Hamilton Spectator

Deaths 1879

 

January 2, 1879

 

GREER - Died on the 1st instant, John H. Greer, in the 69th year of his age. Funeral on Friday next, at 3 o'clock p.m., from his late residence, No 3 Sandyford Place.

The announcement of the death of Mr. John Hood Greer, Registrar, was received by the people of Hamilton with sincere regret, all feeling that a useful citizen had been taken away. The deceased was born in Derry, Ireland, on the 21st of June, 1810, and was therefore in the 69th year of his age. He was educated at the High School in Derry, and on attaining his majority he came to Canada about 1829, settling at first in Kingston where he engaged in the mercantile business with some success. He subsequently engaged in the forwarding and wharfage business with the late Donald Bethune in that city, the firm becoming quite prominent, Greer's wharf being almost a household word in marine and mercantile circles in Canada. Deceased continued to prosper in business till 1851 when a fire destroyed his property and left him almost penniless. In that year he removed to Hamilton where he again engaged in mercantile pursuits meeting with a fair measure of success. His health failing him, Mr. Greer moved to a farm on the Governor's Road, Ancaster, where he remained some two or three years. In the year 1855, he removed to London where he engaged in the grain business, but meeting with some severe losses, he was compelled to retire, and took railway employment in thin city. In March 1859, he was appointed Registrar for Wentworth, succeeding Captain Stuart, and retained office till the day of his death. During his incumbency, the deceased gave his personal attention daily to the duties of his office and succeeded, with the able assistance of his son, in making such improvements as to make the Wentworth office a model Registry Office. Mr. Greer was a member of the Kingston Home Guards during the rebellion of 1837 and was a participant in many of the stirring scenes which characterized the 'rising' in Canada. The deceased was the father of three sons and five daughters, only two of whom, one son and one daughter, survive him. The former, Mr. George Greer, has been Deputy Registrar for the past fifteen of sixteen years. Mr. Greer was a life-long temperance man, carrying a pledge book in his pocket, and by his great persuasive powers succeeding in inducing many addicted to the immoderate use of intoxicating liquors to sign the pledge. He was also very active in organizing temperance societies. On Its opening Mr. Greer was connected with the Great Western Railway. On the 8th of September, 1877, the deceased was prostrated by paralysis, being confined to his bed and house for about two months. On the 4th of March last, he was afflicted with a second attack, from the effects of which he never rallied, not having been able to leave his bed.


He retained the power of speech until about a week prior to his death. The deceased was a staunch adherent of the Episcopal Church, seldom missing a service, and performing all the duties of a Christian in the most unostentatious and conscientious manner. In every relation in life, Mr. Greer was an exemplary man, one who was sure to gain and retain the respect and esteem of his fellow mortals, and to exercise an influence for good on all with whom he came in contact. The funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon at 3 o'clock.

 

MCKAY - Died at Suspension Bridge, N.Y., December 31st, 1878, John McKay, aged 63 years, 7 months, and 5 days. Funeral from his late residence, January 2nd, 1879, at 3 o'clock p.m.

 

WILDE - Mr. John Wilde, the father of Mr. Edwin Wilde, of this city, notice of whose death appeared in our issue of this morning and who was interred in the afternoon, was a native of Derbyshire, England. He sailed from the old land on Christmas Day, 1833, and settled at Niagara, subsequently removed to Thorold and Gainsborough, and then settled down in the Township of Caistor where he was engaged in farming operations for a long period of years. During the rebellion of 1837, he took a very active part in the campaign, being at the front during the whole time. He retired from his farm about three years ago and has resided in this city since. He was a gentleman of sterling character, being very open and direct in his dealings, being highly respected by all who knew him, on this account and his kindly disposition. Until a few years ago he enjoyed remarkably good health. He was in the 79th year of his age at the time of his death, and leaves a widow, two sons, and four daughters to mourn his loss.

 

January 3, 1879

 

PATRICK - Mr. Thadeus Patrick, of the House of Commons, and brother of Mr. Alfred Patrick, Clerk of the House of Commons, died last night after a brief illness.

 

MUNRO - The death is announced at Detroit of Mrs. Maria Munro, wife of Dr. Munro of that city, and formerly of St. Thomas.

 

MANDAY - Died on December 31st, 1878, Calista Maria, wife of William T. Manday, of Hamilton, and eldest daughter of the late Benjamin Hornor, of Princeton. The funeral took place on Thursday at 3 p.m., from her late residence, 188 Walnut street, Hamilton.

 

January 4, 1879

 

GAGE - Died at the residence of their father, Philip Gage, Barton, Mattie F., aged 7 years and 4 months, and Bertha E., aged 4 years and 11 months. Funeral on Sunday from the above


residence, at 1:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

TAYLOR - Died in this city, on the 4th instant, in the 56th year of her age, Elizabeth Dumas, the beloved wife of William Thomas Taylor, G.W.R., and third daughter of the late Henry Dumas, Esq., of Milltown, County Kerry, Ireland. Funeral will take place from her late residence, no 73 Elgin street, on Monday, the 6th, at 3 o'clock p.m.

 

HALL - On New Year's Day, the funeral of the late Henry Hall, of Binbrook, took place at the Episcopal Church, Binbrook. It was largely attended. Rev. Mr. Clappeson was the officiating clergyman and preached an impressive sermon on the occasion. The Rev. Robert Henry and Harvey Hall, sons of the deceased, were also present.

 

MURPHY - (Toronto) Joseph Murphy, aged 32 years, yesterday got intoxicated, and while staggering about in the middle of the road, was knocked down by a hack sleigh. One of the horses kicked him, and both runners passed over his body, inflicting injuries which resulted in death this afternoon. Deceased resided at Lambton Mills and only recently came to this country from Ireland. He had no friends or relations in this country.

 

LARMOUR - (Toronto) James Larmour, a pensioner, aged 60, and his wife were burned to death last night at Brockton, a western suburb of the city. It seems that the old man had drawn his pension of $25 during the day and according to his usual custom on such occasions proceeded to get drunk. In this he was joined by his wife, a woman about his own age and who had been married twice before she became Mrs. Larmour three years ago. The last seen of the couple was entering their residence late in the afternoon, both being then intoxicated. About 9 o'clock the neighbours saw the house on fire, and in hastening to render any assistance in their power, found that the flames had made too much headway to be easily quenched. As no sound was heard in the house, it was thought the old couple had escaped, but after the fire bad burnt out, their charred remains were found lying side by side where the kitchen had been. The bodies were burnt to a crisp, it being impossible to distinguish the man from the woman. Their legs were burned completely off. Their arms could not be distinguished from a heap of hot ashes, while their skulls were as bare as that of a skeleton and were blackened with the living coals that were scattered about them. A county constable drove seven miles in one of the worst storms ever experienced, with the thermometer ten degrees below zero, to tell Coroner Dr. Beatty of the tragedy. He was nearly frozen to death by the time he arrived at the doctor's place and had to be medically treated. This morning Dr. Beatty visited the scene of the fire and at once issued his warrant for an


inquest, the result of which was a verdict to the effect that the deceased couple net their death by burning, but how the fire was caused there was no evidence to show.

 

January 6, 1879

 

WHITE - Died on Friday, 3rd instant, at his father's residence, No 109 Robert street, Adam, eldest son of David White, formerly of Berwick-upon-Tweed. Funeral on Monday, at 2:30 p.m. from 109 Robert street. Friends are respectfully invited to attend.

 

BEARMAN - Died in this city, on the 4th instant, Thomas E. Bearman. Funeral will leave his late residence, 23 Charles street, at 3 o'clock p.m., on Monday. Friends are requested to attend.

Mr. Thomas Bearman, brother of the proprietor of the American Hotel, who has been suffering for some years from a pulmonary complaint, died on Saturday evening in the 41st year of his age. The deceased was at one time connected with his brother in business in the city, but a few years since removed to Ingersoll where he carried on business until failing health compelled him to retire, and he returned to Hamilton where he had many warm and sincere friends. The deceased leaves a wife and two young children to mourn his early death, but fortunately well provided for. The funeral will take place this afternoon at 3 o'clock.

 

MCINNES - The body of Simon McInnes of Port Hood, Cape Breton, who had been missing for several weeks, was found in the river at that place. The evidence showed that, he had been under the influence of liquor when last seen.

 

January 7, 1879

 

ELLIOTT - Mr. Andrew Elliott, one of the oldest and most respected residents of Port Robinson, was found dead in his bed on Monday morning, the cause being the bursting of a blood vessel.

 

BAZONLEGETTE - (Halifax) Captain James Bazonlegette, formerly attached to this garrison as paymaster of the 42nd Highlanders, died this morning. He wag son of Col. Bazonlegette who in former years occupied a military position in Halifax.

 

SERENSON - (Georgetown) An inquest was held by W, Freeman, M.D., Coroner of Georgetown, on Saturday, 4th of January, and the following wag the verdict: That the deceased C. Serenson came to his death by deliberately hanging himself by a woollen cravat from the cross beam of one of the beds in the room where he slept in Thompson's Hotel. Cause unknown.

 


FORBES - (Sarnia) Elizabeth M. Forbes, aged eighteen, who had been employed as nurse girl in the family of Mr. Thomas Symington for some time back, died very suddenly of heart disease early on New Year's morning. She had been undergoing medical treatment for sore throat and was recovering rapidly when the more serious malady cut her off without a moment's warning. Her parents live in Wallaceburg. Her funeral was largely attended.

 

PERKINS - Died on the 7th instant, Julia Anna, beloved wife of S. E. Perkins, in the 27th year of her age. Funeral on Thursday at 9 o'clock a.m. from her late residence, 110 Bay street north.

 

January 8, 1879

 

HOOD - Died in this city, on the 8th instant,, Percival Frederick John Hood, only son of Thomas and Eva D. Hood, aged 5 years, 10 months, and 28 days. Funeral on Thursday, at 3:30 p.m. from Royal Hotel. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

LABONTE - (Quebec) A painful case is reported from the neighbouring parish of St. Antoine de Tilley. A respectable bachelor of middle age, named Maxime Labonte, of exemplary habits, who lived alone, had not been seen for some days out of doors, and when the neighbours went to his house they found him dead, sitting in his chair, and partly eaten, especially about the face, by cats which had been fastened up in the house.

 

WATT - Saturday afternoon John Watt of Fergus, father of James Watt of Guthrie, Watt, and Cutten, Guelph, died very suddenly. A few moments previous to his death he appeared to be well and was evidently preparing to take a walk. He was in his 69th year and his remains were buried to-day.

 

SYMONS - On the 30th of December, Mr. Charles Symons died at Parry Sound, aged 56 years. Typhoid fever was the cause of his death. It whs at first intended to bring the body to Acton for interment, but after proceeding some distance on the road, the great drifts prevented such being done, and the body was taken back to Parry Sound where the burial took place. The deceased at one time carried on business in Acton and was well known in that neighbourhood. In the fall of 1873 he was employed by the Guelph Lumbering Company to manage their stores at Parry Sound where he was employed up to the time of his death. He was universally respected by his acquaintances. He leaves a wife and seven children.


HATCH - (Woodstock) Mrs. Hatch, one of the oldest residents, died this afternoon about 2 o'clock. She was a. lady possessed of the most amiable and Christian traits of character, and was held in the highest esteem by a large circle of friends. Her death has been looked for for some time, but the sorrow of her relatives and friends will be none the less on that account. She was in the neighbourhood of a hundred years of age.

 

TUSKER - It was briefly mentioned in last night's "Spectator" that the body of an unknown man was found hanging to a rafter in the barn of Mr. S. Kerns, near Ryckman's Corners, about four miles from the city. It has since been ascertained that his name is Thomas Tusker, aged about 50 years, and that he had been working in the employ of Mr. Kerns for the past fifteen years. It appears that Mr. Kerns, having recently sold his farm, had notified Tusker that his services would not be longer required and that he had better look out for another place. To this he is said to have replied that he would never leave the farm alive. The impending change is supposed to have so worked upon his mind that he went and hanged himself. His body was found at 8:30 yesterday morning. An inquest will be held this forenoon by Coroner Thomas White. (In a later account, the name is given as "Taskey") An inquest was held to-day before T. White, M.D., coroner, touching the death of the man Thomas Tusker found hanging in Mr. Samuel Kern's barn at Ryckman's Corners yesterday morning, and a verdict returned that the man had committed suicide while labouring under temporary insanity.

 

CHECKLEY - (Toronto) A local paper refers this morning to a case which within the last few days had stirred Church of England circles in this city to the depths and rudely awakened them to the fact that while in common with other religious sects they have been building palaces in which to worship their God at least one administrant of spiritual food has actually died in their midst of starvation. The case referred to is that of Rev. W. F. Checkley, assistant minister of St. Paul's Church, Bloor street, who died on Friday last, it is said of typhoid fever, but it was in reality from sheer want. A few years ago, he was engaged by the Bloor street congregation at a salary of $800, but the congregation found that they could pay half that amount, and on $400.00 a year Mr. Checkley had to keep alive himself and his family of five or six children, including an adult son who some time ago had both his hands amputated, two children of a dead brother, and an invalid sister. Nothing was known of the extreme poverty of the family until Mr. Checkley's death, when it was ascertained that the household had actually been existing for two years past on almost bread alone, butter during that time they had not had in the house, and the taste of meat was almost forgotten. Mr. Checkley was of a plucky, noble disposition and always had a joke for everybody. One day recently he was met by a brother clergyman who remarked that he looked


terribly cold and asked him where his overcoat was. Mr. Checkley in a joking manner replied that he hadn't got one, and in this way he warded off any suspicion as to the real state of his family affairs. As soon as the true state of things became known, the neighbours and congregation of St. Paul's offered assistance in abundance, and probably a fund will now be raised for settlement on the bereaved widow and her family. The case was referred to last Sunday from the pulpit in a couple of Episcopal churches.

 

January 9, 1879

 

NICHOLSON - Died on the 4th instant, in Caledonia, Mary Ann, wife of Thomas Nicholson, aged 35 years.

 

YOUNG - Died on the 2nd instant, in Caledonia, Susan, wife of Mr. William E. Young, aged 28 years.

 

MERCER (O'REILLY) - (Toronto) Bridget O'Reilly, known as Mrs. Mercer, who with her son is claimant to the celebrated Andrew Mercer will case, died this morning.

 

FURLONG - A young lady, about 18 years of age, daughter of Mr. William Furlong, resident on the 4th concession of Walpole, died suddenly on Friday morning without any premonitory symptoms of illness It is supposed that heart disease must have been the cause of death.

 

ROSCOE - Mr DeCosmos, M.P. for British Columbia, at present in the city (Ottawa), yesterday received a letter giving the particulars of the suicide of Mr Roscoe, ex-M.P. for Victoria.

 

TASKEY - (See Tusker, page 6) Yesterday Coroner White held an inquest at Mr. Samuel Kern's residence, Barton, touching the death of Thomas Taskey whose death was reported in the "Spectator" of Tuesday. Mr. Ira Rymal was foreman of the jury. The following was the evidence taken.

Samuel Ogden, sworn: Knew the deceased for about 14 years. Saw him last alive about 8:30 yesterday morning when he seemed to be in his usual health. At noon yesterday, I went to the barn to feed the cattle and pigs, and when I opened the door I saw deceased hanging with a rope tied around his neck and which was tied to a pole in the roof. He was then dead. I came back to the house and told Mrs. Kern that Thomas had hung himself.

Mrs. Frances Kerns, sworn: The deceased was in my Husband's employ about 13 years. During that time he was apparently healthy. Saw him last alive yesterday morning about 8 o'clock. He seemed to be in his usual health. He refused to take breakfast. Never knew anything to go wrong with deceased mentally.


Samuel Smith deposed to finding deceased hanging in the barn, his evidence being corroborated by Isaac Kerns and George Dawson.

James Hannah swore that deceased complained of heart disease and said he was going to die.

Jacob Kerns swore that a few days ago the deceased had given him his watch, stating that he was going to die soon. Deceased complained of his heart and said that he might drop off at any moment.

William Ryckman deposed to discovering blood stains and the razor produced in the other barn.

C. F. A. Locke, M.D., deposed that he had made the post mortem examination and found the body to be that of a well developed man of between 65 and 70 yearn of age. At the upper part of the throat above the castilae he had found an irregular, ragged, incised wound for 21/2 to 3 inches in length which had severed the muscles and vessels. The trachea was uninjured. Death in his opinion was caused by suffocation from strangulation.

The jury, after a short deliberation, returned a verdict that Thomas Taskey came to his death by his own hands.

 

January 10, 1879

 

ALLARDICE - Died at Marlington, near Forerun, on Tuesday, the 7th instant, in the 66th year of her age. Robina Kennedy, wife of J. C. Allardice, Esq., and mother of Mr. R. A. Allardice of this city.

 

PATTULLO - (Woodstock)The sad news was received here yesterday of the death of Mr. Thomas Pattullo, brother of Messrs Pattullo, of the "Sentinel Review" at his house in British Columbia. He was highly respected by all who knew him and his sorrowing mother und other members of the family have the sympathy of all, in their sad bereavement.

 

January 11, 1879

 

MOORE - Robert Moore, a farmer living in the 2nd concession, West York, fell off a beam in his barn to-day and was immediately killed. He was throwing down a plank and overbalanced himself, nearly falling on a man whom he had told a minute before to stand from under.


FARRELL - (Quebec) The execution of Farrell, which occurred this morning in the precincts of the district jail, is the first that has taken place in the vicinity of the new building, the last hanging here being that of Mecham for the murder of Pearl, which occurred in 1864 in front of the old jail, now Morrin College...

 

ANDERSON - An inquest was held by Coroner Cameron of Welland the other day on the body of Douglas Anderson of Port Robinson. From the evidence it seems that on the evening of the 1st January, Anderson came to the Shamrock Hotel when a ball was in progress, and being somewhat intoxicated was prevailed upon to go away. That was the last seen of him until he was found in the cistern at the rear of the hotel on Friday last. The verdict of the coroner's jury was that deceased came to his death by falling into the cistern of the Shamrock Hotel and drowning. No blame was attached to anyone.

 

SCOTT - Information has been received in Galt that Mr. Joseph Scott, formerly of Beverly and that town, was recently shot dead in Sacramento, California. Mr. Scott had for some time been connected with the police force of that city, and it was while pursuing his avocation that he met with his death. Mr. Scott served his time as a wagon maker with Mr. Thomas Todd, then engaged in that business in Galt. No details of the tragedy have been received.

 

IRELAND - Died in this city, on Friday night, at 50 Burlington street west, Helen, daughter of Thomas and Amelia Ireland, in the 6th year of her age. Funeral from the above residence to-morrow (Sunday) at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

January 13, 1879

 

ARMSTRONG - Died in this city, on the 12th instant, William, second son of James and Ellen Armstrong, aged 5 years and 4 months. Funeral will leave 58 Cherry street, to-day, at 3 p.m.. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

HARPER - Died at the residence of her grandfather, Mr. Thomas Sylvester, 93 Market street, Emily Amelia, only daughter of W. T. Harper, aged 4 years and 4 months. Funeral at 3 p.m. on Tuesday. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ARCHIBALD - On Wednesday night, a man named Archibald, living in Huntingdon, was kicked in the abdomen by a horse which he went to feed and died in a few hours afterward.


January 14, 1879

 

GRAHAM - Died in Dundas, on January 12th, Mrs. Graham, aged 65 years. Funeral will take place from her late residence, Napier street, to-day (Tuesday) at 3 o'clock.

 

SUTHERLAND - Died on the evening of Monday, the 13th instant, Margaret, widow of the late Capt. James Sutherland, of this city, aged 72. Funeral on Thursday, at 3 o'clock, from her late residence, No 113 Hughson street north. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MORRISSEY - Henry Morrissey, formerly Halifax City Grain Measurer, died Monday, aged 94. He fought on board the "Victory" at Trafalgar, saw Nelson fall, and afterward had his leg broken in an engagement. He was the only survivor of the famous battle on this side of the Atlantic. There are said to be seven others in England.

 

SUTHERLAND - Our obituary column has already contained a notice of the death of the widow of the late Capt. James Sutherland of this city in her 72nd year. She leaves three children, two sons and a daughter. The latter is the wife of Dr. Strong of New York city, and one of the former is a well known Methodist clergyman. Mrs. Sutherland was a much esteemed member of the Centenary Church and took a deep interest in its welfare. Her death which will be mourned by a wide circle of friends, calls up a melancholy reminiscence. Capt. Sutherland, her husband, was one of the victims of the Desjardins Bridge railway accident. He was expected home in the evening of the catastrophe and his wife and family had made every preparation for giving him a loving reception when the heartrending news of the dreadful accident was conveyed to them. It is said that Mrs. Sutherland never fully recovered from the effects of the terrible shock.

 

THWAITES - Mr. Joseph Thwaites died on Friday in East Zorra at the ripe age of 82. The deceased was an unmarried man and resided with his sister, Mrs. Stanley, whose family are related to Mr. William Donaldson and Mr. Joseph Plaskett. He was a native of Cumberland, England, and had spent some time in the West Indies. As a farmer Mr. Thwaites was a model.

 

MCCAIG - Friday night James McCaig of Puslinch, father of Donald McCaig, Eramosa, one of the public school examiners, died at his residence, lot 18, 2nd concession, at the ripe old age of 79. Mr. McCaig settled in Puslinch on the farm on which he died, over forty years ago.

 

DALY - A terribly sudden death occurred at No 365 John street north this forenoon. It appears that there resided in that house a man named Matthew Daly who has been suffering from



consumption. For months last year he was an inmate in the Hospital, and feeling rather better, left the institution. The insidious disease made serious trouble in his constitution these last few weeks, and he was to be re-admitted to the Hospital at one o'clock this afternoon. But as he was leaning over a trunk a couple of hours before the time named, he burst a blood vessel, fell over, and expired. Dr. Mills, the Hospital surgeon was called, but found his services of no avail. An inquest was, we believe, decided to be unnecessary.

 

January 15, 1879

 

ENNIS - Died at his residence, 124 John street north, George Ennis, Jr., aged 28 years and 10 months. Funeral from 124 John street north on Thursday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

BELZ - Died in this city, Monday night, Mathilda, youngest daughter of Lawrence and Antoinette Belz, aged 2 years and 9 months. Funeral will leave No 20 Upper Cathcart street, at 3 p.m. to-day. Friends will please attend without further notice.

 

DOWD - (St. Andrew's, N.B.) Thomas Dowd was executed here at 6:15 this morning for the murder of Thomas Edward Ward, committed at New River on the 8th of September last. Death was instantaneous. About 60 persons were present.

 

WALKER - (Ailsa Craig) An extraordinary and melancholy tragedy occurred in the Township of Lobo, a few miles from here, yesterday afternoon. A young lady named Miss Walker, a sister of John Walker, Brecon Mills, dropped dead suddenly. She was engaged to be married to Mr. Edward Cousins, son of Thomas Cousins, and nephew of Mr. James Cousins, London, and the ceremony was shortly to be celebrated. As soon as the young man heard of the sad event which had happened to his betrothed he was seized with a frenzy of grief, and retiring to his room, cut his throat from ear to ear. He was found weltering in blood, but still alive. Dr. Anderson put in twelve stitches, and does not despair of his final recovery. The young lady's mother, arriving from St. John's in the afternoon and seeing her daughter a corpse, also dropped dead. The extraordinary affair has caused a deep gloom throughout the neighbourhood.

 

VINEY - An old coloured woman named Viney, residing on North street, St. Catharines, was found dead in her bed yesterday morning. The woman escaped from Virginia per underground railway some years prior to the American war.

 

January 16, 1879

 

MOORE - (Palmerston) This morning a man named Thomas Moore, a farmer living about four


miles from here, became suddenly ill, went into the house, and told his wife he was going to die, and before she had time to comprehend his awful word, he was a corpse.

 

KELLER - (St. Catharines) The body of the late Mr. Keller was brought here from Buffalo to-day. His funeral will take place from the Welland House to the cemetery at 11 a.m. to-morrow. Mr. Keller resided here for several years and was highly respected. It is thought that grief for the death of his daughter which occurred here last summer had unsettled his mind and caused him to commit suicide. Deceased was a respected member of the Masonic body. Several of the members of that society are now assisting in the obsequies.

 

January 17, 1879

 

HUGHES - (Halifax) W. Hughes, a gunner of. the Royal Artillery, was found to-day frozen to death in Point Pleasant Park. He was missing at roll call last night. He was seen in company with a girl early in the evening and later under the influence of liquor. He is supposed to have lost his way in the woods and went to sleep. An inquest will be held on the body.

 

YONATT - John Yonatt of Eden Mills, one of the oldest settlers in the neighbourhood, died Monday at the advanced age of 92 years and 7 months.

 

SMITH - (Guelph) The death is announced of Mr. George Smith, tax collector. He was a leading member of the Methodist Church, was always in the van in any good work, and was highly respected by the people of Guelph and vicinity. His remains will be interred on Friday

 

GRAY - On Monday last, a three-year-old son of Mr. John Gray, merchant of Bismarck, was jumping on a sleigh loaded with wood; he fell and the sleigh passing over his leg, crushed it from the knee to the thigh, the bones protruding through the flesh. The poor fellow was carried home and lingered till yesterday when he died. Mr. Gray lost a little girl a short time ago by her being drowned in a well, which makes the bereavement doubly painful.

 

CHAPMAN - Died at Burlington, on Thursday, January 16th, Sarah, beloved wife of William Chapman, and mother of Mrs. John Field, aged 77 years. Funeral from her late residence on Monday next, at 2 p.m.

 

January 18, 1879

 

COUMBS - Died on Friday, the 17th instant, Isabella Clark, the widow of the late John Coumbs. Funeral from her late residence, 115k Rebecca street, at 2:30 p.m. on Monday, the 20th instant.


BAYLEY - (London) The Rev. Benjamin Bayley, M.A., headmaster of the High School, died this evening at three o'clock, at the age of 72 years. The deceased was Master of the old Grammar School from the early history of London, having taught most of the young gentlemen of our city and neighbourhood who have now reached middle age and are filling high and responsible positions throughout the country. He was a very successful teacher and one of our most highly esteemed citizens. He was also for many years assistant minister of Christ Church. The disease which he had was inflammation of the lungs.

 

MCARTHUR - A few days ago a young man named John McArthur, a son of John McArthur of Ormond, Russell County, met with a fatal accident. He was at work chopping in the woods when a tree fell upon him, crushing him to death. Deceased was some twenty years of age and was well known and respected throughout the neighbourhood.

 

MOORE - (Ingersoll) Mrs. Moore, mother of Mr. William Moore, of William Moore & Co., grocers, Mrs. Stothers, and John Moore, machinist, all of London, died last night. She was one of the oldest residents.

 

MCMILLAN - (Nottawasaga) Mr. Archibald McMillan, one of the oldest settlers of this place, died of apoplexy last Sunday. Mr. McMillan first settled in this neighbourhood in 1837, and his was the third house erected in Nottawasaga. The nearest market to him in those days was Barrie, some forty miles from his residence.

 

CHAPMAN - In our obituary column yesterday afternoon we announced the death of Mrs. Chapman, relict of the late Mr. William Chapman, of Burlington village. Mrs. Chapman, who had reached the ripe old age of 77 years, was well known and much respected by a wide circle of friends, having resided for fifty years in the counties of Wentworth and Halton. The deceased was mother of Mrs. John Field, of Hamilton; Mrs. F. Awty, of Mitchell; and Mrs. S. M. Durkee, of Burlington. The funeral will take place in Burlington on Monday, at 2 o'clock p.m.

 

BROWN - Mr. George Brown, an estimable young man and a prominent member of the IOOF, died at Galt the other day. He was brother of Mr. E. I. Brown of Galt Post Office, Mr. David Brown of Paris, and Messrs J. and T. Brown of this city.

 

FITZPATRICK - Died in this city, on the 17th instant, Kenny Fitzpatrick, aged 55 years. The funeral will take place from his late residence, corner of Park and Cannon streets, at 9 o'clock on Monday morning. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


We have a melancholy duty to perform this morning announcing the sudden and unexpected death of Mr. Kenny Fitzpatrick, Sr., alderman for No 5 Ward. Mr. Fitzpatrick, up to a year ago, enjoyed excellent health, and although he never complained of illness till lately, it was evident that his strength was failing. A few weeks ago he was accidentally knocked down by a sleigh and had a rib broken, besides receiving other injuries which confined him to his residence till the municipal nomination day. Last week he complained of illness to his family physician, Dr. Thomas White, and on an examination, it was found that he was seriously affected with disease of the kidneys, although no fatal result was anticipated.

Last night deceased attended the last meeting of the Board of Aldermen for 1878. Prior to entering the Chamber he met a brother councillor who shook him heartily by the hand, whereupon he remarked that he did not feel well. Shortly after 9 o'clock, he rose and proposed the vote of thanks to the retiring Mayor with the usual grant of $1200, following the motion with a few brief remarks uttered in a nervous tone of voice. As Alderman Chisholm was putting the motion, he noiselessly left his seat at the Board and went into the cloakroom. None of the Aldermen or reporters knew he was absent till Mr. Smith, the city messenger, rushed into the Chamber and called to Dr. Crooker. When the doctor arrived, Mr. Fitzpatrick was down on the floor in an insensible condition. No time was lost in applying the usual restoratives, and as the case appeared serious, additional medical aid was sent for. Drs. George Mackelcan, Thomas and James White, and O'Neil were speedily in attendance, Dr. Ryall, who was in the Chamber at the time of the sad occurrence, also giving all the aid in his power. There was a little hope at first, but it was soon discovered that the attack was a fatal one. Very Rev. Vicar-General Heenan, spiritual adviser of deceased, was sent for and administered the last sacrament. The wife and family of the deceased were also sent for, the sad news being gently broken to the former by the Vicar-General. Deceased never rallied but lay in an insensible state till 11:30 p.m. when he died. It is needless to say that the members of the Council and personal friends of the deceased were much affected by the melancholy event and thoroughly sympathized with the widow and family in their terrible bereavement. It was a sad termination of the Council of 1878 that the senior alderman of the Board should be so suddenly called away.

The late Alderman Fitzpatrick was one of the oldest residents of the city, born in Ireland in 1824, and is thus in his 55th year. He left his native land with his family while yet a boy and came to Canada, settling in Hamilton some forty years ago. He grew up with the city, and having learnt the painting trade, began business on his own account many years ago, carrying on a large trade up to his death. Although naturally of a retiring disposition, his friends prevailed upon him seventeen years ago to allow himself to be put in nomination for a seat at the Council Board.


He was triumphantly returned and has continued to represent either No 4 or No 5 Ward for the long and continuous period of seventeen years, being generally returned at the top of the poll. At the late election he was returned for the eighteenth time by a large majority. For the past two years, he has made an admirable finance minister for the Council and had he lived would doubtless have been re-elected to that important trust. A consistent Liberal-Conservative, he was so by conviction and was not loathe to grant to others the liberty to think and act differently from him. It was the same with his religious views. He was a good member of the Catholic Church, but he was never known to intrude his views on those whose beliefs did not agree with his. A kindlier heart we never knew; a firmer friend when once his friendship was gained no one could have desired. A genial whole-souled citizen, he has left hosts of friends to mourn his death, while at the aldermanic board we are safe in affirming he had not an enemy. In him the city has lost a public servant whose place will not soon be filled, his varied experience, his clear-headed views of business, and his sterling integrity of purpose constituting him par excellence a model alderman. As he lived, so he died, in harness. In fact so anxious was he to attend his aldermanic duties that his friends felt he resumed them after his late accident much too soon for his own comfort. He leaves a widow and some seven or eight of a family, together with three brothers, to lament his untimely end.

 

BROWNJOHN - Died on Saturday morning, January 18th, at the village of Grimsby, Keturah Lauren Muir, wife of Thomas C. BrownJohn P.L.S., in the 44th year of her age.

 

LINDSAY - Died at No 20 Ray street south, on Saturday, January the 18th instant, Annie Jane, beloved wife of Walter J. Lindsay. The funeral will take place on Monday next, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

January 20, 1879

 

VOSPER - Died on the 18th instant, in the Township of Barton, Jemima, the wife of Charles Vosper, aged 26 years. Funeral will leave her late residence, to-day, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

HARRIS - Died in this city, on the 19th instant, Eliza, relict of the late John W. Harris, aged 49 years. The funeral will leave her late residence, No 11 Cannon street west, on Tuesday next, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

SCOTT - Died at Caledonia, on the 18th instant, Alice J., eldest daughter of John Scott, Esq., in the 20th year of her age. Funeral from her father's residence, on Tuesday, 21st, at two o'clock in. the afternoon.

 

 


COUGHLAN - (Ottawa) A child, six months old, belonging to a notorious character named Mrs. Coughlan, who attempted to get up a sensational story in connection with the McAulay inquest, was found dead this morning. The matter was reported to Coroner Lynn who summoned a jury and held an inquest. A post mortem examination revealed the fact that the child was starved to death. It is probable that the mother will be arrested. An adjournment took place till to-morrow. The house in which the woman lives is situated at the foot of Albert street and is the picture of poverty.

 

DEANS - A few weeks ago a lad named Taylor was fighting with another boy in Sackville, N.B., when a third lad named Deans interfered. Taylor then turned on him, beating and kicking him brutally about the head and other sensitive parts of the body. Deans was so badly hurt that he had to take to his bed. Brain fever set in, followed by erysipelas, and death took place Saturday morning. It is probable that an inquest will be held. Taylor is about 14 years old, and Deans a year or two older.

 

MEADDAUGH, MOORE - (Ingersoll) Diphtheria is quite prevalent. Mr. George Meaddaugh lost three children out of four, James Moore of Springford lost one, and several others are sick with it. Thomas Wood's have been bad with it, but are seemingly on the mend.

 

LINDSAY - We deeply regret to hear of the death of Mrs. Walter Lindsay which took place at her husband's residence in this city on Saturday. The deceased lady was the daughter of Mr. Henry Racey of Brantford, and first married Mr. S. E. Stewart, for many years proprietor of the Hamilton "Times". After some years of widowhood succeeding his death, she married the husband who is now left to mourn her loss. Though twice married, Mrs. Lindsay was in the bloom of early womanhood and seemed but a short time ago destined to many years of life. Her many accomplishments, her vivacious manners, and her warm-hearted disposition made her a special favourite in a large social circle in which her death will be deeply mourned and from which she will be greatly missed.

 

HARRIS - It is with regret we to-day announce the death of Mrs. Harris, relict of the late John W. Harris, which occurred at her residence, Cannon street, yesterday afternoon. Deceased had never fairly recovered from the prostration induced by constant attendance during the illness of her husband whose death took place some months ago. Mrs. Harris was recently called to London to the deathbed of her brother-in-law and returned quite ill. She sank rapidly notwithstanding the efforts of the best medical skill to save her. The surviving


members of the family, three sons and four daughters, have the sincere sympathy of a wide circle, of friends in their double bereavement. The funeral will take place to-morrow at 4 p.m.

 

January 21, 1879

 

RONAN - Died in this city, on the 20th instant, Robert, only son of John and Sarah Ronan, aged 8 years, 5 months, and 20 days. Funeral will leave his father's residence, corner of Wellington and Cannon streets, at 2:30 p.m. on Wednesday next. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

WATTS (Toronto) An inquest was held on Saturday evening on the body of John Watts who was on Friday evening killed by a fall in Call's carpenter shop, Soho street, and a verdict of "accidental death" was returned.

 

GORMAN - (London) Mr. Cornelius Gorman, a resident since 1844, died yesterday after a long and painful illness, aged 70 years. He served twenty-eight years in the Royal Welsh Fusiliers under four crowned heads of England, being discharged as a sergeant. He was father of Mr. Henry Gorman of the Sarnia "Observer".

 

GLENN - A daughter of Thomas Glenn, farmer in the Township of Usborne, died suddenly at Exeter on Saturday. During a period of shopping, she entered Renton Bros. store and feeling faint, called for a glass of water. She was shortly afterward seized with a serious illness and carried into Mr. Eaovett's house where she expired in about two hours. The cause is thought to have been the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain.

 

January 22, 1879

 

BROUGHTON - Died on the 21st January, at Hamilton, Ontario, William Coates, youngest son of Frederick and Fanny Broughton, aged 11 years. Funeral on Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

 

MOORE - Died in this city, on the 21st instant, Charlotte Crisp, wife of Robert Moore, in the 28th year of her age. Funeral from her father's residence, corner of Wellington and Jackson streets, at 2 p.m. Thursday, January 23rd, 3.879, Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

WADLEY - (Montreal) A man named David Wadley, a clerk, died suddenly in a saloon this morning.

 

HOBBS - (Ingersoll) We regret to hear of the death of an old resident, Mr. William Hobbs, who has for a long time been engaged in the business of butcher and cattle dealer in Ingersoll.


He was a man weighing in the neighbourhood of 300 pounds, and the suddenness of his demise is, in a manner, attributed to his being so stout. The deceased was about town as usual on Saturday. The cause of his death was inflammation of the lungs.

 

PERLEY - The death is announced of Colonel Perley of Burford which took place at his residence on Sunday last The deceased gentleman was 82 years of age. He was born in New Brunswick and came to this section of the country at a very early age, being for about 77 years a resident therein, living first at Ancaster, from there removing to the County of Norfolk, and came to Burford in 1832 where he has lived ever since. He served in the war of 1812 and also in the rebellion of 1837. The colonel was a staunch Conservative. He is deeply regretted by all who knew him.

 

January 23, 1879

 

MCDONALD - The funeral of Senator Donald McDonald took place to-day, the remains being placed in St. James cemetery. His five sons acted as pallbearers.

 

JOHNSON - (Kingston) This morning about 5 o'clock a fire broke out in Thomas Johnson's bakery on Princess street. Johnson, with his family, lived in the upper part of the building. The flames had made considerable headway before they were discovered and two little daughters of Johnson, who slept in the third storey, could not be rescued and were burned to death, the other members of the family barely escaping with their lives. The building was totally destroyed and the premises adjoining, occupied by George Brown, were badly damaged.

 

BENEDICT - (Kingston) Mr. R. C. Benedict, who was one of the oldest, if not the oldest, printer in Canada died in this city this morning.

 

GRIPER - George Griper, living near Crediton, committed suicide by cutting his throat with a razor on Monday night and died last night from the wound. No cause can be ascertained for the rash act. He was a German by birth, aged 62, not married.

 

GORDON - One night last week Mr. Charles Gordon, proprietor of the Spring Creek Mills, North Embro, went to bed in his usual good health and in the morning was found dead in his bed. Great sympathy is felt for the bereaved family.

 

MCLAREN - An inquest was held yesterday afternoon at the residence of Mr. Henry McLaren, corner of MacNab and Herkimer streets before Dr. T. White, coroner, touching the death of


Mary Gates McLaren, aged 5 years, who was accidentally poisoned by having a dose of carbolic acid administered to her in mistake for a tonic.

The following were the jury: Edward Martin, foreman, Adam Brown, H. C. Baker, Edward C. Kerr, Thomas Young, David Kidd, James Howard, A. T. Wood, Thomas Corson, Col. Irving, George H. Gillespie, Rowland Hills.

The following evidence explains the sad affair.

Fred William Gates: The deceased was my grandchild and was five years old last November. Last evening Mrs. McLaren was dining with us when the servant girl came over and announced that the child had been given carbolic acid by mistake instead of a tonic. We telephoned for Dr. Ridley and other doctors and then went over to the home of Mrs. McLaren. On arriving I found the child in her mother's arms, apparently suffocating. Mrs. Carey endeavoured to give the child anemetic, but she could not swallow it. Dr. Malloch then arrived and took charge of the child till she died.

To the foreman: I am positive that the giving of the poison was purely accidental, Mrs. Carey has been a most faithful and devoted servant. Mrs. Carey is completely prostrated and it is feared her life is in danger. She is an elderly woman. She could have read the directions on the bottle with her spectacles. The carbolic acid had been in the house for some time. The child had been suffering from scarlet fever. The tonic had been received only recently. None of the family believe that the medicine was given through design.

Bessie Shupland: I am a nurse in the employ of Mr. McLaren. Last evening after I came up from my tea deceased asked Mrs. Carey for her medicine. Deceased asked me to get her the medicine when I told her I didn't know what to get her. Mrs. Carey then went to the wash stand and got the bottle which she thought was the medicine. She then poured out a teaspoonful and I gave it to her. The bottle produced, marked 'Carbolic acid' is the bottle. The deceased looked as if she couldn't swallow, When I looked at the bottle and told Mrs. Carey she had been giving her carbolic acid. When the housemaid came upstairs, Mrs. Carey sent her over to Mr. Gates's for Mrs. McLaren.

To the foreman: I am not sure whether both bottles were on the stand. I knew that the carbolic was in the house. Didn't see Mrs. Carey pick up the bottle. The gas was lighted at the time. I think Mrs. Carey didn't have her glasses on at the time. She told the housemaid she thought the acid would not hurt the child. Mrs. Carey tasted the acid herself.

Dr. A. G. Malloch: About 7:30 last evening was called to see the child who was said to be poisoned by carbolic acid, a dose of which had been given in mistake. On reaching the house, I found the child in a dying state. Extremities were cold and the child was insensible, the pulse low, and noise when breathing as if from a collection of fluid in the throat, but not apparently from an affection of the windpipe, as there was no difficulty at that time in the breathing as


 judged by the absence of laryngeal breathing. The child swallowed some spoonfuls of lead. She died in about fifteen minutes after my arrival. The lips and part of the mouth presented a white appearance like that produced by carbolic acid. It is my opinion that death was caused by poisoning by carbolic acid.

To the foreman: I should say that a teaspoonful of carbolic acid would be sufficient to cause death. It is not marked a poison.

