found in Puslinch lake this evening.

 

COTTER - (Montreal) James Cotter, second officer of the "SS Brooklyn", while walking up the gangway of the steamer at an early hour this morning, fell into the water and was drowned.

 

HOUGHTON - (Toronto) A fatal accident occurred this afternoon at Hamilton's elevator on the Esplanade. Stephen Houghton, one of the employees, was assisting a farmer named Duncan to unload barley when one of the sides of the wooden building was forced out and nearly a thousand


 bushels of grain descended upon Houghton, burying him beneath it. He was extricated and taken out one half an hour afterward, but life was extinct. Duncan had also a narrow escape and his horses were injured. Houghton leaves a wife and four children.

 

TYE - (Toronto) Charles Tye, a bricklayer, lay on the Grand Trunk track last night about two miles east of the city. A freight train came along and before it could be stopped, the cowcatcher struck Tye on the head, killing him. A bottle of whiskey was found in his pocket.

 

KANE - (St. Catharines) Robert Kane, formerly of this city, lately of Rochester, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor.

 

REDDEN - Cornelius Redden, one of the unfortunate family which has been so terribly visited by the smallpox, died yesterday afternoon at the pest house. He was 12 years old. The undertaker who has the contract for removing bodies from the hospital refused to take the corpse in charge, and Alderman Morgan, chairman of the board of health, was obliged to seek another party to undertake the dangerous duty. The undertaker mentioned will be obliged either to give up his contract or carry it out.

 

October 13, 1885

 

CHRISTY - Died in this city, at 295 Catherine street north, Mary, beloved wife of John Christy, blacksmith. Funeral from the above address on Tuesday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

ANDERSON - Died on Sunday, October 11, William Anderson, aged 59. funeral will take place from his late residence, 17 Liberty street, on Tuesday, October 13, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

WILSON - (Toronto) This afternoon about 2 o'clock a fatal accident occurred on King near George street, the victim being a man named James Wilson, 28 years of age, who lived at No 145 Ontario street, and formerly worked for Messrs Brown Bros as a bookbinder. Wilson had been drinking in excess and shortly after 2 o'clock fell in with an elderly individual who had been imbibing pretty freely. On reaching the corner of George street the two had a dispute which resulted in Wilson striking his companion in the face. The latter retorted in like manner and a large crowd soon gathered to witness the drunken brawl. About the same time Charles Gibb, a farmer from the second concession of West York, drove up with a load of hay and just as he arrived opposite the fighters, Wilson squared up and stepped back in preparation to receive his opponent. He tripped on the edge of the boulevard and fell backward, and before he could


recover, the front wheel of the wagon containing the ton of hay passed over his abdomen, crushing the life out of him. The farmer tried to stop the horses in time to save the man but was unable to do so. Wilson was carried into the Little York Hotel and Drs. Oldwright and Robinson were quickly in attendance but their efforts were unavailing, as Wilson died in less that half an hour. The police are searching for the man who was fighting with Wilson when the tragedy occurred.

 

MOSS - (Kingston) Joseph Moss, a brakeman on the Kingston & Pembroke Railway, was run over near Sharbot Lake and instantly killed.

 

October 14. 1885

 

SHEPHERD - Died on October 15, at 133 Park street north, of inflammation of the lungs, Catherine Brown, the beloved wife of Francis Shepherd, of H.M. Customs, in the 50th year of her age. Funeral will take place on Thursday afternoon at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HAMILL - Died on October 12, Nettie Ann, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Hamill, 138 Locke street north, aged 10 months. Funeral on Wednesday at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

Monday evening Mrs. Hamill, 138 Locke street, went to an outbuilding carrying her 10-months-old child. She stumbled on the threshold of the outhouse and the child fell from her grasp into the vault below. Mrs. Hamill immediately gave the alarm, but before the outbuilding could be removed so that the vault could be reached, the unfortunate child perished from suffocation. Coroner Dr. Philp was notified and after learning the particulars of the casualty, decided that an inquest would not be necessary. Mrs. Hamill is the wife of John Hamill, yard master at the Grand Trunk. Mr. and Mrs. Hamill are overwhelmed With grief in consequence of the fatality and have the sympathy of all in their sudden and terrible bereavement.

 

RICHARDSON - (Toronto) The body of John Robertson, a labourer, was found lying on the roadside this morning near Lake street. There was a deep cut over both eyes and bruises behind the left ear. Foul play is suspected. The deceased was 60 years of age.

 

October 15, 1885

 

REINHART - (Arthur) Martin Reinhart, pump maker at Damascus, Township of Luther, committed suicide this morning by hanging himself in his stable. Life was extinct when found. No cause is known. He leaves a wife and numerous small family.


WEAVER - (Berlin) Rev. Samuel Weaver, who was so seriously injured in Waterloo on Saturday, died on Tuesday morning at 2 o'clock. He never regained consciousness.

 

REED - (Guelph) David Reed, a carpenter engaged on the new Methodist church at Lucknow, while working on the tower on a swing scaffold, was in the act of turning around to descend when the knot slipped and the scaffold fell. Reed was caught by the foot and suspended in the air, head downward. He began calling loudly for help, but before assistance could be rendered, he fell to the ground. His body was shockingly mangled and he died in two hours.

 

CAMP - (St. Catharines) George A. Camp died suddenly on Wednesday.

 

October 16, 1885

 

CULP - Died in this city, on Wednesday, October 14, at Catherine street north, Bessie, youngest daughter of Jacob Culp, aged 1 year and 8 months. Funeral from the above address to the G.T.R. station for St. Catharines, on Saturday, October 17. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

VILA - Died in this city, on October 15, Ann, eldest daughter of Augustus and Alice Vila, aged 11 year and 2 months. Funeral from her father's residence, to-day (Friday). Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MULLET - (Galt) Thomas Mullet, a carpenter, aged 22, was accidentally drowned in the Grand River here this afternoon. James H. Robertson and Mullet were in a row boat endeavouring to secure a duck that Robertson had shot. When turning around the oar lock broke, and while trying to fix it, the boat drifted into the swift current leading to the dam where the water falls ten feet. Robertson jumped when he saw the dam and swam to land, but Mullet clung to the boat, was carried over the dam, and dashed out of sight in a minute. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

SMITH - (Montreal) A farmer named Smith, living near Sutton, Quebec, committed suicide on Wednesday by hanging himself in his barn. This is the third person who has hanged himself in this barn within eight years.

 

KELLAR - (Belleville) On Monday last, Mrs. Kellar, wife of Allen Kellar, a farmer in the township of Huntingdon, was thrown from a wagon in which she was riding with her husband, and alighting on her head, was instantly killed. Her neck was broken.

 

MCCULLOCH - (Galt) Mrs. H. McCulloch died on Friday.


October 17, 1885

 

FITZPATRICK - Died in Chicago, on October 15, Ellen, relict of the late Kenny Fitzpatrick. Funeral from the Grand Trunk depot on the arrival of the 6:50 a.m. train, Saturday, October 17, to St. Mary's Cathedral, thence to Holy Sepulchre cemetery. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MURPHY - Died in this city, on October 16, in the 47th year of his age, Michael Murphy, a native of County Carlow, Ireland. Funeral from his late residence, No 122 Emerald street north, at 1:30 p.m. on Sunday, October 18. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

MCFARLAND - Died in the village of Grimsby, on Friday morning, October 16, 1885, Andrew McFarland, in the 86th year of his age. Funeral at 2 p.m., on Monday next, Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

O'CONNOR - (Guelph) John O'Connor, who was accidentally shot in the thigh, is dead.

 

REDDEN - Edward Redden, a 14-year-old lad, one of the unfortunate Redden family, died at the smallpox hospital yesterday, thus making the 4th victim of the dread disease out of Hamilton's six patients. They all belong to one family. Michael, who was the first attacked, has recovered, and the other patient is in a fair way to recover. There is only one case in the city now, and there is little danger of their being any more at present.

 

October 19, 1885

 

TREMLETT - Died in this city, on October 17, at 120˝ King street east, William Tremlett, of Devonshire, England, aged 71 years.

 

MCANDREWS - Died in this city, October 18, William McAndrews, in the 29th year of his age. Funeral on Tuesday, at 2 p.m. from the residence of Mr. M. D. Nelligan, 263 Hughson street north. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BROWN - (Stayner) Last evening Richard Brown, hostler of the Wilson Hotel, fell through a large hole in the stable loft floor and was killed, his neck being broken.

 

BERSOIN - (Montreal) A suicide occurred in a house on St. Louis street at about 4 o'clock this morning. Mr. Joulin, the proprietor of the house in which the suicide took place, was suddenly awakened by the cries of a young lady who was boarding with him. The young lady was shouting for help, saying that the servant girl had poisoned herself with Paris green. Mr. and Mrs. Joulin went to the girl's room wherein they found her lying unconscious on her bed and a basin half


filled with Paris green on the floor. Medical aid was summoned but when they arrived the girl was dead.