Henry D. Ridley, M.D.: I attended deceased who had a severe bilious attack three or four days since from which she was recovering, and prescribed for her. Saw her yesterday afternoon between four and five o'clock when she came downstairs with Mrs. Carey. Saw deceased again about 7:40 last evening who was then insensible and almost pulse less. Corroborate Dr. Malloch's evidence as to the cause of death. The bottle produced is the one I prescribed for the child on Monday last. I made up the medicine myself and labeled it. Mrs. Carey I have known for many years and always considered her a careful and prudent nurse, and I cannot account for the mistake, there being such a difference in the size of the bottles, and one having an adhesive label and the other a loose one. Mrs. Carey is a very intelligent woman about 60 to 65 years of age. Mrs. Carey has been in the habit of using carbolic acid, the child having had a severe attack of scarlet fever. My opinion is that carbolic acid should be marked 'poison'. It is seldom given internally.

The jury after a short deliberation brought in a verdict "That the deceased came to her death from the effects of an overdose of carbolic acid administered to her by accident through a mistake of the nurse. The jury regret to find that the bottle containing the carbolic acid was not marked 'Poison' and that all medicines of such a dangerous character should be so marked".

It is scarcely necessary to add that the afflicted parents have the entire sympathy of the community in their distressing bereavement. Mr. McLaren was at Kingston attending the School of Gunnery at the time, but arrived home yesterday.

 

JENKINS - Died in this city, on the 23rd instant, of inflammatory croup, Clara, the beloved daughter of Stephen and Frances Jenkins, aged 2 years and 6 months. Funeral from her father's residence, 101 Queen street north, on Saturday afternoon, at 2:30. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

January 24, 1879

 

MCLAREN - Died on the 21st instant, Mary Gates, only daughter of Mr. Henry McLaren, aged 5 years.


BLACKNEY - Information was received last night of the death of Mrs. Blackney, only sister of the Hon. Dr. Tupper, which occurred at the residence of Dr. Nathan Tupper, at Amherst, N.S., yesterday. The deepest sympathy is expressed for all the family.

 

LAFLAMME - A collision occurred on the Levis and Kennebec Railway near Anselme, Quebec, at noon to-day. between a passenger train and an engine that was opening the road. The second-class car on the passenger train was telescoped by a platform car, and one passenger, named J. B. Laflamme, was instantly killed. Dr. Morrisette of St. Hendiene had his leg cut off, and another passenger was badly hurt. One of the engines was smashed and the other was little damaged.

 

HUFFMAN - We have to announce the death of another pioneer in the demise of Paul Huffman, Sr., of Burford. On Monday evening last, Mr. Huffman retired apparently in good health and spirits, and not arising at his usual hour, a member of his son's family, with whom he was living, called at his room and found that he had passed away. Mr. Huffman was much respected in the neighbourhood in which he lived. He was one of the few who settled in Burford when it a was a howling wilderness and for many years endured the hardships incident to pioneer life before the mighty forests gave way to the subduing influences of the civilizer's axe. He leaves a numerous family, nearly all settled in Burford. At the time of his death he was in his 77th year. In politics he was all his life a consistent Conservative.

 

WARDER - (Chatham) Dr. Murphy, coroner, on Tuesday held an inquest on the body of Mrs. Mary Warder who died suddenly at her residence, Duke street, that morning. The evidence of the witnesses called showed that the woman was a dissipated character and had brought about her own death by exposure to cold while under the influence of liquor. The jury returned a verdict to this effect.

 

January 25, 1879

 

WILSON - The death is announced of Mr. Andrew Wilson, lumberman, formerly a resident of Barrie, and lately of Bearbrook, Ontario. The gentleman died suddenly at Ottawa on Monday last. Peace rest his ashes.

 

MESSMORE - There died at his residence in St. Mary's this week one of the oldest gospel ministers in the Dominion, the Rev. Joseph Messmore. Mr. Messmore was 83 years of age and entered the ministry of the Methodist church in the year 1828, and continued in this active work until 1867. Since that time he resided in the town of Simcoe until two years ago when he removed to St. Mary's. Deceased was interred in Woodhouse cemetery.


SCHOOLEY - A young man named Edward Schooley, who was much respected in Humberstone Township, was killed by a falling tree while chopping in the woods on Tuesday last.

 

MCCORMICK - (St. Thomas) Archibald McCormick, an old school teacher of this county, died at the House of Industry of dropsy, aged 81 years.

 

GORDON - Miss Charity Gordon, daughter of Mr. Duncan Gordon, 2nd concession of Southwold, died suddenly last Saturday night after a short illness of about thirty hours.

 

NELLES - The death is announced of Mr. Robert F. Nelles, long connected with the Galt Post Office. He was interred with Masonic honours on Thursday last.

 

MILNE - A telegram received in Brantford on Thursday by fir. Patrick Milne announced the death of his father in Philadelphia. The deceased was well known in that city, having lived in the North Ward for a great number of years.

 

January 27, 1879

 

STAPLEY - On Friday night, William Stapley, a brakesman on the G.T.R. freight train, fell off the train near Scarborough and was run over and killed.

 

GOSSELIN - The body of Louis Gosselin, stolen from the morgue at River des Prairies, was found in the dissecting room of the Bishop's Medical College.

 

CAMPBELL - (Woodstock) Another death has occurred in our midst. Mr. Josiah Campbell, an extensive apple dealer and well known in and around Woodstock, died yesterday at the ripe age of 57 years. His funeral takes place on Monday at 2 p.m.

 

BENSON - (St. Thomas) Lillian, daughter of the Rev. Manly Benson, died on Wednesday morning of diphtheria.

 

NORTHROP - Solomon Northrop, the one-legged peanut vendor who has peddled around the N.Y. Central depot at Suspension Bridge for many years, fell down stairs in his dwelling in that village the other night and fractured his skull. Death was instantaneous. Deceased was over 60 years of age.

 

January 28, 1879

 

COSGRAVE - The information has been received of the death of James Cosgrave, a tramp printer hailing from this city, who was killed by being run over by the cars near Burlington, Iowa. Deceased had worked in nearly every newspaper office from Collingwood to Memphis, Tenn., and was returning northward from the latter place when killed.


BUCHANAN - (St. Catharines) The death of Thomas Buchanan of the firm of Benale and Buchanan has created profound regret here as he was a man well known and respected.

 

HEINWICK - (St. Catharines) The demise of Mr. Charles Heinwick, one of the oldest musicians in the city, is also deeply regretted.

 

COUCH - (London) An old man named H. A. Couch who has earned a precarious living by selling shirt patterns and who was an habitue of the Police Court and for some time an inmate of the City Hospital, was found in a dying state on King street yesterday morning. He shortly afterward expired. The cause was heart disease. The victim was about 65 years old, was an American, and formerly lived in Toronto.

 

HUDSON - On Saturday afternoon when Mr. William Hudson, living on Rectory street, London East, returned home, he found the door very hard to open. He succeeded at last in raising the latch when the door flew open showing to the husband the body of his wife lying on the floor with her head towards him which appeared to have been pressed against it. Coroner Flock held an inquest on the body last night. The jury after hearing the evidence brought in the following verdict: We the jury empaneled to investigate the cause of death of Mrs. Mary Hudson do find that she died of suffocation, and we believe that she was under the influence of intoxicating liquor.

 

MARSHALL - (Galt) A young man named Marshall who resides about three miles from here was at Glenmorris on Saturday helping to repair a mill dam, and when returning home at night, by some means lost his way and remained out all Saturday night. He was found on Sunday morning by the people coming to church so badly frozen that he died early last night. The thermometer fell rapidly on Saturday night to a minimum of 6 degrees below zero, but has risen to-day to 42 degrees above zero, with rain.

 

HARWOOD - Died at Ingersoll on the 16th instant, Mr. Henry Harwood of general debility and old age. Deceased came to Canada in 1834 and settled in Oxford County in what was called a Town Plot in Blandford, now Woolwich. He died at the ripe old age of 88 years and leaves a long list of descendants amounting in all to upwards of eighty, some of the third generation having arrived at manhood.

 

June 29. 1879

 

LEMON - Some two or three months ago, a man named Lemon, a farmer in Peel, was committed to Guelph jail as a lunatic. Thursday morning he died in Jail very suddenly.

 

EGLESTON - Died on the 28th instant, at his residence 'Trelawne' Ancaster, Alonzo Egleston, in the 56th year of his age, deeply regretted by a large circle of friends. Funeral will take place from his late residence on Thursday, 30th instant, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

We deeply regret to have to announce the death of Mr. Alonzo Egleston, ex-Reeve of Ancaster, which sad event took place at his residence in that village at 4 o'clock on Tuesday morning. The deceased had been ill but for a few days, having been in town doing business no later since than last week. On Saturday and Monday, as our readers will remember, we acquainted them of Mr. Egleston's critical state, but it was not anticipated that death would so soon put an end to the career of so useful a citizen. Mr. Egleston was constantly attended in his last illness by his son-in-law, Dr. Richardson of Ancaster, but all the skill that could be brought to bear on the affection from which the deceased suffered was of no avail. The cause of death was rheumatism of the heart and inflammation of the lungs.

The late Mr. Egleston who has passed away at the comparatively early age of 55 was one of the oldest residents of the County. In 1841 his brother Harris came here from New York state of which the family were natives and settled in Ancaster. Deceased joined his brother in his adopted home in 1845, and for the long period of thirty-five years the brothers have been actively and extensively engaged in Commercial pursuits in the village. For many years the firm of Egleston Bros. carried on a foundry in which they manufactured carding machines, agricultural implements, etc, and also woollen mills and a grist mill built by the way on the site of the mill which was used as a prison during the American war of 1812-15. In later years Mr. Egleston assumed the sole control of the foundry and woollen mills which he carried on most successfully. Deceased also owned a couple of farms, although he never took any very active interest in agricultural matters. He entered the Council of the Township of Ancaster as 4th Deputy Reeve in 1859. In 1863, he again entered the Council as 6th Deputy Reeve and sat as such till 1866 when he was returned as Reeve, being the 4th Reeve which the village of Ancaster had, and the first Reeve elected by the popular vote. This position he was returned to year after year till 1877 when he retired. By virtue of his office, he held a seat at the Council Board for sixteen years, rendering valuable service to Wentworth. In 1861 he was elected Warden, an honour worthily bestowed and which he upheld to the satisfaction of all with whom he came in contact. He was the independent candidate for the representation of North Wentworth in the Local Legislature at the ensuing general election, and so fully did the electors of the riding appreciate his many services to the County, his enterprise, honesty, and integrity as a citizen, that there was little doubt he would have been elected and have proved a worthy representative.


The late Mr. Egleston married the second daughter of Mr. Jacob Gamble, tanner, well known to many of our readers, by whom he had two sons and three daughters. One of the former is engaged in the business. His daughters are married, one to Dr. Richardson, above referred to, and the other to Mr. B. W. Donnelly, merchant in Ancaster. His wife, one son, and three daughters survive him. We are sure that the family will have the sympathy of a wide circle of friends in their sad bereavement. The death of Mr. Egleston is a loss to the County of Wentworth which cannot easily be repaired, and it is to be regretted that a life spent so usefully and unselfishly should have so untimely an ending.

 

January 31, 1879

 

WILKES - (St. Thomas) A man named David Wilkes, an employee in the manufacturing establishment of Messrs Haggart and Cochrane of this place, suddenly dropped dead while engaged at his work yesterday afternoon. The man who had recently come from Buffalo had been in the employ of Messrs Haggart and Cochrane about one week and appeared to be in good health and spirits up to the moment of his death. An inquest was held and verdict "Died by a direct visitation of God" was returned.

 

MCMILLAN - (Brantford) Mr. W. B. McMillan died at Denver, Col., on the 22nd instant. Deceased was well known in this city, having been book-keeper for William Buck, Esq., for several years. More recently he was station master on the M.E.& T. Railway at Sedalis, Mo., but had gone to Denver for his health. He was there only three hours when he succumbed to that fatal disease, consumption. Mr. McMillan was a brother to Mrs. Prior of this city and a son-in-law of Mr. Lowes, East Ward.

 

DAY - (Burford) The sudden death of Merritt Day, merchant, has cast a gloom over the whole village, Mr. Day and his brother were thrown from a buggy some months since by the breaking of the axle. One of his legs was severely injured. He was just recovering from the injury when last Saturday he was attacked,with inflammatory rheumatism. The pain was very great, and leaving his leg attacked the region of the heart, resulting in death on Tuesday morning. Mr. Day was respected by all.

 

PHILLIPO - Died in Ancaster on the 30th instant, Mrs. Phillipo, wife of the late Charles Phillipo. Funeral from her late residence on Sunday, the 2nd instant, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

FOYSTER - Killed at Myles' Wharf, John Foyster, in the 37th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 363 James street north, on Sunday, February 2nd, at 3 o'clock p.m.


Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

A melancholy accident occurred at Myles' Wharf at half past nine o'clock this morning by which a highly respected citizen came to his death instantaneously. At the hour named, Messrs John Foyster, John Boyd, and John Brown were engaged in hoisting a large stone by means of a derrick from the pile to a wagon, the derrick occupying the same spot it did when the stone was unloaded from the schooner "Galnair" (Captain Sweet) which had brought them from Ohio for the new Baptist church in course of erection on James street south. The two men, Boyd and Brown, were working at the winch, the deceased, John Foyster, standing on the pile of stones holding the guy rope in his hands. The rope, it may be explained, is used for the purpose of guiding the derrick to the spot where it is intended to deposit the stone or other heavy substance. Boyd says that when the stone had been elevated some feet, he heard deceased cry, "Hold. Stop", and on looking round saw Foyster disappearing between the vessel and the wharf. Almost immediately afterward, the stone weighing between a ton and a half and two tons swayed against the side of the vessel, the hooks coming against the bulwarks, and the concussion causing the stone to become unloosed, when the enormous mass descended on Foyster who was lying on the ice below, a distance of ten or twelve feet, crushing the life out of him. So great was the force of the fall that a large section of the stone was broken off by the contact with the ice. Foyster's body from the shoulders down was smashed to a jelly, the lower portion of the trunk being held together by a flannel shirt which he wore. The right leg and foot were also crushed, but the left appears to have escaped injury. It is supposed that while holding the guy rope, the weight of the stone overbalanced Foyster and losing his hold he slipped on the stones and was stunned by the fall on the ice. At all events, there are marks on the stone indicating such to have been the facts. As soon as possible the hooks were again attached to the stone and the poor mangled remains of Foyster conveyed to the Hospital. The deceased was 37 years of age and resided at 363 James street north. He was a very enterprising, hard-working man, and by his industry and frugality had succeeded in accumulating a considerable amount of wealth. He leaves a wife and six young children to mourn his sudden death. He was highly respected by all who knew him and was considered one of the best business men in the city. An inquest will be held on the body this afternoon by Dr. Woolverton at Mr. Gardner's, John street.

 

February 1, 1879

 

MUNSEY - (Toronto) Mrs. Munsey, wife of the storekeeper of the Dominion Telegraph


 Company, was found dead on the sofa this morning. She was all right at breakfast and her death was terribly sudden. Munsey is in Montreal.

 

SUDWORTH - (Woodstock) Miss Sudworth who has for many years been teaching music in our town died this morning after a lingering illness of several weeks' duration. The news of her death will be received with much sorrow by her many friends and acquaintances, as she was held in the highest esteem by all.

 

MCMILLAN - The other day we announced the death of Mr. W. B. McMillan, of Brantford, which took place in Denver, Col., on the 22nd ultimo. On Wednesday the dead body of the deceased arrived at the G.W.R. station of Brantford and was taken to Mrs. Lowe's house. What followed is of a very sad character. In the afternoon between four and five o'clock, says the "Expositor", Mr, and Mrs. Prior, the sister of the deceased, and Mrs. McMillan, the mother, proceeded to the house of mourning. As they entered the room where the loving form lay dead, the mother advanced with faltering steps, assisted by Mr. Prior. The shock was too much for the mother's heart, and her mind seemed to yield, for in a meaningless way she raised her hand that had so often caressed her only son and struck the coffin, not in anger, but in an agony of sorrow. Mr. Prior feared she might unintentionai1y shatter the glass over the silent sleeper and he took her hand in his. At this moment her head sank forward and in a broken voice she addressed her son, "My son. My son, you've crossed the river before me". The voice became silent, the form drooped, and ere assistance could be summoned the two, severed a little time by death, were re-united. The deceased lady was in apparently excellent health. Dr. Philp saw her, but his aid was of no avail. As may be readily surmised, Mrs. Prior and Mrs. Hunter are nearly distracted by this double calamity. Mrs. William B. McMillan, remains in Sedalia, MP., with her little family.

 

SOUCH - Died at Brussels, on the 3rd of January, Mary Jane Souch, eldest daughter of Robert Souch, aged 23 years. Funeral from her father's residence, at 10 o'clock, Sunday a.m. at Brussels, Ontario.

 

GLASS - Died at 164 Rebecca street, on the 30th January, Mr. George Glass, Sr., in the 6lst year of his age. Funeral from his late residence on to-morrow (Sunday) at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

February 3, 1879

 

GRAHAM - About noon on Saturday, the dead body of Michael Graham whose mysterious disappearanee we have already announced was found in the Desjardins Canal about twenty feet


 from where he was supposed to have fallen in. Mr. Wesley Lee was the finder. There is now no doubt that Graham came skating down the Canal from Dundas, and getting into the hole below the ice was unable to extricate himself.

 

PADFIELD - Died at his residence, Burford, on Sunday morning, the 2nd instant, the Rev. James Padfield, in his 76th year.

 

VILA - Died in this city, on the 2nd instant, Willie, second son of Augustine and Alice Vila, aged 2 years, 4 months, and 9 days. Funeral will leave his father's residence, 255 Bay street north, on Tuesday afternoon, at 2 o'clock.

 

FARISH - Died on the 2nd instant, at her late residence, No 38 Augusta street, Miss Catherine Farish, aged 78 years, second eldest daughter of the late Francis Farish, merchant and brewer in Annan, Dumfries-shire, Scotland, who emigrated with the family to Canada in 1831. Funeral from her late residence at 3 p.m. on Wednesday, 5th instant.

 

WILLIAMSON - Died at his residence, 118 James street north, James Williamson, in the 56th year of his age. Funeral on Wednesday, the 5th instant, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

The "Spectator" of this morning announced that Mr. James Williamson, a prominent business man of this city, was in a very precarious state. Since the annoumcement, Mr. Williamson breathed his last. The deceased was a native of Scotland and removed to this city from Galt where he was a prominent business man, some years ago, entering into a general commission business in grain, wool, and other farm produce. He was the originator of the Ontario Vinegar Works, carrying on the business for some years in partnership with the late Mr. Birely. The deceased also carried on business as a wool buyer for a short tine in St. Catharines. He leaves a wife, family, and a father to mourn his death. For many years the deceased was one of the trustees of Knox Church in this city, the congregation of which will miss his services very much. His illness was of only a few days duration.

 

PALMER - Mr. Lewis Palmer of Bertie Township, one of the oldest Masons in the world, was called away at the sound of the Grand Master's gavel a few days ago, the funeral taking place with Masonic ceremonies. Mr. Palmer was in his 83rd year and had been a Mason for 61 years.

 

BETHUNE - (Toronto) Bishop Bethune died this morning at half past eleven o'clock. He succeeded the late Bishop Strachan in 1867, and was 79 years of age at the time of his death. He had been suffering for some time from erysipelas to which he finally fell a victim.

 


MUTTON - (Mitchell) On Thursday a daughter, aged eighteen, of Thomas Mutton, a well-to-do farmer of Fullarton, died under the following circumstances. On Wednesday afternoon she was seized with vomiting which continued at intervals all the evening and during the night. About one o'clock on Thursday morning, she asked her mother for some water, and shortly after drinking it, she expired. Search showed that a package of Paris green had been opened and some of it mixed in a cup. There were also traces of its having been spilled. A letter in the deceased's pocket named six young gentlemen whom she wished to be pallbearers, and closed by bidding good-bye to all. Two youths stated at the inquest that she had asked them on Sunday previous if they would carry her to the grave that week, and thinking she was joking, they laughingly answered that they would. Their names were on the list of pallbearers she left behind. The jury returned a verdict to the effect that death was the result of a dose of Paris green administered by her own hand. No possible cause is known or can be thought of for the poor girl's committing the rash act. She was good looking, intelligent, bright, and lively, and generally beloved.

 

February 4, 1879

 

WEBBER - (Toronto) A man named William Webber fell dead at the Northern Railway station to-day. He was about to return home to Davenport.

 

SELBY - (Sombra, Lambton Co.) A terrible accident occurred here a day or two ago. Charles Selby, bidding his children stay in the house, went out to shoot a bird which he wished to dress for dinner. Unfortunately his only son, a bright little youngster, four years of age, unheeding his father's command, ran out of doors. The man whose attention was centred on the fowl took steady aim and fired, when to his horror amid the echo of the discharge, he heard a child's cry. He hastened to the spot and found that while he had killed the bird, he had also slain his son. The crevices and spaces of the corner of the house are filled with straw, and the unfortunate man who is frantic with grief at the terrible mishap, could not see the boy. Sad to say, the shot scattered and some going through the straw and spaces, entered the head of the child who was on the other side of the house. The poor little fellow lingered for four hours and then died. His father swears he will never handle a gun again.

 

HULGRAVE - Died in this city, on the 4th instant, of diphtheria, George William, son of Joseph and Annie Hulgrave, aged 6 years and 3 months. Funeral from his father's residence, 148 Hughson street north, to-morrow (Wednesday) afternoon at two o'clock.


February 5, 1879

 

HARMAN - (Ottawa) A man named Harman was killed to-day in Templeton by a dynamite explosion. He was engaged at the time in moving phosphate.

 

LITCHFIELD - (Woodstock) Mr. Charles Litchfield who has long resided in our town and was for many years employed by Mr. George Bowditch, hardware merchant, died of delirium tremens last night. He had been confined in jail and was under treatment there at the time. Dr. Field, coroner, summoned a jury this forenoon and the following verdict was rendered "that the deceased, Charles Litchfield, died of delirium tremens".

 

BOMBERRY - George E. Bomberry, M.D., of the Six Nations Indian died at the residence of Dr. Bee, Tuscarora, on Wednesday last Dr. Bomberry was born near Brantford on the 6th of April, and received his education at the Mohawk Institute and the Collegiate Institute in Brantford. He studied medicine at McGill University, Montreal. He graduated in March, 1875, taking the degrees of M.D. and CM., and in June, 1878, he became a member of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario. Upon his return from Montreal in 1875, he received the government appointment of assistant physician and surgeon on the Six Nations which position he ably filled until the time of his death. By hereditary right, he was one of the first chiefs of the Cayuga Tribe of Six Nations and as such was entitled to a seat in the Council.

 

DAID - A rigger in the dockyard at Halifax named Peter Daid fainted at his work yesterday and died before reaching his home.

 

SMITH - A young man, named Charles Smith, son of Jacob Smith of New Sarum, Elgin County, was instantly killed yesterday morning by a falling tree while chopping in the woods, six miles east of St. Thomas.

 

February 6, 1879

 

WEBSTER - Died at Wentworth street north, on Wednesday, the 5th instant, George Webster, aged 73 years. Funeral from his late residence, foot of Wentworth street, to-morrow (Friday) at 2 o'clock

 

WELLS - (Woodstock) Mrs. Wells, wife of Prof. Wells of the Canadian Literary Institute, died this morning about ten o'clock. The news of her death has cast a gloom over the Institute and expressions of sorrow are heard from all who enjoyed the pleasure of her acquaintance. Her death was brought on by a paralytic stroke which she received some two or three years ago, and which


 has made her so weak that she had been totally unable to discharge the phlegm arising in her throut. The sympathies of all are extended to her bereaved husband.

 

DARBY - Mr. A. Darby's infant child at Blenheim was choked to death by swallowing a small tin box.

 

February 7, 1879

 

DENN - The death is announced of an aged minister, Rev. Mr. Denn, who was well known in this neighbourhood (Halton) and in the vicinity of Church Hill. We are informed that he was the first minister in the Congregational Church, Church Hill, about three miles from Acton. Deceased was buried in Ingersoll.

 

SPIGLER - (Ingersoll) Mr. Henry Spigler, an elderly farmer residing near here, died suddenly on Saturday morning, it is supposed, of apoplexy. He had been an active and very robust man. When he arose that morning he complained of excessive pain in his head; he was helped back to bed and expired.

 

PRICE - The death is announced of Mr. Aaron Price of Aylmer who departed this life on Tuesday last. Deceased had been ill for some time so that his death was not unexpected. He was an old resident of Aylmer.

 

O'CONNER - Died in this city, on the 6th instant, Thomas, youngest son of Thomas and Bridget O'Conner, aged 10 months and 14 days. Funeral will leave 147 Mary street north, to-morrow (Saturday) at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

SYLVESTER - Died on the 7th instant, at 91 Market street, Maria H. eldest daughter of Mr. Thomas Sylvester. Funeral will take place from her father's residence, on Sunday, the 9th instant, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this invitation.

 

FORBES - The death is announced of John M. Forbes of North Oxford aged 57. Mr. Forbes, who was a native of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, came to this country over twenty-five years ago. He was a stonemason and worked at his trade in Hamilton for two years after his arrival in Canada, after which he went to North Oxford and took up land, living there ever since. He leaves a wife and two children, a son and a daughter.

 

February 8, 1879

 

LOUNT - The sudden death from an illness which did not at all indicate a fatal termination of the wife of Mr. George Lount of Barrie is one of the sad events of the week.

 

BLACKSTONE - The death is announced of Mr. Stephen Blackstone of Monticello, Ill., who died there lately, aged 83. Deceased, who was a native of New York State, resided for a number of years on the farm on the mountain now occupied by Mr. Peter Filman. His only daughter is Mrs. Allan Smith of Ancaster.

 

MACPHERSON - Died in this city, on the 7th instant, Mrs. MacPherson, widow of the late William MacPherson, aged 59 years. Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law, Thomas Mcleod, 255 James street north, on Sunday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

DICKSON - Died of inflammatory croup, on Friday evening, 7th February, 1879, at 85 Wellington street north, James Hall, youngest son of Mr. C. Dickson, H. & N.W.R, aged 3 years and 4 months.

 

February 10, 1879

 

CORNELIUS - Died in this city, on Saturday, 8th instant, of inflammation of the lungs, Jane, beloved wife of Richard C. Cornelius, aged 34 years. The funeral will leave the residence of her late husband, on Tuesday, 11th instant,, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

MUIR - Died at 171 Park street, 4:30 p.m. Saturday, 8th instant, William Muir, aged 78. Funeral from his residence as above, 3 p.m., Monday, 10th instant. Friends will please receive this intimation.

Mr. William Muir whose death we announce this morning was one of the oldest citizens, having died at the ripe old age of 78. Born in Greenock, Scotland, in 1801, where in Kilmarnock and Glasgow he was actively engaged in business for many years, he finally followed his family to this country where he has since resided. His life here is too well known to our people to require any extended outline. He has been for many long years an honoured and respected elder in the Central Presbyterian Church, and few men in these days at his age were in such full sympathy with what was youthful and entered so largely into the spirit of what was going on around him. He had a kindly word for all, young and old, and a warm heart and an open hand to all in trouble or distress. We fail to hear of even the shadow of enmity anywhere being felt towards him. He has had the unspeakable satisfaction of seeing his family around him, all in honourable positions and able to take care of themselves. One of them, Mr. William K., is the well known railroad


 manager, and another, Thomas, is equally well known in business circles as the manager of the Ontario Oar Works at London. Fully prepared like the whole grain for the sickle, he has been garnered to the mansion above.

 

ROBINSON - Died on Monday, the 10th instant, at her residence, No 26 Hunter street east, Mary Eliza, beloved wife of Mr. John Robinson, and eldest daughter of the late Rev. John Wilkins. The deceased was the mother of Mr. A. G. Robinson of C.S.R., and Robinson Bros, stationers, the only surviving sister of D. P. W. Wilkins, B.A., and Harriet Annie Wilkins. Funeral of Friday at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

CAMPBELL - The funeral of the late Dr. D. Campbell, of Toronto, took place on Saturday afternoon with Masonic honours. Dr. Vernon of this city was one of the pall bearers. The body was deposited in the vault of the cemetery and will be removed to Niagara in the spring for interment.

 

VESEINA - Charles Veseina, a labourer, aged 66, died suddenly in his chair on Friday morning at Lange Gardien of County of Montmorency.

 

RICHARDSON - Mrs. Col. Richardson died at Battleford on the 2nd instant.

 

MALLAN (Iroquois) A few days ago a young man named Mallan while feeding a bull in the barn of John Glover was knocked down by the animal and gored so badly that he died from the injuries this morning.

 

CONNORS - An old Brantford boy, named James Connors, moulder, son of Mr. Andrew Connors, died in Paris on Tuesday last of inflammation of the lungs. His remains were brought to Brantford for interment and followed by a large number of sorrowing friends and relatives.

 

HASKETT - Mr. Thomas Haskett of Thedford was married about a year ago. About a month ago death claimed him for its own. His life was insured, and when the insurance officers came to pay the insurance to his wife, they found that she was dead also. Only a few days intervened between their deaths. Consumption is said to have been the cause.

 

February 11, 1879

 

LAVELL - Died in this city, on the 10th instant, Charles Lavell, son of Victoria and John Lavell aged 5 years and 1 month. Funeral took place from his father's residence, 51 Wilson street, this afternoon.


BRIDGEWOOD - Died in this city, on the 10th instant, William James, eldest son of James and Mary Bridgewood, aged 5 years and 4 months. The funeral will leave his grandfather's residence, No 20 Jackson street east, on Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock

 

February 12, 1879

 

WHEELER - Died in this city, on the 11th instant, Annie Wheeler, daughter of Henry and Ann Wheeler, in the 18th year of her age. Funeral on Thursday, at 3 p.m., from the residence of her father, Macaulay street near Mary.

 

AUCLAIR - (Montreal) The coroner's jury in the case of Olivine Auclair brought in a verdict that she died from the excessive use of spirits.

 

HULLWORTH - A man was found dead about a mile west of Lambeth, Westminster, this morning on the farm of Mr. Joseph Poole, some ten rods from the road. The body proved to be that of a German music teacher named Hullworth who was well known in the locality.

 

BOYLE - (Chatham) Thomas Boyle, Esq., a native of Wexford, Ireland, and father of Mother Angela of the Ursuline Convent, died at that institution on Saturday, and was buried in Maple Leaf cemetery, his body being followed to its long rest by a large number of citizens. The deceased gentleman was over 86 years of age.

 

LAND - A Grimsby correspondent gives particulars of the sudden death of John Land, a labourer residing on the townline between Grimsby and Saltfleet. Deceased, who was 60 years of age, came into the city on Saturday last in a sleigh driven by Mr. Robert Watt. At half past four the couple left for home, Land being slightly the worse of liquor. Refreshments were partaken of in two places, Albion being the last place where drink was got. On arrival at Land's house, it was found that he was dead. Land leaves a wife and large family.

 

February 13 1879

 

MCKENNA - Died in this city, on Wednesday, the 12th instant, William Allan, youngest son of John and Annie McKenna, aged 1 year, 10 months, and 6 days. The funeral will take place to-morrow (Thursday) at 3:30 p.m. from the residence of his parents, No 37 King William street. Friends will kindly accept this intimation and attend without further notice.

 

RIACH - Died on the 13th instant, Emma Riach, widow of the late Alexander Riach, aged 50 years. Funeral on Saturday, 15th instant, from her late residence, No 43 Cherry street. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


DAVIS - Died in this city, on the 13th instant, Jane, beloved wife of Mr. William Davis, and mother of the late Mrs. Jane Cornelius, long a resident of Hamilton, aged 63 years. Funeral at 3 o'clock on Sunday, 16th instant, from the residence of her son-in-law, corner of Chisholm and Cannon streets. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

BEDFORD - (St. John, N.L.) News was received here last night of the drowning of William Bedford of Carleton, Ontario, of the crew of the brigantine "Mary A. Kershaw" of this port. During the passage from Newport, G.B., to Guadaloupe while the vessel was in Bristol Channel on the 13th December, Bedford fell overboard. All that was possible was done to save him, but it being dark and the wind blowing fiercely, every effort proved unavailing. He leaves a widowed mother and a brother to mourn his sudden taking off.

 

FARRELL - (Ingersoll) The youngest daughter of Mr. John Farrell died Monday morning, aged 4 months.

 

ANDERSON - A man named Anderson was crushed to death yesterday at Levis by the fall of an avalanche from the cliff.

 

February 14, 1879

 

NICOL - Died in Beverly, on the 1st instant, Thomas Nicol, aged 84 years, 3 months, and 28 days.

 

February 15, 1879

 

GATES - Died on the 13th instant, Beatrice Emily, youngest daughter of Frederick W. Gates, aged 10 years and 8 months.

 

WHEELER - Died on the 14th instant, Henry Wheeler, a native of Walworth, London. England, aged 49 years. Funeral tomorrow (Saturday) at 3 p.m., from his late residence, Macaulay street near Mary. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

ARMSTRONG - Thomas Armstrong, one of the oldest citizens of Springfield, passed away last week from the effects of old age, being about 90. He and his wife, who is still alive and hearty, enjoyed matrimonial life for 70 years.

 

HOWELL - An Ancaster correspondent send the intelligence of the death of Mr. Moses H. Howell, one of the pioneers of that township. For the long period of seventy-seven years, he had lived in Ancaster, having settled there with his parents who came from New Jersey about twenty-six years after the revolutionary war. He was one of the first deputy-reeves of the township when it belonged to the Gore District, and was a consistent member of the Methodist church. There was a large attendance of his friends at the funeral, and Rev. John Robbins preached an impressive funeral sermon.

 

DIAMOND - The notorious Rose Diamond who has figured so frequently for the past dozen years or more before the Police Court, was found dead in a house on Hess street on Friday, the cause being probably exposure and drink.

 

DARLING - Died on the 9th instant, at the residence of her son, T. H. Darling, Esq., Hill View, Oneida, Agnes Terry, relict of the late John Darling, Esq., and daughter of the late Col. Terry, M.P., in the 80th year of her age.

 

February 17, 1879

 

DAVIS, SMITH - Mrs. Davis, residing in East Zorra, died on the 12th instant, at the advanced age of 91 years. Her sister, a Mrs. Smith, 85 years of age, also of East Zorra, hearing of her death, was so overwhelmed with grief that she herself expired a few hours afterward. The sad event shows the great affection that existed between the two sisters, both of whom were highly respected in the neighbourhood. They were buried together at Innerkip yesterday.

 

FORREST - (Woodstock) Mr. John Forrest, Sr., died during last night at the advanced age of 77 years. Deceased was a native of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, but he had been living here for many years, and has made for himself a host of friends. His death is universally regretted.

 

COSTELLO - (Guelph) On Thursday, at his residence 144 Northumberland street, died Michael Costello after 62 years of useful and upright life. He was a native of the County of Clare, Ireland, and had been a resident of Guelph for about twenty-five years. He was universally respected.

 

SHARP - Died at 42 Cherry street, on the.17th instant, Elizabeth, daughter of William and Elizabeth Sharp, aged 2 years and 6 months. Funeral to-morrow (Tuesday) at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

STAINES - (Montreal) Conductor Staines of the G.T.R. died suddenly here while conversing with his wife.

 

February 18, 1879

 

OUELETTE - (Montreal) It is reported here that a beggar named Joseph Ouelette from this city was murdered on the railway track near St. Scholastique by a man who has been arrested. Robbery is said to be the object of the murder, deceased having been seen changing some money before setting out for town.

 

MACDONALD, MCALDUFF, MCLENNAN - (Halifax) Despite all efforts the contrary smallpox continues spreading at Alberton, P.E.I. and residents of that place are much alarmed for

fear the infection may become general. On Friday week a child of Allan Macdonald died from a cause which was at the time of death unknown to the child's parents and also to the physician. On Friday night between forty and fifty persons assembled at Macdonald's house to attend the child's wake. Late in the night they were horror stricken to discover that the deceased came to its death by smallpox. On the same night Mr. Macdonald contracted the disease and died on Monday morning. The deaths of Mr. McAlduff and Neil Mclennan, who had also attended the wake, were reported yesterday. Young McLennan fell sick at his father's house and was removed to Macdonald's house where ten patients are now lying sick of the contagious disease. Macdonald's house is very small and the patients are huddled together in an apartment of fifteen by twenty-two feet capacity.

 

CYRE - Christopher Cyre and his wife, two of the oldest inhabitants of Madawaska, aged 90 and 86 years respectively, died recently within thirty-six hours of each other after a married life of sixty-two years. They were buried in one grave.

 

YATES - It is reported that Mr. Yates, late of the firm of Yates and Carson, builders of this city, who mysteriously disappeared some years ago, died a short time since in Liverpool, England.

 

DIAMOND - The adjourned inquest on the body of the late Rose Diamond took place last night in the James Street Police Station before Coroner Woolverton.

John Myles, a carter, swore that he had on Saturday moved the deceased from Spring street to the house of a coloured man named Middleton, residing in Stinson's block "Swamp poodle " and that on Tuesday following meeting her on the corner of Walnut and King streets, he and a man named John Campbell had accompanied her to Benjamin Bradfield's, 120 Cannon street.

Henry Middleton testified that the deceased had remained at his place on Sunday night after her things were brought to her house.

Benjamin Bradfield testified that deceased was the wife of a man named Henry Barker of Toronto, and that she had gone to his place on Tuesday evening last and remained there, being apparently quite well. She slept on a bed made up on a box and some chairs. On Thursday morning between 7 and 8 o'clock when he went home he found her still at his house and asked her to leave, when she turned over but did not speak. He then told a policeman between 11 and 12 the same morning that she was dead. P.O. Griggs said that when he went to Bradfield house about 11 o'clock he found the woman dead and cold.


Drs. Shaw and Griffin who made the post mortem examination gave it as their opinion that the cause of death was an organized clot of blood in the heart, superinduced probably for want of nourishment and perhaps alcoholic poison. The jury after a short deliberation returned a verdict of death from natural causes.

 

February 19, 1879

 

KERSHAW - Died on the 17th instant, Annie, second daughter of Thomas Kershaw, of the G.W.R., London East, aged 17 years and 2 months. Funeral on Thursday morning from the G.W.R. station on the arrival of the 11:25 express from the west.

 

MCGREGOR - Yesterday afternoon, a maiden lady, between thirty and forty years of age, named Miss McGregor, residing on Ferguson avenue, between Rebecca and King William street, was found dead in her bed by a neighbour woman named Mrs. Potter. The deceased was a seamstress and until the fell disease consumption sized her, managed to secure a respectable living, A year or two since her strength failed fast, when the Ladies Aid Society of MacNab Street Presbyterian Church (Rev. Mr. Fletcher) took her case in hand, purchased her a sewing machine, and provided other comforts. For the past six months she has not been attended by a physician, her case, being considered hopeless. The ladies continued to aid her in every way. When Mrs. Potter went into the house yesterday to see how she was getting along, she found her cold and stiff in death, the poor creature having breathed her last without the presence of a single friend or relative. The deceased has two sisters residing in Wallaceburg.

 

RAYMER - (Woodstock) A very sad event occurred in town yesterday. Mrs. Raymer, who resided near the east-end school, had arisen in the morning and gone about her work as usual. After breakfast one of her sons went out about 9 o'clock to go to school, leaving his mother apparently quite well, and no one entered the house till past half past ten, when Mrs. Raymer was found lying on the floor in an insensible condition, having fallen in an apoplectic fit. She was immediately placed on a bed and a physician sent for, but every effort to save her proved unavailing, and she died in a few hours afterward. Her bereaved children have the sympathy of all. It is a strange coincidence that her husband died in a very similar manner some years ago.

 

February 20, 1879

 

WEATHERSTON - Died in this city, on the 19th instant, James Patterson, eldest son of James and Agnes Weatherston, aged 8 years, 1 month, and 16 days. Funeral will leave his father's residence, No 6 Kinnell street, this afternoon, 20th instant, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.


BATTY - Died on the 19th instant, at 104 Simcoe street east, Daniel Fraser, third son of Robert and Elizabeth Ann Batty, aged 11 years and 6 months. Funeral on Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

DESJARDINS - The late Madame Desjardins, wife of Mr. Desjardins, M.P., editor of "Nouveau Monde", was buried to-day. The Roman Catholic bishop officiated at the funeral, and an immense concourse of citizens attended. (Montreal)

 

PROVENCHER - A child belonging to a man named Provencher of Rockland Quarry in this province was burned to death during the absence of its parents from the house. (Montreal)

 

February 21. 1879

 

GAGE - Died on the 20th instant, at Ryckman's Corners, Elizabeth Huffman, wife of John Gage, in her 75th year. Funeral from her late residence, on Saturday, 22nd instant, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

SCATHERD - (London) Mr. R. S. Scatherd died at his residence in Strathroy this morning from a stroke of apoplexy. Deceased was born in this city in November, 1832, and was educated at the old grammar school here. He studied law with his brother, the late Thomas Scatherd, and removed to Strathroy in 1862, where he had practised his profession. He married a daughter of Mr. James Oliver, Sr., of this city who together with four children survive him. Mr. Scatherd had filled the highest municipal offices at Strathroy, and in 1874 was elected to represent North Middlesex in the House of Commons, being defeated at the last election by Mr. Coughlin. He was a very genial and pleasant gentleman and had hosts of personal friends of all shades of politics.

 

BOYLE, MCCANN - (St. Andrew's. N.B.) During the winter, the inmates of the Alma House have been suffering from a sort of influenza. Last Friday an old women named Mrs. Boyle, aged 85 years, died of the complaint. Since then three more old women have succumbed to the same distemper, aged respectively 80, 85, and 80. There are a few more inmates suffering with the same epidemic. Ross McCann, aged about 87, an inmate of Alma House has also succumbed to the epidemic last night. A few more are sick.

 

ELLIS - During the last illness of Mr. George Ellis of Clifton, who died Saturday, his hostler, an Englishman named William Ralley, was very attentive in caring for the sick man. Mr. Ellis's funeral was held Monday, and when the relatives and friends left the house, Rally remained in charge of the premises. During the absence of the funeral party, Ellis's quondam nurse proceeded coolly to dress himself in the dead man's best suit of clothes, including an overcoat,


drew on a pair of his boots, appropriated a gold watch and chain, a silver watch and chain, an amethyst ring, a set of studs, a meerschaum pipe, meerschaum cigar holder and twenty-five dollars in money. Having secured the money, Ralley left the house, crossed the river, came to Niagara Fails, ate his supper at Hamilton's restaurant, drank a glass of ale at Western Hotel, and left for parts unknown.