The following letter was found in her bosom: "La Fotique Dansereau, my dear Fotique, I have done with the world. I am in eternity forever. I forgive you. May God do the same. Even after my death I will never leave you alone and you will again see me at your side. Before long I shall come back and bid you good-bye. I died for you. (Signed) V. B."

Dansereau it appears had been a lover of hers.

An inquest was opened this afternoon, but the coroner decided to have a post mortem examination and it was adjourned till Monday. The girl's name was Virginie Bersoin.

 

ROMILLY - (Montreal) This morning the wife of Jean Baptiste Romilly, a farmer in St. Vincent de Paul, a village about ten miles from Montreal, was feeding her fowls while her child, aged 2 years, was playing around. Suddenly a large eagle swooped down and bore the little one off in its talons. The child screamed and extended its arms to its mother who was beside herself with mental agony but was powerless to render assistance. The screams of the child attracted the neighbours who with shotguns pursued the eagle. The bird was seen to alight with its prey upon the roof of a barn a mile distant. Lifting up its head, with one powerful stroke it drove its beak into the child's head and then began its horrid feast. At the near approach of the neighbours who were firing guns to frighten the eagle, it took flight leaving the child behind. When the body was recovered life was extinct. The child was split in two and part had been devoured.

 

October 20, 1885

 

ARMSTRONG - (Guysborough, Ont) Yesterday afternoon a serious shooting affray took place near Mabee's tavern about a mile from this office which resulted in the death of a man named John Armstrong who with his wife lived in a shanty with Alfred Root, about a quarter of a mile from Mabee's. The particulars are as follows.

Joseph Smith, better known as Devil Joe, residing near Langton, was at Mabee's hotel yesterday, and in the afternoon went over to Root's taking with him a gun made in the shape of a walking stick which he often carried. Smith says that he and Armstrong were fooling and Armstrong in trying to kick him in fun, kicked the gun instead, with the result that he was shot in the abdomen, the ramrod entering with the charge. Armstrong said before he died at about 1 a.m. to-day that Smith said, addressing him, "You could not think how quick I could make a corpse of you", and with that snapped the gun twice before it went off with the above result. This his wife and Root corroborate. The general opinion, however, here is that although Smith is a rather wild character, he did not shoot him intentionally.


FITZPATRICK - (Halifax) A telegram from Charlottetown, PEI, says: On Friday evening a boy, Joseph Fitzpatrick, 16 years old, was shot by two men or boys who were driving in a cart while he was walking from his father's house on the main road, two miles from the city. Two shots entered his body. The boy died on Saturday night. Two boys named Francis Beal and Arthur Smith have been arrested. An hour previous to his death the victim said he did not think the boys shot him as he knew both of them. They will be examined to-morrow.

 

DAVIES - (Toronto) A dispatch from Toronto last night says: Annie Davies, a young girl residing on Cumberland street, attempted to commit suicide a fortnight ago by drowning in a well in consequence of her lover's marrying another girl in Hamilton. Since her attempt at suicide she has refused to take any food and gradually grew weaker till Saturday night when she expired. She was buried to-day.

 

October 21, 1885

 

MCQUESTEN - Died on Tuesday morning, October 20, at his late residence, Jackson street, Hamilton, Calvin McQuesten, M.D., in the 85th year of his age. Funeral on Thursday, October 22, at 3 o'clock p.m.

Dr. Calvin McQuesten, one of the oldest and most respected citizens of Hamilton, was found dead in his bed yesterday morning. He had been ailing for several years though affected with no particular disease. Monday night, he retired in apparently as good health as usual, but during the night he passed away while sleeping.

Dr. McQuesten was born in Bedford, now Manchester, NH in 1801. He studied medicine and graduated at Bowdoin College, Me. and practised his profession at Brockport, NY for several years. In 1838 he came to Hamilton and entering into partnership with John Fisher began an iron manufacturing business, the name of the firm being McQuesten & Co. The foundry which was on the site where the Royal Hotel now stands was burned down in 1857, and the company removed to new premises at the foot of Wellington street. Dr. McQuesten retired from business about 1860 and the firm was succeeded by L. D. Sawyer & Co.