 

February 22, 1879

 

SCHWARTZ - Died at the residence of her father, No 91 Jackson street west, Emma Leonora, only daughter of John and Margaret Schwartz, aged 1 year and 5 months. Funeral will take place on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please take notice.

 

SHANNAHAN - Mr. Thomas Shannahan of Medonte died on Monday after an illness of three months at the age of 66 years. The deceased gentleman was one of the pioneers of this county having been a resident of it over forty years.

 

MCCONKEY - The death is announced of Mr. James McConkey of the 7th concession of Innisfil. He was returning home from a visit and expired suddenly on the way. Deceased, who was a brother of Sheriff McConkey, was in his 67th year.

 

GRANT - (Barrie) Wednesday an inquest was held in the jail before Dr. Watson, coroner, on the body of Alexander Grant, 50 years of age, who had been committed to jail as a vagrant, on the 19th instant by Mr. R. Leadley, J.P., of Vespra. Verdict: death from natural causes.

 

PHELAN - (Eastwood) Mrs. Phelan, an old settler in this village, died very suddenly on Wednesday last. It appears that her nephew who was living with her was away on business for a few days, and on Tuesday, the neighbours not seeing anyone moving about the place, looked in at the windows and were horrified at beholding the old lady stretched on the floor. On entering they found her quite unconscious, in which condition she remained until she died. She was 80 years of age and settled in Eastwood over fifty years ago before there was a house in Woodstock.

 

CAMPBELL - Colonel A. Campbell, the uncle of Dr. Robertson of Milton and brother of Mrs. McIntyre of Kincardine, died recently at his residence in Scotland at the advanced age of 89 years, being born on the 26th of May, 1790.

 

SCOTT - Old Mrs. Scott of Blenheim died and was buried last week at Chesterfield. She was one of the oldest settlers in this township and came from Roxboroughshire, Scotland, over forty years since. Aged 89 years.


MITCHELL - (Bright) Mr. William Mitchell, farmer of Wilmot, died suddenly on Saturday, the 15th instant. He had been complaining a few days previously, yet nothing serious was apprehended. On the day of his demise he looked at himself in the looking-glass and remarked as he looked well, he had no doubt but that he would be all right in a day or two. He then sat down in his chair and expired immediately.

 

KING - An old man by the name of King died very suddenly last Wednesday morning in North Chatham.

 

LAMBERT - Died in this city, on the 21st instant, James William, beloved son of Charles and Maggie Lambert, aged 16 months. Funeral will leave his parents' residence, 19 Locomotive street, at 2 p.m. to-morrow, Sunday. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

February 24. 1879

 

HOPE - Died at 61 Hunter street west, on the morning of the 23rd instant, Catherine Lucy, wife of Robert Knight Hope. The funeral of Mrs. R. K. Hope will take place to-morrow afternoon from her late residence, No 61 Hunter street west, at 3 o'clock.

 

CRAIGIE - Died on the 23rd instant, at his residence, mountain top, Barton, in the 48th year of his age, Andrew Craigie, son of the late Dr. Craigie of this city. Funeral on Tuesday, 25th instant, at 2 p.m., from his late residence.

 

MCFEGGAN - Mr. Bryce McFeggan, father of P.C. McFeggan, whose illness was announced in the "Spectator" on Saturday, died yesterday. The deceased came to this country from Galloway, Scotland', in 1852, settling first in the Township of Ancaster removing from thence to Beverly, and finally settling in Glanford where he resided for the past nineteen years. The deceased leaves five children, three of whom are married, to mourn his loss. The immediate cause of death was congestion of the lungs.

 

February 25, 1879

 

CHAMBERS - Died at St. Thomas, on Saturday, 23rd, Mary Ann, beloved wife of William Chambers, G.W.R., aged 54 years and 1 month.

 

BRYDEN - (Toronto) John Bryden of St. Thomas, a student at Knox College, died suddenly yesterday. His remains were take to St. Thomas.

 

MCKEE - The Township of Wellesley lost one of its oldest inhabitants in the death of Mrs. Ellen McKee, mother of Mr. John McKee, aged 82 years.


MONKMAN - (Woodstock) A most distressing affair took place in town this evening about six o'clock. A family by the name of Monknan had just moved to a house on Finkle street near where the river crosses it, and a little daughter of Mr. Monkman, four years of age, was wanting all day to run around and see the objects of interest in the neighbourhood, and towards evening she was permitted by ber mother to do so. On going out, she made her way over a fence and across the road towards the river till she came to a hole made in the ice for watering cattle, into which she fell, and was drawn by the current under the ice. An alarm was soon raised, and a number of men turned out to look for the child. The river was dragged for about 150 yards when they were successful in recovering the body of the child which had been in the water for about two hours and a half.

 

ANDRICH - On Saturday, John Andrich, hotel keeper, Little Germany, died of injuries sustained on 7th of August last by the fall of the frame of the new Catholic church there. Deceased was 35 years of age and leaves a widow and one child.

 

ECKSTEIN - Mr. Christian Eckstein, an old man of Waterloo County, was found dead in his bed in Berlin, Saturday morning. He went to bed last night apparently as well as usual and no noise or anything else was heard in his room.

 

HOLDEN - Died on the 25th instant, at his late residence, 143 James Street, J. H. Holden, Esq., barrister in bis 55th year.

We regret to hear of the death of John Rose Holden, an old and respected citizen of Hamilton, which sad event took place today after a brief illness. Deceased, who was an Englishman by birth and a member of a family which has made its mark in his native land, was the son of an English rector who was was possessed of a rich living. John Rose, while still very young, came to Canada and studied law under the late Judge Campbell of Niagara. On being called to the Bar, he entered into partnership with the late R. C. Duggan of this city, and the co-partnership resulted in a very lucrative practice. For many year he was an alderman of the city, and when the great Boston Jubilee was held at which Lord Elgin represented England, Mayor Holden was the representative from Hamilton. Ever since his advent into the city, Mr. Holden has been an active and leading member of our charitable and municipal bodies. For a long time he has taken a great interest in the Mechanics' Institute, and at the time of his death was president of the valuable institution. Of fine physique and scarcely past the prime of life, being only in his 55th year, there was reason to hope that he would long be spared to exercise his powers for good in the community.


He was a man of a stamp which we can ill afford to spare and his death will be universally lamented by our citizens. The sorrowing widow and family will have the sympathy of the community.

 

O'MARA - Intelligence has been received of the death in Newark, N.J., of Mr. John O'Mara, at one time a resident of this city. Since the time of his settling in Jersey City, the deceased gentleman had been unusually successful in business, and at the time of his demise was very popular with his fellow townsmen and held several positions of public interest. His many friends in this city will regret to hear of his death.

 

February 26, 1879

 

MCCREADY - Died in this city, on the 25th instant, Mr. James McCready, aged 60 years. Funeral will take place from his late residence, No 52 Caroline street south, at 10:30 for the G.W.R. station. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

FORRESTER - Died in this city, on Wednesday morning, Andrew Forrester, aged 11 months, son of Andrew and Jane Forrester. Funeral will leave the residence of his father, 66 Caroline street south, on Thursday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends are requested to attend.

 

DATH - Died in this city, on the 23th of February, Margaret Dath, aged 85 years, a native of the parish of Kiltegan, County of Wicklow, Ireland, a citizen of Hamilton for 33 years. The funeral will leave her late residence, 131 Napier street, on Thursday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

PAXMAN - (London) Early this morning a young printer named Paxman died from the effects of an apoplectic fit which he took last evening in an outbuilding of the "Advertiser" office. He was found there insensible by one of the hands and conveyed to his lodgings in a cab.

 

CHAPMAN - It is sad to have to record the death of one of Ingersoll's oldest and, when well, most useful inhabitants in the person of John M. Chapman, at the advanced age of 71 years. Deceased came from Leicestershire, England, about the year 1833 and laboured diligently in the new country. He assisted greatly in the building up of the town. When yet in its infancy, he entered into the dairy business, and by strict attention to business, he succeeded in amassing for himself considerable property. About five years ago, he sold out his business to Mr. John Gayfer, and retired. He leaves one child and several brothers, as well as a large circle of friends to mourn his loss.


February 27, 1879

 

CRIPPS - Died in this city, on the 26th instant, Thomas Cripps, son of Charles and Charlotte Cripps. Funeral will leave the residence of his father, 52 Stephen street, on the 27th instant, at 2 o'clock p.m.

 

STEPHENS - William Stephens, the labourer who met with an accident a few days since on the Lachine Canal, died from the effect of his injuries to-day.

 

FLETCHER - (Galt) Last night about half past ten, Mr. Charles Fletcher, about 50 years of age, baggage master and watchman at the Grand Trunk station here, was found dead sitting in one of the cars. He had helped to turn the engine just a few minutes before, and had gone to the car to put out the lights, when Conductor Huskin's father, on going past shortly after, saw him and went in. He was dead then. Coroner Philips held an inquest this morning and rendered a verdict of heart disease.

 

ORR - We are sorry to announce the death to-day of Marilla Orr, wife of Mr. J. L. Orr, of Woodstock, who died very suddenly Monday afternoon. She had been ailing for some time of consumption, but on Monday morning was up and apparently much better, but took a relapse and died before evening.

 

ROBERTS - Thomas Roberts, of Rodney street, Carleton, N.B., dropped dead in his home Wednesday afternoon. Although a man of 76 years, he was quite active.

 

February 28, 1879

 

DYGERT - Died at Ingersoll, 25th instant, Isaac Dygert, aged 73 years.

 

HOPKINS - Died in Bowmanville, 20th instant, Mrs. Hopkins, mother of Benjamin Hopkins, esq., reeve of Dereham, aged 90 years.

 

BROWN - (London) Mr. A. C. Brown, a noted dry goods merchant of Aylmer, and formerly a well known resident here, has come to a terrible end, much to the sorrow of all who knew him. Some time ago he began to develop symptoms of mental derangement which increased with such rapidity and violence that he had to be removed to the Lunatic Asylum. Having injured himself seriously when left alone, he was removed to the refractory ward where he died this morning. He leaves a wife and four children in Aylmer. Deceased was a prominent member of the Baptist church.


ARNOLD - (Chatham) Miss Nancy Arnold, aged 44, who was visiting her relative, A. D. Arnold, near Louisville on the river Thames, was found dead in her bed this morning. Deceased was in good health and spirits last night at ten o'clock, the time she retired. Dr. Bray, coroner, assisted by Dr. Murphy, who made the post mortem, held an inquest upon the remains this afternoon. Verdict: died of heart disease.

 

TWOMEY - (Galt) James Twomey, employed as a sawyer at Gilholme & Hogg saw mill in this town, was accidentally killed this afternoon while attending to his duties. His feet by some means slipped when on the large circular saw, and falling, the saw caught him on the back of the head and almost severed it. Death ensued nearly instantly. Deceased was a married man, and leaves a wife and four young children.

 

CLEMENT - (Northfield) Mr. Edward Clement, who was kicked some weeks ago by a horse, was buried on Tuesday last.

 

March 1, 1879

 

DIXON - Died at St. Thomas, on the 25th February, Sarah, the beloved wife of Braithwaite Dixon, G.W.R., aged 34 years and 12 days.

 

BRUNET - Died in St. Thomas, on the 24th February, Fredericka, wife of Rudolph Brunet, in the 55th year of her age.

 

APPLEBY - Died at her residence, Oakville, February 24th, after a short and painful illness, Mrs. Elizabeth Appleby, aged 56 years.

 

FINLAYSON - Died at Walsingham Centre, on the evening of the 25th ultimo, Elizabeth Gale Finlayson, wife of H. M. Finlayson, and second daughter of the late Captain Bray, H.M.R.N.

 

FLITCROFT - Died in this city, on the 27th ultimo, Thomas Flitcroft, aged 58 years. Funeral from 25 York street, on Sunday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

PAULY - Died in this city, on the 1st instant, Mary, wife of Joseph Pauly, aged 38 years and 2 months. Funeral from her husband's residence, No 328 Hughson street north, to-morrow, Sunday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

March 3, 1879

 

ROBERTSON - (Montreal), Mrs. Robertson, of Halfern street, died very suddenly this morning. She had not been complaining of illness.


CARLING - (London) Mr. William Carling of the firm of Carling & Co., brewers, died this afternoon of inflammation of the lungs contracted at the late fire which destroyed the brewery. He was the elder brother of the Hon. John Carling, M.P. for this city, and the active superintendent of the works. He was a native of this city and lived here all his life. Though taking no part in public affairs, deceased was widely known and esteemed for his hearty and genial qualities and business abilities. He was a bachelor and aged about 53 years.

 

JONES - (St. Catharines) Mr. Stephen Jones, an old resident, died this morning. Deceased at one time carried on business here as a wagon-maker.

 

ORR - Mr. Thomas Orr, an old resident of the Township of Westminster, died on Tuesday morning last at the advanced age of 98 years.

 

EMIGH - Jonathan Emigh, one of the oldest residents of North Norwich, died this week at the ripe age of 88.

 

STEPHENSON - (Niagara) The death is announced of Mme Stephenson at the ripe old age of 86.. She was the widow of a military officer who had served with distinction in the British army. Her daughter was also the consort of a military officer who had served with distinction and was favourably known in military circles. He was known as Allison and was the father of three amiable children: John, Victorine, and Effie. The deceased lady was leader of the Catholic choir in this town for many years. Her funeral was honoured by the notables of of the town - Mayor and Councilmen. The obsequies were performed by the worthy pastor, Rev. Father Gallagher, assisted by Rev. Father Hobin, St. Catharines. At the close of the service Rev. Father Hobin pronounced a fitting panegyric.

 

March 4, 1879

 

STEWART - Died at her father's residence, 122 John street north, Laura Ellen, youngest daughter of Charles Stewart, Esq., aged 6 years and 2 months. Funeral to-morrow, Wednesday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends will kindly accent this intimation.

 

CRIST - Died in this city, on the 4th instant, of scarlet fever, Harry, only son of Simon and Amanda Crist, aged 2 years and 6 months. Funeral from his father's residence, 202 Hughson street north, on Wednesday morning, at 9:30 o'clock. Relatives and friends will please attend.


ALDRIDGE - Died in the village of Caledonia, on Sunday, the 2nd instant, Harry, youngest son of James Aldridge, Esq., aged 26 years and 14 days.

 

MCFARLANE - On Thursday evening, Mr. John McFarlane, living near Morriston, died of paralysis of the brain.

 

BROCKNEY - Charles Brockney, a Frenchman, was frozen to death at La Orange Mills, near Frelightburg.

 

ARPIN - (Montreal) Adelaide Arpin, a prisoner in the jail, died suddenly of heart disease.

 

CASSIN - (Morriston) A young man named Hugh Cassin, aged 24, son of Hugh Cassin deceased, while chopping on the Halligan Farm near Aberfoyle, was accidentally killed this afternoon by the falling on him of a tree which first lodged, then swung round and struck him on the head, killing him instantly.

 

FROST - (Ottawa) Information has been received in the city of a supposed murder on the Black River at a point some distance from its junction with the Grand River. The story as told by the teamsters arriving from Pembroke is to the effect that a man named Frost, well known on the river as a pretty hard character and a big powerful man at that, gave a companion, a Frenchman, a most unmerciful beating in one of the wayside stopping places. Just when the ruffian had finished his evidently congenial task, a brother of the beaten man happened to come in. He too was assaulted. Being small in size and likely to get the worst of it in a few minutes, the Frenchman drew a revolver and fired three shots in succession at Frost. The bullets took effect and Frost died in a very short time. That is the story as told by teamsters from the shanties of Pembroke.

 

CAMERON - (Ottawa) Dr. C. A. Cameron, for some years past pastor of New Edinburgh Presbyterian Church, died to-day after an illness extending over a number of months. At the time of his death, he was 43 years of age. He was a native of Kingussie, Scotland, and chose the ministry for his life work. The best part of his years he expended in missionary labours in India and Australia. Deceased was a man of cultivated tastes and quite gifted as a poet.

 

March 5, 1879

 

BOVIL - (Ottawa) The inquest on the body of the woman, Eliza Bovil, who was beaten by her husband last week, was resumed this morning. The prisoner, her husband, was present, and on being shown the corpse was very much moved. The jury brought in a verdict that deceased came to her death from the effects of injuries feloniously inflicted by Thomas Bovil.


FOURNIER - (Ottawa) Madame Fournier, wife of Justice Fournier of the Supreme Court, died to-day. She had been suffering for several months with bronchitis.

 

GRAHAM - (Ottawa) Alexander Graham, a clerk in the Inland Revenue office, died this evening suddenly while eating his dinner.

 

O'CONNOR - Smallpox has broken out at Weston in the house of a farmer named O'Connor. One daughter was buried on Monday, and shortly after a brother, who had also been affected by the disease, succumbed and was laid in the same grave. The mother and another daughter are all unwell, but the doctors are as yet unable to say whether they are suffering from the smallpox or not.

 

MCDONALD - A young woman named McDonald, charged with infanticide at Little Glace Bay, C.B., has been committed for trial and is now in jail at Sydney. She denies all knowledge of the birth or death of the child.

 

CRUIKSHANK - Rachael Cruikshank of Trenton, Ontario, committed suicide in her sister's house at Montreal by taking Paris green. She left a letter accusing a young man who was keeping company with her of inveigling her into a house of ill fame and seducing her under promise of marriage.

 

DURYEAU - (Windsor) Yesterday morning news was received here that a terrible calamity befell a family at Sandwich West, seven miles down the river, at a late hour on Saturday night, by which a girl of 15 or 16 and her brother, a lad of 7, lost their lives. About 11 o'clock, Saturday night, Simon Duryeau was awakened by the smell of smoke and unusual heat in the house. Pushing open his chamber door which was on the lower floor of the house, he discovered the whole rear portion of his dwelling was in flames and that the staircase leading to the second storey where his little son and daughter were sleeping had already fallen a prey to the flames. Mr. Duryeau had barely time to arouse his wife and get her out of the burning building when he heard the agonizing screams of his daughter, and the next moment the roof fell in and the son and daughter were buried in the blazing ruins. The neighbours and country people for some distance hurried to the scene but too late to be of service. The loss of the house and furniture was but little compared with the lives of the two children who awoke from a peaceful sleep only to meet a death too horrible to contemplate. The details of the horrible affair are very meager, but it is thought that the dwelling caught fire from an ash barrel at the rear.

 

ROBB - Died In this city, March 4th, Earnest Lewis, youngest son of Andrew and Catherine Robb, aged 3 years and 8 months. The funeral will take place on Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock from his father's residence, 59 Robinson street. Friends will please accept this intimation.


March 6, 1879

 

WILKENS - Died Hannon Wilkens, son of H. A. Wilkens, sculptor, at his father's residence, 45 Park street north. Requiem mass will be said at half past seven a.m., Friday, 7th instant, at St. Mary's Cathedral, whence the remains will be taken to London.

 

MCGUIRE - Died on the 5th instant, at Mr. D. Barry's residence, corner of John and Hunter streets, Barney McGuire, in his 57th year. Funeral will take place this Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock from the above address. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

TURNER - (Tillsonburg) We regret very much to announce the death of our esteemed friend, Mr. Samuel A. Turner, grocer, He was one of the leading business men of the town.

 

DARLING - The late Mrs. Agnes Terry, relict of the late John Darling, and daughter of the late Marshall Terry, M.P. for Scarborough, whose death we recorded a short time since, at the advanced age of 80 years, was born and spent her life at Scarborough Heights on the Don River, near Toronto, which she knew for many years as "Muddy York" and a mere village. She had visited Hamilton when its best buildings were only a few wooden structures. She remembered the old town of Niagara in its palmiest days as her brother, Dr. Terry, then a member of the Government, resided there. Of a family of ten children four sons and two daughters survive her.

 

REGAN, RODGERS - (Montreal) A terrible calamity occurred here at a late hour last night. Shortly after midnight a fire was discovered in the Grand Trunk Railway Company's building adjoining the crossing on Wellington street. In a short time the structure was in flames. At the time of the fire there were in the building James Regan, clerk, and Robert Rodgers, checker. Alexander Towngey, an employee who was outside, heard the cry of fire, rushed in through the smoke, and informed Rodgers. Believing Rodgers had rushed past him, he left the building to save his own life and never thought of anyone else being in the building. It is said by many that Rodgers came out safe. No one, however, could be found who was positive. The theory is that Rodgers came out and then suddenly thought of Regan, the night clerk, and ran back to save him. There is a door at the eastern end of the building used as an entrance, and at the other a door securely locked, barred, and bolted. In this end of the building, Regan was at work, and when he and his companion, Rodgers, turned to escape they found themselves caged in and the fire swooping towards them through the large opening in the partition, rendering retreat impossible


save through some of the windows. It could not have taken many moments to accomplish what they attempted as both were strong vigorous men, Rodgers in the full prime of life and Regan a hale, hearty Scotchman about 60 years old. They smashed the inner window window into fragments with their bare hands and broke two panes of glass in the double window, the fastenings of which were also partially loosened. A minute later, they would have escaped but it was not to be. As they fought and struggled, the flames rose with increased fierceness. The smoke augmented in volumes. Soon they sank overpowered by the flames no more to rise alive. The firemen arrived and set to work, but none thought of the poor fellows inside. None had the slightest suspicion that anyone was in the building. After a short struggle, the flames were got under control and soon were extinguished. Still no one seemed to be aware that death so terrible and sudden had visited the scene. In looking through the building for the cause of the fire, the firemen discovered the awful spectacle of two charred bodies which a few minutes before had been struggling so desperately for dear life. The bodies presented a sickening spectacle and presented traces of efforts made to save themselves. Each right hand had flesh cut away from it by the window sash and the skin pulled from their faces as they thrust them through the window for a breath of air and features twisted in agonized contortions; their clothing was burned and charred particularly at the back, but the features were easily recognized. Regan leaves a wife and four children. He had been in the service of the Grand Trunk Railway for years, much respected. Rodgers was a native of Ireland. The building destroyed was merely an old shed and will be very little loss to the company.

 

March 6, 1879

 

BARRINGER - Died at 47 Cherry street, on the 6th instant, Mr. William Barringer, compositor, in the 33rd year of his age. Funeral will leave the above residence, on Saturday, 8th instant, at 4 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will kindly accept this intimation.

 

DYMENT - (Lynden) Mrs. Dyment, wife of the late John Dyment, died on the 3rd instant.

 

HOLLAND - (Toronto) Eliza Holland, between seven and eight years of age, was returning from school this afternoon with her sister when in crossing Yonge street a street car knocked her down. She was picked up insensible and died ten minutes afterwards.

 

MCDERMID - (London) The wife of D. A. McDermid, and sister-in-law of Rev. R. W. Wallace, of the Congregational Church, died suddenly this morning.


MORRISON - Mrs. A. J. Morrison of this town while in the second stage of pneumonia died suddenly of heart clot at one o'clock on the morning of the 4th instant.

 

MCLEOD - (St. John, N.B.) Passengers by the trains from the trains from the East say that the wreck caused by the collision yesterday morning was something terrific. The forward cars were fairly ground into kindling wood. The engines, one going at about 25 miles an hour and the other from 15 to 20, met on the curve almost at the sharpest point and thus struck each other augularly. They rose up in the air and then fell side by side on the track. All possible care was given to the wounded. It is thought that McLeod, who was killed, never saw the approaching train that he merely got a glimpse of its smoke as it came on the curve a few yards ahead of him. He seized his lever and all was over. It is alleged that as soon as the men on the platform at Springhill saw the freight train start, they ran to stop it, but were too late. Then all they could do was to send news of the accident which they felt soon would happen. McLeod was much esteemed by the men on the line. He is said to have been impressed with the idea that his engine was unlucky and he is said to have had some narrow escapes.

 

March 10, 1879

 

RUTHVEN - Died at 82 Merrick street, on the 8th of March, George Gordon Stannus, son of G. F. S. Ruthven, aged 6 months and 3 days. Funeral to-day (Monday) at half past three.

 

KNOX - Died at 54 Tisdale street, on Sunday, 9th March, Joseph Knox, a native of Dumbarton, Scotland, aged 42. Funeral will leave his late residence on Tuesday, 3 o'clock p.m. Friends are requested to attend.

 

MCLEAN - Died in Barton, on the 8th instant, John McLean, aged 78 years. Funeral from the residence of his son-in-law, David Ewing, Barton, on Tuesday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

PIERCE - (St. Catharines) Mr. George W. Pierce, for many years teller of the Niagara District Bank here, expired at noon to-day. Deceased was aged 45 years, a native of the County of Mayo, Ireland, and was married to the daughter of the late Thomas Adams, paymaster of the Welland canal, cause of death - carbuncle. Mr. Pierce was a warm-hearted and highly esteemed citizen. He leaves a numerous family.

 

WOODWARD - (St. Catharines) Mr. George Woodward, formerly of this city, died yesterday in St. Louis and the body is to be brought here for interment. The cause of death is said to have been due to an attack of typhoid fever.



MCLEOD - Intelligence has been received here that Mr. John McLeod, M.P.P. for West Durham, Ontario, died at his residence in Bowmanville on Sunday. The deceased gentleman was born of Scottish parents on the 20th of September, 1833, in Glengarry where he received his education. He was married in 1857 to Caroline Rose, youngest daughter of the late Mr. Thomas Plews of this city. Mr. McLeod was Warden of the United Counties of Northumberland and Durham. He was first returned to parliament at the general elections in 1867, and has since represented the riding. He was a Reformer in politics. Mr. McLeod had been in failing health for some years past. He was popular on both sides of the House, but never took a prominent part in its proceedings.

 

March 10, 1879

 

LUCAS - (Beamsville) For some years an aged lady, Mrs. Lucas, has been living alone in a little house on the Lake Shore road. As she was not observed outside the premises on Saturday last, a search was instituted which resulted in finding her stiff and cold in death. She had probably died the day previous. The deceased was a very active old lady and during fine weather she might have been frequently seen on her way to the village carrying a small basket of vegetables with her.

 

EMIGH - On Thursday last was buried at Burgessville Mr. Jonathan Emigh, an old resident, who died in his 89th year.

 

HALL - (Woodstock) A man by the name of Thomas Hall died in the county jail here of consumption last Thursday, aged 40 years.

 

March 11, 1879

 

COOK - Died Caroline, the beloved wife of George Cook, aged 38 years. Friends are respectfully requested to attend the funeral on Wednesday afternoon at 3 o'clock, from 22 Crooks street.

 

NIXON - Died on Tuesday, 11th instant, at 345 James street north, Annie Maria, eldest daughter of Esther and Thomas Nixon, aged 2 years and 8 months. Funeral to-day (Wednesday) at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

March 12, 1879

 

MAHEN - (Montreal) Mrs. Pierre Mahen died suddenly last night from heart disease.

 

CAMPBELL - Mr. Dugald Campbell, a farmer residing with his father on the Back street, Township of Southwold, was found dead in the barn about 7 o'clock on Sunday evening last. He had been in his usual health during the day.

 

STIVER - Died in great peace at Buttonville on Tuesday, the 18th ultimo, in his 84th year, John H. Stiver who was the first white child born in the now populous and wealthy township of Markham in the County of York. His parents emigrated from Hanover and settled in Markham in 1794 and were, among the first settlers whose early struggles and privations were intense and not likely to be endured again in any portion of Ontario. The subject of this memoir was born in 1795. He was 16 years old when the American war broke out, and being embued with true Canadian patriotism, be enlisted in the York Light Dragoons and was present and took part in the battles of Stoney Creek, Lundy's Lane, and Queenston Heights. He was taken prisoner by the Americans and carried away captive to the dominion of Uncle Sam. but soon made his escape and joined his comrades in arms and continued in active service until the close of the war when he returned to his home in Markham and married his present surviving partner in 1817, sixty-two years in the same house, the old homestead, in which he died. He is justly entitled to the appelation of a patriarch. He was the father of twelve children, eight sons and four daughters; four of the former are still living. The eldest and the last of the daughters was buried on the day two weeks previous to her father's death, aged 61 years. There are nineteen grandchildren and eleven great-grandchildren surviving him and a large circle of family connections. He remembered when Toronto was a trading post consisting of three log houses located on the provincial exhibition grounds. His brother-in-law was offered 200 acres on which the Brunskill mill and privilege is located at Thornhill, for $14 and thought it too dear, and his father-in-law, captain Sheits, who died in 1837, was offered lot 11 in the 8th concession, Markham, 200 acres, for a yoke of yearling steers that he considered of little value, but it seemed that the journey of twelve miles to Little York to have the writings drawn was more than the land was considered worth. The government grant to Mr. Stiver for his services during the war on which a portion of the town of Brantford is located, he traded off for twenty bushels of wheat, about $15, and considered he had made a good bargain. For some time past he seldom left his home; his last journey was to Toronto some three years ago to prove his claim to the pension of volunteers of 1812. He continued to enjoy good health until last year.

 

GILMORE - Died on Tuesday, 11th instant, at 40 Walnut street, Annie, wife of William R. Gilmore, aged 34 years. Funeral on Thursday, 13th instant, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

March 13, 1879

 

CARMICHAEL - Died in Petrolia, at his late residence, on Friday morning, February 28th, Dugald Carmichael, aged 85 years.

 


FLEMING - Died at Glenmorris, on Thursday, the 6th of March, at six o'clock p.m. Margaret, only daughter of Gavin Fleming, M.P., aged 13 years, 2 months, and 5 days.

 

WADDLE - Died on the 9th instant, in the city of Toledo, Ohio, U.S., Dr. T. Waddle, eldest son of William Waddle, Esq., of the Township of Seneca.

 

DONOGHUE - We regret to record the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Donoghue, relict of the late Cornelius Donoghue. which took place at her residence in Eramosa on Thursday, the 6th instant. Deceased was a native of the County Kerry, Ireland, and came to Guelph in 1827.

 

BENNETT - (Dundas) The death is announced of Mr. Truscot Bennett, brother of Mr. A. C. Bennett of this town, which took place at New Westminster, B.C., the other day.

 

PHILIPS - (Brownsville) A man by the name of Philips was so badly injured on Saturday last in Anger's gravel pit, two miles south of this place, that he died the following Monday.

 

March 14, 1879

 

CAMPBELL - (London) Mrs. Rusan Campbell, a resident of this city for over thirty years, died yesterday at the Protestant Orphans' Home, aged 105 years.

 

HARDING - A man named Harding, of London East, died suddenly last night of apoplexy. He was employed for some time in Waterman's refinery. He was a very poor man and leaves a wife and family.

 

TAYLOR - (Norwich) James Taylor, a respectable and industrious Scotchman, who has leased Lossing's woollen mills, four miles from here, committed suicide by poisoning himself with strychnine this morning. It is supposed to be on account of financial difficulties.

 

LONG - (Owen Sound) A young man named George Long of the Township of Sydenham died suddenly at Cobeau's Hotel last night. An inquest was held to-day, and the evidence went to show that he had procured a bottle of strychnine at a drugstore stating that he wanted to poison foxes. He was around the hotel in the evening, but nothing unusual was noticed in his conduct. About 12 o'clock he was found dead in his room. The jury returned the verdict of death from the effects of poison administered by his own hands.

 

SANDWICH - Died at Barrie, on March 9th, after a lingering illness, William Sandwich, Esq., P.L.S., in the 72nd year of his age.


CAMPBELL - Died at Collingwood, on the 11th instant, Maggie, the wife of Rev. Dr. Campbell, minister of the Church of Scotland, aged 37 years.

 

March 15, 1879

 

MCRAE - (Balsover) Duncan McRae, M.P.P., died on the 12th instant. His wife died on the 6th instant of inflammation of the lungs after an illness of nine days.

 

BARRINGTON - A fatal railway accident occurred at Oil City last evening about seven o'clock. A man named Thomas Barrington, while crossing the track, was struck by the west-bound train and received such injuries that he died at one a.m.

 

SMITH - (Oakville) The eldest daughter of Mr. Walker Smith died on Monday after a short but severe illness. The family has the sympathy of the entire community.

 

MCBETH - Died on Friday, 14th instant, at 35 Caroline street north, Ida May McBeth, daughter of William and Frances McBeth, aged 7 months and 14 days. Funeral to-day (Saturday) at 2 o'clock p.m.

 

STEWART - Died on the 14th instant, at No 10 Grove street, John, fifth son of William and Agnes Stewart, aged 23 years. Funeral will leave his father's residence, Monday, at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

PARK - We regret to record the death of another old landmark, Major John M. Park, J.P., who died at his late residence, Hillsdale Farm, 1st concession Of Westminster, of congestion of the lungs, March 4th. He was born at Long Point, near Port Dover, in 1801, and consequently was 78 years of age at the time of his death. In 1812, he served under his father, Captain William Park,in the Long Point Militia as sergeant. He was afterward made captain, and during the rebellion of 1837, he had charge of the Commissionariat Department from Long Point to Windsor, for which services he was created Major and was succeeded by Colonel Moffatt, retaining however by request of the then government his rank of Major of Militia. In 1855, he succeeded his brother, Samuel Park, as jailer for the County of Middlesex at London, retiring from the same in 1858. One year afterward, he moved his family from London to his late residence. In politics he was a consistent Conservative all his life. He was created Justice of the peace in 1862. His parents were U.E. Loyalists from New Jersey and emigrated to Canada in 1797, taking six weeks to travel that distance. His mother in the year 1802 rode from Long Point to New Jersey and back again on horseback, the greater part of the journey through a dense forest. He has left behind him to mourn his loss, his wife, and son, and three daughters.


MCDONNELL - Thursday morning, at the hour of three o'clock, D. AE. McDonnell breathed his last at his residence in Brockville. The deceased gentleman was born in the County of Glengarry, and at the time of his death had reached the ripe age of 85 years.

For half a century he occupied a prominent place in the history of Eastern Ontario, having been a lieutenant in the 80th British Regiment of the Line, and exchanging into the 67th Regiment he served with the gallant militia of the country in the battle of Lundy's Lane where he was severely wounded. For some time he was sheriff of the Eastern District at Cornwall, subsequently becoming a member of parliament. In 1847, he was appointed Warden of the penitentiary at Kingston, a position which he filled with distinguished ability. About nine years since, he retired, and took up his residence in Brockville. A faithful and conscientious public servant, his last days were those of pleasantness and all his paths were peace.

 

March 17, 1879

 

HOPKINS - Died in this city, on Saturday, the 15th instant, Maggie, youngest daughter of James Hopkins, aged 2 years. Funeral will take place from 11 Emerald street north, at 3 o'clock this afternoon. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

MACINNES - Died on Sunday, 16th instant, the beloved wife of Donald MacInnes. The funeral will take place from Dundurn on Wednesday, 19th instant, at half past three o'clock.

 

NIXON - Died in this city, on the 17th instant, William, son of John and Jane Nixon, County Fermanaugh, Ireland, aged 21 years and 3 months. Funeral at 3 o'clock p.m. to-morrow from 29 Florence street. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

COOPER - (Guelph) On Saturday night as Mr. T. W. Cooper was proceeding home, he attempted to pass underneath a G.T.R. freight train standing across the street. While going under, the train started, the wheels catching him. The brakesman immediately put on the brakes, but before the train could be stopped, two cars had passed over him, crushing his legs and lower portion of his body in a frightful manner. He died this afternoon at three o'clock from his injuries. Deceased was a resident of this town for many years and was the engineer in charge of the Guelph water works.

 

GODSPEED - The death is announced the other day of Rev. J. B. Godspeed, pastor of the Canada Methodist Church on the Harrow circuit. Deceased was born in the Township of Middleton, Norfolk County, in October 1826. His parents died when he was quite young. Having received a liberal education he fitted himself for a school teacher and for many years taught


the Common School in Waterford, being at the same time a very acceptable local preacher. He was induced in 1866 to enter the ministry of the late New Connexion Methodist Church which united with the Wesleyan Church in 1874. He travelled the Bruce, Oxford, Dereham, Simcoe, Goderich, and Garafraxa circuits. On the last circuit his health failed and he came in June last to the Harrow circuit in hopes that the more southern climate would renew his health. But it did not, and he died regretted by a large circle of friends.

 

March 18, 1879

 

WRIGHT - Died in Berlin, on the 13th instant, Carrie, wife of Dr. G. W. Wright, aged 36 years.

 

HUTCHINSON - Died in St. Catharines, on the 14th instant, Janet Hutchinson.

 

CLIFFORD - Died in St. Catharines, on the 15th instant, of diphtheria, John Patrick, eldest son of Captain J. Clifford, aged 8 years.

 

BARWICK - Died at Toronto, on the 14th instant, suddenly, Hugh Crawford, son of H. C. Barwick, St. Catharines.

 

DECATUR - Died in St. Catharines, on the 14th instant, of consumption, Sarah A. Decatur in the 68th year of her age.

 

JENKINS - Died in this city, on the 17th instant, Mary Elizabeth Jenkins, eldest daughter of Mrs. Lavina Jenkins, aged 16 years and 8 months. Funeral will leave the residence, No 169 King street east, at 3 o'clock, Wednesday afternoon. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

SMITH - Died at Woodland Hall Farm, Oakville, on the 11th instant, of peritonitis, Mary Isabella, eldest daughter of Robert Walker and Emma Ann Smith, aged 6 years, 2 months, and four days.

 

LILLY - Yesterday afternoon it was reported that an old man named John Lilly, who has boarded at the Red Lion Hotel near the wood market for the past nine or ten years, had died suddenly and under circumstances which required investigation. On inquiry it was ascertained that Lilly had been complaining for some weeks and for the past three or four days had been under the treatment of Drs. Crooker and Rosebrugh, so that an inquiry was not deemed necessary. Further enquiry elicited the fact that Lilly was an Englishman by birth, had no relatives in the country who were known, was of temperate habits, and had suffered for a length of time from a pulmonary complaint.


March 19, 1879

 

MERCER - Died at Chatham, Ontario, on the 17th instant, after a lingering illness, Bathia Sarah, wife of Mr. Sheriff Mercer

 

DAW - Died at St. Catharines, on the 13th instant, Caroline Turner, beloved wife of John Daw, in the 77th year of her age.

 

HANES - (London) An inmate of the Lunatic Asylum named Walter Hanes fell through a trap door on Saturday, a distance of fourteen feet, and sustained such injury that he died yesterday. He had been in the Asylum for 32 years and was aged 71.

 

MACKENZIE - (Woodstock) We are sorry to record the death of Mrs. Mackenzie who died at the residence of her brother, Mr. John Douglass of this town, at the age of 74 years.

 

March 20, 1879

 

SINNETT - (Ridgetown) This morning Edward Sinnett, a well known farmer and racehorse man, was found dead on the C.S.R. track here. Strong suspicion of foul play is entertained as the engineer of the train reports seeing two men rushing away from him. An inquest will be held on the body this afternoon.

 

WIGGINS - (Schomberg) John Wiggins of this place left here yesterday morning for Newcastle and on his return attempted to walk across the marsh where he was found dead this morning. He was brought to Isaac's Hotel here where an inquest was held and a verdict given of death from exposure. He was supposed to have been under the influence of liquor. Much sympathy is felt for the family.

 

GEORGE - The death is announced of Mr. Anthony George who has been for forty years a resident of Beverly. Deceased, who was in his 70th year, was widely known and highly respected. He leaves a widow and large family to mourn his loss.

 

DROPE - Died on Thursday, March 20th, Annie Noble, second daughter of Thomas and Jane Drope, aged 18 years, and 7 months. Funeral from the family residence, 81 George street, on Sunday, March 23rd, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please attend.

 

WILKES - Died in this city, on the 19th instant, Alfred Wilkes, aged 36 years. Funeral will leave 135 Ferguson avenue, at 2 o'clock on Friday, 21st instant. Friends will please accept this invitation.


March 21, 1879

 

LOCKIE - Died in this city, after a long and severe illness, on the 20th instant, Alexander Lockie, aged 46 years. Funeral will leave 25 Charles street, on Saturday, 22nd instant. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.

 

CURTIS - (Kingston) Last night the stable and barns of A. M. McAdoo, Township of Pittsburg, together with the contents, were destroyed by fire. A young man named Curtis while endeavouring to save some of the livestock from the stable was burned to death. Mr. McAdoo was severely burned.

 

LAMPMAN - (St. Catharines) The "Journal" of this evening has the following obituary. One by one the old veterans of the Niagara district are passing away from this vale of tears to the bourne from which no traveller ever returns. The last addition to the list is Capt. John Lampman of Grantham who expired yesterday at the ripe old age of 88 years, 3 months, and 6 days. Deceased was born in Niagara Township and in the troublous times of the last war with the United States took up arms in defence of his country, being then a young unmarried man and full of fire and enthusiasm of youth. He held a commission as ensign and fought at Lundy's Lane, Chippewa, and other noted engagements during the war of 1812-14. After the war was over he settled down on his farm in Grantham in the more peaceful occupation of tilling the soil, still however retaining a great interest in militia matters. He was subsequently gazetted captain. Many are the stories which the old gentleman used to tell of his engagements with the enemy and many a time and oft at the ingle nook has he interested his listeners with stories about the Yankees whom the British and Canadian forces vanquished on the blood-stained battlefield. He was a fine specimen of the manhood of this Canada of ours, and though the opening of his life was spent amidst scenes of blood and carnage, his later years were peaceful and happy in the enjoyment of as much domestic happiness as falls to the lot of most men. His wife died some time since. He leaves behind him a family of seven children, five girls and two boys. The old gentleman passed away amidst the bosom of his family, mourned and regretted.

 

March 22, 1879

 

BARKLEY - (Morrisburg) Amos Barkley, a farmer residing in the 17th concession of Williamsburg, was found this morning by Isaac Hellesley in the 3rd concession of Williamsburg buried under his load. It appears that Mr. Barkley left here alone about dark last night with a load of provender he had ground at the mill and was found this morning where his load had upset and piled on top of him. The coroner thinks it is not necessary to hold an inquest.