Dr. McQuesten was for many years vice-president of the Gore Bank. He was also vice-president of the Wesleyan Ladies College. He was a member of Central and Macnab Street Presbyterian churches in both of which he was an elder.

Dr. McQuesten was married three times. A widow and two children survive him. The latter are Dr. Calvin McQuesten who practises medicine in New York city, and Mr. L. B. McQuesten, barrister, of this city.

 

KELLY - (London) John Kelly of this city, who was attending Mr. 5". L. Owens of Ailsa Craig, in the capacity of nurse, dropped dead at that place, it is supposed of heart disease.


The deceased was well known in London and was for several years a member of the police force. Latterly he officiated as nurse and was one of the best in the country.

 

KITCHEN - On Saturday evening a young man named Americus Kitchen living with his parents on a farm near Copetown went to the pasture to get a horse. He did not return, but the family were not troubled by his absence till late Sunday night. When they searched for him Monday morning he was found lying dead. The horse he had gone after was wild and had kicked the young man to death.

 

O'NEIL - Last evening the H. & N.W. train from the south, due here at 7:25 p.m., ran over and killed a woman at the Wentworth Street crossing. The engineer felt the jar as he sat at his post and knew that the wheels of the engine had passed over something. He stopped the train. A search was made and there among the wheels and scattered along the track were found the remains of a woman. The unfortunate woman had evidently been lying across the track, for she was cut in two a little above the waist. The head was so mangled as not to be recognizable. As much of the remains as could be found were collected and taken to the railway station whence they were conveyed to the morgue in the police patrol wagon.

The name of the woman was Ellen O'Neil, better known as Black Ellen. She lived with her sister, Red Mary, in a hut on the mountain side near the city reservoir. The sisters have supported themselves by raising garden stuff on their small patch of ground and selling eggs on the market. They also worked as field hands on neighbouring farms in harvest time, and it is said could do as big a day's work as most men. Black Ellen was a woman about 45 years old. She was respectable enough but for one thing, her unfortunate appetite for liquor. Yesterday she was in the city and drank too much. It is more than probable that she had liquor with her while she was going home and took so much of it that she finally tumbled on the track in a drunken stupor and lay there. Coroner Dr. Biggar was notified of the accident, but when he learned the circumstances, he decided that an inquest was unnecessary.

 

October 22, 1885

 

MURPHY - Died on October 21, P. H. Murphy, aged 40 years. Funeral from his late residence, 26 Macauley street west, on Saturday, October 24, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please attend.

 

DEWAR - Died at 31 Jackson street west, on Wednesday morning, October 21, Millicent Burgogne Dewar, aged 11 years and 10 months. Private funeral to-morrow.

 

LONG - Died in this city, on Tuesday, October 20, Andrew, youngest son of Robert and Maggie


Long, aged 2 years and 11 months. Funeral from his parents' residence, 20 Railway street, at 2:30 p.m., Thursday, October 22. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

AIKENS - (Stratford) On Monday last word was brought to this city that Alexander Aikens, an old man, 90 years of age, living near Topping, in the township of North Easthope, had been found dead in a shanty belonging to one of his sons. Investigation proved that he had been shot through the abdomen with buckshot. His throat was also cut, evidently with a razor. An inquest was held and although nothing very definite was brought forward in the way of evidence the circumstances surrounding the case seem to indicate that Aikens came to his death at his own hands. The inquest, however, was adjourned till next Tuesday when some further light may be thrown on the matter.

 

FOURNIER - (Quebec) A very sad accident occurred in the village of St. Thomas on Sunday afternoon. It seems that a little boy, nine years old, son of T. Fournier, got possession of his father's loaded fowling piece, and while playing with it, it accidentally exploded, fatally wounding his little sister, aged six.

 

HARVEY - (London) Last evening Mr. Dan Harvey of Centre street died of lockjaw, caused by a scald on his leg received in Petrolia while working in a cooper's shop. The scald itself was not serious, but unluckily he caught cold in the wound and inflammation set in which speedily resulted in death.

 

TROTTER - (Omemee) A farmer named Robert Trotter, living about two miles from Omemee, was found hanging in his barn this morning shortly after he had gone out to feed his horses. No motive can be assigned for the act, except that he had been drinking for some time past. He leaves a wife and family.