DORLAND - William Dorland, an old and highly esteemed resident for upwards of thirty years of the Township of Trafalgar, died on the morning of the 15th at his home after an illness of some years past of chronic complaints at the advanced age of a little over 76 years.

 

HINGSTON PICKERING - On the 13th. Lizzie, daughter of John Hingston, near Postville, died of diphtheria  in the 18th year of her age. On the same day, Fannie, a daughter of Thomas Pickering of Oakville died at the age of 13 years of the same disease.

 

CARROLL - (Ingersoll) We regret to have to chronicle the death of Mr. and Mrs. Carroll's adopted daughter which occurred on Thursday.

 

March 24, 1879

 

HEMPHILL - Died on Saturday night, 22nd, John Scott Tidrington, in his 13th year, youngest son of Mrs. Z. Hemphill. Funeral will leave 132 Market street on Tuesday at 11 o'clock.

 

DURNAN - (Toronto) Mr. Charles Durnan, a clerk for many years in the postoffice, died this morning.

 

MCEWAN - (Halifax) A man named Christopher McEwan, who has been employed in Moir and Co's bakery for seventeen years and never lost a day by illness, was taken suddenly ill yesterday while at work. He went to his home and died in an hour from paralysis.

 

CLAIR - (Puslinch) Mrs. John Clair who died on Sunday was the eldest settler in Puslinch at the time of her death. She died on the 79th anniversary of her birth, having been born in Kilkenny, Ireland. She came to New York a widow, and there married her second husband, John Clair, who died many years ago. They settled in Puslinch, lot 10, in the front of the 8th concession, the place being known as Clair's Corners. She leaves six daughters and one son, William. She was grandmother of the young man, Cassin, who was killed by a falling tree a short time ago.

 

ARMSTRONG - (Toronto) Mr. Philip Armstrong, an old and very highly respected citizen of this city, died this morning at his residence, Deer Park, Rosehill. He was 70 years of age and was formerly a butcher, but had retired from the business for some years. He was very much devoted to Horticulture and was president of the Toronto Electoral Society and a member of the Council of Agricultural and Arts Association.

 

March 25, 1879

 

HART - (Montreal) Mr. A. M. Hart, advocate, and one of the oldest members of the local Bar, died yesterday.


TIFFANY - (London) One of the oldest settlers in this city, Mr. Frederick Tiffany, died very suddenly on Saturday, aged 68 years. He resided nearly all his life in the Township of Delaware and was a witness of London's growth from its first foundation. The remains were taken to Delaware to-day for burial. A notable incident in the life of the deceased was his rescuing eleven persons from drowning in the river Thames one Sunday in April, 1843. The story is related in Davin's "Irishmen in Canada".

 

O'DONOHUE - (London) John O'Donohue, who for many years kept a tavern on York street, died suddenly last night aged 48 years. He had lately become blind.

 

HEATHFIELD - (London) Mr. W. Heathfield, formerly a druggist in this city, died in the hospital on Saturday night, aged 57.

 

THOMAS - (Dundas) The Winnipeg "Free Press" thus refers to the death of an old resident of this town. Very many of our readers will doubtless remember Mr. J. D. Thomas, an elderly gentleman who was a few years ago engaged in railway work on the CPR. Word has just been received of the old gentleman's death at his son's residence, Prairie City, Kansas, of pneumonia. Mr. Thomas was formerly a prominent citizen in Canada and at one time owned an extensive flouring mill in Dundas, Ontario, from which he retired to enter the grain buying business. He was a Scotchman by birth and was highly educated, a thorough gentlemen, and one whose death will be learned with deepest regret by his friends everywhere, and particularly by his many associates in Manitoba.

 

LUCAS - (Bridgewater) Samuel Lucas started from his home near Bogart village this morning to go to the shanties and stopped at a hotel here. While sitting by the stove, he suddenly fell forward and expired. Dr. Hash was summoned but of course could render no assistance. It was not considered necessary to hold an inquest.

 

HARVEY - (Bertie) There died the other day-at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. John Palmer of Wardsville, Mrs. Sarah Harvey, wife of the late John Harvey of Caradoc in her 88th year. Born in Pennsylvania on the 11th of May, 1791, she emigrated to Fort Erie in 1812 and settled in the Township of Bertie from which she moved to Caradoc in the year 1825 and remained there until the year 1869 when she removed to Wardsville and remained there till her death.

 

BARBER - The death is announced of Mr. Edward Barber at the age of 76, which sad event took place at his residence, King street east. Deceased, who was a native of New York, came to the city in 1851 and shortly thereafter started the first vinegar factory established here.


He subsequently retired, leaving his partner, Mr. B. F. Charlton, in the business, and entering the tobacco trade. Deceased leaves two children, one married to Mr. Charlton, and the other in the post office here. He was highly respected.

 

BLAGDOUS - Died at Carlisle, on the 24th instant, of influenza, the infant daughter of Mr. John Blagdous, aged 13 days.

 

SAUNDERS - Died in this city, on the 25th instant, May, only daughter of Jabez and Louise Saunders, aged 2 years and 4 months. Funeral will leave her parents' residence, No 52 Bay street north, at 2:30 o'clock on Wednesday afternoon, the 26th. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

JAMESON - Mr. William Jameson of Point Fortune, Quebec, who died at Woodstock the other day at the residence of his sister, Mrs. Cunningham, requested a few days previous that if the attack of heart disease from which he was suffering should prove fatal his body should be opened before burial and a search made for a pistol bullet and a portion of a brass buckle which he had been carrying with him for about forty-one years. In 1837, the memorable year of the rebellion in Canada, Mr. Jameson, then a young and strong man, resided at Carillion in the Lower province, and one day in the post office there got arguing politics with a 'rebel' whose language became so insulting or otherwise provoking that at last Mr. Jamieson struck him, whereupon he drew a pistol and fired at his loyal opponent. The bullet broke-an iron buckle in his right suspender and then entered the breast, inflicting a wound which came near proving fatal and from which he was laid up for six weeks. At the expiration of that time he was nearly well again and never afterward felt any ill effects from the hurt, but as the bullet had not been extracted and as it was believed to have taken the missing part of the buckle in with it, Mr. Jamieson often expressed and repeated during his last illness the wish that after his death the locality of the 'foreign' body as medical men would call them should be ascertained, and Doctors Allan and Bryson searched for and were successful in finding them. They were together and close to the backbone, the bullet resting on the diaphragm and entirely enveloped in the cartilaginous formation of considerable size while the other article was partially hidden by a deposit more nearly resembling flesh. The bullet is for a pistol of rather large bore and originally round, but is much damaged at one spot, no doubt where it struck the buckle which was broken by the blow, part with the tongue or tongues attached probably remaining fast to the suspender. The portion driven in by the bullet formed three sides of the buckle and is of the simplest description, being merely a piece of iron


wire about two inches long and bent at right angles a little more that half an inch from each end. It is only rusted in spots and there not deeply, and the mark made by the blow of the bullet is still plainly visible.

 

March 26, 1879

 

LAW - Died in St. Catharines on the 25th instant, at the residence of her son-in-law, Charles L. Benson, Martha Law, relict of the late John Law, aged 73 years. Funeral Thursday the 27th instant, from the station, on the arrival of the 2:45 p.m. train from St. Catharines. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

ROSS - Catherine Ross, from Wallace town, died at the Elgin House of Industry on Saturday, from influenza, at the advanced age of 95 years.

 

CAMERON - On Thursday afternoon, 20th instant, as Mr. Angus Cameron, 3rd concession of Moore, was taking a stroll in his woods, he was accidentally shot by William Smoke. It appears Smoke was shooting with a rifle at a mark. He however missed his mark, and going thirty-two yards further on to look for where the bullet struck, found to his surprise and horror the then almost lifeless body of Mr. Cameron whom he had not observed on account of some underbrush. The distance from where Smoke was standing to where he shot Mr. Cameron dead was 133 yards. At the coroner's inquest a verdict was rendered in accordance with the above statement. Deceased was an old settler of the township and leaves a grown-up family to mourn his loss.

 

MCLELLAND - Died in this city, on the 26th instant, Lizzie E., wife of William McLelland. Funeral will leave the residence of her brother John A. Orr, 51 Gore street, on Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

 

March 27, 1879

 

LAW - A very large number of our readers will regret to learn of the death of Mrs. Martha Law, widow of the late Mr. John Law of this city, at the advanced age of 73 years. Deceased who had been residing with her son-in-law  Mr. Charles L. Benson of St. Catharines for some time past, was one of the oldest residents of Hamilton. Many years ago her husband had a school on the corner of Jackson and Hughson streets and there not a few of the present generation in Hamilton got all the education they ever received. Mrs. Law was also the mother of Mr. P. M. Law, at one time a well known barrister in Hamilton. She was of a kindly genial disposition and was beloved by a wide circle of friends.


SMITH - (Ingersoll) About half past four this afternoon, Charles Moore, a painter by trade, entered the Royal Hotel where Reuben Smith, a hostler, was sitting in a chair apparently asleep. Moore threw Smith from the chair and kicked him once or twice in the face, killing him instantly. Moore is a young man about 25 and Smith was an old inoffensive man probably 50 years of age. Moore was under the influence of liquor at the time and it is thought had some old grudge against Smith. An inquest will probably be held to-morrow night. Moore was promptly arrested.

 

NOBLE - We regret to have to record the death at his father's residence, St. Catharines, on the 23rd instant, of consumption of James Noble, third son of Mr. James Noble of that city. Deceased was a brother of Mr. George Noble of the C.S.R. superintendent's office, St. Thomas, and was for some time employed in one of the departments there before taking a position at Detroit under Mr. Callaway of the Detroit and Milwaukee road. He was young man of excellent promise.

 

HENDERSON - We regret to learn of the death of Mr. George D. Henderson, St. Catharines, who died at his father's residence in that city, on the 21st instant, at the early age of 26 years. Deceased leaves a widow and three children who together with his bereaved parents and four brothers will have the sympathy of the community. He was a brother of Mr. S. A. Henderson of this city. The funeral which took place on Monday was largely attended.

 

LEE - The death is announced of Mr. Thomas Lee of the 11th concession of North Dumfries, one of the pioneers of that township. The deceased in company with his brothers, John, George, and David, all of whom are still living with the exception of George who died in Owen Sound a number of years ago, emigrated to this country from Scotland while still young men. Thomas, John and David engaged in farming operation while George carried on a watchmaking end jewellery business in Galt but afterward removed to Owen Sound.

 

WALKER - This morning an old and well known citizen of Hamilton Mr. Thomas Walker, residing on Main street in the Magill block, opposite St. Thomas Church, and employed in Campbell's waggon making and blacksmith shop, King street east, went into Mr. Benjamin Lewis's planing mill for the purpose of seeing about some hubs he wanted to have turned. After he had given his order he had a look at the machinery and on turning to go out, he fell down on the floor and expired almost immediately. Drs. Smith and Ryall arrived after a short time; both pronounced him dead. Deceased was a member of St. Thomas Church. He had been visited by his brother who lives at Ayr the day previous whom he had not seen for over fourteen years. After eating his breakfast, deceased occupied himself for a little while reading aloud to his wife


from a newspaper, afterward leaving the house in his usual health. He had complained of being affected with heart disease; in fact several of his family had previously died from that ailment which no doubt was the cause of his death. He was a brother of Robert Walker who lives on Walnut street, and leaves besides his wife several children. Coroner White was notified who announced that an inquest would he held at the Walker House at 3 o'clock this afternoon.

 

March 28, 1879

 

MORGAN - The wife of John Morgan, Reeve of Adelaide, died suddenly last night. Death was caused by a fall on the road in the afternoon.

 

WALKER - Died yesterday morning, Thomas Walker, native of Durham, England, of apoplexy. Funeral from his late residence to-morrow, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends are cordially invited to attend.

 

SUTER - (Dundas) The "Banner" reports that yesterday afternoon Robert Sutor, Esq., one of the oldest residents of Dundas, died in the 68th year of his age, after a lingering illness. Mr. Suter was a native of Bimblepatan, Madras Presidency, British India, where he was born in 1812. He was sent to England in 1820 to be educated, and in 1832 he came to Canada and settled in Ancaster from whence he removed to Dundas some years afterward, having resided here ever since. Mr. Sutor was of a very retiring disposition and was greatly respected by his many friends.

 

HUNTER - The death is announced of Mr. Thomas Hunter which took place at his residence, West Brantford, on Wednesday, at the ripe age of 80 years and 9 months. Mr. Hunter was born in the county of Fermanaugh, Ireland, and emigrated to this country in 1837, taking part in the rebellion. He took up his residence in the Township of Brantford in the fall where by his energy and indomitable pluck he soon placed himself in very comfortable circumstances. Deceased was always a Conservative.

 

WALKER - (Woodstock) Charles Walker, a member of Court Beaconsfield, Independent Order of Foresters, who died on Monday last was interred in the Roman Catholic burial ground this afternoon by the members of the Order. He leaves a wife and eight children, and to them the endowment benefit will be a boon under their present affliction.

 

MCDOUGALL - The other day, Alexander McDougall, farmer, East Flamborough, went to his bush with his team for a load of wood. After loading the wood he got on the load and had gone but a short distance when a boy who was with him observed him fall back, and on examination it was found he was dead.


March 29, 1879

 

FOSTER - Mr. Oswald Foster, for thirty years a resident of Yorkville and a justice of the peace, died yesterday aged 71 years.

 

VALLE - (Halliburton) A Frenchman, named Dennis Valle, employed as cook in one of Mr. Boyd's shanties in the Township of Havelock, was found dead this morning on North Lake, about twenty-five miles north of Haliburton. Valle had occasion to visit Havelock depot yesterday afternoon and while there it was noticed he was somewhat under the influence of liquor. He left the depot at five o'clock to return to the shanty which was about five miles distant and nothing more was seen of him until this morning when he was found by a party from one of the other shanties. As there was no evidence of any crime having been committed, it is supposed the unfortunate man lost his way and becoming weak from hunger and exposure, lay down in the snow to rest. The body was forwarded to Halliburton to-day and deceased's wife, who lives at St. Pierre du Sud near Montreal, was notified by telegraph.

 

CARRUTHERS - Mr. John Carruthers of Thedford died on Friday last aged 86. He was probably the oldest inhabitant of the village.

 

JONES - On Thursday morning the body of Joseph Jones of Drummondville, well known to all the residents of the vicinity, was found in the cedar bush beyond Mr. V. Fralick's house. He was last seen alive by his son about six o'clock the evening previous. He was then somewhat under the influence of liquor. The supposition is that he got more liquor at the village and while trying to make his way home fell down in a helpless condition and was frozen to death.

 

March 31, 1879

 

RONAN - Died on the 29th instant, of inflammation of the lungs, Andrew, eldest son of the late Michael Ronan, aged 40 years. Funeral will leave the residence of his brother, John Ronan, corner of Wellington and cannon streets, at 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday. Friends and acquaintance will please attend.

 

WILSON - (Toronto) On Saturday night., a Grand Trunk locomotive and two cars ran off the track at Port Huron. The engineer and fireman were badly injured, and the brakesmen, John Wilson, a resident of this city, was killed. The latter leaves a wife and four children. The rolling stock was considerably damaged.

 

ANDERSON - (Galt) Rev. W. H. Anderson, D.D., for the past three years pastor at the United Presbyterian church of North America in this town, died suddenly this afternoon of heart


disease. He was in his usual health up to 8 o'clock this morning when he suddenly became unwell and died at 3 o'clock in the afternoon.

 

JACK - (Montreal) James Jack, of the firm of James Jack & Co of this city, died this evening of a lingering sickness. He was highly esteemed by all classes of citizens.

 

MACDONALD - (Ingersoll) It is our painful duty to record the death of one of Ingersoll's oldest inhabitants in the person of Mr. James MacDonald who died at his residence on Thursday evening, aged 68 years. Deceased was for many years engaged in the hat and fur business at Ingersoll, but latterly had the position of market clerk. He was a member of Samaritan Lodge, I.O.O.F.

 

NIXON - (Ingersoll) The infant son of Mr. James Nixon was buried Friday afternoon. The works were closed for half a day in consequence.

 

SMITH - (Brantford) The "Expositor" chronicles the death of Mrs. A. K. Smith at her residence, Brant Avenue, Brantford, at the advanced age of 73. Deceased was the widow of the late Abraham K. Smith, one of the oldest settlers of Brantford and the original owner of a large portion of the land upon which the city now stands. Mrs. Smith, whose maiden name was Spohn, was born in Albany in 1806 and came to Canada with her family in 1813, settling in Ancaster where her brother, Philip Spohn, still resides. She married in 1825 the late A. K. Smith, then of Hamilton, and came to Brantford in 1836 where she has resided contiguously since. Her family consisted of four daughters: Mrs. Goodson, Mrs. Dr. Griffin, Mrs. Morgan of Chicago, and Mrs. Biscoe of Guelph. Of her two sons, the older, W. K. Smith, died in South America in 1874 of yellow fever, while the younger, Arthur, is at present at home.

 

FLEMING - The death is announced of Mr. A. G. Fleming of Craigleith, Collingwood, at the advanced age of 86. He leaves a wife and a large family of children and grandchildren. Among his sons now living are Sandford Fleming, C.B., chief engineer of the pacific Railway; Mr. David Fleming, of Collingwood; and Mr. Alexander Fleming,

 

April 1, 1879

 

MCKINNON (London) Mary McKinnon, described as a servant girl, was arrested this morning for concealing the birth of a child which was delivered nearly a fortnight ago. She inhabited a small shanty on Bathurst street and was known by the neighbours to be enceinte. She disappeared for a few days and returned, the child evidently having been born meanwhile. As no babe appeared however, the neighbours gave information and the detective made inquiry which resulted in the discovery of the body of a female child in the straw of the mattress which


the unfortunate girl had slept on and where it had probably been concealed since its birth. The woman was arrested and an inquest held which resulted in a verdict in accordance with the above facts.

 

CLEMENT - On Sunday morning last, one of the oldest survivors of the fight for British supremacy in America expired in St. Catharines in the person of Lewis Clement who was the son of a U. E. Loyalist and for many years a leading merchant of Western Canada, having his headquarters at Niagara where the family of deceased settled. When the war of 1812 broke out, Lewis Clement, as the son of a U.E. Loyalist, with his brothers, took up arms in defence of Canadian liberty and was appointed First Lieutenant of Artillery under the late Col. Kirby of Brantford and was placed in command of all the battery guns at the battle of Queenston Heights, October 13th, 1812, He afterward served as captain of the Second Lincoln Militia, then embracing a large district, under Col. Dickson, at the battle of Chippewa where he was wounded three times. None of the wounds proved serious, but two of them the deceased maintained might cause his death at less then a century. In 1837, the deceased turned out again during the Trent affair, and in the Fenian invasion he was among the first to shoulder his rifle to tramp to the front in support of the Queen's Own and 13th Battalion. For his bravery and services, the deceased was in receipt of a pension from the imperial Government of $1.50 per day, and when the distribution of the grants to the veterans of 1812 took place in 1874, he was among the most active and prominent of those taking part, meeting many of his old friends in arms, many of whom have since passed away, but none of them at his age, 92 years. The deceased was the brother of Mr. George A. Clement of Niagara, Peter B. Clement of St. Catharines, and Joseph Clement of Brantford, and has left relatives in almost every part of America. A few years since, he commenced a lawsuit for the possession of some of the most valuable property in the centre of New York state which he might have gained had it not been that all the lawyers whom he first employed died off before the courts of that state could reach a decision. The deceased was father of the late Ralph Clement, the well known merchant of Niagara and St. Catharines, and father-in-law of Mr. C. P. Campbell, formerly city clerk of St. Catharines.

 

MYERS - Mr. Michael Myers, late township clerk of Wilmot, died last week from a cancer in the face.

 

CHILCOTT - A letter was lately received at the Walkerton post office for John Chilcott informing him that a rich relative in England had died and left him 110,000 sterling. Chilcott was a cattle buyer. and had a fondness for fast horses. Racing last summer on the Durham road at Maple Hill, his horse turned suddenly into a driving shed, his sulky ran against one of the posts,


and he received such injuries as resulted in his death. His funeral expenses were paid by Brant Township Council. His good fortune came too late.

 

LANGFORD - The death is announced of Capt. Alexander Langford, formerly of the 5th Dragoon Guards, at the ripe age of 81 years. Deceased, who was the father of Rev. A. Langford of St. Catharines, was born March 28th, 1798. Early in his manhood he left the land of his birth, crossed the Atlantic, and settled in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, where he lived for some months, but not liking the country, he returned to Ireland and soon after joined the 5th Dragoons Guards, continuing with the regiment through all its triumphs and vicissitudes until 1854, when he came to Canada and settled in the Township of London. He served under and received pay from four sovereigns of England; namely, George III, George IV, William IV, and Queen Victoria, a distinction which but very few now surviving can lay claim to. He resided latterly with his son, Mr. Thomas Langford of London Township, and died full of years and honour, leaving a host of sincere and attached friends.

 

April 2, 1879

 

BROWN - Died on the 1st instant, Margaret Brown, third daughter of Mary Ann and Thomas Brown, aged 4 years and 10 months. Funeral will leave her father's residence on Thursday, the 3rd instant, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends are respectfully invited to attend.

 

LABRANCH - A dispatch from L’Islet says an old man named Labranch was killed to-day by a train. It is supposed he was walking on the track and did not see the train passing owing to the snow storm.

 

PENTON - (Montreal) Chief of Police Penton received a second paralytic stroke to-day of which he died this evening.

 

TEEPLE - Died at his residence in Aylmer, on the 28th March, of consumption, Lyman D. Teeple, Esq., barrister, aged 40 years, 10 months, and 23 days.

 

WARREN - Mr. Thomas D. Warren, Clerk of the Crown for the county of Elgin, died at his residence, West Talbot street, St. Thomas, on Sunday, aged 68 years. Deceased settled in St. Thomas in 1828 with his father who was at that time a partner of the late Sheriff Hamilton of Middlesex. The young man evinced a liking for the legal profession and received a first class training. He afterward opened an office and commenced as a practitioner in St. Thomas, continuing until November, 1866, when he was appointed to the office of Clerk of the County Court, Deputy Clerk of the Crown, and Registrar of the Surrogate Court made vacant by the resignation of Peter Marteagh.


April 3, 1879

 

SAWLE - Died on the 27th ultimo, in Caledonia, William Henry, son of William T. Sawle, Esq., proprietor of the "Sachem", aged 2 months.

 

PLIMSELL - (Montreal) John Plimsell, an old and respected merchant of this city, died here last night.

 

JOHNSTON - (Thorold) The death is announced of Mr. Quinton Johnston, P.L.S., of this place which took place at his residence on Monday last. Deceased, who was for many years a resident of Brantford, was attacked with paralysis on the morning of Thursday, 27th March, and continued insensible until the morning of his death when mortification set in. Deceased leaves a wide circle of friends.

 

POWELL - Died in Paris, on the 2nd instant, Olivia, youngest daughter of W. G. Powell, of the "Star", aged 20 years, 1 month and 25 days.

 

CRONK - Died in North Oxford, 1st instant, the wife of Mr. James Cronk, aged 47 years.

 

April 4, 1879

 

QUACKENBUSH - Alonzo Quackenbush, an old resident of Port Dalhousie and identified with the leading interests of the village and for the last twenty-five years connected with the tug business at that harbour, died to-day after a long illness.

 

TRUMBULL - Died in this city, on the 3rd instant, Alexander Trumbull, father of George Trumbull of this city, aged 86 years. The funeral will leave his son's residence, No 15 James street north, at 3 o'clock on Sunday afternoon. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

Yesterday afternoon at 3 o'clock, Mr. Alexander Trumbull breathed his last at the residence of his son, Mr. George Trumbull, saloon keeper in this city. The deceased was ailing only five days and the suddenness of his death has cast a gloom over his large circle of friends in this city. Mr. T. was born in the County of Cavan, Ireland, in the year 1793 and was consequently in his 86th year. He emigrated to this country in 1846 and settled in the city of Toronto. Subsequently he removed to Rochester in New York state, and afterward returned to Toronto. On the death of his wife last December, deceased came to spend his remaining days with his son here,


and up to a week ago appeared hale and hearty. The cause of his death was an affection of the liver, accompanied by a severe attack of bronchitis. Mr. Trumbull was an enthusiastic member of the Masonic fraternity, being not only a Master Mason, but a most respected member of the Royal Arch. His certificates of withdrawal from the Irish register date as far back as the beginning of the year 1844. We believe he was affiliated with a Toronto lodge and was a frequent visitor at communications of the Order in this city.

 

April 5, 1879

 

BOICE - Died on the 4th April, 1879, at 50 John street north, Hamilton, William Boice, Esq., in the 62nd year of his age. Funeral at 3 p.m. from his late residence on Sunday, 6th instant. Friends will please attend without further notice.

 

GRAFF - (Oakville) Monday morning the editor of the "Express" received a telegram from Fort Scott, Kansas, announcing to him the sad news of his oldest sister, Mrs. Mary A. Graff, aged about 53 years.

 

MACKENZIE - (Guelph) William Mackenzie, book keeper for George Lees & Co, died very suddenly on Wednesday. He had consumption but was able to attend to the duties of his desk until about a week since.

 

CONILEAU - (Guelph) Rev. Father Conileau, formerly a rector of St. Bartholomew's Church in this town, died suddenly on Tuesday last when returning to Montreal, his residence, after giving a mission in Athabasca.

 

FOSTER - (Brantford) Mr. Francis Foster died on Wednesday morning at Canandaigua, NY. He was born in Wiswell, Lancashire, England, and came to Canada in 1844. He farmed for many years in the vicinity of Brantford, but for the last 12 or 15 years has lived quietly in the city. He leaves behind him a large family, all of whom are well and favourably known; namely, Mrs. I. Cockshutt, Mrs. William Young, Mrs. William Buck, Mrs. Francis Ellis, Miss Kate Foster, Mr. George Foster and Mr. Thomas Foster of the Customs. The funeral to-day was very largely attended.

 

BODFORD - (Burford) Mrs. Bodford, mother of Mrs, John Charles of this village, died after a lingering illness on Sunday last. She had the previous week attained the good old age of 86 years. Her remains were interred in the cemetery at Paris to-day.

 

WALLIS - The death is announced at Liverpool, England on the 30th ultimo, of the respected father of Herbert Wallis, Esq., mechanical superintendent of the Grand Trunk Railway.


CALDER - Died on Saturday morning, the 5th instant, Jeanie, eldest daughter of John and Sara Calder, aged 7 years and 20 days. Funeral from her father's residence, 98 Hughson street south, on Monday first at 3:30 p.m.

 

VINCENT - (London) We regret to chronicle the death of an old resident, Mr. George Vincent, which took place Friday afternoon rather suddenly of inflammation of the lungs. He had lived in London thirty-four years, having come here with the 23rd Regiment in 1845. He was employed as an engineer at Hyman's tannery for twenty-four years and has since been employed on the Great Western Railway. Deceased's native place was Bath, Staffordshire, England.

 

MCBRIDE - On Thursday morning, Thomas McBride, Sr. passed away at, the ripe old age of 88. The deceased had been failing for some time past, but he was able to be about on Saturday. On Sunday, however, he took to bed and from that time it was evident that he would not recover. Mr. McBride, with his wife and five children, emigrated from the County Tyrone, Ireland, in the year 1827. After a voyage of about nine weeks they landed at Quebec and came on to the town of Niagara. In a few weeks after, they moved to Saltfleet, nine miles from Hamilton, and in a few weeks more removed to Wellington Square where they lived in a house belonging to Mr. Kerr, a son-in-law of the great Indian warrior, Brant. Leaving his family there, deceased worked a short time on the Welland canal, in March, 1823, he moved to Guelph, stopped a few days at the Priory, and then took up a farm lying on both sides of the Elora road at ten shillings an acre, now owned by Mr. John Pipe. He lived there until 1833, and then sold out to Mr. James Wilson and bought the farm in the rear which he sold to Mr. Williams in 1835 and bought a farm on the Brock road near what is now the Model Farm, where he remained till the day of his death. The deceased was very much respected by all who knew him. He had eight sons and six daughters, and he leaves behind his wife, seven sons, three daughters, about twelve grandchildren, and one great-grandchild.

 

BOICE To-day the death is announced of one of Hamilton's oldest and best known wholesale merchants in the person of William Boice. The deceased was born in Kingston, 27th April, 1817, and was therefore in the 62nd year of his age. From Kingston the deceased removed to Niagara, and from thence to Toronto, Hamilton, Picton, and Dundas, in each of which towns he carried on business. Finally in 1850 he started the wholesale drygoods business near the corner of King and James streets in this city in which he remained and met with success until 1872 when he was prostrated by an attack of paralysis and was forced to retire. He never thoroughly recovered. The deceased married a sister of the late John P. Larkin in 1839 by whom he had six children,


three of whom, sons, survive to mourn the death of a kind parent and exemplary Christian.

 

HULL - We regret to learn of the death of Mr. Chester H. Hull, a well known San Francisco journalist. Deceased, who was from Oswego, NY, is well known to Canadian pressmen. He was for a time employed at the "Spectator" and was looked upon as an admirable all-round newspaperman. During his stay in Canada he never returned to his native city being compelled to stay abroad on account of some political offence against the Unites States Government. When he was pardoned however he went to San Francisco where he has since been very successful. The demise of this gentleman at a comparatively young age will be deeply regretted by his many friends in Canada.

 

April 7, 1379

 

DILWORTH - Died on the 6th instant, in Detroit, Michigan, after a long and painful illness, Richard Dilworth, in his 41st year, late of Trafalgar.

 

TRUSCOTT - Died at his residence, No 111 Wellington street north, on the 6th instant, William H., second son of the late William Truscott, in the 20th year of his age. Funeral will take place on Tuesday, 8th, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

PATTULIO - (Woodstock) The death of Mrs. Pattullo, the mother of A. Pattulio, of the "Sentinel Review", took place on Friday at the age of 70 years and some few days. She had many friends.

 

MACKAY, CONNERS, CHESHIRE - (Halifax) This morning Christopher Mackay, his son, 14 years old, James Conners a fisherman, 62 years old, and Bombadier Cheshire of the Royal Artillery started in a fishing row boat from Ketch harbour for Sambro island off this harbour, the signal station at which Cheshire was in charge of. The water was comparatively calm at the time of starting. They started about half past five o'clock and at about eleven o'clock the boat was seen near the place filled with water and badly stove in. The dead bodies of Mackay end the bombadier were in the boat and in a short time the body of Mackay's son was found near the boat. Conners' body is not yet found. It is supposed the boat swamped by a sudden high sea.

 

April 9, 1879

 

ROE - The death is announced at Newmarket of Mr. William Roe who buried the government money in the war of 181.2 in order to save it from the enemy. He was 84 years of age.


SOMERS - Between five and six o'clock Tuesday evening, Mr. Bernard Somers, aged about 65, a market gardener residing on the Don and Danforth road who had been in bad health for about a year, committed suicide by shooting himself in the side. He died in about half an hour.

 

DUNCAN - The particulars of the saw mill accident at Lambeth were brought here (London) at an early hour this morning. It appears that Mr. Robert Duncan while engaged in sawing wore a long overcoat and while placing the log, the coat tail entangled in the machinery. The unfortunate man was drawn into contact with the circular saw which, striking his hip joint, split his leg down to the ankle; his back was also lacerated in a horrible manner, He expired about ten o'clock after several hours of insensibility. He was aged 53 years and had formerly resided in the Township of Zorra. He leaves a wife and five children.

 

EVANS - Died at his father's residence, no 112 Locke street north, Francis, second son of Mr. Frank Evans, G.W.R., aged 3 years and 2 months. Funeral will leave the above residence to-morrow (Wednesday) at half past 4 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

HIPKINS - Died in this city, on the 8th instant, Jane Thompson, second daughter of Alfred and Annie Hipkins, aged 5 years and 2 months. Funeral from her father's residence, 28 Caroline street, on Wednesday, at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SMALL - Died in this city, on the 3th instant, Mary Jane Small, widow of the late William Small, of this city, aged 63 years. The funeral will leave her son's residence, No 47 cannon street west, on Thursday afternoon, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

BETHUNE - Died on the 7th instant, at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. C. B. Calvert, 130 High street west, Detroit, Mary T., wife of Donald Bethune, Esq., of Windsor.

 

THOMPSON - (Stouffville) An inquest was held to-day on the body of Catharine Thompson, aged 65 years, who has been living alone for four or five years on the 7th concession of Markham. She was found dead in her house yesterday by Mr. McDowell of Unionville. She has for some time been receiving help from Council. The coroner said she must have been dead two or three days. Her head was fearfully cut with a sharp instrument and beaten with a chair which was covered with blood. A box had been broken open which contained two purses of money, one of which was emptied, and other containing $35 left untouched. It is supposed she was murdered for her money. As yet there is no clue to the guilty party.


April 10, 1879

 

HYSLOP - Died in this city, on the 9th instant, of scarlet fever, Lizzie, eldest daughter of William Hyslop, aged 5 years. The funeral will take place from the residence of her parents, 27 Wellington street south, this (Thursday) afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

GHENT - Died on the 9th instant, suddenly of heart disease, John George Ghent, in the 42nd year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, Beach road, Saltfleet, on Friday next at one o'clock.

 

STUART - A man named Jack Stuart, a resident of Goulbourn, was killed to-day while attempting to jump off the Canadian Central Railway at Renfrew.

 

SAUNDERS - (London) Mr. James Saunders died rather suddenly last night. He was a native of Devonshire, England, and settled in London thirty years ago. He was father of Mr. William Saunders, the well known chemist and editor of the "Canadian Entomologist".

 

MCLEAN - (St. Catharines) Though not unexpected, the death of James McLean, Esq., at 8 o'clock this morning was received with a shock by the old residents of the city among whom he has resided for a period of thirty years. Deceased was about 64 years of age at the time of his death. He was a native of County Monaghan, Ireland, from which he emigrated to this country. For a year past he has been suffering from an illness which about a week since assumed a more severe form and ended in his death.

 

MADDEN - As anticipated in the report of Wednesday morning's "Spectator" Mrs. Madden, the old lady so fearfully scalded on Tuesday evening, died yesterday morning at one o'clock, having endured excruciating pain up to the hour of her demise. Mrs. Madden, who came here from Princeton about five weeks ago, had occupied her residence on Catharina street only since Sunday evening, having previously resided with her friends, Mrs. Murphy's family. Before her death Mrs. Madden was restored to consciousness and gave an account of how the accident occurred. It appears that in the evening Mrs. Murphy’s little girl went into Mrs. Madden's and lit the lamp for her which singular to say was not provided with a chimney and placed it on a small table near the door. Mrs. Madden sat down beside the table and at a few minutes to 3 o'clock the lamp exploded with a loud noise, scattering the contents over the clothing of the deceased which immediately ignited. Mrs. Madden's screams for aid attracted the attention of Mr. Glendon who rushed into the house as soon as possible and succeeded after a time in extinguishing the flames


and getting the unfortunate woman into Mr. Murphy's. The deceased had no relatives in the city. Under the circumstances Dr. White, coroner, deemed the holding of an inquest unnecessary and therefore none was held.

 

April 11, 1879

 

PEARCY - (Toronto) George Pearcy, a carpenter, was fixing an inner door at the entrance to the Receiver-General's office on Tuesday when a chair on which he was standing slipped and he fell, striking his head on a stone step. He was picked up insensible and early this morning expired.

 

CAMERON - About 10 o'clock Wednesday night, the passenger train going east on the Grand Trunk ran over a man named Cameron who has been in the employ of Mrs. Edwards near the G.T.R. station, Georgetown. The man was believed to be under the influence of liquor and no blame can be attached to the company. The body was horribly mangled. An inquest was held and verdict returned according to the facts.

 

CLARKSON - About 5 o'clock a man named Philip Clarkson dropped dead at Markham while working at Alexander Fleury's foundry. Heart disease is supposed to be the cause of death.

 

MCDONALD - Alexander McDonald who disappeared suddenly from Elora on the evening of the 26th of October last, was discovered on Thursday in the Grand river about ten yards below Victoria bridge and about twelve feet from the shore. He was a strong healthy man, about 40 years old, and was last seen about on the evening of the 26th of October. An inquest was held and a verdict returned that deceased came to his death by accidental drowning while in a state of intoxication.

 

DOAN - (Springfield) A man named Nelson Doan, who has been employed for some time at the C.S. Hotel as hostler, died on Tuesday very suddenly of the lockjaw. An inquest was held by Coroner McLay of Aylmer when the following facts were brought out. It appears that three young men; McCarthy, McCanby, and Douglas, got into a row with Doan about two weeks ago, and first named struck Doan, knocking him down, and in the fight his thumb was broken. The man, Doan, had been around, however, all the time after until the day before his death. Drs. Mills and Franklin made the post mortem examination, and from the evidence it appeared that, he died from congestion of the lungs, and the jury brought in a verdict accordingly.

 

MACKLIM - Thursday a young child named George Macklim was found dead in bed by his mother's side. It is supposed he had been overlaid.


April 12, 1879

 

WILSON - The inhabitants of Alexandria and vicinity were deeply shocked to learn last evening that Robert Wilson, J.P., was fatally injured by one of his own horses. Within five hours this gentleman, a resident in this village for over a quarter of a century, passed away from our midst, and his death will be regretted both as a citizen and a friend.

 

CLARKE - (Tillsonburg) A little girl, six years old, daughter of Mr. E. Clarke in Middleton and some other children were playing in the yard and built a small bonfire. The fire had been started only a few minutes when the little girl's dress caught fire, and before assistance came, she was so fearfully burned that she died a few hours after.

 

BEATTY - An esteemed correspondent at Ancaster sends us particulars of a melancholy accident which took place there on Wednesday last. It appears that John Beatty, a young man working on the farm of William Anderson, was driving a colt out of the orchard when by some means the colt kicked him with both hind feet, each foot placed directly under the lower jaw. He walked a short distance to the house and made an effort to speak but was unable to do so. The blood was running from his mouth and nose. Drs. Orton and Brandon were soon in attendance, but nothing could be done, and he died shortly after. Beatty was a steady sober young man and well liked by the whole community. He leaves a widowed mother, three brothers, and two sisters to mourn his untimely end. He was in the 26th year of his age and a member of the Orange Association.

 

HENRY - Died at Brantford, on Friday, the 11th instant, Jane, wife of John Henry, Esq., builder, in the 60th year of her age.

 

KNIGHT - Died on the 11th instant, at 147 Mary street, Michael, son of Thomas and Mary Knight, aged 9 months and 11 days. Funeral on Sunday, 13th instant, at 2 p.m.

 

FOSTER - Died on Friday, the 11th, Mary, the beloved wife of William W. Foster, in the 37th year of her age. The funeral will take place from her late residence, No 154 King William street, on Sunday, the 13th, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances and members of the Hamilton Temperance Reform Club are respectfully requested to attend without further notice.

 

April 14, 1879

 

BEDARD - (Montreal) Thomas Bedard of Champs de Mars street died suddenly last night.


STEVENSON - Died on Sunday morning, 12th instant, Annie, beloved daughter of Robert C. and Sarah Stevenson, aged 3 years and 9 months. Funeral will leave her father's residence, 90 Stinson street, on Monday, 14th instant, at 3 o'clock p.m.

 

SCOTT - Died at his residence, Port Rowan, Anthony Scott, in the 57th year of his age. Mr. Scott was an ordained minister of the Regular Baptist denomination and for some years preached for the Baptists in this village, but latterly worked at his trade, tailoring.

 

HARRISON - Died in this city, on the 14th instant, Amelia, beloved wife of Edward Harrison, in the 23rd year of her age. Funeral will leave her late residence, corner of Locke and Main streets, on Wednesday, 16th, at 4 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

April 15, 1879

 

HAWKINS - (Beamsville) Rev. Charles W. Hawkins of the Canada Methodist Church died here yesterday morning.

 

MAGEE - (Woodstock) We regret to chronicle the death of Mrs. Magee, mother of Charles Magee, Esq., of this town. She has been in a low state for some time past, Her remains were interred in St. Paul's cemetery on Sunday.

 

April 16, 1879

 

CROSS - Died in London, on the 13th instant, Lydia A., twin daughter of Mr. John Cross, of the G.W.R., aged 22 years and 3 months.

 

BROWN - (Windsor) Jacob Brown, an old resident and once a member of the Town Council, died this morning.

 

MYERS - An inquest was held upon the body of George Myers in the village of Tavistock in the Township of East Zorra on Saturday the 12th instant. The deceased was found in a mud puddle on the side of the road leading to the above-named village, by W. R. Creenholgh, with the face buried in the water and mud which was coated with ice, but life was extinct. He was seen, according to the evidence, the night before at Mr. Murray's house, a short distance from where he was found, but appeared then to he the worse of liquor. He followed the trade of a peddler and was addicted to liquor, more or less. The verdict of the jury was as follows: That George Myers was found dead, cause supposed to be drowning.


April 17, 1879

 

KENYON - Died near Tapleytown, in the Township of Saltfleet, on the 8th of April, of apoplexy, Ann Paterson, the beloved wife of Jacob Kenyon.

 

HARCOURT - Died on the 16th instant, at San Diego, California, Robert Hamilton Harcourt, MD., of Chicago, eldest son of the late Michael Harcourt, ex-MP for Haldimand.

 

GOODSON - Died at the residence of her son-in-law, P. Stewart, Binbrook, on the 16th instant, Mrs. Ann George, relict of the late William Goodson, of Brantford, and mother of J. W. Goodson of Waterdown, in the 73rd year of her age. Funeral from the above residence, Binbrook, on Saturday, at 10 a.m.