 

O'NEIL - (O'Brien) Mrs. O'Neil, a sister-in-law of the woman who was killed on the Hamilton & Northwestern Railway track on Tuesday evening, denies several statements that were made in the published account of the accident. "My sister-in-law was not in the habit of getting drunk", said Mrs. O'Neil. "She did not drink whiskey, but took a glass of beer once in a while. She wasn't drunk on Tuesday, for I was with her in the afternoon and she was sober when I left her. When she was struck by the train she was sitting on the track resting, for she had been carrying a heavy load. Her name, too, was not O’Neil, but O'Brien. Her name was O'Neil before she was married, but she was a widow for a good many years". The funeral of Mrs. O'Brien will take place this afternoon. (See O'Neil, page 160)

 

WINSTONE - David Winstone died in the county jail at 12:40 yesterday. He was about 70 years of age and in feeble health.


For the past few days he had been on the sick list, nothing seeming to be the matter with him beyond old age and general feebleness. He gradually sank until the end. He was incarcerated for insanity, but had served several terms previously for drunkenness and vagrancy. He belonged to the city.

An inquest was held at 4 o'clock in the afternoon before Coroner White. It was very short. A verdict of death from accidental causes was returned. No blame attaches to any jail officers.

 

October 23, 1885

 

WARD - Died in this city, at his late residence, Herkimer street, on October 22, P. Ward, aged 60 years. Funeral on Saturday at 8:30 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

POWERS, CUSHMAN - (Nanaimo, BC) The steamship "Alaska" brings intelligence of a terrible landslide which occurred on September 23 in the basin above Juneau, by which Mike Powers and Fred Cushman, mine owners, and an Indian, lost their lives.

 

BRENNAN - (Toronto) Edward Brennan, who was run over by a cab about a week ago while intoxicated, died at the hospital to-day, never having regained consciousness after the accident happened.

 

APPLEBY - (London) William Appleby, a farmer residing on the 1st concession of Westminster, was found dead in his bed this morning. Dr. Hutchinson was summoned, but an inquest was not deemed necessary as he thought the deceased died of heart disease.

 

FERGUSON - (London) Mr. John Ferguson, father of Vice-Chancellor Ferguson and Dr. Ferguson, M.P., died at his residence in London township yesterday, aged 86 years.

 

October 24, 1885

 

GILMORE - Died in this city, on October 23, at 62 Wellington street north, Mary Jeannette, eldest daughter of William and Henrietta Gilmore, in the 18th year of her age. Funeral on Sunday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WOODRUFF - (Montreal) Some four weeks ago, Mr. Charles Woodruff was stricken down with smallpox and was removed to the hospital where he subsequently died. His two children also caught the disease and died, and since, the poor mother and wife has been put in the Longue Point Asylum and fears are entertained that she will not recover her reason.


GIBSON - (Galt) Rev. Hamilton Gibson, formerly of this town, recently died at Toronto.

 

MAGUIRE - Father Maguire, the parish priest of Galt, died on Thursday. He was one of those young priests who were brought out from Ireland by the late Bishop Crinan about twelve years ago. For some time he was assistant priest at St. Patrick's church here. Father Maguire was a man of gentle and loving disposition and was greatly beloved by his parishioners as well as by his clerical brethren. He was about 35 years of age.

 

JONES - The Oakville "Independent" gives the following particulars of the appalling accident that occurred last Sunday at the residence of Mr. C. P. Chisholm of that place. Shortly after Mr. and Mrs. Chisholm had gone to church, Mrs. Jones, wishing to retire, entered her room and placed the lamp which she was carrying in her hand, as she thought safely, on the shelf. But it appears there were letters on the shelf which caused the lamp to tip over, setting fire to Mrs. Jones's clothing and the carpet. The unfortunate woman did not realize her perilous state and burning garments, but at once set to work to do what was possible to extinguish the flames in the room by no doubt thoughtlessly stamping on them. She at last succeeded pretty well by using old carpets, but not until the greater part of her clothing was burnt from her body. She next rushed outside and rolled in the wet grass to put the fire out on herself. When Mr. and Mrs. Chisholm returned from church they found the poor woman in bed where she had put in nearly two hours of the worst kind of suffering. The flesh was literally roasted from her body , her hands being burnt almost to a crisp. Dr. Urquhart was at summoned and did all that could be done until death finally relieved her at 11:30 p.m. on Monday. Deceased put off going to Detroit on Friday last to visit a daughter at Islington and a son who lives on the Middle Road. Deceased was 57 years of age.