 

SMITH - Died Mary Elizabeth Smith, second daughter of Alexander and Mary A. Smith. Funeral will take place from her father's residence, 243 James street north (No 2 Police Station) on Saturday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

VIRTUE - (Burford) The death is announced of Mr. Matthew Virtue, one of the oldest residents of the Township of Burford, which sad event occurred after a brief illness at the advanced age of 77 years. Deceased was the son of the late Captain John Virtue of the East Lothian Cavalry, and was born in the city of Edinburgh, Scotland, where he resided until he came to Canada in the year 1821. He at first settled in the Township of Dalhousie, but subsequently removed to this township where he resided ever afterward. He was an esteemed elder of the Presbyterian church.

 

HENSELWOOD - This morning a pork butcher named Alexander or "Sandy" Henselwood was found dead in the small shoe shop of Frank Brown, corner of John and Augusta streets. The deceased was employed by the butchers and packers in putting up what is known as Glasgow hams. He was a most excellent workman but addicted to the immoderate use of liquor. He resided most of the time in Barton Township, but a few months since, as near as can be made out from Brown's story, he came to the city and went to reside in the hovel mentioned. Wednesday they were drinking as usual, and this morning deceased was found with his legs and part of his body on a shoe bench, his head hanging over the floor and doubled partially under the bench, and a stream of blood flowing from his mouth across the floor. Brown was in such a maudlin state that very little could be made out of him beyond the fact that the deceased had resided with him and they had got drunk together on the previous evening, on the occasion of Henselwood paying up a back debt of $4. The place which Brown and dead acquaintances inhabited is in a most filthy condition, and when our reporter visited it, the effort which had been made to clean up the


pool of blood had not much improved the room. The deceased was in his 56th year, and had lived here some six or eight years. At one period of his life he was a well-to-do commercial traveller in Glasgow, Scotland, and had a happy home, but a faithless wife, put an end to his enjoyments, and he came to Canada. since then he has endeavoured to drown his sorrows by very frequent indulgence in intoxicating liquor. When sober however, he was a first-class workman. So far as we can learn, he has no friends in Canada. The body was, on the suggestion of Dr. White, removed to the dead house. Dr. Mackelcen will hold an inquest on the body to-night.

 

April 18, 1879

 

CLARY - (Windsor) George C. Clary who committed suicide did so because his wife came to the knowledge that he was guilty as a partner in a scandal in which a girl figured.

 

April 19, 1879

 

DORMAN - Died on the 17th instant, Jennie Irene, daughter of Charles and Jennie Dorman, aged 9 months. Funeral from her father's residence, corner of John and Jackson streets, at 2 o'clock on Saturday afternoon.

 

STEWART - Died on the 17th instant, William T., son of Charles and Alamedia Stewart, aged 2 years and 3 months. Funeral from his parents' residence, 122 John street north, on Saturday, 19th, at 10 a.m. Friends are invited to attend.

 

HOLDEN - Died in this city, on the 17th instant, Mrs. Elizabeth C. Holden, beloved wife of Mr. James B. Holden, in the 76th year of her age. Her end was peace. Funeral from the residence of her son, Mr. C. C. Holden, No 11 Victoria avenue north, on Saturday, the 19th, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

SMITH - (Galt) The death is announced of John Smith who came from Roxburgh, Scotland, to Sprague's road about three miles from here and settled fifty years ago. Deceased who has lived in the town for several years had reached his 83rd year.

 

CAREY - (Halifax) A coloured girl named Sophis Carey, 22 years of age, was burned to death at Liverpool by her clothes catching fire from a stove.

 

CALDER - Died on Saturday morning, the 19th instant, Frederick Hamilton, youngest son of John and Sara Calder, aged 9 months and 14 days. Funeral from his father's residence, 96 Hughson street south, on Monday first, at 3 p.m.


April 21, 1879

 

WILSON - Died in this city, on the 19th, of inflammation, Lily Mabel, third daughter of Robert and Nellie Wilson, aged 4 years and 4 months.

 

HYSLOP - Died in this city, on the 20th instant, of scarlet fever, Jessie, youngest daughter of William Hyslop, aged 3 years and 6 months. The funeral will take place from the residence of her parents, No 27 Wellington street south, this (Monday) afternoon, at 4:30. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

WALTON - Died in this city, on the 20th instant, William Walton, aged 39 years. Funeral from his late residence, 121 Hess street north, to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GRIFFITH - Died in Brantford, of croup, on the 18th instant, Thomas Griffith, son of J. Griffith and M. J. Brewer, aged 6 months and 24 days.

 

BRUCE - Mr. William Bruce, formerly sergeant-major of the Hamilton Field Battery, and was one of the officers of the 24th Regiment which fought the Zulus at Tsundula and Rorke's Drift, it is reported was killed in one of these engagements, having command of a company during the temporary absence of the captain through illness. The deceased was well known to the older members of the Volunteers of this city and was highly respected.

 

BATES - (Brantford) Mr. Joseph Bates, father of Mrs. F. Elliott of this city, died at Virgil, Ontario, on Sunday the 13th instant, aged 82 years. Mr. Bates was a resident of this city for many years since, and he, with Mr. James Wilkes, assisted in organizing the Sabbath schools in connection with the Congregational Church fifty years ago. Mr. Bates was the first superintendent.

 

April 22, 1879

 

MCBETH - Died at Springfield, Ohio, on the 9th of April, 1879, of diphtheria, Edith Mary McBeth, aged 4 years and 28 days, only daughter of Thomas and Josephine McBeth, formerly of Hamilton.

 

MCMENEMY - Died on Tuesday, 22nd instant, at 237 Wellington street north, Margaret McMenemy, sister of John McMenemy, aged 68 years. Funeral from 237 Wellington street north, Thursday, at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this notice.


SEYMOUR - (Montreal) Hiram Seymour, an old and highly respected citizen, died here yesterday.

 

MORRIMAN - (St. Catharines) A youth named John F. Morriman, fourteen years of age, who resided with his parents at their residence on the Great Western Hill, died suddenly. He had been suffering somewhat from heart disease for some time, but no serious result was anticipated. He went to bed as usual with his brother on Saturday night, and an hour afterward his mother visited the bedside and found the boy dead.

 

April 23, 1879

 

CROHER - (Chatham) On Friday morning, a little five-year-old girl, daughter of John Croher of Raleigh, while playing next a heavy iron plough, pulled it over upon herself, the handle falling across her throat, and being unable to remove it or call for help, the little thing strangled to death. Life had been extinct about half an hour when she was discovered by an elder sister.

 

LYNCH - Miss Agnes Lynch, school teacher at Cayuga, and daughter of John Lynch, Esq. , who resides on the Thompson estate near Indiana, attended the Catholic church at Cayuga on Sunday morning and after services were over returned to her home with Miss Murphy, apparently well and hearty. In the evening the two young ladies returned to Cayuga to attend vespers. On the way, Miss Lynch complained of not feeling well and she and her companion stopped at Mr. Murphy's, Miss Lynch lying down from a feeling of weariness. Haemorrhage from the lungs set in and Dr. Baxter was immediately sent for who pronounced it a case of congestion of the lungs, and about three o'clock on Monday morning, she expired despite all that medical skill could avail. It is very rare thing indeed that congestion of the lungs terminates fatally in so short a time. Haemorrhage, however, must have been the immediate cause of death. Miss Lynch was a well-educated and highly respected young lady and had hardly attained to the age of 19 years.

 

April 24, 1879

 

BIGGAR - Died at Niagara, on Saturday, the 19th April, 1879, Annie Biggar, only daughter of William P. Biggar, C.F., in the 16th year of her age.

 

FLORENCE - Died at Brantford, on the 22nd instant, Mr. William Florence, aged 84 years, 11 months, and 2 days.

 

CARPENTER - Died at the residence of her parents, Township of Saltfleet, Maud Ethelyn, daughter of George and Catharine Carpenter, aged 5 years and 6 months.



April 25, 1879

 

BELTZ - (London) Mrs. H. Beltz expired last evening, aged 78 years. She was born in Fort Erie in 1801 and was a spectator at the battle of Lundy's Lane and other struggles on the frontier. She settled in London in 1834 and has lived here ever since.

 

O'NEALL - Died at Paris, on the 19th instant, Minnie A., wife of Mr. James O'Neall, and youngest daughter of the late James Smith, of Dundas, aged 36 years.

 

CLEMENCE - (New Dundee) The wife of Daniel M. Clemence, aged about 60, living near Roseville, committed suicide by hanging herself. Her mind has been deranged for some time. An inquest is to be held to-day.

 

FREY - (Brantford) F. Frey, a brakeman on the G.T.R., was killed yesterday afternoon between Tavistock and Stratford. It appears Frey was on a special train from Stratford, standing on the platform of the last car, and when passing the Port Dover Railroad his attention was attracted by some person on the train waving a handkerchief. He leaned over to see who it was, at the same time hanging on to the railing of the car. While leaning over, a side bridge struck him on the back of the head, killing him instantly. His remains were brought here to-day to his parents' residence.

 

April 26, 1879

 

WINCKLER - Died in this city, on the 24th instant, Otto, son of Adolph Winckler, aged 4 years and 3 months. Funeral will leave his parents' residence, 120 Rebecca street, on Sunday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

ABEL - Died in this city, on the 25th instant, Mary, eldest daughter of Elizabeth and Frederick Abel, in the 21st year of her age. Funeral will take place from No 15 Lower Cathcart

street, on Sunday, the 27th instant, at 4 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend.

 

COVERT - Jacob Covert, of Shannonville, was drowned while crossing Big Bay in a skiff on Wednesday.

 

CHAPMAN - R. C. Chapman, a farmer residing near Minden, died last Thursday night after a few minutes' illness.

 

GEMLEY - (London) Mrs. Gemley, wife of Rev. John Gemley, died this morning after a lingering illness, much regretted.

 

TROTMAN - (Montreal) This morning about 6:45 the inmates of a flat above the Tivol restaurant, Jacques Cartier square, were aroused by the report of a pistol. Upon enquiry it was found that Richard Thompson Trotman, aged 42, better known as Richard Thompson, had shot himself, the bullet entering the right temple. He has been for the last twelve years in the employ of the Grand Trunk Railway as caretaker from which he received his discharge. He leaves a wife and two children.

 

LYONS - (Windsor) On Wednesday, the wife of Daniel Lyons, a night watchman at the Great Western depot, was found dead at her home. When discovered she was kneeling at her bedside in the attitude of prayer.

 

SCOTT - Mr. Hugh Scott, a resident of Burwell settlement, Caradoc, had been missing since Friday night last. It seems he got up in the night and went out in his stocking feet and proceeded to the river bank, the Thames, along which his tracks have been traced sometimes near the water for about half a mile, when they ceased. It is supposed he has been drowned either by his own act or by accident.

 

KETTLE - Died at Windsor, on the 24th April, T. H. Kettle, conductor, G.W.R., aged 23 years and 3 months.

 

GAGNIER - Died in this city, on the 26th instant, John Oliver, infant son of Sarah and Oliver Gagnier, aged 3 months and 15 days. Funeral from 350 James street north, to-morrow (Sunday) afternoon, at 4 o'clock.

 

MOLESWORTH - On Thursday morning, Mr. Thomas Nepean Molesworth, chief engineer in the employ of the Ontario Government, died suddenly at his residence, Toronto, at the age of 55 years. Deceased appeared to be in his usual health when he arose in the morning, but was seized not long after by a fit of apoplexy and died in about two hours. Mr. Molesworth was a native of Armagh County, in Ireland, and came to Canada about thirty years ago. He had studied for the engineering profession in his native land and pursued it with success after coming to this country. For many years he was engineer of the Buffalo and Lake Huron Railway, and was afterward connected with the International Bridge scheme. He had occupied the post of Government engineer for about ten years before his death.

 

April 29. 1879

 

MARTINDALE - (London) An inquest was held to-day on the body of an infant which was found dead lying in bed beside its mother, Catherine Martindale, yesterday, in London Township, where she was a servant. The woman came from Detroit five weeks ago and was confined at the hospital, the child being illegimate. It was therefore suspected by the parties with


whom she lived and who had taken her in, partly out of pity, that she had done the child harm. The post mortem, however, showed that death was caused by inflammation of the lungs, and a verdict rendered accordingly.

 

BARTLETT - (Tillsonburg) On Sunday afternoon some citizens walking in Mr. Tillson's woods within the corporation found the body of a finely developed new-born male infant partly covered with leaves. At a coroner's inquest on Monday, the evidence was conclusive that the mother was a domestic servant named Mary Jane Bartlett whose parents reside in Middleton. The child had been born alive and strangled with a piece of old cotton wound tightly around the neck. The verdict of the jury was wilful murder against Mary Jane Bartlett. The girl has disappeared and the constables are searching for her.

 

COLLINS Mr. John Collins of Fairfield dropped dead Friday evening. The deceased was upwards of 70 years of age. He was widely known and universally respected.

 

PAINTER - The death is announced of Martha Moore, wife of the late Rev. Joseph Painter, who died at her own house, Onondaga, the other day, aged 68. Deceased was born in Northamptonshire, England, and emigrated to America in the year 1845, her husband coming the previous year. After their arrival in this country, they settled on a farm near to the village of Onondaga which Mr. Painter worked for a number of years and also as a minister, preached as he had opportunity. Two children survive her, one of whom is the wife of Mr. Matthew Whiting, warden of the county of Brant, who together with her grandchildren were present at her death.

 

NOYES - Died in this city, at 118 King street east, on the 29th instant, Janet E. Barr, beloved wife of James Noyes, jr., in the 26th year of her age. Funeral will leave the residence of James Noyes, Sr., 118 King street east, at 3 o'clock p.m. on Thursday, the 1st May. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend without further notice.

 

April 30, 1879

 

HAIGHT - Died at the 'Maples', Sparta, on the 22nd April, Bertha, wife of Granville Haight, and second daughter of J. A. Eakins, Esq., Sparta, aged 25 years.

 

HAGERMAN - Died at Lynedoch, on the 23rd instant, W. C. Hagerman, MD.

 

EGENER - Died on the 29th of April, Gertrude, the beloved wife of Fred Egener, in the 65th year of her age. Funeral will leave the residence, corner of Bay and Stuart streets, on Friday, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend without further notice.


BABCOCK - A child of Edward Babcock, Odessa, Ontario, aged about three years, was accidentally drowned on Monday while playing near a sunken box partly filled with water.

 

NELSON - J. Nelson, Luther, who was recently kicked by a horse, died on Sunday.

 

COLLIER - Robert Collier, of Bast Garafraxa, who recently severed three toes of his right foot with an axe, has died of lockjaw since.

 

REIBEL - A year-old-son of Mrs. John Reibel, of Minto, was scalded to death last week. His mother had poured the water off potatoes and set the pail on a chair.

 

NORTHEY - The cable announces the death of Colonel Northey of the 60th Rifles. He was, it will be remembered, severely wounded in a recent engagement with the Zulus. By his death the British army loses a gallant and accomplished officer. Colonel Northey was well known to many of our readers, having served in Canada and taken a prominent part in the Red River Expedition. He was a son-in-law of Colonel Gzowski of Toronto.

 

May 1, 1879

 

EGENER - We regret to have to record the death of Mrs. Egener, wife of Mr. Fred Egener, hotel keeper, corner of Bay and Stuart streets, under somewhat extraordinary circumstances. Mrs. Egener had enjoyed exceptionally good health up to four o'clock on Tuesday afternoon when her husband informed her that the Licence Commissioners had declined to give him a licence, although Mr. Egener had held a licence for the past twenty-four years. It is supposed that Mrs. Egener took the disappointment so much to heart that it was the immediate cause of her death which took place at half past eleven the same evening. Mrs. Egener, who was in the 65th year of her age, had many friends in Hamilton and neighbourhood who will regret to hear of her death.

 

MCMURRAY - The widow of the late Andrew McMurray died at Gosfield last week at the age of 102 years.

 

ARMSTRONG - (Newbury) A very sad affair occurred at three o' clock this morning about a mile out of town by which the house of Robert Armstrong and its contents were totally destroyed by fire, and Mr. Armstrong's father, who was stopping with him overnight, was nearly burned to a cinder. His legs were burned off above the knee and arms above the elbow. Mr. Armstrong, Jr. had to exert himself to get out all his family and came very near forgetting one of his daughters,


but she was rescued through the daring efforts of a gentleman present. The deceased was between 100 and 108 years old and was in town the day before the fire. He first came to this country from Ireland about the year 1830 and settled near Ottawa, afterward removing to the city of Ottawa where he remained about three years. He then moved to St. Thomas, and moved to his present place of residence about 1835 where he has remained ever since. He served in the Irish Cavalry about 1798. The friends of the deceased have the deep sympathy of the community, the sad affair having cast a gloom over the whole neighbourhood. An inquest will be held to-morrow morning.

 

May 2, 1879

 

WORSLEY - (Guelph) Old Alfred Worsley has at last passed away. The almost helpless, paralysed old man will be remembered by the citizens for many a day. He is said to have been the last of his family. In 1841, his mother and sister kept a general store in the place now known as Smith's drugstore. He was 68 years old and was a bachelor.

 

GARRITY - (St. George, N.B.) A very sad accident occurred at Back Bay, Charlotte County, on the 29th ultimo, by which a girl named Isabel Garrity was shot and instantly killed by a boy named Richard Cook. The victim was about twelve years old and the boy is ten. An inquest was held yesterday by Coroner Dick and a verdict of Accidental death was returned.

 

May 3, 1879

 

REGAN - (London) The funeral of Mr. Cornelius Regan, father of Ald. D. Regan and a settler of Westminster township since 1834, took place to-day and was largely attended.

 

BARR - Died at Brantford, on 30th April, William John Barr, only son of the late Rev. John Barr, in the 10th year of his age.

 

HOWLAN - Died in this city, on the morning of the 3rd instant, of consumption, Peter Howlan, aged 38 years and 1 month, born in County Monaghan, Ireland. Funeral will take place on Monday next, 5th instant, from No 35 Rebecca street.

 

May 5, 1879

 

STUART - (Toronto) Emeline Stuart, coloured, aged 52 years, employed in Scales's tobacco factory, dropped down dead in the street to-day. No inquest will be held.


GARDENER - (London) This forenoon the body of a young woman, aged about 25, was found in an outhouse in rear of Bennett's fancy store on Dundas street. A physician was at once brought and pronounced the woman dead. A phial of laudanum was found lying on the floor. She had evidently poisoned herself with its contents. The face was discoloured and raw about the mouth and nose from the application of the liquid. No one recognized the body and it was removed to the morgue. Two letters were found upon her, but they gave no clue to her identity. Late in the afternoon, Dr. Cream identified the remains as those of a Miss Gardener who had several times consulted him, representing that she had been employed at the Tecumseh Hotel. The hotel people, however, disclaim any knowledge of her. It is supposed she had been betrayed and committed suicide to end her shame and misery. An inquest will be held.

 

STEVENS - Died in Niagara Township, on the 1st May, Mr. Elijah Stevens, aged 53 years.

 

MILLER - Died in this city, on the 5th instant, Annie, only daughter of James and Matilda Miller, aged 16 months and 28 days. Funeral will leave her father's residence, 136 Catharina street east, at 2 o'clock p.m., on Tuesday, the 6th instant. Friends are requested to attend.

 

MCCLURY - (Petrolia) Mrs. McClury, wife of Mr. McClury, principal of the public school, died on Monday the 28th ultimo, after a few hours' illness, resulting from confinement. She was well known and highly respected, and very general sympathy is felt for Mr. McClury in his affliction. On Wednesday the remains were conveyed to St. Mary's for interment and were followed to the station by a large number of friends, consisting of many of the business men of the town, school teachers, and children, besides the clergymen of the Presbyterian and Methodist churches.

 

WILKINS - The evidence taken by the coroner in the matter of the body recently found near the County poor house of Wellington goes to show that the remains were those of Mary Wilkins who was an inmate of the poor house. She had run away from the institution and being thinly clad, perished in a snow storm. The question now is "What has become of the Body?" No trace of it has been found since it was stolen from the shed at Kinnettles' house.

 

May 6, 1879

 

HOLGATE - Died at the residence of her uncle, T. N. Best, 78 Market street, Bessie Holgate, aged 30 years. Funeral will leave the house at 3 p.m., on Wednesday, the 8th instant,, Friends please accept this intimation.


TORRANCE - (Toronto) Thomas Torrance, aged 35, was found dead in his yard to-night in the suburban village of Seaton. He went out to attend to his horses, and not returning, his wife went after him when she found him lying dead by his stable door. Heart disease was the cause.

 

FRASER - (Montreal) A young servant girl named Helen Fraser from Edinburgh, Scotland, employed in the family of Mr. D. Brown, hardware merchant, committed suicide by hanging herself.

 

KER - (Guelph) On Saturday last, William Ker, tinsmith, died of congestion of the lungs. He had only been sick a short time. Deceased came to this city about seven years ago when he bought out the tin and store business of John Webster, Cork street. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity and it is probable that he will be interred with masonic honours.

 

MOLTZAN - The man Moltzan whose furniture had been seized by Bailiff Servos and which caused the row in which the officer was assaulted by the men, Hanna and Smith, died in the hospital on Saturday morning from an attack of erysipelas from which he had been suffering since the attack on Mr. Servos. The disease was superinduced by drunkenness.

 

May 7, 1879

 

BOARBRIDGE - The people of the village of Corinth, Air Line Railway, were much surprised at the sudden death of Mrs. J. Boarbridge. She had been to church on Sunday morning, and then returned home, apparently as well as usual, but when she was reading in the evening suddenly expired. Heart disease was the supposed cause of her death.

 

THORP - Mrs. Thorp, relict of the late John Thorp, died at the residence of her son in Detroit on Sunday. The deceased lady was one of Guelph's oldest settlers, having arrived here with her husband in 1828. She became a widow in 1865. She leaves a family of grown-up sons and daughters.

 

May 8, 1879

 

DROPE - Died of bronchitis, on the 7th instant, Araminta Letitia, eldest daughter of Thomas and Jane Drope, aged 21 years and 4 months. Funeral from the residence of her father, 81 George street, on Friday afternoon, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances please accept this intimation.

 

MCDOWELL - Died in this city, on the 7th instant, Mrs. Flora McDowell, aged 65 years, mother of Mrs. John Eager and Mrs. A. Jameson. Funeral on Friday at 3 p.m., from the residence of her son-in-law, Mr. John Eager, corner of King and Queen streets.


SATTER (Montreal) - An old man named James Satter, dropped dead last night from heart disease.

 

EGENER - At the adjourned inquest held in No 2 station yesterday before Dr. T. White, coroner, touching the death of the late Mrs. Egener, three witnesses were examined; namely, Charles Egener, and Mr. and Mrs. Risemann, who proved the finding of a paper which had contained Paris green, in a bookcase in a dressing-room of the bedroom occupied by the deceased, and that for some time before death deceased had exhibited symptoms of mental depression. The jury brought in a verdict that deceased came to her death from an overdose of Paris green, administered by her own hand while labouring under a fit of mental depression.

 

DROPE - We regret to record the death of Miss Araminta Letitia, eldest daughter of Mr. Thomas Drope of this city, which took place yesterday afternoon, Deceased, who was an amiable young lady, was in the bloom of her youth, being only 21 years of age, and had apparently a long life before her until a week ago when she took a slight cold. Bad symptoms of bronchitis were exhibited yesterday morning, and medical aid was got, but proved of no avail. Miss Drope had but lately graduated with honours at Toronto as a teacher and held an appointment in the Central School here. She was an esteemed teacher in All Saints' Sunday school in which she will be much missed.

 

HOLGATE - The funeral of the late Mrs. Bessie Holgate took place yesterday afternoon from the residence of Mr. T. N. Best. Deceased was superintendent of All Saints' Sunday school and was much beloved by the pupils and teachers, as well as by a large circle of friends. There was a large attendance of teachers and scholars at the service which was held in the church, Very Rev. Dean Geddes, Rev. Canon Townley, and Rev. Messrs Thomson and Sutherland taking part. The solemn funeral service of the English Church was said. The following were the pallbearers: Messrs P. Garland, J. J. Mason, J. V. Teetzel, Charles Lemon, F. Monck, and F. G. Jaffe.

 

LITTLE - An inquest was held last night at the house of Mr. William Little, pedlar, corner of Bay and Jackson streets into the circumstances attending the death of his son, Franklin, a child three and a half years old, who had been drowned in a cistern in rear of the dwelling some time during the afternoon. Dr. Thomas White was the coroner.

Martha Little, sworn: The deceased was my son. He was three years old and was born in Hamilton, Last saw deceased about 2:30 o'clock this afternoon. He was in good health. When I saw him last he was in the shop with me at the corner. I missed him from there and went out to find him about half an hour afterward. After searching different places, I finally went to the cistern and took the hoe to search for him and as soon as I put it in, I felt the body which I drew


to the top of the water and then took it out myself. Mrs. Nichols came in shortly afterward and carried the child into the house. We rubbed the body to ascertain if there was any life and then sent for Dr. Husband who came but failed to restore life. The child was always healthy.

Dr. G. E. Husband testified that at 3:30 o'clock he had been called to see the child and when he arrived found life extinct. The child had a small abrasion on the right hip which had been received in the fall into the cistern.

After deliberating a short time, the jury brought in a verdict "That deceased came to his death accidental1y by falling into a cistern. The jury find that there has been the grossest negligence on the part of both landlord and tenant in leaving said cistern wholly unprotected by cover or anything else. The jurors would further recommend that if it is the duty of any person to see that such traps are not allowed to remain unprotected, they should look after them at once".

The father of the child is a pedlar who moved from Wellington Square to the city a short time since. He is now absent in Millbrook in pursuit of his business. The cistern which is referred to is a large barrel sunk into the ground at the corner of house, so placed that even an elderly person not aware of its position might tumble into it as it was uncovered, and immediately alongside there are three other barrels partially filled with water and also uncovered. A couple of boards were thrown over the first barrel after the drowning of the child. The managers of the Girls' Home who were present a short time after the finding of the boy rendered Mrs. Tittle all the assistance in their power. The deceased was the only child.

 

BONNET - (St. John's, Que.) Mr. Bonnet, one of the oldest employees of the St. John's Stone China Co., died this a.m. of haemorrhage of the lungs. While working at the kiln, he turned around saying to the other men that he was choking. The blood then began to flow from his mouth and he soon afterward expired. His wife is still in England and was expected by the next steamer.

 

GRANT - Last week a child of Mr. Alexander Grant, who lives opposite the Boys' Home, was attacked with diphtheria and succumbed to the fatal disease on Sunday morning. On Monday another child, aged 12 years, after helping to get the breakfast was attacked and died on Tuesday afternoon at three, We regret to hear that a third child, aged four years, has been attacked and given over by the physician. The mother and father are respectable worthy people and almost beside themselves and have an idea that their household is doomed. The neighbours are in a state of fear and are afraid to render any assistance. We would advise all households to keep their houses thoroughly clean and well ventilated.


May 9, 1879

 

MCBRIEN - Died in this city, on the 8th instant, William John, second child of David and Ellen McBrien, aged 3 years and 3 months. Funeral will leave his father's residence, 35 Spring street east, this Friday, at 2 o'clock p.m.

 

FILGIANO - Died in this city, on the 9th instant, Nellie, beloved wife of A. T. Filgiano, in her 21st year. Funeral will take place from her late residence, No 14 Wellington street north, on Monday, the 12th instant, at 9 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

WATSON - (London) While two young children of Mr. George Watson's were crossing Phillip's mill race to-day on a single plank, the little boy, aged 4 years, fell in, and before assistance came was drowned.

 

KAUFMAN - While Mr. and Mrs. Kaufman were absent on Tuesday, their infant child, a girl about 18 months, got hold of some matches and ate the ends off them. Medical aid was promptly summoned and all possible done to save the child's life, but to no avail. She died on Thursday forenoon.

 

May 10, 1879

 

FRASER - Died at his residence, Township of Proton, on the 28th ultimo, aged 71, Alexander Fraser, father of Rev. Mungo Fraser of this town, and James Fraser of Philadelphia, U.S.

 

LARGAY - Died in this city, on the 9th instant, Mr. Michael Largay, aged 52 years. Funeral will take place from his late residence, No 17 King William street, on Sunday at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

GEOFFRION - A man named Geoffrion died yesterday on the Gatineau from the effects of a dose of poison taken in mistake.

 

SOUTHERGILL - (Montreal) An eccentric individual named William Southergill died here under peculiar circumstances. He had been ill for some time, but refused all attention. He kept a loaded revolver at his bedside to shoot either doctor or clergyman who might be tempted to visit him. He was in a disgustingly filthy state at his death.

 

WILSON - (Montreal) G. B. Wilson, one of the oldest citizens and a veteran of 1812, died here to-day. He was a retired merchant.

 

DORMER - (Peterborough) On Thursday evening a child, two years old, daughter of Mr. John Dormer, while playing on the street in Ashburnham was run over by a passing wagon and instantly killed.


May 12, 1879

 

CLARKSON - Died in thin city, on Sunday morning, 11th instant, Francis Clarkson, in the 32nd year of his age. funeral will leave the Masonic Hall, James street, to-morrow (Tuesday) morning at 10 o'clock.

 

TRIX - (Toronto) A few days ago James Trix died in the general hospital of congestion of the lungs. No one claimed the body and it was sold to the Toronto Medical school for $5 by the Inspector of Anatomy according to the usual practice. After the remains had been disposed of, the deceased's widow turned up and claimed the body. Before she could get it, she was compelled to pay $9 to the Medical School officials. She now seeks to recover the money, alleging on the advice of friends that it was illegally extorted from her. When a person dies in a hospital and leaves no address of relatives, the body is held by the authorities twenty-four hours at the expiration of which time, if not claimed, it is handed to the Inspector of Anatomy who sells it to the Toronto or Trinity Medical school, as the case may be.

 

DAWSON - (Montreal) Anne Dawson, a widow with seven children, was drowned in the canal last night. She visited her son in the evening and left at nine o'clock to go home, after which nothing was seen of her until her body was found this morning.

 

LABELLE - Joseph Labelle, aged 75 years, was killed on the track by a freight train at Point Claire last night.

 

CHEVALIER - Augustin Chevalier, 13 years of age, was accidentally drowned at Cote St. Paul on Saturday evening.

 

MANNING - William Manning, a cigar maker, of Belleville, visited Madoc on Friday, and on Saturday morning was found dead in bed in a hotel where he stayed in that village.

 

CLARKSON - Those of our readers who were acquainted with Mr. Frank Clarkson, who for several years past has been employed as a commercial traveller for the firm of Hyslop, Russell, & Co. of this city, will learn with regret of his sudden death which took place at the Dominion Hotel about two o'clock yesterday morning. The deceased had been away on one of his trips and returned to the city on Wednesday last, and except that he complained of a cold, he was apparently in his usual state of health. On Friday he had a slight attack of intermittent fever for which he consulted Dr. Stark. Up to Saturday night, late, however, no serious apprehensions were felt, and even then although it was deemed necessary for an attendant to sit up with him no fatal result of his illness was anticipated. Mr. Archibald Spera, junior partner in the firm of Hyslop, Russell, & co. arranged to spend the night with Mr. Clarkson and was the only person present at the time of his death. Shortly before two o'clock, Clarkson said to his companion that


he felt pretty well and that he (Mr. Spera) had better go home and get some sleep. This of course Mr. Spera refused to do, but placed himself in a reclining position on the edge of the bed so as to be ready should his services be required. A few minutes after this, Clarkson had occasion to get out of bed which he did so quietly as not to disturb Mr. Spera who was dozing at the tine. A moment more and the latter was startled by a heavy thud on the floor and he at once perceived that Clarkson had fallen. He immediately raised him up, but only in time to see him draw his last breath and expire in his arms. Dr. Stark was sent for without delay, but on his arrival he pronounced that life was extinct.

At Dr. Stark's suggestion, Dr. Thomas White, coroner, was informed of the sad occurrence and asked to hold an inquest. Accordingly a jury was summoned yesterday morning and at two o'clock in the afternoon they met and viewed the body after which they adjourned until this evening at eight o'clock. Subsequently a post mortem examination was made by Dr. Stark assisted by Nr. James White, and from what can be learned it is supposed that death was caused by heart disease.

The deceased gentleman who has passed away at the early age of 32 years came to Hamilton about five years ago from Don Mills, a few miles from Toronto, where he is supposed to have some distant relatives. At that time he was engaged with the firm mentioned above, and in their employ remained, the members of the firm always having the highest confidence in his honour, integrity, and business ability. Mr. Clarkson was known by a large circle of friends in Hamilton as well as along the route which he travelled. He was a member of Richmond Hill Lodge, No 23, A.F. & A.M., and about a year and a half ago he affiliated with St. John's Lodge, N0 40, of this city. He was also a member of Unity Lodge, IOOF last evening the body was removed by the Masons to their hall, James street, they having decided to take charge of the funeral arrangements. His friends have been telegraphed and as soon as they are heard from the date of the funeral will be announced.

 

MCDONALD - (Ingersoll) A special dispatch received this afternoon says: Mr. D. R. McDonald of this town, a cheese buyer, well known in this section, died last night from the effects of an overdose of aconite, a medicine which he has been in the habit of taking to relieve severe pain with which he has been troubled very much lately.

 

CLARKSON - This morning Mr. John Cooper and wife, and several other relatives of the late Francis Clarkson who died suddenly on Sunday morning arrived in this city from York Mills. As may be easily understood, they were all profoundly grieved at the sad news of their kinsman's untimely death, he having been held in the highest esteem by them. From Mr. Cooper, our


reporter learned that the deceased was born and brought up in the village of York Mills where he was highly respected by all who knew him. The body will be conveyed from the Masonic Hall to the great Western station in time for the 11:35 train to-morrow morning where it will be conveyed to York Mills for interment.

 

May 13, 1879

 

CHRISTIAN - Died at his residence, No 112 Main street west, Thomas Robert Christian, native of Sligo, Ireland, for some time manager of the Rank of Montreal here, in his 52nd year. The funeral will take place on Wednesday next, at 4 p.m. and friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

As will be seen by the obituary column of this morning, Mr, T. R. Christian, late manager of the Bank of Montreal in this city, died last night in the 52nd year of his age. Mr. Christian was a native of County Sligo, Ireland, and after going through the usual course of education became connected with the Provincial Bank of Ireland, in whose employ he remained for a number of years. On his removal to Canada, he became manager of the branch office of the Montreal Bank in Montreal city, retaining the office until starting the banking and brokerage business under the name of Christian, Galt, & Co. When this firm dissolved, Mr. Christian entered the employ of the Bank of British North America with which he remained until appointed to the managership of the office of the Bank of Montreal here. A couple of years since, his health began to fail and although every effort was put forth to stay the disease, it made steady progress, and a removal to Colorado was advised, but the change was unavailable, and about three months since, the deceased returned to die. He leaves a wife, two sons, and a daughter to mourn his loss, along with a wide circle of friends. He was a type of citizen we can ill afford to lose.

 

SILLS - (Picton) Mrs. E. Rills died suddenly this morning of heart disease.

 

GELINEAU - (Windsor, Que) Yesterday evening en eight-year-old son of G. Gelineau of this place fell into a tank containing hot water and was so severely scalded that death ensued this morning.

 

MCFANE - (Dublin, Ont) As Mrs. McFane, wife of Mr. McFane, merchant, was driving home from Exeter, when within a mile from Cromarty, her horse took fright and ran away, throwing her from the buggy and killing her almost instantly. Her little girl, aged about three years, was also thrown out and so seriously injured that poor hopes are entertained of her recovery.


WISEMAN - (Toronto) John Wiseman, about 60 years of age, was walking on the Grand Trunk track this evening opposite the morgue when a freight train came along. The engineer blew the whistle several times, but the old man did not seem to hear him, and the engine struck him full on the back. His spine was broken and two ribs each side, and he was thrown on one side. The train was stopped and the man picked up. A few minutes afterward, he expired. His lifeless body was taken into the morgue. He leaves a wife and family.

 

MCCAULAY - The adjourned inquest on the body of the late G.W.R. tie inspector, Murdoch McCaulay, assembled at No 2 police station, Dr. Woolverton, coroner. The jury without retiring brought in a verdict that deceased came to his death from being run over by the 6:45 a.m. train leaving Hamilton for Toronto; that deceased was walking on the track to inspect ties when the said train overtook him near the Toronto junction, and running over him produced the injuries which the jury believe was the immediate cause of death, and that the jury consider there is no blame to be laid to any of the G.W.R. officials or employees.

 

BLAMEY - Died on the 12th instant, Elizabeth, relict of the late Robert Blamey, in the 64th year of her age. Funeral from her son's residence, corner of Park and Cannon streets, at 3 p.m., on Wednesday, the 14th instant. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

May 14, 1879

 

DEAN - (Toronto) A seven-year-old child, daughter of a Mr. Dean, has died from the results of a fall while at play two or three weeks ago. She fell on her knee, cut it, end inflammation set in.

 

FOSTER - (Windsor) Mrs. Foster, living on Aylmer avenue, was found this morning drowned in a cistern, it is supposed she had accidentally fallen in last night and was unable to extricate herself.

 

DELMAGE - (Sarnia) As some boys were playing on Clark's wharf, they discovered the body of Willie Delmage, aged about five years, who had been missing since 15th April. An inquest was held and a verdict of 'accidentally drowned' was returned.

 

SMITH - Died at Oakville, on Tuesday, 13th instant, Robert Smith, in the 72nd year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, Oakville, on Thursday, at 3 p.m.

 

CASEY, EVERARD - (Toronto) Another horrible catastrophe occurred here shortly after four o'clock in the afternoon.


Three children named Richard Casey, aged 5; John Casey, aged 3; and John Everard, aged 5, were playing in a shed at the corner of Adelaide and Bathurst streets, owned by one Nolan, when by some means it caught fire. The doors somehow or other became closed, and it was not known that the poor little things were in the shed until it was burned to the ground and their charred remains were found among the burning embers. It is supposed that they were playing with matches and set fire to a quantity of old shingles which were in the barn. The parents of the children, who are hardworking industrious people, are frantic at their great loss. The fire was only burning a few minutes and the finding of the little bodies was a terrible surprise of everyone.

 

May 15, 1879

 

HALL - Died in East Flamborough, on the 13th April, Mr. George Hall, aged 79 years.

 

GOODERHAM - (Toronto) The funeral of Mr. Gooderham who was killed at the Carlton disaster is taking place this afternoon. There is a large attendance including all the prominent citizens and many from Streetsville and other points of the country.

 

MCARTHER - (Seaforth) About 4:30 yesterday morning a chopping stone in Mr. Lee's grist mill at Varna burst, scattering fragments in all directions, fatally injuring John McArther, head miller, who only lived about three hours afterward, and injuring Mr. Lee and Charles Weeks. McArther was leaning over the stone at the time. Lee and Weeks were only six feet from it. Pieces of the stone weighing three hundred pounds were flying on both sides of them. McArther leaves a wife and six children to mourn his loss, four of the latter being under ten years of age. Mr. Lee's loss is $300.

 

MCCRUM - On Monday morning last, says the "Reformer", one of the oldest residents of Galt, Mr. Henry McCrum, passed away very suddenly. The deceased in the pioneer days was one of our most prominent business men.

 

STODDART - (Galt) On Sunday afternoon, another old resident, the mother of Mr. Henry Stoddart, passed away, having attained the good old age of 75 years.

 

NOLAN - Died in this city, on the 15th instant, Bridget, relict of the late James Nolan, in her 73rd year. Funeral will take place from her late residence, No 72 Park street north, on Saturday, the 17th instant, at 9 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.


WILSON - A young lad, named James Wilson, twelve years of age and son of John Wilson, Elizabeth street, Stratford, ran a nail into his foot while returning from school a couple of weeks ago. The wound continued to inflame and on Sunday lockjaw set in from the effects of which he died on Tuesday.

 

May 16, 1879

 

MCDONALD - (London) Mr. Hugh McDonald, a school teacher, formerly of this city, died suddenly in Yarmouth one morning this week.

 

GANAND - (Sherbrooke, Que.) A horrible murder was reported as having occurred yesterday morning near Lake Aylmer on the Quebec Central Railway. Two men, Ganand and Letourneau, quarrelled in reference to some land when the latter struck the former with an axe in the chest, the axe sinking in nearly to the handle. Letourneau was reported to have left for Lambton. High Constable Loomis left by special engine on the Quebec Central to effect his arrest with Coroner Woodward to hold an inquest.

Later: Letourneau has arrived in Sherbrooke and surrendered himself to justice and is now in jail.

 

ROONEY - (Montreal) The residents of Melbourne Quarry in this province are much agitated by a case of suicide brought to light the day before yesterday, It appears that about six months ago, a man named Rooney of that place had $1150 in money and notes stolen from his house. The loss preyed upon his mind and it is supposed unsettled his reason. His body was found on Tuesday and an inquest held. A. verdict of "suicide while temporarily insane" was returned.

 

May 17, 1879

 

LIONELS - (Montreal) a son of George Lionels of Visitation street fell off a balcony at the rear of his father's dwelling to the ground, a distance of twenty feet, and was killed.

 

MACKLEM - We regret to learn of the death on Wednesday last at Naples, Italy, of Mrs. Macklem, widow of the late Oliver T. Macklem of Chippewa, sister of the late Mr. T. C. Street for many years member for Welland, and sister-in-law of the Bishop of Niagara. The deceased lady had been travelling on the Continent for about a year. Her death will be regretted by a large circle of friends in Ontario.

 

WILLIAMS - Mr. Thomas Williams of Norfolk County whose death we lately reported was until he became deaf and blind one of the most prominent men in this section of the country.


He settled in Norfolk at a very early date and took a prominent part in the war of 1812, was at the battle of Lundy's Lane, Chippewa, and Fort Erie, and was a prisoner but made his escape from the prison at Philadelphia with a number of others. He was also under arms in the rebellion of 1837-38 and in 1866 made a patriotic speech to the two Walsingham companies on the morning of their departure for the front.

 

ROSS - Mr. Charles Ross, who was buried Thursday last at Port Rowan, was for some years an officer in the volunteer force and graduated with honour at the Military School, Hamilton. He was an efficient officer. The deceased was a much respected member of Walsingham Lodge, No 174, A.F. & A.M., and was buried with Masonic honours. Mr. Ross leaves a wife and seven children to mourn his loss.