 

October 26, 1885

 

HORE - Died on Saturday, October 24, at his residence, 142 Victoria avenue north, F. W. Hore, Jr., in the 32nd year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence at 12:30 p.m. on Monday for the family burying ground, Bullock's Corners, Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

One of the ablest and most enterprising of Hamilton's young business men, F. W. Hore, died last Saturday at 8 a.m. On Saturday, October 17, he and Dr. Malloch went to St. Clair flats for a few days' shooting. Mr. Hore caught a heavy cold the same evening, grew worse, and on Tuesday started for home. The next day he was taken very much worse, inflammation of the lungs setting in, and that brought on a low fever. On Wednesday Mr. Hore became unconscious and remained in that state with only a few moments' interval Saturday morning until his death.


The deceased gentleman was born in West Flamborough 32 years ago and received his education at Rockwood Academy. As soon as he became of age, his father gave him an interest in the wheel manufacturing business which he carried on in a small way in West Flamborough. About six years ago Messrs Hore & Son moved to this city and started the Hamilton Wheel Works. From the first the business prospered and has grown so rapidly during the past six years that for a considerable time Messrs Hore & Son were in their line the most extensive manufacturers in the Dominion. Much of this prosperity is due to the energy, enterprise, and sound business capacity of the younger member of the firm.

Mr. Hore was a member of St. Thomas Church. He was also both a Freemason and an Oddfellow. Some seven years ago he married, and his wife and four children survive him.

 

STERLING - Died on the evening of Saturday, October 24, at his late residence, 101 Main street west, George Sterling, formerly of Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, in his 82nd year. Funeral will take place from John Street Wesley Church on Tuesday, October 27, at 2 p.m.

Mr. George Sterling, one of Hamilton's oldest and most highly respected citizens, died at his residence, 101 Main street west, Saturday night. Deceased was born in Newcastle, England, in 1803. In 1841 he came to this country, and for eight years resided in Toronto. For thirty-six years he has lived in Hamilton, being engaged in active business pursuits for the first twenty-one years of that time. He has been actively connected with Wesley Church during the entire period of his residence here and has seen that church grow with the city to be what it is now. For years he has been a trustee and steward. He leaves a wife, four sons, and two daughters, two sons being in business in London, one in Chicago, and one in this city. The funeral will take place on Tuesday at 2 o'clock from Wesley Church.

 

ROBOTAILLE - (Montreal) A curious story comes from St. Sulpice. A grave digger named Robotaille made a grave next to where a man who had died from smallpox a month ago was buried. At that time there was no smallpox in the village, but Robotaille some days after digging the grave sickened and finally died of smallpox, making it evident that he contracted the disease from the body of a man who had been buried a month.

 

October 27, 1885

 

SMYTH - (Thorold) The boiler of a hay pressing machine at John Kearney's farm near here burst this morning, killing instantly Frank Smyth, son of John Smyth, local superintendent of the Welland canal.


DUFRESNE - (Montreal) A two-year-old son of August Dufresne, a letter carrier, was run over by the street cars to-day and instantly killed.

 

October 28, 1885

 

TWITZER - Died at the Aged Women's Home in this city, Mrs. Jane Twitzer, aged 70 years. Funeral from the institution on Wednesday, at 3 p.m.

 

WILD - Died on October 26, Samuel Pearson Wild, aged 1 year and 8 months. Funeral will leave his father's residence, 95 Catherine street, on Wednesday, October 28, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

O'BRIEN - (St. Catharines) Yesterday afternoon the body of Mrs. Patrick O'Brien was found lying cold in death at her residence, an old frame building on the corner of Geneva and St. Paul streets. For years back this woman, who was probably between 60 and 70 years of age, had been addicted to gross indulgence in ardent spirits. The result has been frequent quarrels and disagreements between herself and her husband, leading to a separation. He is now living in Toronto. The woman continued to occupy the house at the corner of Geneva and St. Paul streets, living there alone. The last seen of her was on Sunday morning. Her absence was not especially noticed until shortly before the discovery of her remains when one of the neighbours happened to mention her name and wonder was expressed that she had not been seen. Search by neighbours revealed the fact of her death. The woman was found lying on her face on the floor of a bedroom upstairs and had evidently been dead for a considerable time. The place was in the utmost disorder and filthy beyond description. She had been a drunken woman for years and when in liquor very quarrelsome, so much so that her husband was obliged to separate from her owing to the continued assaults she made upon him. Coroner Goodman, on learning the facts of the case, did not deem it necessary to hold an inquest. A search of the premises showed that deceased had $30.25 in her possession and a bank passbook with a credit of $60, but not a scrap of anything eatable was in the house except a hard crust of bread.