 

May 19, 1879

 

STONE - (Napanee) An old man, 64 years old, named Stephen Stone, living in Little Creek, was found dead in his bed this morning. He walked three miles to attend church last Sunday and was in his usual health last evening, having worked all day yesterday. It is supposed he died from heart disease.

 

WILSON - (Montreal) A man named William Wilson, 45 years of age, who was arrested for drunkenness last night and locked up in a cell, was found dead at four o'clock this morning. He seemed in good health when placed in the cell, and it is suspected he poisoned himself. An inquest will be held to-morrow. He was an electrician by trade, and was engaged in connection with the experiments in the electric light.

 

May 20, 1879

 

WADDELL - Died in this city, on the 19th instant, Robert Gordon Byron Waddell, eldest son of Mr. William Waddell, aged 24 years and 10 months. Funeral from his father's residence, 121 John street north, on Wednesday, the 21st, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

SYMES - (Ottawa) The mystery surrounding the disappearance of the young man Symes of Fitzroy Township on the night of his wedding on New Year's has at last been solved. The body of the unfortunate young man was found in Chats Lake yesterday afternoon. There is no doubt that Symes, who was a farmer in comfortable circumstances, suddenly became insane.

 

BORDEAUX - (Montreal) An infant child of Louis Bordeaux died from an overdose of soothing syrup administered by his nurse.


WOODERMAN - Mrs. Wooderman, wife of an engineer of the steamer "Acadian" was found dead at her residence in Halifax yesterday.

 

HORTON - William Horton of Fenelon Falls was drowned yesterday while attempting to cross the rapids between the falls and Crab Lake.

 

BATTERBEE - It was reported on the streets of Windsor on Saturday night that a brakeman named William Batterbee was killed in the afternoon while coupling cars at St, Thomas. He was in the employ of the Canada Southern Railway and was well known in Windsor. The report of his death bore evidence of authenticity.

 

BELT - Died at the rectory, Burlington, on Monday, 19th instant, Mary, eldest daughter of Rev. William Belt, aged 21 years. Funeral on Wednesday, 21st instant, at 2 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

BURNETT - Died on the 19th instant, David Burnett, son of David and Sarah Burnett, aged 7 years. Funeral will take place at 10 o'clock on Wednesday, the 21st. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

JOHNSTON - Died in this city, on the 19th instant, Emma Irenia, youngest daughter of Isabella and John W. Johnston. Funeral will leave the residence of her father, 21 Magill street, on Wednesday, the 21st, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends are requested to attend.

 

WILKINS - Upon retiring to bed on Friday evening, S. Wilkins, of Galt, took a portion of laudanum. When his condition was discovered on Saturday morning, medical aid was at once sought, and he so far recovered as to be able to converse with those present. He then said he had done it on purpose and that he did not want to live. Everything was removed from his room by which it was thought he could injure himself but unfortunately he retained possession of a small penknife with which he stabbed himself some five times, two of the strokes penetrating the ventricle of the heart. He lingered on in a state of unconsciousness until 8 o'clock in the evening when he died. Mr. Wilkins has not been in robust health for some time, and the shock of the late fire in his establishment is supposed to have unsettled his reason. An inquest had been held and a verdict of "Death from his own hands while labouring under mental depression" was returned. Deceased has long been a prominent merchant of Galt and carried on an immense business at the corner of Main and Water streets for many years. A year or two ago he was worth at least $60000. In 1873 he sat in the Town Council and was one of the most popular members. He was an enthusiastic Oddfellow and had been Noble Grand of Waterloo Lodge, IOOF,


more than once, and was instrumental in establishing a lodge at Preston. Mr. Wilkins leaves a wife and family to mourn his sad and sudden end.

 

May 21, 1879

 

PETTIPIECE - (Ottawa) Recently a number of boys were playing ball in the Township of North Cower when one of them, a twelve-year-old son of Mr. Thomas Pettipiece, was struck on the head just back of the ear by the ball, which knocked him insensible. Medical aid was summoned, but in a short time he had breathed his last. It was found that the skull had been fractured by the blow.

 

JENKINS - A dreadful accident occurred in Westminster, near the city, by which one man lost his life, another sustained probably fatal injuries, and a young lady was seriously hurt. Mr. Benjamin Jenkins left home this morning with a load of straw for market, driving a high-spirited team of horses. His nephew, Mr. William Jenkins, and sister-in-law, Miss Elliott, accompanied him, sitting on top of the load. Coming down a hill approaching Clark's bridge, one of the wiffle trees became unbolted and the horses started. The driver, Mr. B. Jenkins, was dragged violently off and the wheels passed over his legs. The horses kept on and ran into a ditch near the bridge, throwing Mr. William Jenkins high in the air and causing him to fall with great force. Miss Elliott managed to throw herself off the lead in the rear and fell on the road on her back insensible. Mr. B. Jenkins recovered himself and scrambled to where his sister-in-law lay, but after some sympathizing words regarding her state he fell down in his tracks and died in twenty minutes from internal injuries. He was 50 years old and leaves a wife and six young children. Mr. William Jenkins is said to be seriously hurt internally. Miss Elliott has ever since been delirious and has to be kept indoors by force. The doctors do not give much hope for the young man's recovery.

 

May 22, 1879

 

COWAN - Saturday afternoon about two o'clock Mrs. James Cowan, mother of Dr. Cowan of Guelph, took suddenly ill at the residence of her husband in the Dickie Settlement, North Dumfries; The attack was one of inflammation of the heart and terminated fatally at ten o'clock Sunday morning. Mrs. Cowan was aged 68 years and 11 months at the time of her death. Deceased was a native of Selkirkshire, Scotland, and emigrated with her husband and family to this country in the summer of 1831, and has been a constant resident of Galt or neighbourhood until her decease, and was well known for numbers of miles around. She leaves a large grown-up family to mourn her loss.

 


May 23, 1879

 

FEAST - Died in this city, on the 22nd instant, Harry Cush Feast, in his 11th year, third son of Alfred, Sr. and Mary C. Feast, and grandson of William Servos. Funeral will take place from the residence of his grandfather, Mr. Servos, 42 Murray street west, at 9 o'clock on Sunday morning, proceeding to the burial ground in Binbrook. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

ARMSTRONG - The funeral of John Armstrong, aged 104 years, took place at Huntley yesterday morning.

 

HORTON - (Elora) A shocking accident occurred in the Flora grist mill about four o'clock to-day by which one of the proprietors, Mr. Henry Horton, aged about 65, lost his life. While in the act of oiling the machinery on the second flat, his clothes were caught by a revolving shaft making 150 revolutions per minute, and in less that a moment his body was torn to pieces. The limbs were severed from the body, the entrails strewn on the floor, and the sight was of the most sickening description. Deceased had been absent from the first flat about half an hour and was not known to have been upstairs. His son, on going to the third storey to change a slide, discovered the body of his father revolving in the machinery. He immediately stopped the entire machinery. An inquest was held and a verdict of 'accidental death' returned.

 

DEWAR - John Dewar, aged 26, was found dead in a field in North Easthope yesterday morning on the farm of Mr. John Cameron. He was subject to fits and it is supposed that he fell down in one and was suffocated.

 

May 24, 1879

 

LANG - (Ottawa) The body of the lad, Lang, who was drowned yesterday at the Chaudiere, has not been recovered.

 

BOULDRING - (Toronto) George Bouldring, a labourer, going to Victoria park in search of employment, fell off his vehicle, the wheels of which went over him, causing such injuries that death was almost instantaneous.

 

SMOKE - (St. Catharines) As Andrew Smoke of Crowland Township was riding a horse along the road this morning, he was seen to fall off, and on assistance arriving he was found to be insensible and expired in a few minutes. Heart disease was the cause.

 

BEATTY - Died on the 23rd instant, Mr. Robert Beatty, Customs broker of this city, in the 29th year of his age. The funeral will take place from his late residence, 235 MacNab street north, on Sunday afternoon.


Yesterday afternoon a melancholy accident occurred at Burlington Beach by which a well known and highly respected citizen, Mr. Robert Beatty, customs broker, lost his life. The news of the sad occurrence reached the city by telegraph about half past four o'clock this afternoon, causing deep sorrow among the many friends of the unfortunate gentleman as the report reached them. The particulars of the accident, as near as can be ascertained, are as follows.

At two o'clock in the afternoon, Mr. Beatty went on the steamer "Dennis Bowen" to Oaklands and thence proceeded to the Beach where he remained until the return of the steamer about four o'clock. The "Bowen" lands and receives her passengers at the west end of the south pier, and at the hour above named, it would seem that the deceased was taking his way along the pier at a rapid walk to catch the boat as she was departing, when his foot caught on one of the rotten planks and he was precipitated into the water of the canal. After falling into the water, he was seen by the ferryman and Mr. Charles Holton apparently swimming a short distance from the pier. Holton and the ferryman were then about 200 yards away and as they say did not at first suppose there was any danger as the one observed to the other, "It's a funny thing to go swimming".

Closer inspection showed them that the man was struggling for his life, when the ferryman ran for a boat and Holton ran down the pier in the direction of the drowning man. Just as the latter got near enough opposite to where deceased was and before the ferryman could reach the spot with his boat, he saw Mr. Beatty sink and strange to say he never rose again. Grappling irons and boats were immediately procured and the parties already named, assisted by Messrs T. Fairchild, Roach, Lear, Brierly, G. A. McCully, and others engaged in the search but it was not till half an hour had elapsed that the body was recovered, and although every effort was made to restore life, they were of no avail. The body when brought to the surface presented a very natural appearance. After the efforts to restore life had failed, the remains were removed to Fairchild's hotel where an inquest was instituted...The deceased who has thus suddenly been cut off in the prime of life, being only in his thirtieth year, was well known to the people of Hamilton. He was the son of the late William Beatty, formerly Surveyor of the Customs at the port, and brother of Mr. Charles Beatty, customs broker, and Mr. Samuel Beatty, Toronto.

He was born in Ireland in 1849 and while yet a mere infant was brought to this country by his parents who settled in Hamilton. He leaves, besides his two brothers and his mother, a wife and two children to mourn his untimely end. The family will have the deep sympathy of the community in their affliction.


MCLEAN - The death is announced of the wife of Captain James McLean of the Indian Reserve near Hagersville. Her Indian name was Nbo-lah-noo-qua. She was born at the north end of Burlington Beach near Wellington Square in 1785, and at the time of her death she was in the 94th year of her age. She was converted to the Christian faith through the instrumentality of the Rev. Peter Jones at the River Credit in the year 1824 and was baptized at the Grand River by the Rev. Alvin Tory on the 25th December, 1825. For some years she had been deprived of her sight.

 

May 26, 1879

 

OWEN - (Ingersoll) Last p.m. about nine o'clock, a very sudden death occurred to a colored woman named Owen who lives on the north side of the river. It seems she had been working all day for Mr. L. Thompson and left his place about 7:30. She then went to her daughter's place and returned home about 9 o'clock. After being home a short time, she asked for a drink of water, at the same time tearing the front of her clothes saying she was burning up inside. After taking the water she commenced vomiting and foaming at the mouth and died in a short time. At the inquest the jury returned a verdict of "died from heart disease produced by overeating".

 

BROCKINGTON - (Brantford) Mrs. Brockington, wife of E. Brockington, hotel keeper of this place, was drowned last night in a cistern at the back of the hotel. Mrs. Brockington had been ill for some time and a relative was attending her, but did not know the deceased had left her room during the night. Mr. Buchanan, a neighbour, saw Mrs. Brockington at 3 o'clock walking in the yard in her night dress, shortly afterward he heard a splash of water but paid no attention to it. In rising this morning he saw a shawl lying near the cistern. He went and looked into it and saw a woman. Assistance was called and when the body was taken out, it was discovered to be Mrs. Brockington. After the above evidence was taken, the coroner's inquest adjourned till Tuesday.

 

MCDONALD - Roderick McDonald of Antigonish, N.S., was found dead on Saturday.

 

BRYDON - (Toronto) On Saturday night a Mrs. Brydon, aged 60, living on Jarvis street, Toronto, after looking at the fireworks in the Horticultural Gardens, went into her house and quietly sitting down in a chair, died without a word or murmur. She was apparently in excellent health a minute before.

 

LECLAIRE - Joseph Leclaire, an Ottawa labourer, died suddenly on Saturday morning of angina pectoris.


May 27, 1879

 

MARSHALL - Died in Glanford, on the 26th, Sarah Jane, only daughter of William and Catherine Marshall, aged 2 years and 4 months. Funeral from her father's residence, on Wednesday, the 28th, at 1 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

DUNCAN - Died in Guelph, on the 25th instant, Diogenes Duncan, aged 89 years. Deceased was a native of Aberdeenshire, Scotland, and came to this country many years ago.

 

BURKE - Died in this city, on the 26th instant, John Burke, aged 26 years. Funeral will leave his late resident, 95 King William street, on Wednesday, the 28th instant, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends are respectfully invited to attend.

 

KENT - Died this morning, 27th instant, at the residence of her daughter at Brantford, Mrs. M. A. Kent, relict of the late Joseph Kent, of Bodmin, Cornwall, England, and mother of Alderman Kent of this city, in the 86th years of her age. Funeral at 4 o'clock Thursday afternoon.

 

LLOYD - Died at the residence of Dr. Mackelcan, Gore street, on the 27th instant, Lucinda Floyd, second daughter of the late Charles Lloyd, Esq., L.L.D. of Cardiganshire, South Wales, in her 79th year. Funeral from 16 Gore street, on Thursday afternoon, 29th instant, at 3 p.m.

 

BARNES - (St. Catharines) A lamentable accident heralded in the celebration of the Queen's birthday here. Early this morning George Albert Barnes, aged 13, was accidentally shot in the breast and instantly killed by his brother, Samuel, while the latter was handling a revolver. The weapon was out of order and would not stay at full cock. While in the act of cocking the weapon, the hammer slipped and the pistol exploded. An inquest was held and a verdict rendered according to the facts. The jury exonerated Samuel Barnes of all blame.

 

BOULTON - (Kingston) A shocking case of cruelty which may amount to murder has come to light. A family named Boulton for two weeks past have occupied a small house on King street The family was composed of father, mother and one daughter. The mother and daughter were very dissipated. On Friday afternoon a clergyman was requested by the neighbours to call and see the girl who was very ill. She was found in a terrible condition, full of bruises and apparently in the last stages of life. On Saturday it was determined to remove her to the hospital, and on visiting the wretched house, it was found locked and a policeman's aid had to be called to force open the door and overcome the resistance offered by the girl's mother. The girl was found in a filthy bed with her face and hands covered with blood as if she had just been severely beaten. She was removed to the hospital where she died on Sunday morning. An inquest is being held and Mrs. Boulton is under arrest.


DEMOLINE - (Barrie) This morning an engine of H.& N.W.R. was backing from Barrie station; the engineer saw a man walking on the track. The whistle was sounded, but the man who was deaf did not hear it. Before the engine could be stopped it struck the man on the head. He was identified as a man, 33 years of age, named William Demoline. He died in an hour afterward. An inquest will be held.

 

BIGGAR - The death is announced of Mr. James L. Biggar of Murray, Ontario, brother-in-law of Dr. Rosebrugh of this city. Deceased, who came of an old U.E. Loyalist family, was educated at Victoria College, then the Upper Canada Academy. He was married in 1816 to Miss Hodgins, a daughter of Mr. William Hodgins of Sandymount, Dublin, and sister of J. G. Hodgins, L.L.D., and Thomas Hodgins, QC, of Toronto. Mr. Biggar took a prominent part in politics and was for a long time member for East Northumberland in the old Parliament.

He died suddenly at Clifton Springs where he had been trying to improve his health. The body was brought to this city on Sunday and yesterday conveyed to Murray where it will be interred to-day.

 

May 28, 1879

 

BURGER - Died at his residence, Palermo, on the 26th instant, James E. Burger, a long and well known resident, after a long illness. Funeral Thursday morning by IOOF.

 

RESY - (Montreal) Joachim DeLang Resy died suddenly yesterday from pulmonary haemorrhage.

 

MURPHY - (Toronto) Edward Murphy, the United States soldier drowned while crossing the Niagara River oil Saturday, was a native of this city, and his parents, wife and two children reside here now.

 

LITTLEWOOD - (London) John Littlewood, aged 103 years, lately died at the residence of Mr. Robert Hobson, Westminster.

 

May 29, 1879

 

COOKE - Died at Toronto, on Wednesday, 28th instant, Charlotte Helena, eldest daughter of William Cooke, Merchants Bank, aged 20 years. Funeral on Saturday at 4 p.m.


LEWIS - Died in this city, on the 28th instant, Levi Lewis, Esq., in the 72nd year of his age. Funeral on Friday at 1 o'clock, from his late residence, comer of victoria avenue and Kings street, to Winona. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

We regret to have to announce the death of Levi Lewis, Esq., which took place at his residence, King street east, yesterday afternoon. The deceased was in his 72nd year, having been born on the 26th of June, 1803, in the Township of Saltfleet where he resided until about four years ago when he removed to this city. He had been engaged in farming all his life until the above period, in which he was very successful. Mr. Lewis was highly esteemed by all who had the pleasure of his acquaintance, not only on account of his kindly disposition and strict probity and uprightness but also for his business ability. Hence he occupied all the township offices in the gift of the municipality, occupying the posts of Reeve and Deputy-Reeve for some years.

Being an enthusiastic farmer and bringing to bear his intelligence and energy in the improvement of everything relating thereto, we find him early associated with those who founded the Agricultural Association which has done so much to foster improvement and progress in the various departments of the farm. He was one of the most steadfast friends the Association had and this was fully recognized by his co-adjutors who showed their estimation of his character by electing him to the position of vice-president and president. The latter position he held last year. He also held for many years the office of vice-president of the Victoria Mutual Insurance Company until a few years ago.

 At the time of his death he was a director of the Hamilton Mutual Fire Insurance Company which institution will very much miss his help and kindly counsel. Mr. Lewis was a staunch Conservative in politics. He leaves a widow and son and daughter, Mrs, N W. Birely, to mourn the loss of a faithful and loving husband and father.

 

CARLETON - (Ottawa) Mr. C. Carleton, a Customs House official and an old resident, died last night.

 

MULLIGAN - (Montreal) Mrs. Mary Mulligan dropped dead on the street last night from heart disease.

 

CHARPENTIER - (Montreal) Zephern Charpentier, who was run over on the street by a vehicle on Thursday, died last night.

 

GREGORY - (Toronto) The jury at the inquest on the body of Arthur Gregory, injured by falling off a scaffold while employed at the Mercer Reformatory, returned a verdict in accordance with the facts, and entirely acquitting Dr. Fisher, in whose hands he died while under the influence of Chloroform, of all blame.


DETWEILER - (Port Elgin) This afternoon when a young son of Daniel Detweiler was fishing off the pier, he fell into the water and was drowned before assistance could be rendered.

 

O’NEIL - The adjourned inquest on the body of the late Henry O'Neil, the boy drowned in the Bay on Sunday afternoon, was held last night in the Rob Roy hotel, John street south, Dr. T. White coroner.. .The jury after a short deliberation brought in a verdict of "accidental drowning".

 

May 30, 1879

 

BLACK - (Guelph) Charles Black, manufacturing jeweller, died very suddenly on Monday afternoon. He had been ill for some time.

 

PICKARD - (Ingersoll) The wife of Mr. James Pickard who fell into the culvert on the G.W.R. on Thursday last and broke her leg, died on Wednesday. Coroner McCausland had a jury empanelled and an inquest was held.

 

BRADY - This morning while Martin Allan and two other G.W.R. trackmen were proceeding along the line about four miles east of this city, they came upon the dead body of a middle-aged woman lying on the south side of the southern track. The face was lying downward and on examination was found to be frightfully mutilated. It is supposed that the woman had been walking along the line and that either intentionally or through lack of observation she had permitted an eastbound train to come upon her, the locomotive striking her a fearful blow in the face and head which caused the mutilation of these parts. The cowcatcher had then evidently pitched her off the track. After discovering that the woman had for a considerable time been dead, the workmen reported to Mr. Armstrong, station master at this city, who communicated the information to Dr. Thomas White, coroner, who had a dummy engine placed at his service-by the G.W.R. Co. and had the body brought to the city under the care of Constable Knox. The body was placed in the city dead house to await identification.

The body was subsequently recognized as that of Mrs. Brady, wife of Mr. Patrick Brady, 20 O'Reilly street, an old resident of the city. Deceased, who was an elderly woman, left her home on Thursday evening, but as it was thought she might have gone on a visit to some friends, her absence did not excite much alarm. How she came to be four miles out of the city has not transpired. She leaves her husband and grown-up family to mourn her sad death.

This evening at 7:30, Coroner White will hold an inquest on the body at the city Hall police station.


May 31, 1879

 

KIGGAN - (St. John, N.B.) An inquest was held this afternoon on the body of James Kiggan who committed suicide this morning by cutting his throat. The evidence showed that he had been drinking heavily, brooding over the disgrace brought upon him by his wife being placed on trial for receiving stolen property. The jury returned a verdict that deceased committed suicide while temporarily insane, Kiggan was a pensioner and 50 years old.

 

PATCHING - A Chatham correspondent writes: The funeral of J. W. Patching, for some years past keeper of the Station Hotel on Queen street, took place from his late residence, on Prince street the other day. The deceased had for a long period before settling in Chatham been a conductor on the Great Western and was widely known and respected. His remains were escorted to the grave by members of the Masonic body who conducted the funeral ceremonies.

 

TINSLEY - Died in this city, on the 31st instant, Harry, only son of Joseph and Clara Tinsley, aged 5 years and 1 month, Funeral from No 117 Rebecca street on Monday, June 2, at 4 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

HUTT - Died this morning, at his residence, No 290 York street, after a brief illness, John R. Hutt of the G.W.R., in the 48th year of his age. Funeral will take place to-morrow afternoon at 4:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

June 2, 1879

 

RYAN - Died in this city, on 31st May, Thomas, son of James and Ellen Ryan, aged 4 years and 6 months. Funeral took place this afternoon.

 

FRASER - Died in Hamilton, on the 2nd instant, Alexander T. Fraser, aged 53 years. Funeral will take place at 3 o'clock on Tuesday, 3rd instant, from his late residence, 171 Mary street. Friends and acquaintances please accept this notice.

 

BRAY - Harry Bray was drowned near Ottawa on Saturday.

 

QUENNEVILLE - (Montreal) The name of the man murdered in Morey's stables is Alphonse Quenneville. He was a French Canadian and leaves a wife and three children. He made a desperate struggle for life, but was overpowered. The post mortem revealed that he had severe contusions about the heart and was also stabbed in three places, twice in the neck and once in the left side. The scalp is torn off and there are contusions about the right eye, lower lip, and chin.


GRANT - Friday last a young farmer named Richard Henry Grant, aged 23 years, residing about a mile and a half from Caistorville, Caistor Township, Lincoln County, committed suicide by shooting himself through the right temple with a revolver. The deceased had, on the death of his father Mr. Thomas Grant, succeeded to the management of the farm, a responsibility which it appears be considered too great to bear. On Friday morning in consequence of the mistake of some hunters, the bush surrounding his farm was enveloped in flames and the work of fighting these exhausted not only the physical energies of the deceased but of several others. The young man had also been paying attention to a young lady of the neighbourhood with whom he had a quarrel. The deceased was a nephew of the late Mr. Peter Grant of Gainsborough Township in the same county.

 

BROWNE - At 5 o'clock this morning there passed from this earthly scene another of Hamilton's enterprising citizens who have contributed much to the building up of the city as a great commercial centre. We refer to the death of Mr. Michael M. Browne which took place at his residence, No 8 Park street south, at the hour named. Ever since last year when the lamented gentleman had a severe bleeding at the nose, Mr. Browne had impaired health and he informed some of his intimate friends quite recently that he believed that he was failing fast. But nothing very serious was anticipated as on Saturday Mr. Browne was downtown, and on Sunday he was able to be out in his garden, At 4 o'clock, however, he became ill and Dr. Leslie, his medical adviser, was sent for and prescribed medicine to the patient whose pulse he found to be strong. At 5 o'clock, however, he was being raised for the purpose of taking his medicine and Mr. Browne was seized with what was evidently a severe shock of apoplexy which caused his death in a few minutes.

The late Mr. Browne was born in Limerick in 1816 and therefore was in the 64th year of his age. He came to Kingston in 1828, a friendless lad, and found employment as wharfinger in one of the leading offices of that city which was then one of the busiest places in that line of business in the Canadas. In 1836 he came to Hamilton and entered into partnership with Mr. D. G. Gunn, the firm carrying on a large forwarding and wharfage business up till 1847 when Mr. Gunn retired and Mr. Browne took into partnership his brother Edward, and the firm was thereafter known by the name of M. W. & E. Browne. The firm carried on a very large and profitable business on the lakes, and at one time owned a dozen large vessels, being also shareholders in the fine steamers, "Canada" and "America" built at Niagara in 1856 and subsequently sold to the American Government. In fact in the heyday of the lake forwarding business they were the largest ship-


owners on the Canadian side of the lakes. When the era of railroads arrived, deceased with other gentlemen who had built up the enormous lake traffic suffered heavily by the diversion of freight and passenger traffic, but he took the reverse with a commendable spirit of enterprise and at once set to work to retrieve his misfortune by engaging in the business which had caused a revolution in the carrying trade of the country, accepting the position of station and freight agent of the G.W.R. at Sarnia in 1860. Mr. Browne held that post until 1864, those years being noted for a very large traffic of grain, etc., over the G.W.R. from the Western States via Sarnia. After leaving the G.W.R. he managed with ability the affairs of the Hamilton and Lake Erie Railway until it was merged in the H. and N.W.R., when he became manager for the G. T. Railway Company in Hamilton, and was instrumental in building up a large business for that line in the city.

In later years he had not engaged in any active commercial pursuits, although still taking a great interest in the prosperity of the city, prior to Hamilton's assumption of the dignity of a city, Mr. Browne had a seat at the Council Board as a representative of St. Mary's ward and subsequently on the extension of the ward system when the town came of age he sat for a number of years for No 3 ward, occupying the position of chairman of the Finance Committee with credit and ability. In the absence of Mayor McKinstry, he was acting Mayor in 1859 and in that capacity laid the foundation stone of the Crystal Palace.

For many years he was a valuable member of the Board of Trade, and as a good Irishman alive to the welfare of his poorer Brethren, he was one of the first to join the Irish Protestant Benevolent Society. A Liberal-Conservative by conviction, his fellow citizens showed the respect and esteem in which they held him by nominating him to contest a seat for the city in the commons in 1875 when Messrs Wood and Irving were opposed by Messrs Browne and Witton. Since the organization of the Reformed Episcopal Church in the city, he has been one of its principal supporters.

He leaves a widow and two grown-up sons and daughters to mourn his death. They will have the sympathy of a very wide circle of friends and acquaintances who recognized in the lamented gentleman a true man and therefore a good citizen, From first to last his life has been that of the honest, thoroughgoing businessman. Coming to Canada a poor boy, he battled fortune with commendable zeal, and by honesty and integrity achieved not only an enviable worldly position but a place of regard in the hearts of his fellow citizens of which his family may well feel proud.

The flag on the City Hall is half-mast high out of respect to the memory of the deceased. The funeral takes place on Wednesday next at 3:30 p.m.


June 3, 1879

 

BROWNE - Died at his residence, No 8 park street south, on the 2nd instant, M. W. Browne, Esq., in the 64th year of his age. Funeral on Wednesday, at half past 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

HUGHES - (Ottawa) An inquest has been held on the body of the man found floating in Black Bay. By a passbook found on the body, it was discovered the body was that of Peter Hughes, a shoemaker. A verdict of "Found drowned" was rendered.

 

MURPHY - (Montreal) Mrs. Helen E. Murphy of Ottawa street was found dead in bed this morning, it is supposed from heart disease.

 

TACKABERRY - (London) Mrs. Sarah Tackaberry, mother of Mr. William Tackaberry, died to-day aged 73 years. Her remains were taken to Belleville.

 

MCINTOSH - The inquest on the body of James McIntosh returned a verdict that the deceased died by Paris green administered by himself, and the jury were of the opinion that had timely medical aid been rendered the man'.s life could have been saved.

 

FAIRBAIRN - (Oakville) A child, six years old, son of Mr. Archie Fairbairn, cooper of this place, was found drowned in a cistern yesterday. It is supposed he climbed up the curb to look in and losing his balance, fell over. He was in the cistern an hour and a half before being found.

 

MCLEOD - (Inverhuron) A son of Malcolm McLeod, a fisherman, was found dead on the beach yesterday morning. An inquest was held and a verdict of "accidental drowning" was returned.

 

KING - (Lindsay) The funeral of King, one of the victims of the boiler collapse, took place yesterday, and considering the unfavourable weather, the attendance was very large. He was not long from England.

 

RICHARDSON - Mrs. Ann Richardson of Jenettville was accidentally killed yesterday morning while driving her son to church. A part of the harness broke which caused the horse to run away. Both were thrown from the buggy and Mrs. Richardson fell on her head which caused instantaneous death. The son was severely cut and bruised. The accident has caused great sorrow in the neighbourhood as Mrs. Richardson was a highly respected and useful member of society. Her husband was instantly killed about eighteen years ago by falling from a tree.


CLARKE - Died in this city, on June 2nd, James David, son of Joseph Clarke, aged 11 years and 5 months. Funeral will take place from his father's residence, 84 Wellington street north, on Wednesday next, 4th instant, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this notice.

 

June 4. 1879

 

PORTELLO - (Ottawa) A man named Portello in the employ of Hamilton Bros, was drowned recently at the Piskatookeen about sixty miles above the Desert on the Gatineau. While running a shute, his boat was capsized.

 

June 5. 1879

 

CURRANT - On Tuesday, a young man named Currant, from Crowland, came into Welland to attend the picnic at Port Colborne. Not feeling very well after the arrival in Welland, he went to Dr. Glasgow's office and asked for something for chill fever which he obtained, and feeling quite ill, he lay down in the office for a short time. He was shortly afterward taken with a congestive chill from which he died about four o'clock next morning.

 

RUSHLAND - (Anderdon) Frederick Rushland, a Lutheran minister from Saxony, Germany, was killed at Amherstburg last evening while attempting to jump on a car while in motion. The verdict of the coroner's inquest found that death was accidental. No blame is attached to the company or employees.

 

KEMP - (Richmond Station, Que.) The body of a man was found in the river at King's Eye last night. It is supposed to be that of Mr. Kemp who was drowned opposite here last January.

 

GRAHAM - This morning as the 6:45 train rounded the curve near the old trestle works approaching the junction, the engine driver, Mr. Moses, was surprised to see a man walking on the track just ahead of the locomotive so close that it was impossible to stop the train before the man was struck and killed. The train was stopped at once, and the body of the deceased brought to the station and from thence to the city dead house. The body appears to be that of a man between 60 and 70 years of age and from the dress apparently while in life a man in very poor circumstances. Nothing was found on his person to show who he was or where he came from. The train was in charge of conductor McKay. Dr. Woolverton was notified and an inquest will be held this afternoon. (Later identified as Donald Graham)


June 6, 1879

 

CHRISTIE - The death is announced of an old Waterloo veteran in the person of Mr. David Christie who died at the residence of his son-in-law, Mr. James Stewart, 12th concession of Hibbert. Deceased bad reached the ripe old age of 98 years, almost a centenarian. As already stated, he was one of the veterans who took part in the conflict which decided the fate of the first Napoleon. Born in Donkeld, Scotland, he enlisted in the 91st Regiment at the age of 18 years, he fought under Wellington in the series of battles in Spain which ended in the battle of Vittoria, and afterward acted his part in the field of Waterloo, yet never received a wound. For the past twenty years he has lived with his son-in-law, and up to about three years ago retained possession of all his faculties. Of late he bad been afflicted with loss of both sight and hearing.

 

SCHWARTZ - Mrs. Anna Schwartz, of North Cayuga, Haldimand County, Ontario, died suddenly on Tuesday afternoon at the dry goods store of John Eckert at the corner of Emalie and William streets, Buffalo. The deceased lady had come to the city, accompanied by her husband for the purpose of consulting with some of our resident physicians with reference to a tumour in the stomach from which she was suffering, she became unconscious near Mr. Eckert's store and was carried inside. Dr. VanReyma was sent for but before his arrival the unfortunate woman died. She leaves three children. Coroner Almendinger was notified and by his direction Dr. Petit on Wednesday made a post mortem examination when it was ascertained that death resulted from syncope.

 

GRAHAM - (See page 113) After reading the account of the accident in the evening edition of the "Spectator" Mr. M. A. Graham of 38 Bay street north, held a conversation with his wife when the latter observed, "I wouldn't be surprised if that was grampa". The remark attracted Mr. Graham's attention, and as his father had left Wednesday morning to visit his daughter, Mrs. Caulker of Woodstock, whither his wife had gone on a visit a few days before, he resolved to make inquiry. Accordingly, between eight and nine o'clock last evening, he visited the dead house on King William street and at once identified the body as that of his father. The deceased, Donald Graham, was a native of the county of Ross-shire, Scotland, and was in the 93rd year of his age. He was a farmer and for forty-five years resided in the Township of East Zorra, Oxford, where he was well known. He had but two children, Mr. M. A. Graham of this city and Mrs. Caulker of Woodstock. On Wednesday evening on ascertaining that his father had left with the avowed purpose of going to Woodstock, Mr. Graham went down to the G.W.R. station to make inquiry, and ascertaining that an old man answering his father's description had got on the


westbound train, he made up his mind that deceased had carried out his intention. He was, however, mistaken. Where the old gentleman stopped during the night has not yet transpired.

 

June 7. 1879

 

YOUNG - We regret to hear of the death of Mr. James W. Young, a farmer well known resident of this city, and one whose death will be especially regretted by all lovers of manly sports inasmuch as in years gone by he was a very enthusiastic member of the Hamilton cricket Club. Deceased, who was the brother of George A. Young, insurance and shipping agent here, had gone to Salt Lake City to try and recuperate, but his health gradually gave way and he died on Wednesday last at the comparatively early age of forty, deeply regretted by all who knew him.

 

BAMPFIELD - Died at Clifton, on the 7th instant, of paralysis, James Bampfield, Sr., aged 63 years. Funeral from his late residence on Monday, at 9 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

JONES - Died at Montreal, on June 3rd, Charlotte Tyson, beloved wife of J. A. Jones, aged 43 years. Funeral took place on Friday afternoon from her husband's residence, 416 Seighneurs street, on Friday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock to place of interment, Mount Royal cemetery.

 

DAVEY - As previously announced in the "Spectator" the body of the young man, John Davey, who was drowned in the Bay on the night of the 26th ultimo, was found on Thursday when Dr. T. White, coroner, summoned a jury and held an inquest at John Dynes's hotel, Saltfleet. yesterday afternoon... The jury after a short deliberation brought in a verdict that the deceased came to his death by accidental drowning.

 

June 9, 1879

 

EDWARDS - Died in this city, on the 8th instant, Henry Alfred, son of John Edwards, hatter, aged 2 years and 11 months. Funeral from his father's residence, No 143 Wellington street north, on this (Monday) afternoon at 4 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BLUMENSTIEL - Died at 39 John street south, on Sunday morning, 8th instant, Joseph, third son of Mr. Joseph Blumenstiel, aged 16 years and 2 months. Funeral from the above address at 2 o'clock this Monday afternoon. Friends will please accept this intimation.


SMITH - (London) The remains of Mr. W. Simpson Smith, merchant, who died on Thursday evening, were interred to-day at Mount pleasant cemetery with Masonic honours. Nearly 800 of the brethren turned out with the 7th Battalion band.

 

LEWIS - (St. Catharines) A young lad named Alexander Lewis, aged. 12 years, fell into a partly sunken scow in the Welland canal this afternoon and was drowned. A younger boy who was with him at the time did not give the alarm until nearly an hour afterward. The body was easily recovered.

 

SMITH - On Saturday afternoon three children, one of Captain Henery' s, one of Mr. Allan's, and one the son of Mr. Charles L. Smith, 98 Barton street east, were playing in the jail yard when they came across some gooseberry bushes, the fruit on which although green had a very tempting appearance. The children partook of it very freely. In a short time afterward, Mr. Smith's child became very sick, throwing up, and having spasms, the symptoms becoming so alarming that Dr Rosebrugh was sent for, who found the child exhibiting evidence of narcotical poison, and at once applied the proper antidotes, but without effect, as after suffering for some hours, the child died. One of the men employed about the jail had some time during the day applied a strong solution of tobacco juice to the hushes in order to kill the worms, and it is supposed that by some mischance Mr. Smith's child, 4 years of age, obtained some berries that had received an extra quantity of the juice. Neither Captain Henery nor Mr. Allan's child was affected. An inquest was not deemed necessary, the cause being apparent.

 

CLARK - Died at 97 Walnut street, on Monday, the 9th instant, William Clark, aged 48 years. Funeral to-morrow (Tuesday) at 4 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

June 10, 1879

 

TEHAN - Michael Tehan was fatally injured by a falling rafter at a barn raising near St. Mary's on Monday.

 

HARRMANN - (Berlin) Mr. Wendell Harrmann, living three miles from here and very highly respected, while temporarily insane hung himself this morning in his barn.

 

JOHNSTONE - Died in Beverly, on the 23rd of May, Mr. William Johnstone, aged 78 years, a native of Dumfries-shire, Scotland.

 

MATHESON - The funeral of the late Mr. Donald Matheson who was killed on the G.W.R. near this city took place last Sunday from his daughter's residence, East Zorra, to the Presbyterian burying ground in Ingersoll. It was largely attended.


June 11, 1879

 

WADDELL - (Freelton) Last evening Hannah Waddell, a young girl near Strabane in perfect health, went out to bring home the cows and not returning in the proper time, a search was made by the neighbours through the fields, but failing to find her, the party continued their search around the house. When entering the barn they discovered the body in a sitting position with the hands upon the face, quite dead, She was subject to fits which has been attributed to be the cause of her death.

 

BICE - (Cambray, Ont.) At Cameron to-day, a young man named John Bice, the only son of a widow who keeps a hotel here, was killed by a kick from a stallion.

 

BOYCE - (Lindsay) This afternoon John Boyce, son of the late George Boyce of the Township of Fenelon, was driving a young horse in a sulky and when about halfway home the footboard broke and he fell forward to the ground, breaking his neck. An inquest was held and the jury brought in a verdict of accidental death.

 

STAPLEY - A two-year-old child of Mr. James Stapley, 9th concession of Rawdon, was drowned in a well yesterday.

 

DINSMORE - (Clifton) A seven-year-old son of Mr. C. T,. Dinsmore, watchmaker of this place, was accidentally drowned by falling into a cistern.

 

FRASER - Alexander T. Fraser, brother of J. M. Fraser, Elora, died in Galt on the 2nd instant, in the 54tb year of his age.

 

HENDERSON - On Saturday evening, Mrs. Robert Henderson of the Township of Oxford, took in mistake for medicine, a quantity of oil of vitriol. A doctor was called but death ensued in about seven hours.

 

SMITH Mr. Charles L. Smith, 98 Barton street east, who lost a boy by poison on Saturday last, was last evening called upon to mourn the loss of a daughter who died from that very dangerous disease to youth, scarlet fever. By these afflictions Mr. Smith has lost two of his three children. The child who died yesterday had been convalescing from a severe attack of bilious disease when the fever set in.

 

RYCKMAN - Many of our readers will remember the Mr. Ryckman who took a leading part in the meetings of the Anneka Jane Bogardus estate in this city. We regret to have to record that he died at Woodstock the other day whither he had gone on a short visit. He was ill for only a short period. Mr. Ryckman was a native of Wentworth County came of an old U.E. family who are


numerous in this locality. They are believed to be amongst the more likely heirs to the estate above referred to, and Mr. Ryckman spent not a small portion of his later days in hunting up the pedigree of his family which he leaves most complete, we believe. The "looking after" of the estate will still be proceeded with.

 

June 12, 1879

 

POWELL - (Prescott) A four-year-old son of William Powell, switchman at the St. Lawrence and Ottawa railway station here, while playing on the dock this afternoon with several other children, as the train was moving up to the station jumped for the platform of one of the cars and fell under the wheels, two of which passed over him, killing him instantly. An inquest is being held to-night.

 

June 13, 1879

 

FRANKS - (Doon) Considerable excitement was caused in this village yesterday morning by the finding of a coat and vest on the waste gate of the dam, and further search was made and about one o'clock in the afternoon the body of a man named John Franks was found. Coroner Bowlby of Berlin was summoned and held an Inquest. The jury returned a verdict of suicide while labouring under a fit of temporary insanity. The deceased was unmarried and about thirty years of age. His folks, who live in Petersburg, were telegraphed for and arrived last night and took charge of the remains. He was buried this morning at tern o'clock.

 

GRIEVE - To-day John Grieve, 4th concession of Eramosa, was taking down an old barn. One of the bents fell, crushing the skull of Thomas, a son of Mr. Grieve, a young man of about thirty. He lingered until this morning when he died. A farmer whose name cannot be learned was badly injured in the spine and his recovery is doubtful. Another son of Mr. Grieve was going to Fergus for a doctor to attend his brother and he was thrown from his horse and considerably injured. The family has been extremely unfortunate as it is but a few years since another son was killed by the falling of a limb of a tree.

 

June 14, 4-879

 

KENNEDY - (Beamsville) The youngest son of Mr. John Kennedy fell into a cistern and was drowned last evening. We condole with the parents in their sad bereavement.

 

HOOPER - (Fort Erie) A sad drowning accident occurred here yesterday afternoon. A man named Frank Hooper, a moulder, about 40 years of age, residing in Buffalo, in company with


a man named John Haas, went fishing on Niagara river. While at anchor they both got to one end of the boat in which they were and which caused it to fill and sink. Haas was rescued and Hooper was drowned. Hooper's body was recovered about eight o'clock last evening and removed to his home. The deceased was a widower and leaves three children to mourn his loss.

 

HARGRAVE - (Ottawa) A boy named Hargrave was drowned in the Ottawa last night. While engaged in spearing fish, his boat capsized and dumped him into the water. Being unable to swim, he was drowned before his companions could render any assistance.

 

MOORE - (Lanark) A young man named George Moore, residing in Playfairville in the Township of Bathurst, about 30 years of age, who has been missing since the 5th instant, was found to-day a short distance below the village, floating in the water. An inquest will be held.

 

KENNARD - (Kingston) This morning Mrs. Kennard, a resident of Williamsville, a suburb of this city, left her house to bring a pail of water from an adjacent well. Not returning for some time, search was made and her body was found in the well. It is supposed she fell in accidentally. She leaves two children.

 

June 16, 1879

 

HARDING - Died on Sunday, 15th instant, Harry, only son of Henry Harding, plumber, aged 6 years, 7 months, and 10 days. Funeral from his father's residence, 60 Hughson street north, at half past two o'clock on Tuesday, 17th instant.

 

FRANKLIN - (Montreal) John Franklin, a notorious drunkard, died suddenly from the effects of heavy drinking yesterday evening.

 

CONGER - David P. Conger, an old and respected resident of Picton, died on Saturday.

 

FAIR - (Orangeville) Dr. Fair is dead. His death was hastened by his getting very wet and catching a severe cold.

 

June 17, 1879

 

EDWARDS - (Montreal )r Mr. J. H. Edwards of McGill street has lost three children within a week with diphtheria. His two remaining children are ill with the same disease.

 

EDMONDSON - Christopher Edmondson, who was injured by a beam falling on him on Campbell's farm near Brantford last week, died yesterday.


Deceased was very highly esteemed. He held a seat in the County council of Brant for ten years and last year was elected warden.

 

MULLIN - Patrick Mullin, an Ottawa grocer, took arsenic yesterday and died.

 

Martin - (Windsor) The body of Frank Martin, drowned Tuesday last, was recovered to-day.

 

RILEY - While the steamer "Minnesota" was on her way to Pembina and Emerson the ferry rope at St. Vincent caught the boat's rudder. The steamer was at once stopped and the engines reversed, and then the rope became entangled in the stern wheel. The rope, which was around a windlass on the bank, was held by a young man. As the wheels caught it the rope was pulled out of his hands and the windlass flew round at a fearful velocity. A number of spectators were standing near, one of whom, a boy named Riley, the sweeper struck on the head, knocking him about fifteen feet into the air, causing death almost instantly. The deceased was about 12 years of age.

 

MILLER - Yesterday afternoon a woman named Mrs. Miller, No 201 Main street, was working in her garden between five and six o'clock when she approached a neighbour's house and rapped on the door. The neighbour on answering the summons discovered Mrs. Miller bleeding from the mouth, and in a few minutes afterward, she vomited a large quantity of blood. Another neighbour was then sent for as well as the husband who is employed at Campbell's pottery, both of whom arrived as soon as possible. Dr. Husband was then sent for, but before he arrived Mrs. Miller had bled to death. The deceased was 54 years of age and has suffered occasionally for some years past from attacks of asthma, but no fatal result was apprehended. Dr. White, coroner, was sent for, but under the circumstances he deemed the holding of an inquest unnecessary. Mrs. Miller leaves a husband and grown-up family to mourn her sudden death.

 

June 18, 1879

 

KERR - (Ottawa) A book-keeper named W. Kerr dropped dead this evening while playing a game of handball at the St. Louis Hotel.

 

YOUNG - James Young, West Garafraxa, died last week aged 83. He was one of the pioneers and was highly respected.

 

GRIFFIN - (St. Thomas) Jack Griffin, the unfortunate brakesman injured by the accident reported last week, died on Sunday.


RIPLEY - Died in this city, on the 17th instant, Isabella Ripley, wife of Abraham Ripley, aged 47 years. Funeral from her husband's residence, 128 Victoria avenue north, to-morrow (Friday) at 3:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this Intimation.

 

JUPP - Died at 155 Wellington street north, on the 18th instant, George Hamilton, only son of George and Mary Jupp, aged 1 year and 6 months. Funeral to-morrow (Thursday), 19th instant, at 2 O'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accent this notice.

 

RICE - Died in London East, on 17th instant, Ellen Penelope, wife of Rev. J. J. Rice, aged 49 years.

 

June 19, 1879

 

EASSON - Died in this city, on Wednesday, 18th instant, Alexander, eldest son of the late Allan Easson, aged 31 years. Funeral will take place from No 26 Hess street north, Friday next, 20th instant, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

LEGARDE - (Montreal) The infant son of Pierre Legarde was found dead in its cradle to-day. An inquest will be held.

 

CAMPBELL - (London) John Campbell, boot and shoe maker of the market square, died rather suddenly last night. He was highly respected as a citizen. The cause of death was aneurism of the heart.

 

MCCORMICK - (Morewood) James, son of Patrick McCormick of this place, was killed this morning by being thrown from a milk wagon.

 

WATTS - (Toronto) A seven-year-old boy named Watts was playing with a companion at the Dufferin street school this afternoon when the latter struck him over the head with a piece of umbrella wire which penetrated the brain. The poor boy was taken up and carried to the hospital where he now lies dying.

 

MCDOUGALL - (Winnipeg) Mrs. Jane McDougall committed suicide by shooting herself at Little Saskatchewan on Wednesday last while en route with her husband to their new home. The rash act was committed in the morning while her husband was outside washing himself. She was only 20 years of age and had been married but a month. An inquest was held and a verdict of temporary insanity returned. It is believed to have been the result of homesickness.

 

ANTICKNAP - (Arthur) This quiet little village was thrown into a state of the greatest excitement this morning on account of a report that a terrible murder had been committed. The


victim of the horrible deed is Mrs. John Anticknap, Sr. On the news getting around the village, the people flocked from their homes in all directions and made their way to the scene of the tragedy. The body of the poor woman presented a sickening spectacle, being frightfully mutilated by some sharp instrument. The weapon used by the murderer is supposed to have been an axe, but it has not yet been found. From the circumstances surrounding the case, suspicion fastened on the husband of the dead woman as the perpetrator of the crime, and a warrant was promptly issued for his arrest. This was executed without any trouble as he made no attempt to escape and he is now held in custody. The coroner, on being notified, summoned a jury and an inquest is now being held.

 

June 20, 1879

 

HAYES - (Stratford) A profound sensation was created here this forenoon by the unexpected announcement of the death of Mr. Michael Hayes, County Crown Attorney. Deceased had not been in robust health for some time past, but was not confined to his house until two days ago when nothing serious was anticipated. Mr. Hayes had been a resident of Stratford for some twelve years, having been appointed to the position prior to Confederation.

 

KITCHEN - (New Hamburg) Charles Kitchen, about nine years of age and only son of Mr. J. B. Kitchen, photographer, was drowned here this afternoon at about half past four o'clock. He was playing with some other boys near a deep spot in the river when he accidentally slipped in. his body was recovered shortly after, but life was extinct.

 

DEWOLF - (Halifax) The murder of his wife by Dr. Albert DeWolf at Wolfville, King's County, last night had created a great sensation in the city. The prisoner was examined before the magistrate this morning and was fully committed to jail at Kentville, there to await his trial at the Supreme court for wilful murder.

 

MCADAMS - (Brantford) John McAdams, a carpenter aged about twenty-four, fell from the top of Bagton's new building this morning, breaking his neck and causing instant death. McAdams was raising some shingles with a pulley through a hole in the roof, and it is supposed that he fell through. In falling he grasped at a rope that was hanging to the pulley in the roof, but unfortunately he got hold of the loose end of the rope which ran through with him.

 

FLETT - (Mount Forest) A very sad accident occurred here this morning resulting in the death of Mr. John Flett, and the severe injury of Mr. James Brown, both carpenters. They had been assisting in felt roofing on a new three-storey brick building. Flett was on the roof while Brown


was hoisting from the ground the tar used for the purpose. Mr. Flett accidentally stepped on the hot tar and immediately slipped from the roof, carrying with him part of the scaffolding. Mr. Brown who was underneath had not time to escape from the falling debris and was struck with a pole. On being picked up it was observed that both men had their skulls fractured. Mr. Flett breathed only a few minutes and expired. Mr. Brown was carried to his residence where he now lies in precarious condition. Mr. Flett was 52 years of age and leaves a wife and large family.

 

JAMESON - Mr. Patrick Jameson, who died in Lucan recently in the 80th year of his age, was a Mason in good standing for over 50 years. He witnessed the grand gathering of the Masonic fraternity of Scotland when they met on the banks of the Doon over 50 years ago to unveil a mausoleum erected to the memory of the great poet. He was a pioneer in Biddulph.

 

EAUSTICE - Died in this city, on the 19th instant, from the effect of injuries received at the G.W.R. gravel pit on Monday last, John Eaustice, a native of Ireland, aged 43 years. Funeral from his late residence, 125 Ferrie street east, to-morrow (Saturday) at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

BUTTON - Died in London, on the 19th instant, Sarah Jane, beloved wife of Walter Button, of Ingersoll, aged 22 years and 6 months.

 

MCKENZIE - Died at her late residence, South Dumfries, June 17th, Elizabeth Burt, wife of Duncan McKenzie, Dr., aged 52 years.

 

June 21. 1879

 

GORDON - Died at the residence of Andrew Innes, Port Dover, on the 16th instant, Miss Jane Gordon, in the 72nd year of her age.

 

MAIN - Died in Galt, on 18th instant, at 9 o’clock, May Turnbull Main, aged 69 years and 2 weeks.

 

BEAUPRE - (Montreal) Joseph Beaupre, an employee of the Richilieu Company for thirty years, dropped dead on the street to-day.

 

SUNDERLAND - John Sunderland, a respectable farmer was killed in Anderdon on Thursday by his horses running away.

 

PATTERSON - (Manitoba) The death of Mr. John Patterson of Sunnyside is announced. He was a native of Argyllshire, Scotland, a resident of Bruce County, Ontario, for sixteen years, and of Manitoba for several years.


June 23, 1879

 

MOTTASHED - Died in this city, on the 21st instant, Mary Ann, relict of the late John Mottashed, in the 96th year of her age. Funeral will leave her late residence, No 13 Hughson street north, on Monday, the 23rd instant, at 2:30 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

FLEMING, WHITHAM - George Fleming and Matthew Whitham, old residents of Brantford died last week.

 

BROWN - On Thursday last, as the family of Bernard Brown of Crediton was sitting down to dinner, a little 9-month-old child pulled the scalding contents of a large teapot, which stood on the table, over its body, scalding it so severely that from the chin to its knees almost the entire skin came off with its clothing. Medical aid was at once summoned, but the poor child only lived a couple of hours after the accident occurred.

 

GREEN - (Goderich) Last evening while Andrew Green, a farmer residing in the Township of Colbourne, was assisting at raising a barn, through some mistake, one of the upright timbers they were raising slipped, striking Mr. Green and crushing him in a fearful manner. From the effects of his injuries, he died this morning.

 

WALKER - (Mount Forest) Last evening a young man named Robert Walker, while leading a horse along the road, was suddenly kicked in the chest by the animal. Medical aid was procured, but his injuries were too severe to permit of recovery, and he lingered until this morning when death ended his sufferings, He was about 23 years of age and followed the occupation of farming in the Township of Egremont.

 

COOK - (Rosemont) A shooting affray took place near Mansfield last evening whereby a young man named Thomas cook was fatally shot by an old man named Chester Monroe. Coroner Armstrong of Rosemont held an inquest this morning when the jury returned a verdict of "manslaughter". The prisoner was committed to Barrie jail. Great sympathy is felt for the parents of the deceased.

 

UNSWORTH - A sad casualty resulting fatally late last Friday occurred at 43 Robinson street on the afternoon of that day. About 4 o'clock, a fine promising boy, between three and four years of age, the son of Mr. John Unsworth, painter, who resides there, was out playing in the garden. By some means or other, the little fellow got hold of a quantity of matches with which he had been


playing. Sad to relate the matches ignited and the unfortunate child's pinafore caught fire and he was speedily in a blaze. He rushed into the house and was speedily stripped by his terrified mother who applied all the restoratives at hand and sent for Dr. Mullin who dressed the child's wounds. The lower portion of the body and legs were rather severely burned, but the medical man's utmost efforts were made to save the boy, but all was of no avail, and he died late on Friday night as stated. The child was insensible from the time of reaching his mother until his death. It is needless to say that the parents have the sympathy of a wide circle of friends in their affliction.

 

ROLLAND - (Niagara Falls) This morning about half past ten o'clock a lady named Mrs. Pierre Rolland, a guest at the Park hotel, fell into the Niagara River and was swept over the Horseshoe Falls. The details of the affair are as follows. This morning Mr. and Mrs. Rolland, who were recently married, left the hotel in apparent good spirits and took a walk around the village. They went to Goat Island about ten o'clock, and according to the husband's story walked around it once, and when on the Canada side she went to the water's edge with the intention of getting a drink when her foot slipped and she fell into the river, the rapid torrent quickly carrying her away. What seems remarkable is that the husband made no outcry nor told anyone about the sad affair until he returned to the hotel. Neither he nor his wife could speak a word of English, so that it was some time before he made himself understood.

Rolland and family were residents of Paris, France, and were consequently of French extraction. They were en route from Japan and were to have left the Falls this afternoon for the East. Considerable excitement exists here over the affair. Rolland was perfectly frantic and had to be closely watched to prevent him from committing suicide.

 

June 24, 1879

 

BIRSE - Died on Sunday, the 22nd instant, after a lingering illness, Anna Briscoe, beloved wife of John Birse, HM Customs. Funeral will take place on Wednesday, at 3 o'clock p.m. from her late residence, 58 Catherine street north, Friends will please accept this notice.

 

NASON - Died in this city, on 21st instant, Celina Nason, aged 23 years and 4 months, daughter of the late Joseph Nason, of Durham.

 

REID - Died in this city, on the 23rd instant, Mary, the beloved wife of William Reid. Funeral on Wednesday, the 2 5th instant, at 2 o'clock p.m. from 190 victoria avenue north. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.


HOPKIN - Died in this city, on the 23rd instant, at 213 King street east, James Hopkin, carpet weaver, aged 40 years. Funeral from the above residence at 4 o'clock this afternoon. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

WALLACE - (London) Mr. Charles Wallace, a settler for thirty-one years in this city, died on Saturday aged 78.

 

BOND - (Montreal) The funeral of Mrs. Bond, the deceased wife of the Bishop of Montreal, took place here to-day. The attendance of clergy and citizens was very large.

 

PELLETIER - A man named Pelletier was struck by lightning and instantly killed at St. Michel, island of Orleans, last evening.

 

BLACK - A Mrs. Black died suddenly at Halifax yesterday morning.

 

LUNN - (Toronto) John Lunn, aged 55, was found dead this morning in the basement of a house on Adelaide street. It was at first thought he had committed suicide as he was found lying in a pool of blood with a bloody penknife beside him. On examination, however, it was found that he had burst a blood vessel in his lungs. He leaves a wife and grown-up family. Deceased was a man of dissolute habits. He was a native of Chelsea, England, but had been in Canada ten years.

At the inquest this evening on the body of John Lunn who was found dead this morning it was found beyond a doubt that the deceased had committed suicide, He had stabbed himself with the penknife that was found beside him, three times in the throat. The wounds were small and were not discovered till his beard had been taken off, when it was seen that he had succeeded in severing an artery and had bled to death.

A verdict of suicide while labouring under temporary insanity was returned.

 

EWART - Died in Ingersoll, on Saturday morning, the 21st instant, after a short illness, Marion, eldest daughter of William Ewart, aged 20 years and 8 months, deeply regretted.

 

ROE - Died at Georgetown, on the 23rd instant, William W. Roe, aged 59 years.

 

June 25, 1879

 

BARLOW - Died in this city, on the 24th instant, Thomas Michael, youngest son of John and Alice Barlow, aged 2 years, 10 months, and 14 days. The funeral will leave his father's residence, 225 York street, at 3:30 Wednesday afternoon. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.


SAVERS - Mr. Thomas Sayers, of Guelph, who was so seriously injured by falling into a well about a week ago, died yesterday.

 

FAIRFIELD - A son of Mr. Thomas Fairfield who lives a few miles from Collins Bay was drowned yesterday. The body was recovered to-day.

 

WATTS - A man named Watts fell from a scaffolding at Metcalfe yesterday, and to-day died from the effects of the injuries received.

 

YOUNG - Died in this city, on Wednesday, the 25th instant, David Calvin, youngest son of D. D. Young, conductor G.W.R. Funeral on Friday at 2 o'clock p.m. from No 11 Catharina street. Friends are invited to attend.

 

KELSO - Died at Brantford, on the 24th instant, Agnes, relict of the late George Kelso, aged 79 years, native of Ayrshire, Scotland. Funeral from her son-in-law's residence, No 29 Simcoe street, to-morrow at 2:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

June 26, 1879

 

FLETCHER - (Halifax) Charles Fletcher, a well known citizen active in many charitable institutions, died last evening after a short illness. He was 63 years of age.

 

WAGNER - (Port Lambton) On Sunday, the 22nd, Frank Wagner of Thorold, watch-man on the steamer "Clinton" was drowned in Lake Michigan. The steamer was about five hours run above the south Manitoulin Island when the accident occurred.

 

KONTRE - (Aylmer) While Albert Kontre, son of Charles Kontre, near Port Bruce, was in bathing, he was seized with cramps and before any assistance could be rendered was drowned.

 

June 27, 1879

 

ARMER - (Montreal) Catherien Armer, who attempted suicide by jumping out of the Military Hospital window, died last night from the effects of the fall.

 

HATELY - John Hately, a well known resident of Middlesex, was found dead yesterday on the roadside between Wardsville and Newbury.

 

MCCABE - A son of Ralph McCabe of Greenville, Cumberland County, N.B., was killed on Saturday by a tree falling on him while chopping in the woods.


PATTERSON - Robert Patterson, a prominent and highly respected citizen of Owen Sound, died Wednesday.

 

LEVESQUE - Charles Levesque, aged 22, a labourer, died suddenly at the Ancient Lorette, Quebec, on Wednesday, through drinking a copious draught of cold water while very heated. Death resulted from congestion of the lungs.

 

LAING - Died on the 26th instant, James B. Laing, M.A., MD., in the 67th year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, 70 Cannon street west, at 1 p.m. on Saturday.

Dr. Laing was a native of Aberdeen, Scotland, but he lived in this city and in the same house since 1859. In his boyhood he was nine years in business and during that time served an apprenticeship of five years in a commercial house, but his mind was set on study, and after passing through a University and Theological curriculum at Glasgow, he settled at Woodside in the precincts of his native city in 1840 where he ministered for nineteen years in a small Congregational church meeting in Cotton Chapel. In 1841 he married Miss McCombie of Tilly-four, sister of William Mccombie, Esq., the late MP for Aberdeenshire. She died of consumption fifteen months after their marriage, having a son aged five months. In 1844 he graduated A.M. at Aberdeen, and in the same year he started a cheap religious magazine called "The Day Star" which soon attained a monthly circulation of 20,000, spread over the world. He carried it on for six years. It was afterward conducted by the Rev. John Kirk of Edinburgh. In 1850 he married a Miss Hargreave of Southport near Liverpool, England, who died exactly a year after marriage, leaving an infant son who is now a promising young citizen, Henry Hargreaves Laing, for the last few years in the employment of Thomson, Birkett, and Bell as one of their commercial travellers. On the death of his second wife, he found it necessary to have his time and attention completely occupied with something to compel him to take exercise, and having already studied some of the subjects; such as, botany and chemistry, he entered into a: regular medical curriculum at the University of Aberdeen to which he walked over two miles every morning, and after attending all day at classes, the hospital, and dissecting room, walked home again in the afternoon. He graduated as an MD. in 1855. In 1859, he removed to Canada and settled in Hamilton. He was for many years an active office bearer in the Congregational church till failing health unfitted him for active service, but he took little or no part in public city matters and did not mingle in politics. He quietly passed away at noon Thursday in the 67th year of his age. The remains will he interred on Saturday afternoon.

 

BELL - Died on the 26th instant, at Glanford, Thomas Bell, in the 83rd year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, Glanford, on Saturday, 28th instant, at 2 o'clock p.m.


Friends and acquaintance are respectfully invited to attend.

 

June 28, 1879

 

HODGSON - Yesterday a man named Hodgson was instantly killed on the Gatineau while removing a stick of timber from a wagon. It appears that he slipped and fell to the ground and the timber fell on his body and crushed him to death.

 

MCCORMACK - (Montreal) At a late hour this evening the body of a young woman named Mrs. McCormack, alias Jenkins, living on William street, was found by the people living upstairs in a tub covered with rubbish. She did not bear a very good character and it is supposed she was murdered in a drunken row. There is no clue as yet to the murderer.

Later: The murdered woman, Mary McCormack, was about 38 years of age. It appears that she went into a house that she often frequented, kept by a party named Jacobs, this morning with a young man, and as the people living upstairs say that they heard a noise as if something heavy fell, and just after a noise like the chopping of wood. Susan Kennedy, Jacobs's wife has been arrested on suspicion. She said that she was asleep and did not know anything about the murder until afterwards. She said she wiped the blood off the floor to prevent it from running through. The police say they think Susan Kennedy is the murderess, as she had spots of blood on her dress and apron. She is a very powerful woman. The axe with which it is supposed she did the deed was found in a valise. The head and one hand were completely severed from the body and found in a tub while the body lay on the floor. More arrests will he made to-morrow.

 

MARACLE - (Belleville) An Indian named Maracle, living on the Tyendenaga Reserve, was literally roasted to death by the sun on Wednesday. He partook freely of whiskey until he became drunk and then lay down in the sun near his dwelling. His daughter tried to rouse him, but could not, and on visiting him some time afterward, found that he was not sleeping but dead. In taking off his clothing, parts of his flesh came off with them, the flesh being roasted by the heat of the sun. Deceased was about 55 years of age.

 

STONTINBURY - (Clarksburg) yesterday afternoon three children aged 11, 9, and 7 years, sons of Alfred Stontinbury, Collingwood, were out fishing, and frightened by an approaching storm, were making their way to the house of James Latter, their uncle, and while passing through a piece of bush, a tree fell on the two eldest, striking them on the head and killing them instantly.


June 28, 1879

 

BEATTIE - The death is announced of one of Stayner's most respected residents in the person of Mr. T. A. Beattie, carriage maker. He has been a resident of Stayner for a number of years and has always taken great interest in Sunday School work and temperance. He was also a member of the lodge of Freemasons, His sickness arose from over-exercise at the recent fire.

 

DILLON - Died in this city, on the 27th instant, Mary, daughter of John Dillon, aged 19 years and 2 months. Funeral from her father's residence, 150 Bay street north, to-morrow (Sunday) at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

KERR - Died on Saturday, June 28th, at 63 East avenue south, Garry, the beloved wife of Murray A. Kerr, aged 25 years. The funeral will take place on Monday, 30th instant, at 2 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice

 

July 5, 1879

 

ARMSTRONG - Mr. James Armstrong, formerly an old and highly respected resident of Guelph, died in Stratford on the 2nd instant, aged 74 years.

 

FLUMMERFELT - (Welland) On Saturday morning last says the "Telegraph" Mrs. H. Flummerfelt left her child, aged 8 months, asleep in bed in the morning while she went to prepare the breakfast meal. Shortly after, she went to get the child and found it dead in the bed. It was playing around the evening previous apparently perfectly well.

 

THOMAS - (Toronto) Louisa Thomas, the woman brutally beaten by David Thomas, her husband, a couple of days ago, died from the injuries her husband had inflicted on her, but at the inquest held this evening the doctor who made the post mortem examination stated that she died from the effects of an ovarian tumour and that there was nothing to show that she had been cruelly beaten by her husband. The inquest was not concluded and will be resumed to-morrow.

 

KINSMAN - (Halifax) Mrs. Betsy Kinsman, 105 years of age, of Horton landing, was found dead in her bed on Wednesday morning. Her first husband was in the battle of Waterloo and she accompanied him as hospital nurse.

 

July 7, 1879

 

WILLIAMSON - Died at the residence of his daughter-in-law, 118 James street north, David Williamson, after a long and painful illness which he bore with patience and Christian


resignation, at the advanced age of 91 years. Funeral on Tuesday next at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CHAPMAN - (Chatham) Robert Chapman, a boy about 13 years of age, yesterday left home with his younger brother, Richard, and in company with James Howard and Albert McMullen went catching swallows in the high clay banks of the river, while doing so, Robert lost his footing along the steep bank and rolled into the river. Howard says he waded into the water as far as he dared to help his drowning companion, but could not reach him, and when he had ceased to struggle and sank out of sight, Richard prevailed on his companions not to tell what had become of his brother because his father would whip him. The body was found this morning by the officers of the Steinhoff. Chapman's father works in the G.W.R. yard. Dr. Holmes, coroner, held the inquest.

 

HEALE - (Guelph) The young waif left at Reynold's Hotel some months ago by Maggie Heale, its mother, has been removed from all trouble. The child died on Thursday.

 

July 8, 1879

 

BABCOCK - (Belleville) While a labouring man named Babcock was fishing from a wharf at Burk's saw mill about a mi1e from the city, one of the masts of the old schooner "Troy" which was dismantled some years ago fell, striking him on the head, breaking his neck, and killing him instantly. Deceased was 26 years of age and leaves a wife and one child.

 

FRENCH - (Toronto) A man named French who has been driving a wagon for Shedden Company of the G.T.R. for nine years fell from his wagon this evening, his horses having suddenly started off, and broke his neck. He leaves a wife and child.

 

VAUDETTE - (Ottawa) Last night a three-year-old daughter of Augustine Vaudette, St. Patrick's street, met her death in a melancholy manner. It appears her brother, aged seven, was playing with a revolver and by some means it discharged, the ball entering her head. The child has since died. It was stated yesterday by the parents that the child had been sitting in a high chair with a broken wine glass in her hand and that the chair upset and the glass cut her forehead. The story, however, turns out to be incorrect. This morning it was reported to the Chief of police that the child was murdered, and an inquest was held. The boy in his evidence stated that it was purely accidental, end the jury returned a verdict of "death from accidental shooting".


July 9, 1879

 

MCCARTER - Died on the 7th instant, in the Township of Oneida, near Hagersville, S. W. McCarter, eldest son of George McCarter, Esq., aged 22 years and 4 months.

 

BLACKWELL - Martin Blackwell, a well known citizen and teller in the Halifax Bank, retired to bed last night at 12 o'clock in his usual good health and was discovered dead two hours later. He was 62 years old and a member of one of the oldest Halifax families.

 

BARRY - On Tuesday last as Mr. John Barry, a young man about 25 years of age, living on the 12th concession of Stephen, was drawing gravel to Halls Corners, he was affected with sunstroke, and before assistance arrived be died from the effects.

 

July 10, 1879

 

BASSETT - (Sarnia) Mrs. Bassett, mother of Edward Bassett, furniture dealer, dropped dead yesterday, supposed to be from heart disease.

 

DUNN - (St. Catharines) The death is announced of Mr. Arthur Dunn, formerly connected with the Inland Revenue office here, and brother of Mr. R. D. Dunn, paymaster in the Welland Canal office. His remains will be brought here for interment.

 

SILVERTHORN - On Wednesday night there died at Cherry Hill, near Cooksville, Mr. Joseph Silverthorn at the patriarchal age of 97 years, 7 months, and 2 days. In the year of his marriage, 1807, Mr. Silverthorn and his wife, a daughter of Mr. John Chisholm of Queenston Heights, left Niagara for Little York in a sailing vessel. The passage across the lake which was made in a gale of wind occupied only two and a half hours. They took up their abode in the only tavern then in Toronto which was kept by D. Stiles. Then they moved to Etobicoke, finally settling on Lot 11, n. Dundas street, Township of Toronto, where he has ever since resided. He served in the militia in the war of 1812 and 1815. He leaves behind him eight daughters, 36 grandchildren, 79 great-grandchildren, and 2 great-great- grandchildren. Mr. Silverthorn had besides these children, three sons and a daughter who died before him.

 

July 11, 1879

 

SCOLLOCK - (Port Colborne) The body found floating down the Niagara River at the International bridge yesterday evening proved to be that of John Scollock, one of the missing six. The bridgemen say that other bodies passed down the river yesterday, but they were unable to catch them.


HARE - Mr. Horace Hare, formerly a resident of Dundas, died in New York very suddenly at Thursday last.

 

SLACK - (Petrolia) This morning a boiler exploded at a well that, was being drilled on the Egan farm. George Slack was injured about the head to such an extent that he died in half an hour, and William Slack sustained a compound fracture of the left leg. Drs. Mearns and Longhead were promptly in attendance and did all that could be done for the unfortunate men. Dr. Mearns will hold an inquest to-morrow morning.

 

MCLELLAN - (Tiverton) Last evening as Mr. Duncan McClellan, a farmer near this village, was digging a hole to bury a large stone on his farm, the stone suddenly rolled into the hole where he was working and struck him a severe blow which caused his death.

 

DOW - (St. Andrew's, NB) Intelligence of the sad death of James Dow, late of St. Stephen, reached here to-day. His dead body was found three miles from his home at Lawrence Station. Evidently he was thrown from his wagon and had his neck broken. He was well known as a school teacher in this county. He was formerly Mayor of St. Stephen and editor and proprietor of the St. Stephen "Journal".

 

GIGOTTI - (Toronto) Guilio Gigotti, an employee on the credit River Railway, was killed this morning at Parkdale by falling from the car of a construction train. He leaves a wife in Montreal.

 

BRADLEY, MCCURDY - (Ottawa) The names of the boys who were drowned at Wellington village are Bradley and McCurdy. The bodies were recovered the same evening.

 

July 12, 1879

 

BLACK - (Montreal) Georgina Black, a child of two years, was killed by a fall through a hay loft to the ground, only about ten feet.

 

SYLVESTER - A man named Sylvester was killed at Maskinonge, Quebec, Thursday, by a train.

 

MOONEY - The body found in Rattlesnake Creek, Niagara River, on Wednesday afternoon, has been identified as that of John Mooney, one of the six men who on the night before the 4th of July started in a small sailboat from Port Colborne for Buffalo and were without doubt all drowned, a high sea and a heavy wind at the time prevailing.


WRIGHT - (Clifton) The death in announced of Mrs. Wright, mother of Mr. Joshua Wright, mail agent, and George Wright, architect, who died at Clifton at the advanced age of 74 years. Her remains were taken to Dundas for interment, escorted to the G.W.R. .station by Messrs Thomas Butters, William Leggatt, R. Furness, T. McGrath, and Mr. Smeaton, as pall bearers.

 

MCTAVISH - Mr. Duncan McTavish of Huron Township, one of the old pioneers, died at his residence towards the close of last month at the ripe old age of 85 years and 5 months, Deceased was a native of Argyllshire, Scotland. He came to this country sixty years ago and first settled in the County of Halton; twenty-seven years ago he moved up to the Township of Huron and was one of the earliest settlers.

 

HALL - (East Saginaw) A horrible discovery was made in the McFarlane block yesterday afternoon. A terrible stench in the vicinity all day disturbed the people, and the door to the room of Robert Hall, the well known music dealer, was forced open. Hall lay on the couch dead and terribly decomposed with his little pet dog by his side. He was last seen late Tuesday night. He had been suffering with a tumour on one of his legs for some time and was addicted to the use of chloroform. Two empty bottles labelled chloroform were found in his room and it is evident that he either died from an overdose or that he committed suicide. He was from Cobourg, Ontario, and has three sisters at Quebec.

 

SHAW - The body of the late Mrs. Shaw, drowned in Burlington Bay on Dominion Day, was found this morning by a man named Doyle, floating near the Desjardins Canal, Dr. T. White was communicated with and will hold an Inquest this evening at 8 o'clock. The body was given into the charge of Detectives Littlehales and Gates and conveyed to the dead house on King William street.

 

July 14, 1879

 

SHAW - (Port Perry) last evening, A. H. Shaw, bailiff of the Third Division Court in this county, with several others started in the yacht "Tempest" for a bath in the lakes, and when 2 or 3 miles out and a hundred yards from the shore, Messrs Shaw and Watkins stripped and jumped in. Nearing the shore, they became entangled in weeds and were unable to proceed. Mr. Watkins eventually reached the island in an exhausted condition. Mr. Shaw was drowned. The body was recovered this morning.

 

LOUISIER - (Montreal) Louis Louisier, a gatemen on the Grand Trunk at St. Henri, was killed by a locomotive which cut his body in two. He leaves a wife and large family.


BOTTRELL, HENRI - (Ottawa) News of a most melancholy accident reached the city this afternoon. Two young men, E. O. Bottrell and J. K. Henri, sons of prominent citizens, went fishing on Saturday afternoon in the Ottawa river below Deschenes Rapids where the current is very swift. The boat was drawn into an eddy and became uncontrollable. It finally capsized, throwing them into the water, and before assistance could be given, both were drowned. The bodies have not yet been recovered.

 

HANLEY, MCFARLANE, DAYTON - (Port Colborne) The body reported to be found

 at the Windmill Point yesterday was recognized as Edward Hanley. His body was brought here last night. The body reported to be found below the Niagara falls was recognized as J. McFarlane. His body was brought here this morning. The last of the bodies was found at Ross Point near Fort Erie last night and was recognized as Isaac Dayton, the owner of the unlucky boat. His body was taken by his friends to Buffalo for burial. Conroy's body arrived from Buffalo this morning. All the bodies except Dayton's are to be buried here, side by side. Conroy, McFarlane, and Hanley will be buried to-day.

 

MACDONALD - Charles Macdonald, a Berlin young man, whose relatives live in Simcoe County, has died in Berlin from sunstroke.

 

CORSAN - Died at the Bank of British North America in this city, early this morning, Harold Pilkington, infant son of Thomas and Frances Corsan, aged 19 days.

 

RATHBONE - Died on the 13th instant, at the residence of his father, 111 Ray street north, Henry Bateman Rathbone, aged 9 months and 2 weeks. Funeral will take place to-morrow (Tuesday) at 5:30 p.m. Friends and acquaintances please accept this notice.

 

WALSH - Died in this city, on the 14th instant, at 189 James street north, Edward Simeon, only child of Thomas and Frances Walsh, aged 5 months. The funeral will take place from the above address at 2 o'clock, to-morrow (Tuesday afternoon).

 

July 15, 1879

 

BIRCHALL - Died at St. Catharines, on the 12th instant, Thomas William Birchall, aged 82 years and 11 months.

 

LYONS - (Montreal) A sailor named Lyons was found lying in a field in the neighbourhood of the city in a starving state, and died in the hospital last night. He was unable to give an account of himself.


LEPAGE - (Strathroy) Friday's storm was extremely violent in this section while it lasted. On Saturday one of the victims of its fury succumbed to the injuries received. The deceased, a man named Augustine Lepage, was employed in MacPherson's brick yard and saw mill, adjoining the town, and was fatally injured by the falling timbers of the structure which was swept away by the force of the tornado. A number of other buildings adjoining to the town were also injured. Barns were blown down and cattle killed, but no other lives were lost. A companion of Lepage's was also seriously injured. Lepage was a steady man and much respected.

 

HAZLETON - (Guelph) Mr. James Hazleton, who for many years carried on a successful furniture business in this city, committed suicide about 11 a.m. to-day by hanging himself with a rope attached to a sill of a window in his bedroom. Deceased retired from business about eight months ago and shortly afterward became unsound of mind and was removed to an asylum in Buffalo where he remained until some two months ago when it was thought prudent to bring him to his home where he was well cared for. This morning he was missed for half an hour and on proceeding to his room was found hanging by the neck, quite dead. He leaves a wife and family of grown-up sons and daughters.

 

WILSON - (Kingston) On Friday night last, a young man named Robert Wilson, while being chased by a policeman, ran against a wagon and was severely injured. He died yesterday. An in inquest was held and a verdict in accordance with the above facts returned.

 

CALLAGHAN - A little seven-year-old daughter of Mr. Henry Callaghan of Lindsay died on Thursday from the effects of Paris green she had swallowed a couple of days previous in eating lettuce in the garden. The Paris green was put on some potato plants and must have blown off on the lettuce by the wind. The little girl suffered intense pain for two days until death relieved her.

 

DENNISON - Mrs. William Dennison, residing near Laurel, Township of Amaranth, on Tuesday last received a small scratch on her underlip which resulted in her death on Saturday morning. Coroner Halstead held an inquest on Monday, and after hearing the evidence the jury returned a verdict of death from blood poisoning caused by a scratch on the lip.

 

TAYLOR - Died at Hespeler, Ontario, on the 15th instant, of inflammation of the bowels, John Dames, youngest son of W. T. Taylor, of 70 Elgin street, city, in the 21st year of his age. Funeral from G.W.R. station at 11 o'clock a.m. tomorrow, Wednesday.


LAWRENCE - Died this morning, at her residence, 9 Wood street east, Mrs. Mary Lawrence, aged 49 years. Funeral will take place from the above address, to-morrow (Wednesday) at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

July 16, 1879

 

BRIGGS - (Belleville) A young man named George Briggs was drowned in the river this afternoon near Lazier's woollen factory while bathing.

 

DIXON - (Peterborough) About 11 o'clock last night, Mr. Joseph Dixon, a well known and wealthy farmer, living in the outskirts of town, fell from the verandah of his residence to the ground, a distance of sixteen feet, from the effects of which he died early this morning. Deceased was about 40 years of age and leaves a wife and family. The accident is supposed to have been caused by a nervous shock.

 

BLACK - James Black, of the old commission and forwarding firm of Black & Young which did business at the foot of First street, Detroit, from 1848 to 1876, died in Windsor on Saturday at the advanced age of 70 years. The deceased was a native of Scotland and possessed of many sterling traits of character.

 

July 21, 1879

 

SMILES - Considerable excitement over the smallpox question prevails at Granton. A young woman, Susan Smiles, died of the disease on Sunday morning near Whalen. There are a good many cases reported in country places outside St. Mary's. On Saturday evening a public meeting was held in Granton to adopt measures in order to check the approach of the disease, but it ended in a squabble.

 

SOMERVILLE - Two cases of small pox are reported from the western side of Usborne. The disease was carried thither by a girl named Somerville who was working as a servant in Willis's hotel, St. Mary's. She has since died and her mother is reported seriously ill.

 

MCPHALEN - (Welland) The many friends of Mr. Hugh McPhalen in this city will learn with the most sincere regret of his drowning which occurred on the 25th of June in Little Hart river near Bismarck, Dakota Territory, while in the self-sacrificing attempt to save the life of a drowning boy. The boy had gone in swimming, got beyond his depth and was drowning. Mr. Mcphalen went to the rescue and while the boy's life was saved, sad to relate his rescuer was drowned. The deceased was about 19 years of age and a son of Mr. Cornelius McPhelan of Humberstone Township. The young man was possessed of an adventurous and enterprising


 spirit, and went west to find a wider field for action. The instance in question is not the first of his having distinguished himself for unusual bravery. Some months ago it will be remembered he excited some admiration plaudits of the Western press by running a locomotive through a gauntlet of fire, saving an immense amount of property, His relations possess the heartfelt sympathy of the public in their distressing bereavement, only alleviated by the recollection of which they may well feel proud that the noble young man lost his life while in the performance of the truest act of heroism in the powers of humanity to accomplish.

 

TAYINE - (Barrie) About two weeks ago Mrs. Tayine, a resident of this town, stepped on a rusty nail and received an ugly wound in the foot of about an inch in depth. The injury was promptly dressed and no symptoms of even a serious, much less a fatal nature manifested themselves until Sunday last when lockjaw set in and death followed on Sunday morning. The deceased leaves a husband and four voting children.

 

RAWLINGS - Saturday morning about nine o'clock a couple of little boys named respectively Burrows and Kelly informed the hands on board the steamer "Eclipse" that on Friday afternoon about 4;30 o'clock they had seen a man fall off Beckett's wharf at the foot of Simcoe street into the water and that they had not seen him come back. The men proceeded to search at the spot indicated and speedily discovered the body of an elderly man. The head was about six inches below the surface, the body being in an almost erect position and the right hand grasping some weeds. The body was at once raised and given charge of Sgt. Parkes who had it conveyed to the morgue on King William street when a search of the remains was made and documents and letters found which prove that the man as Thomas Rawlings, an accountant of Brantford, who it seems came to this city a few days since to transact some business in connection with the estate of 1. C. Chilman. In one of the deceased's pockets was found a silver snuff box bearing the inscription: "Presented to Thomas Rawlings by his numerous friends as a memento of high respect for his upright and honourable conduct during eleven years he was cashier to Messrs Harvey & Co of this place, Hoyle Foundry, October 10, 1839". There was also found a paper marked. "Memorandum of my experience as an accountant" , and copies of several letters to the Hon. A. S. Hardy, CP. Woods, and other members of the Ontario Government, asking for the office of Inspector of Insurance, a letter from T,. V. Percival of Toronto, acknowledging the receipt of the application and one from Mr. Wood informing deceased that Mr. O'Reilly had been appointed. Another document shows that deceased was at one time auditor for the Buffalo, Brantford and Goderich Railway, also a note for $200 drawn by I . C. Chilman &. Co. dated March 1st, 1876, and payable fifteen days after date, and a receipt for the payment of $5 to James P. Excell of Doric Lodge, 121, A. F. & A.M., payment of dues up to the 15th of February, 1877.


A visiting card bearing the name of M. G. Dickson was also among the documents found. Burrows and Kelly say that they had first noticed deceased on the hill above the wharf where they were chasing grasshoppers. They also saw him leisurely saunter down the bank to the wharf. Other parties state that they saw Rawlings at a later hour than that mentioned by the boys. Mr. Rawlings resided, it would seem from a letter found on his person, at 72 King street, Brantford, and has left a wife to mourn his death. He was between 60 and 70 years of age, very deaf, but steady in his habits. There was not a cent of money found. Whether the drowning was accidental or not is impossible to say, but it seems somewhat strange that at such an hour of the day and in a locality where numbers of people are almost always moving about that any man could drown. Mr. Charles Foster of this city identified the body as that of Thomas Rawlings, and says he was employed by Messrs Watts & Co. of Brantford to attend to their interests in the Chilman estate and carried on a general accountant's business.