 

SCHAFER - Henry Schafer, a German, about 50 years of age, died at the city hospital a day or two ago and was buried yesterday by his fellow workers at the Singer Sewing Machine Company. The deceased came from Buffalo to Hamilton two years ago. It is supposed his wife in now living at Buffalo, but his children are in Germany.

 

October 29, 1885

 

SHARP - Died on Wednesday, October 28, John, son of Arthur and Catharine Ann Sharp,


aged 1 month. Funeral from his father's residence, 239 Cannon street east, on Thursday, at 2 p.m.

 

POTTRUFF - Died in this city, on October 2?, Levi Gordon, youngest son of Levi and Jeanie Pottruff, aged 10 months. Funeral from 42 Hunter street east, on Thursday, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

IRONS - (Wyoming, Ont) The engineer of the mixed train going west this afternoon reported having passed over the mangled form of some person between this station and Wanstead. The section men were sent out to investigate and found the remains to be those of a man named Irons, a resident of London, who with the wood gang of the Grand Trunk Railway, of which he was foreman, had been working at Wanstead for some days past. It is not known at what time he was killed, but as he was in Wyoming last evening and with some other men started back to Wanstead after dark, he being rather the worse of liquor it is supposed he became separated from his companions and lying down was run over.

 

EMERICK - (Guelph) Peter Emerick, a farmer of Allanburg, Ontario, while chopping a tree on Thursday night, was struck by a limb and rendered insensible, but came to, and walked home. He died a few minutes after arriving home.

 

October 30, 1885

 

FOURNIER - (Montreal) A painful accident is reported from St. Thomas, county of St. Hyacinths. On Sunday morning last, while Mr. Fournier was gone to church and the mother was alone in the house with two children, one of them a boy aged 9 years began to play with his father's loaded gun. His younger sister tried to snatch the gun when the discharge went off and lodged in her breast, killing her instantly.

 

LAVAIS - (Quebec) Marie Tremblay, wife of Gonazue Lavais of the village of Murray Bay, a young woman from 28 to 30 years of age and mother of four children, was found on Sunday last hanging in her barn dead.

 

BAILEY - (Guelph) Tuesday afternoon, a 12-year-old son of Daniel Bailey, who lives on Hatch farm, met with an accident which caused his death in a very painful manner. He was in company with the hired man hauling in carrots from the field when he fell over the front of the wagon and before the driver could stop the horses, one of the wheels had passed over his body, breaking the chest bone and causing almost instant death. A doctor was at once sent for, but before his arrival the unfortunate child had breathed his last.


HICKEY - Yesterday the fine steamer "Myles" of this port was at Duluth. She had steam up and was moving about. One of the high pressure cylinders burst and killed both engineers. The chief engineer was Thomas Hickey of 36 Ferrie street west. He leaves a wife and two children. The assistant engineer was not of this city and his name was not given in the dispatch that brought the evil news to the owners of the boat. Aside from the loss of life there was not much damage done. The propellor was owned by Thomas Myles & Son of this city.

 

October 31, 1885

 

SECORD - Died on October 30, in this city, George R. Secord, In the 48th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, No 56 John street north, on Sunday, November 1, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MIDDLETON - Died in this city, on Friday evening, October 30, Arthur Middleton, aged 72 years. Funeral will take place from his late residence, No 138 John street north, on Monday afternoon, at 1 o'clock, to meet the 2:05 G.T.R. train for Niagara Falls. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MCALPINE - (Dutton) Maggie McAlpine, of Cowal, North Dunwich, a tailoress in the employ of Mr. Wilson of Dutton, was killed instantly at noon to-day. She boarded at John Kerr's, south of the track, and was on her way to dinner when No 5 express came along. In attempting to cross the track before the express, she was struck by the pilot and hurled a distance of two rods. Her body presented a horrible sight. She was struck fairly on the head, her skull split open, and brains strewn along the track. Her clothes were stripped from her body which was horribly mangled. No blame attaches to anyone but the unfortunate victim herself.

 

MULLIGAN - (Mitchell) James Mulligan, a farmer living on the 4th concession of Logan township, while going for cows last. night, was attacked by a ferocious bull and killed.

 

November 2, 1885

 

HICKEY - Accidentally killed at Duluth, on October 28, Thomas Hickey, 1st engineer steamer "Myles", aged 37 years. Funeral from his late residence, No 36 Ferrie street west, on Monday, November 2, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WANZER - Died on October 31, at 72 Victoria avenue south, Marion Bulkeley, beloved child of Thomas and Marion Wanzer, aged 3 years and 7 months. Funeral this afternoon at 3 o'clock.


WILLIAMS - Died in this city, on Sunday, November 1, of consumption, Alice F. Allison, the beloved wife of John H, Williams, aged 25 years and 5 months. Funeral will take place from No 46 Cannon street west, on Tuesday afternoon, at 3:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GAY - (Quebec) A batteau man, William Gay, residing at Levis, was instantly killed yesterday by falling between his batteau (a shallow-draft, flat-bottomed boat) and a steamer.

 

November 3. 1885

 

GOODERHAM - (Toronto) Mrs. Gooderham, wife of William Gooderham, died this morning after a helpless illness of over ten years' duration.

 

November 4, 1885

 

DECARY - (Montreal) A young man named Zotique Decary, aged 18, son of Mr. Jean Decary, a warden of Lachine, about two months ago was playing lacrosse. A player accidentally struck him on the ear with his stick which was considered a trifling blow. A few days after, the wound grew worse and finally resulted in an abscess in the head from the effects of which the young man died.

 

EVANS - (London) A brakeman named John Evans met with a fatal accident on the G.W. division near Windsor to-day. The accident occurred about 2 o'clock this morning while Evans was on duty on a freight train leaving Windsor. It appears that the bell cord had become fastened in some manner, and he was pulling on it strongly when it suddenly loosened and as a result the ill-fated man lost his balance and was precipitated to the ground. His neck was broken and death resulted instantaneously. Evans leaves a wife and two children to mourn his untimely death.

 

CROTTY - (Brantford) Bertie Crotty, a domestic employed at the Kerby House, fell to the floor while talking to a guest and died of heart disease.

 

November 6, 1885

 

REYNOLDS - (Montreal) John Reynolds, who slipped from the 'fall' on the steamship "Acadian" and fell a distance of about thirty feet last night, died from his injuries to-day.

 

HURTUBIES - (Montreal) A man named Hurtubies died at the Grey nunnery to-day aged 100 years and 10 days.

 

Unnamed boy - Yesterday afternoon word was received from Galt of the murder of a young man


residing near the town. A description of the supposed murderer was forwarded with instructions to watch the train and arrest the man if he happened along this way. But he did not come, for Chief McFeggan of Galt followed and arrested him at Harrisburg as he was about to take the train to Niagara Falls.

The following associated press account of the murder comes from Galt. A murder was committed this afternoon at the farm of Levi Weber, near the village of Strasbourg, about eight miles from here in Waterloo County. The murdered person is a young farm hand, name unknown, about 15 years of age, recently from Germany, and has been working for Mr. Weber for the past six months. The supposed murderer is said to be John Calvin Ravier, a young Englishman about 17 years of age, who was brought to Canada as an orphan and was formerly employed on Mr. Weber's farm, but left about a year ago. He returned to-day during Mr. Weber's absence from home and went to the barn where he was told the young German boy was working. Upon Mr. Weber's return home he found the murdered boy in the barn, the body covered with chaff. A long wound across the forehead, extending down the face was visible and a broken club was nearby. Mr. Weber immediately set out to notify the coroner and find the suspected murderer who was traced to Blair station where he took a train to Galt It was discovered that he left Galt for Harrisburg, making eastward. Chief McFeggan started after him and brought him back to Galt Mr. Weber states that he cannot assign any motive for the commission of the crime as he does not think the supposed murderer and the victim ever met each other before.

 

November 7, 1885

 

DOW - Died in Buffalo, Mrs. Mary Dow, mother of John Lutz, Teamster, of this city. Funeral will take place to-day from the G.T.R. station on the arrival of the remains by the 2 p.m. train from the east. Friends and acquaintances are requested to attend.

 

WOODHOUSE - (Montreal) Joseph Woodhouse, night watchman at the flour sheds at the Lachine canal, was drowned during last night.

 

COCHRANE - (Owen Sound) About half past six o'clock this evening a young man named Thomas Cochrane of Kingston, second waiter of the C.P.R. steamer "Athabasca", fell from the main deck into the hold and was instantly killed.

 

JOHNSTON - (Oakville) The "Independent" says: The body of young Johnston who was drowned on Tuesday, as was announced In the "Independent" of last week, was washed up on