 

LEBEBVRE, GAUVIN - (Quebec) Up to the present, only two bodies have been recovered of the victims of the late yachting accident, Fefebvre, a school teacher, and Gauvin, a gentleman of private means. In the parish church to-day after mass, Father Rousseaux asked the prayers of the congregation for the unfortunate victims and read out their names. The sobbing in the church was so general that the cure broke down in his sermon. The two bodies recovered will be interred to-morrow.

 

July 22, 1879

 

ROBERTS - Died in this city, on the 20th instant, at the residence of her son-in-law, C. F. Church, corner of Walnut and O'Reilly streets, Mrs. Ellen Maddocks Roberts, aged 53 years. Funeral will leave the above address on Tuesday, the 22nd instant, at half past two o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

JONES - Died on Monday, 21st instant, at No 60 Victoria avenue north, Evan Jones, in the 79th year of his age. Funeral will take plane from the above address on Wednesday, 23rd instant, at 2:30 p.m. Friends are respectfully invited to attend.

 

ORANGE - (Ottawa) Last evening while a boy named Orange was out swimming at the Little Chaudiere about two miles above the city, he was thrown under a boom of logs and drowned. The body has not yet been recovered.

 

NEEHAN - (Toronto) P. Neehan, the man who had his skull fractured last night from a kick by a horse at a fire, died this evening. He leaves a wife and six children.


BEDARD - (Quebec) The coroner held an Inquest to-day on a young child named Willie Bedard who was run over and killed in Fleurie street, St. Roch, by a carter named Absalom Fansfacon. A verdict of homicide was returned and the coroner at once issued his warrant for Fansfacon's arrest. The prisoner was lodged in the jail this afternoon.

 

HURLEY - Died in this city, on the 22nd instant, Margaret Maria, infant daughter of David and Bridget Hurley, aged 2 months and 2 weeks. Funeral leaves 176 Catherine street north to-morrow at 3 p.m.

 

HASTIE - This forenoon about 11:15 o'clock a sad casualty occurred on John Street south, this city, resuming in the instantaneous death of one man, his companion having a most miraculous escape. It appears that on Monday lest Mr. John Hastie of 41 East avenue north obtained a contract from Mr. James Jolley, saddler, whose place of business is on John street south opposite the Court House square to connect that gentleman's residence with the John street sewer. This morning Mr. Hastie began operations, being assisted by Messrs William Home and Patrick Callighan, two labourers who have been in the habit of rendering aid to Mr. Hastie in similar work in the past, that gentleman making such work a specialty. All went well until the hole which was about three or four feet wide and about twenty feet long had been dug down to the nearest main sewer to the depth of about twelve or fourteen feet. Then a small quantity of earth fell which was cleaned out and a brace consisting of not over-strong wood was put in. Operations were then continued and the pipe cleaned out.

Hastie was meanwhile employed in making the connection with the main sewer and was in a stooping position when a large quantity of earth, weighing probably a couple of tons, fell on him, completely burying him. The other workmen were, of course, very much dismayed at the terrible mishap and lost not a moment in organizing means to extricate their unfortunate employer. Horne jumped into the pit which was still eight or nine feet deep and began removing the earth. He had scarcely started when the sides again collapsed and he too was buried, his body up to the neck being covered. Callighan speedily relieved Horne's neck from the pressure of the earth and having meanwhile procured the assistance of Mr. Jolley and others, set to work to dig him out. This took some time and the unfortunate man was for a good while in a tight place, being rather severely crushed. He was taken into Mr. Jolley's residence and attended by Drs. Ryall and White who had by this time arrived. His injuries were not such as to prevent his walking home shortly afterward. He, however, had a most miraculous escape with his life. There were, of course several feet of earth between poor Hastie and the open air, and no hope was held out that he would be rescued alive. Fearful that there would be a repetition of the catastrophe, a gentleman who stood by advised additional bracing of the sides of the sewer which was obtained and the work proceeded.


It, took nearly an hour from the time of the accident to reach Hastie's body and when it was brought to the surface the vital spark had fled. Meanwhile the unfortunate man's wife and other members of the family had arrived and as was to be expected their grief was of the most touching character. Hastie was an old and much respected citizen. For many years he was street inspector and proved a most faithful employee of the city. His untimely death, for he was only about 48 years of age, will be heard of with regret by a wide circle of friends, and the bereaved wife and five fatherless children will have the sympathy of citizens generally.

 

July 23, 1879

 

Woods - (Brockville) An old lady, the wife of John Woods, a pensioner, jumped into the river and was drowned. Her body was found this morning. The cause of the act was a difficulty with her daughter-in-law with whom she had lived.

 

WILSON - (Fergus) Samuel J. Wilson, farmer of Garafraxa, was killed to-day by lightning while leading his horse to the barn. His man, who was close by, was badly stunned. Mr. Wilson leaves a large family.

 

HASTIE - Died on the 22nd instant, John Hastie, aged 49 years. Funeral from his late residence, 41 Fast avenue north, on Thursday, at 4 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

HOYLE - Died in this city, on the 23rd instant, John Hoyle, aged 73 years. Funeral from his late residence, No 4 Jackson street east, on Thursday, at 4 o'clock p.m. Friends will please attend without further notice.

 

July 24, 1879

 

HENDERSON - (Quebec) Mrs. C. Henderson, widow of W. C. Henderson, a well known merchant and importer, last night fell from her chair and died instantly. The cause is supposed to have been apoplexy.

 

DELISLE - (Quebec) The body of Madame Octave Delisle, one of the victims of the recent yachting accidents, was found floating in the river this morning. An inquest will be held.

 

MILLER - (St. John, NB.) Mr. Robert Miller who was charge of the fire station at Eel River lost one of his children by drowning on Sunday last. The child fell from the bank into a brook near the line at that place.

 

HOLMES - (Halifax) A little boy named Gil Holmes was drowned while bathing at Mogghis Creek, Sydney, N.B.


VANVUSTIRK - (Halifax) A boy, eleven years old, named Henry VanVustirk, accidentally hung himself at Pugwash, Cumberland County, by a piece of rope attached to a cart.

 

RYAN - A dispatch from Barrie, dated Thursday, says; A very serious accident occurred here last night. A crowd of people were on Carley's old wharf watching a boat race when the wharf gave way, precipitating them all into the water. They have succeeded in getting all out except John Ryan, a printer's lad of this town. The event has caused considerable excitement about town.

 

July 25, 1879

 

ANDREWS - Died in St. Catharines, on the 23rd instant, after a lingering illness, Edward F. Andrews, aged 60 years.

 

VALENTINE - Died on the 24th instant, at 121 Ferrie street east, Alice, beloved wife of Charles Valentine, in the 45th year of her age. Funeral will take place from her late residence, on Saturday, the 26th instant, at 9 o'clock a.m.

 

COUTTS - The wife of William Coutts of Brant died suddenly of sunstroke on Saturday.

 

ROLOFF - Mrs. Roloff of Brant hung herself the night before last. When found she was dead. An inquest was held yesterday.

 

ANDERSON - The death is announced of Mr. George Anderson, brother of Mr. James Anderson, Vine street, city. It appears that Mr. Anderson, who left this city for Ballerat, Australia, many years ago and who was 60 years of age, was suddenly killed by being thrown from a conveyance in which he was riding in the vicinity of the city named.

 

AUSTIN - On Monday afternoon, a sad accident occurred near Bronte by which Willie, the youngest son of Mr. William Austin, aged about 3 years, lost his life. It seems that the little fellow accidentally fell into an open cistern and drowned before help came or even before his absence from the house had been discovered.

 

EDMONSON - Died on the 24th instant, Samuel T., infant son of George and Sarah Edmonson, aged 24 days. Funeral from parents' residence, Burlington street east, on Saturday, at 1:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

MORRISON - (Toronto) A woman named Annie Morrison dropped down dead in the street to-day.


HALL - (Montreal) Last night about 6 o'clock, Mr. W. H. Hall, notary, lay down in his office, and not returning home was sent for several hours after, being found dead lying on the sofa. Heart disease was the cause.

 

SHANNON - (London) The chapel of St. Joseph's Convent at Mount Hope is draped in mourning for the late Sister Martha Shannon who died very suddenly a few days ago.

 

BUCKLEY - (Prescott) His Worship Mayor Buckley of this town was taken suddenly ill about 8:30 this evening while sitting in a chair in his store conversing with a friend. Medical aid was called immediately but he expired about 9 o'clock. He had been ailing for some time but was around town to-day. His untimely end has cast a gloom upon the town. A large circle of friends is left to mourn his death.

 

GAUVEAR - (Quebec) The body of Xavier Gauvear, the 8th and last victim of the drowning accident at Point aux Trembles has been recovered and buried.

 

KRAGE - (Halifax) A man named Krage was drowned at Lockport, Shelbourne County.

 

GIFFIN - (Glenhuron) A child, three years of age, son of Mr. Andrew Giffin, was run over by a train on the Hamilton and North Western Railway this afternoon and instantly killed.

 

HADEN - (Halifax) Yesterday the house of Richard Haden, Middletown, Guysboro County, was struck by lightning and completely wrecked. Mrs. Haden was killed instantly. Mrs. John Munn who happened to be present was also struck and rendered insensible. Hopes are entertained for her recovery.

 

O'BRIEN - (Thorold) The "Post" gives some additional particulars of the death of Patrick O'Brien by drowning in Lock 24, the brief announcement of which was made in our columns yesterday. Deceased was 60 years of age and was in the act of crossing the lock gates of Lock 24 when he fell into the lock and was drowned. The lock tender, Austin Moran, saw the man fall in and made an effort to save him but without avail. O'Brien was intoxicated at the time. Coroner Lemon was notified but when he learned the facts he did not deem it necessary to hold an inquest. O'Brien was a canal labourer and has resided in the vicinity of Thorold for the past four years. He came from Oneida County, N. Y. where it is said he has relatives.

 

AXFORD - Died in this city, on the 26th instant, Robert, youngest son of George Axford, aged 2 years and 6 months. Funeral will leave his father's residence, 194 Wilson street, at 4 p.m., Sunday.


July 28, 1879

 

CROOKS - Died in this city, on the 27th instant, Alexander Crooks, in the 49th year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, No 7 MacNab street south, on Tuesday, the 29th instant, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

MILLS - (Toronto) Ellen Mills, wife of an employee in the waterworks department, was found dead in her bed by her husband yesterday on his return from work, when he left in the morning, she seemed in unusually good health and spirits.

 

BOWDEN - William Bowden, late Superintendent of Police of British Columbia, died at Victoria Saturday night.

 

FRENCH - Mr. J. B. French, civil engineer, died at Thorold suddenly Friday afternoon. Deceased was on the staff of Mr. Thomas Munro, resident engineer, Welland canal enlargement.

 

ROE - Died on Sunday, July 27th, at 185 King street east, Ella E. V. A., beloved daughter of George and Eliza Roe, aged 3˝ months. Funeral will leave her father's residence to-morrow (Tuesday) at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

July 29, 1879

 

HOLCOMB - Died in this city, on the 28th instant, William Henry Holcomb, in the 53rd year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, Locke street, corner Hannah, on Wednesday, the 30th instant, at half past two o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

WEST - (Courtright) George West who had been running as engineer on the St. Clair branch of the Canada Southern Railway between Courtright and St. Thomas for the last five years died very suddenly this morning. He seemed in about his usual health at 5 o'clock when he came to take charge of his engine. About 5:30 he complained of a curious feeling in his chest and said he felt as he had several times just before being taken ill. He said he would wait until it was time for the train to leave at 6 o'clock and that if he was any easier he would go to St. Thomas, but felt no better and went home and died at 11:15. He leaves an exemplary and industrious wife and a son and two daughters.

 

KAPLER - (St. Mary's) Effy Kapler, a domestic employed by Mr. Thomas McGoleyeck, used coal oil to light the fire last evening. The stove was blown to bits and she was so badly burned that she died after a few hours' terrible suffering.


PURDY - Saturday afternoon Miss A. Purdy, daughter of V. Purdy of Cataraqui, was found lying dead in a small stream close to the village. It is supposed that while crossing the stream she had fallen in a fit and had been drowned.

 

MCARTHUR - (Woodville) Malcolm McArthur, son of John McArthur of Eldon, was instantly killed and six others seriously injured by the falling of bent on Saturday last at the raising of a frame barn on the farm of Mr. McNevin about four miles from here. The parties injured are reported as doing well.

 

BRADSHAW - Mr. George Bradshaw, an aged Canadian and one of the veterans of the war of 1812 who took an active pert on the British side, passed peaceably away on Saturday, the 26th of July, 1879, at the advanced age of 87 years and 10 months. He was born in the then village of Niagara in 1791, the son of U.E. Loyalists who came and settled in Canada after the close of the American Revolutionary war, and on his mother's side was connected with the numerous and well known family of the Hills, settled in the Niagara District and long known among the most worthy and wealthy farmers. Mr. Bradshaw's history and that of his numerous connections on his father's and mother's side would be an epitome of the history of Western Canada all over where he and they were well known. He was called upon at an early age to take part on the British side in the war of 1812 when the population of the Province was very sparse, and was one of the brave hardy young men who defended it against an invading foe with great bravery and activity in many battles. He took part in the bloody and hardly contested battle of Lundy's Lane which was fought, on the 25th of July, we believe, in 1812 in which one of his mother's brothers was killed and in which many Canadians fell. He was also present at the battle of Queenston Heights and the taking of Fort Niagara and in the destruction and taking of Buffalo.

He was in the artillery militia service and thought nothing of walking from Niagara to Hamilton and from Hamilton to Toronto as a messenger in the militia service. Mr. Bradshaw at one time lived in the County of Norfolk and for many years in Saltfleet where he was a merchant, but since 1841 has lived in Hamilton where his aged and venerable form has long been familiar to our people. He was accustomed in his youth, as all then Canadians were, to great hardships in the forests of Canada and had an iron constitution, and thus was enabled until last winter to go daily to perform certain duties in the employ of the city through winter and summer and rain and snow. Last autumn, and especially during the past winter and the earlier months of the spring of this year, advancing age tried his iron frame and as we all must do he had to succumb to length of years. He was remarkable for his punctuality to any duties entrusted to him. For many weeks past he has been a sufferer and quite helpless, but bore his illness with resignation and was ready to go to the Great Father of us all in the Heavens, trusting to the salvation of the Lord Jesus Christ.


July 30, 1879

 

CORMACK - Died on the 29th instant, Hugh Reginald, infant son of John and Kate Cormack, aged 7 weeks and 5 days. Funeral from his parents' residence, 190 Hughson street north, at 3 o'clock Thursday afternoon.

 

ST. PIERRE, BARROW - (Quebec) A sad drowning affair occurred here this evening whereby two men, sailors of the steamer "St. Terence" met their death. It seems that four of the hands were hauling up a loose fender, leaning at the same time upon the railing of the upper deck when their support gave way, and two of them named Philip St. Pierre and George Barrow were thrown into the river, and although both good swimmers they sank to rise no more. The other two by clutching to a rope managed to save themselves.

 

DALY - (Toronto) The body of a naked boy was found drowned last night. At the inquest to-night the body was identified as that of John Daly, a lad who recently ran away from the House of Providence. A verdict of "found drowned" was returned.

 

THURSTON - (Toronto) Frances Thurston, an unfortunate, fell dead this evening in the house of Berry, the coloured oarsman, on York street. The jury at the inquest returned a verdict of "Death from natural causes".

 

HANRAHAN - (Windsor) The funeral, of John Hanrahan from St. Alphonsus Church on Sunday morning was the largest seen in Windsor for many years. Four priests officiated.

 

LODI - (Windsor) John Lodi, a thirteen-year-old son of a widow named Mrs. Joy, met his death by drowning yesterday morning. The circumstances are peculiarly sad. Mrs. Joy's husband, an employee of the Great western Railway, was hurt upon the road in such a manner that he died about three years ago and within six months after his marriage to Mrs. Lodi. Two young sons were left the twice-widowed mother. Yesterday morning these boys aged respectively 13 and 16 years went with some companions to the Lime Kilns near Crawford's dock for a swim. The practice was to dive from the deck of a sunken barge. In running for the dive, John Lodi fell upon the slippery floor and struck the back of his head on the deck. He was stunned and rolled into the water where he sank from sight at once. The larger boys attempted to find the body by diving but in vain, and the elder brother carried home the dead boy's clothing to inform his mother of the sad occurrence. The body was dragged for, but had not been found at the latest advices.

 

BAILEY - (Guelph) On Saturday last, Mr. Thomas Bailey, an old settler in this section, passed away to his long home. The deceased emigrated from Stafford, England, about 48 years ago,


arriving in Puslinch with nothing but his own brawny arms and a woodman's axe. He settled on Lot 14, concession 8, Puslinch, and commenced clearing a farm. Shortly after, he married Miss Catherine McFarlane, and was blessed with two sons and one daughter. After securing a competence and his children all marrying and his health falling, he decided to retire from active life. He sold his farm and moved to Guelph where he has been living for the past seven years. Since moving to Guelph, he has resided on Water street.

 

NICHOLS - Died in this city, on the 30th instant, William James, son of Alexander and Maria Nichols, aged 9 months and 2 weeks. Funeral will leave his father's residence, 61 Hunter street east, at 4 p.m., on Thursday. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

July 31, 1879

 

KEEFER - (London) An infant child of the Rev. P. P. Keefer of Petersville Methodist church died suddenly last night.

 

O'CALLAGHAN - A dispatch from Arthur, Wellington County, says: On Monday night Mrs. O'Callaghan, Jr., went to bed in her usual good health and early next morning her husband found her dead. An inquest was held yesterday and a verdict of "died from heart disease" returned.

 


HUGEL - A dispatch received yesterday from Brockville announces the melancholy fact that Miss Hugel, aged 18, and her sister, aged 9, were drowned while in bathing at that place. Their mother, who is a sister of Mrs. W. E. Sanford of this city, was, with a daughter about 15years of age, here on a visit when the startling and sad intelligence was received by telegraph.

It appears that Miss Hugel and sister, accompanied by a Miss Wright, were in bathing at the river frontage of Sheriff Patrick's property where, after disrobing in his boathouse, they got down into the well of the same and waded into the river. Miss Wright after going a short distance stopped, but her companions continued on when they suddenly disappeared owing to the fact of the river bed descending very abruptly to a depth of about twelve feet. Miss Wright called out for help when Miss Cooke whose father's property adjoins sheriff Patrick's threw an oar down from the cliff above which is about forty feet in height, but it proved of no use. Mr. T. McCullogh who was crossing the river at the time in a small boat, hearing the cries, rowed hurriedly towards the scene of the accident. On learning where the young ladies had sunk he immediately dived down and succeeded in bringing up the body of the younger one, but he was unable to raise the body of the elder which was afterward recovered by Mr. Griffith. Every effort possible was made to restore life, but all proved futile.


Dr. Vaux who is an uncle of the victims had the bodies removed to their mother's residence.

Mrs. Hugel left this city for Brockville last evening accompanied by Mrs. Hanford. They would arrive there at 5 o'clock in the morning. It is but a few years since the death of Mrs. Hugel's husband, and shortly afterward, further bereavement was added by the death of two sons in one day, and now she is called on to suffer the loss of two most promising and amiable daughters, torn from her without a moment's warning. The sad affair is among the saddest which have occurred in Ontario for many years, and will call forth the deepest sympathy for the bereaved relatives of the ill-fated young ladies.

Miss Wright was greatly overcome by the mournful occurrence and has been under medical treatment since it took place.

 

DURAND - (Montreal) A boy named William Durand was drowned yesterday in the canal.

 

MANTEL - (Montreal) The body of the man found in the river St. Lawrence near the city about a fortnight ago has been identified as that of Adolphus Mantel, late of this city.

 

SCOTT, HURADY - (Dunnville) A very painful drowning accident occurred to-day. About 11 o'clock, two boys, sons of Mr. J. E. Scott and Robert Hurady, were drowned while bathing in the river near Mr. Scott's residence. The water is very shallow for some distance from the shore. When last observed by some men working near, they were wading near the shore. A younger son of Mr. Scott's gave the alarm, and after a search of three-quarters of an hour they were found in the channel leading towards an abandoned waste weir about 250 feet from the shore. They were both between six and seven years of age. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved parents.

 

EASTWOOD - (Schomberg) A sad accident occurred in this place to-day by which Alfred Eastwood's little boy, two years old, was drowned by falling into a cistern.

 

August 1, 1879

 

MCEACHERN - (Halifax) Duncan McEachern, residing south of Hillsborough, PEI, hanged himself Tuesday. The cause is thought to have been grief for the loss of a child.

 

FULCHER - Fulcher of St. Mary's who was reported as out of danger died on Sunday morning of smallpox. Some years ago he was afflicted with varicose veins and inflammation from the smallpox attack attacked his legs which gangrened, death resulting. The other patients are all able to walk around and in a week at most the quarantine on Willis's house will be raised.


SCHLENDER - A gentleman named Schlender, living in the vicinity of Berlin station, has buried two of his children this week. Although not very far advanced in years, he had had the melancholy misfortune of seeing no less ten of his children consigned to their last resting place.

 

KEEFER - Died at the parsonage, Petersville, London, on Wednesday morning, July 30th, Christina Huntingdon, aged 13 months and 2 days, only child of Rev. B. B. Keefer of the Methodist Church of Canada.

 

FLEMING - Sheriff McKellar of Hamilton was in Chatham since Tuesday of last week visiting his youngest daughter, Mrs. Dr. Fleming who was dying of consumption. The funeral on Tuesday was the largest that has taken place in Chatham for some years, some 250 carriages, besides citizens, being in the procession.

 

August 2, 1879

 

WHITE - (Ottawa) Coroner Corbett held an inquest last evening on the body of Mr. James White of Gloucester who died very suddenly. A verdict was returned that he died of apoplexy.

 

GERVAIS - (Montreal) An inquest was held to-day on the remains of Pierre Gervais who died in the hospital from delirium tremens and the effects of an accident in the saloon of a man named Hetu. The jury decided that there was no one to blame for the accident.

 

O’BRIEN - (Quebec) Bishop O'Brien of Kingston died suddenly this morning at the St. Louis Hotel in this city.

 

CHARRON - (Ottawa) A boy named Charron was drowned in Deschenes Lake last night while bathing.

 

GROVEL - Solomon Grovel, fireman on the steamer "Prince of Wales", was instantly killed before landing at Carillon at noon to-day, being almost cut in two by some part of the machinery.

 

IVOR - (St. Thomas) On Wednesday another of our pioneers, Mr. Samuel Ivor, expired. Deceased was born in London, England, but he emigrated to Canada and settled in this town about 1834. He became associated in the management of the old St. Thomas Hotel and subsequently became proprietor of that hostelry. Afterward he retired from this business and has since resided in a pleasant dwelling on Talbot streets He was about 80 years of age.

 


August 4, 1879

 

WHITE - (Halifax) Captain Lazaar White was drowned in Margaret, Cape Breton, by the upsetting of a fishing boat.

 

MCLELLAND - (Bracebridge ) This morning about 6 o'clock, a young man named William McLelland was drowned while bathing. The body was recovered about two hours afterward.

 

TUCKER - (Welland) This evening about 7 o'clock, a little boy, about seven years of age, son of Mr. James Tucker, was drowned in the canal. The body was found six or eight minutes after, but life was extinct.

 

EASTING - The body of a man named Peter Easting, aged about 60 years, was found yesterday morning on the lake shore near Grimsby. He had for some years been bartender at Randall's Hotel, and owing to a change in the proprietorship of the hotel, Easting expected to lose his place and had been heard to make threats to suicide which it is supposed he carried out.

 

UPTHEGROVE - Died on the 3rd instant, Elizabeth, wife of Edward Upthegrove, aged 35 years. Funeral from her husband's residence, No 248 Barton street east, on Tuesday afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

IVORY, NIBBS, SEYMOUR - Collapse of a wall of the burned block of Mclnnes & Co

James J. Ivory resided at 74 Mulberry street. He leaves a widow.

 The unfortunate man was a valued employee of the gas Co., having been in their employ for upwards of sixteen years. At the time of his death and for a considerable time previous, he had acted as foreman and was regarded as a most trustworthy man. John Nibbs was employed as a labourer for the Co. and had been a faithful employee for the last six years or more. He resided at 170 Ferguson avenue and leaves a widow and one child.

Robert Seymour has been for seven years in the service of the Gas Co. and had proved himself equally valuable as a workman with those who met their end with him. Much sympathy is felt for the bereaved families, but especially for that of Seymour as he leaves a widow and seven children, and it is not to be expected that a man in his rank in life has been able to make any adequate provision for their future support. It was a melancholy task to break the dread intelligence to the bereaved ones, but as evil tidings travel fast those commissioned to carry the intelligence were in every case anticipated. The grief of those so soon deprived of their breadwinners was heartrending to behold.


HANCOCK - It seems that when one catastrophe takes place, another must naturally follow on its heels. The loss of the fine property burned down on Friday night was sad, but the burial alive of three citizens was much more to be deplored. And now it is our melancholy duty to chronicle the almost instant death of another estimable citizen through an accident which occurred at the ruins yesterday. About midnight on Saturday, Messrs Addison and Hancock, contractors, assisted by Mr. James Hancock, a brother of the last named, a man named Honeycomb, and a teamster began the erection of a derrick on John street nearly opposite the place where it was believed Messrs Ivory, Seymour, and Nibbs were buried alive. The work was under the direction of Mr. Leith, architect, who was appointed by the Board of Aldermen. About half past four o'clock yesterday morning everything was in readiness for beginning work on the ruins, and James Hancock ascended to the top of the derrick by means of a ladder with the object of oiling the upper portion of the machinery. He had barely taken up a position when down tumbled the derrick with a perfect crash, precipitating the unfortunate man into the cellar of the ruined building, a distance of from thirty to forty feet. He fell with a fearful force on his head, coming into very violent collision with one of the large blocks of stone which lay among the debris from the tumbled down wall. Those in the neighbourhood rushed to the spot only to find that their fellow workman had met with fatal injuries. His skull had sustained a fearful fracture nearly the whole length, and he had also sustained several severe injuries about the head and upper portion of his body, as well as internally. Dr. White was summoned but it was soon seen that no mortal assistance could save the poor fellow's life, and he died at his residence on Locomotive street within half an hour after the catastrophe... The deceased who was about 32 years of age leaves a widow to mourn his terribly sudden death. He was a fine manly fellow, and had for years, till lately, been in the employ of the G.W.R. Co. His death will be mourned by a wide circle of friends. He was a valued member of the IOOF holding a high position on the membership roll of Unity Lodge no 47. He was also a member of the Masonic Order, being connected with Acacia Lodge No 61. His remains will be interred on Tuesday afternoon with the usual honours.

 

August 5, 1879

 

HANCOCK - Died in Hamilton, on Sunday, August 3rd, James C. Hancock, in the 33rd year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, 26 Locomotive street, this (Tuesday) afternoon at 4 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

GALLOW - (Toronto) A two-year-old boy of John Gallow's, a resident on the Esplanade, was drowned on Saturday by falling; into a rain-water butt.


MONETTE - (Port Vian, Que.) A terrible case of poisoning from Paris green has taken place at St. Martin. The bread was placed in the same place with the Paris green and the former got impregnated with the poison. Seven of the family named Monette were poisoned. Three of them are dead, and the rest are sick with no hopes entertained of their recovery.

 

KENNEDY - (Oshawa) The body of David Kennedy, formerly of this town, was found this morning close to the G.T.R. track, two miles east of here, by the driver of a westbound freight train and an inquest opened by Dr. Rae, coroner, which was afterward adjourned till to-night to await the arrival of the driver to give evidence. Kennedy was seen in Toronto yesterday and it is supposed left there on a freight train en route to Kingston where he had got employment. Whether he fell of jumped off the train, which was on a grade and must have been running at a great speed, is not known, but it is supposed that he jumped off for the purpose of seeing a Mr. Hall, a farmer who resides close to where his body was found. His injuries consisted of a gash about four inches in length and one and a half in breadth on the left side of his head and another in the back of the head, both of which penetrated to the brain. The fingers of the right hand were also crushed to a jelly.

 

POWER - Died on Monday night, 4th August, 1879, Valentine Edward, youngest child of Mr. N. J. Power, aged 17 months. Funeral from 62 Vine street, Wednesday, 9 a.m.

 

WHEDDON - Died at Brantford, on the 4th instant, Ellen Mary, infant daughter of James and Mary Wheddon, aged 6 months and 19 days. Funeral from the G.W.R. station, Hamilton, on the arrival of the 5:10 p.m. train on Wednesday.

 

August 6, 1879

 

MITCHELL - Died on Tuesday 5th instant, at Mr. Samuel Forsyth's farm, Dundas Road, John Mitchell, Esq., in the 66th year of his age. Funeral will take place from the above residence, on Wednesday, 6th instant, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and Acquaintances are hereby requested to attend without further notice.

 

COOK - Died on Monday, 4th instant, Margaret J., youngest daughter of the late Lewis Cook, aged 30 years. Funeral from the residence of her brother-in-law, Isaac Bernard, 113 Jackson street east, at 2 p.m. to-day (Wednesday). Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

TAYLOR - (Brownsville)- A coloured man named Charles Taylor was found dead on a cattle guard east of Brownsville station on Sunday morning. An inquest was held by Coroner Minchall. Verdict: killed by a train on the C.S.R. near a road crossing.


HAYNES - (St. Catharines) A strange accident occurred, says "the "Journal", about five o'clock Monday afternoon on board the schooner "Sylvester Neelon" now lying at the Red Mill wharf unloading salt in bags by which a boy named Haynes, 11 or 12 years of age, lost his life. The boy was sitting on the railing of the vessel watching the unloading of the bags of salt. By some mischance, one of the bags swung round to where he was sitting and struck him a heavy blow, knocking his side against a piece of iron. The lad was found to be hurt and was taken by Mr. Heelon's team to his home on Academy street. It was not supposed he was fatally injured, as he told his mother on being brought home not to cry as he was all right, but in less than half an hour he breathed his last.

 

REID - An old pensioner named William Reid died suddenly in London, Ontario, on Tuesday. He was 50 years of age and had served formerly in the Royal Canadian Rifles as assistant school master. Since his discharge he has resided in London, drawing his pension as a corporal.

 

August 7 1879

 

TRIDER - (Halifax) A young man named Levi Trider was drowned in the St. Croix River, Hants County, on Sunday last while bathing.

 

WELSH - (Hagersville) George Welsh, conductor of freight train No 23, Canada Southern Railway, attempted to get into the caboose when the train was in motion and was thrown under the cars. He received such severe injuries that he died shortly afterward.

 

O'HAGAN - Thomas O'Hagan, formerly a trackman on the G.W.R., died at his residence on Bathurst street, London, after an illness of six weeks. It will be remembered that about as many weeks ago he was injured near the Bothwell station by a tie falling across his breast and shoulders. He was conveyed home and since that time has been struggling against his injuries which unfortunately, however, have resulted in his death. He leaves to mourn his untimely death a widow and six children, four of whom are dependent for support.

 

HOPE - McGill's bagnio, in the East Ward, Brantford, says the "Expositor", has had an unenviable notoriety for some years past as the resort of loose characters and for unlawful sale and consumption of liquor. Again and again the inmates have appeared in the Police Court only to return to their evil ways more persistently. For some days past ugly rumours have been circulated to the effect that in a row last week one of the women received such treatment as to result in her


death. The deceased was a daughter of McGill, married to one Hope of Paris. She was home last week and on Friday night she and her sisters got into a fight in which Mrs. Hope got a drubbing that left her body a mass of bruises from head to foot. From this or some other cause she died, but the four sisters and others of the household were too drunk to know what was transpiring. On Sunday the corpse of the miserable woman was consigned to its dishonoured grave and if a murder was committed the perpetrators bid fair to be unwhipt (Archaic spelling of unwhipped) of justice.

 

August 8, 1879

 

WILLIAMS - (Fredericton, N.B.) Whinant Williams of Douglas while crossing the river from his residence to Sugar Island where he was haying fell out of his canoe and was drowned. Deceased leaves a wife and three children. The body was picked up an hour after his death.

 

DEROSH - (St. John, N.B.) John L. Derosh, of Tracadie, Gloucester County, was drowned while bathing at Michean's Point, near the mouth of the Richibucto harbour.

 

DUPLEICY, GIROUARD - (Buchaiche, N.B.) Since the last report, information has been received that the destruction is much more extensive that at first supposed. Very few houses have escaped injury. Besides that done to the spire and roof of the Roman Catholic chapel, the outbuildings, storehouse, and barns of Rev. Mr. Michaud are a mass of ruins. Miss Julia Michaud, a niece of the priest, was severely injured, The convent was somewhat racked but is still standing. Several cords of bark awaiting shipment with several rafts of deals were driven to sea. Irving's warehouse was utterly destroyed. The large school building with furniture and library is a total loss.

Timbers, a ton weight, were raised and carried several hundred feet with the violence of the tempest. The old moulding shop and other buildings at the shipyards were swept away. Fences are levelled in all directions. Ruins of farmhouses and barns defy description and in many places they are strewn for miles along the highway. Fields of crops and valuable forest lands are completely destroyed.

New details are continually reported. In one instance a mother was crushed to death while her child in her arms was uninjured. Several children in Dollard settlement are missing. They had been picking berries and are supposed to be killed. Visitors are arriving from all parts and subscriptions to the starving county folk are freely made by the people of the town. The names of  the dead of this vicinity are Mrs. Dupleicy, Mrs. Girouard, and two other children. There are a number wounded.


BURWELL - Leonidas Burwell, of Port Burwell, died at that place yesterday. He was a son of the late Colonel Burwell for many years member for Middlesex in the old Parliament of Upper Canada. Mr. Burwell represented past Elgin as a Liberal for ten years in the parliament of Canada prior to Confederation. Being defeated in the general election of 1867, he then retired from public life.

 

SYMINGTON - Mr. Thomas Symington, Managing Director of the Sheddon Co. and a prominent man in business circle, died in Montreal on Wednesday night.

 

KENNEDY - Mrs. Kennedy, widow of the late Thomas Kennedy of Copetown, died on Friday afternoon, the 1st instant, she had been living in Copetown since 1843, having formerly resided with her husband in Hamilton, At the time of her death, she had attained the ripe old age of 80 years and was greatly respected and esteemed by a large circle of friends.

 

August 9, 1879

 

BONHAM - Mr. John Bonham of South Dumfries died on Wednesday morning. He leaves a widow and several children to mourn their loss.

 

GUINTER - In the "Spectator" of Thursday, it was announced that Mr. Levi Guinter, farmer in Pelham Township, was prostrated from overwork in the harvest fields on his farm and that he was in a very critical state. Friday morning it was learned that he died on Thursday night. Mr. Guinter was a very amiable and philanthropic man; it is sad that he has been cut off at the early age of 32 years. Deceased was a son-in-law of Mr. J. W. James, Health Inspector of this city and leaves a young widow and three children to mourn his loss. Mr. James left Friday afternoon on leave of absence to attend the funeral which takes place to-day.

 

MCDOUGALL - Died at her residence, 6th concession, East Flamborough, Mrs. Margaret McDougall, aged 58 years. Funeral from the above address on Monday at 11 o'clock to Millgrove cemetery. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

HARLAN - (Ottawa) A man named Harlan, an employee of Hamilton Bros., died from the effects of a dose of Paris green which he had mistaken for sugar in mixing a drink.

 

MCINNES - (London) A little boy named Duncan ,McInnes died from lockjaw this week, caused by stubbing his toe against a stone.

 

ADAMS - (Hanover) A sad and fatal accident occurred near the village of Hanover by which Miss Adams lost her life at a picnic party. After tea while enjoying a walk in the woods, a tree fell,


instantly killing Miss Adams. It has cast a gloom over the entire village. She was beloved by all who knew her.

 

MIGHTON, RICHARDSON - (Durham) A very sad accident occurred at a barn raising on the farm of Thomas Mighton, Township of Bentinck, about three miles from this place. This afternoon two men, Mr. Joseph Mighton and William Richardson, were instantaneously killed and some others injured, several of them very seriously. Great excitement has been caused at the result of the catastrophe, and much sympathy is expressed for the unfortunate victims, all of whom are well known and highly respected in this vicinity. Mighton was married and leaves a wife and large family. Richardson was also married only a short time ago.

 

MILLER - (Washago) To-day about 11 o'clock, as some children were playing at the Severn River-side here, one of them, a son of Mr. John Miller, aged about 6 years, fell in and was carried down the current. Means were taken for his recovery by Dr. C. Moore, but were of no avail, He died shortly after being taken out of the water.

 

August 15, 1879

 

ECHLIN - Died at the residence of her father, King street west, two doors west of Park street, Emily Jane Echlin, daughter of Henry M. Echlin, in the 18th year of her age. The funeral will take place from the above address, on Saturday, at 4 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

GATES - (Halifax) Some particulars of the tragedy at Margaretville, Annapolis County, yesterday morning, have been received here. David Gates, a labourer, 45 years old, murdered his wife by striking her on the head with a hatchet and then completed the tragedy by rushing to the wharf and throwing himself overboard. He had been married twenty-three years and leaves a family of nine children.

 

SMITH - Edward T. Smith was recently killed by lightning on Lake Winnipeg.

 

MARKLE - (Halifax) The wife of Rev. Mr. Markle of Chester, who was badly burned yesterday while in the carriage with her husband, died this afternoon.

 

GOWENLOCK - (Queenston) Thomas Gowenlock, a young man, a resident of this village, was found dead in his home this evening. He has lived alone for a number of years. He is supposed to have had a fit and fallen over on his face in the bed where he was found, and suffocated. An inquest will likely be held.


BROOKS (Kingston) A man named Brooks committed suicide last night in the police station by hanging himself with his suspenders. The man Brooks who committed suicide last night in the police station was a tinsmith by trade. He was arrested for drunkenness yesterday morning. A coroner's inquest is being held.

 

August 16, 1879

 

MORRISON - Died on the 15th instant, Ann, beloved wife of James Morrison, and daughter of William Addison, builder, Wellington street, aged 34 years, 7 months, and 13 days. Funeral from her husband's residence, 100 Barton street east at 3:30 o'clock this afternoon.

 

August 18, 1879

 

LUXTON - Died on August 15th, Norman John, youngest son of George and Harriet A. Luxton, aged 7 years and 8 months. Funeral from the residence, Mountain, Barton, to Burlington cemetery, on Monday at 3 p.m.

The little son of Mr. George Luxton on the mountain, who was kicked by a horse a few days ago, died last evening after having lingered in agony since the occurrence.

 

FOTHERGIL - It is with regret we record the death at 9 o'clock Saturday of Mr. H. Fothergil, Sr., Chief Engineer, RN, who has resided at the Royal Hotel in this city for the last thirteen years. He was attacked Friday morning about eight o'clock with a stroke of apoplexy to which he was liable, having previously suffered twice from similar attacks. This time, however, he did not recover, for after lingering in an unconscious state for twenty-five hours, he breathed his last. Deceased was 77 years of age. He was born at Hollowell, near Liverpool, and at an early age entered the navy and was 21 years in Her Majesty's service, He served on the "Traveller" and "Mohawk" at Kingston some 34 or 35 years ago, end was also engaged in the Crimean war on HMS Argus, at the close of which he received a silver medal.

He also served a time on the "Inflexible", a cruiser, and spent a brief period at Cape Horn and the East and West Indies. Since leaving the service he has spent the greater part of his time in Hamilton, where he was well known and greatly esteemed. The notice of his death will be recorded with extreme regret by his numerous friends. He will be buried from his son's residence at Newcastle.

 

HORNING - Died on Sunday, the 17th instant, near Waterdown, William G. Horning, in the 69th year of his age. Funeral from his late residence, to-morrow (Tuesday) at 2 p.m.


MULLEN - (Belleville) Daniel Mullen, working on the city water works, received such injuries yesterday by the caving in of part of an embankment that he died to-day.

 

BEDFORD - (Toronto) A number of young men have taken up their quarters on the Island for the summer months. Yesterday two of the party, Cordon Bedford and William Duggan, came over to the city to get some supplies, on their return, their craft, a sailboat, was met with a sudden squall and capsized about fifty yards from the land. Both continued to hang on to the boat long enough to divest themselves of their clothing and then struck out to swim to shore after vainly trying to right the craft. Both were good swimmers, and when Duggan was just about landing, he looked back for his companion and saw him swimming to the boat which he appeared to reach and get aboard. It was terribly stormy and dark, and while Duggan was looking, another squall struck the boat and Cordon Bedford was seen no more. This morning the boat was found but no trace of the missing man who was a ledger keeper in the Bank of Commerce. He was 31 years of age and was unmarried but was shortly to lead to the altar a daughter of one of our prominent citizens.

 

EDGECOMBE - Died in this city, at his residence, 230 Barton street east, on the 17th instant, after a long and painful illness, O. W. Edgecombe, painter, aged 55 years. Funeral from his late residence, Tuesday, 19th, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

HOLMAN - As briefly announced in this morning's "Spectator" Miss Julia Holman, second daughter of Mr. George Holman, expired Sunday evening at her father's residence in London, after a painful and lingering illness of nine weeks' duration. The announcement will be received with general regret in this city where the young lady was well known, and everywhere else that the Holmans have appeared professionally. In public Miss Julia was an ever-welcome favourite on account of her general excellence and great vivacity as an artist. In private she reckoned many sincere friends. During her illness, a kindly interest was felt throughout the city, and many hopes indulged that she would recover. But the physicians in attendance gave no encouragement and the unfortunate young lady gradually sank, becoming insensible about noon yesterday and remaining in that state until her death at half past eight o'clock. The family have the sympathy of all in their bereavement.

 

August 19, 1879

 

HILL - (London) A man named Richard Hill died this morning from lockjaw. He was engaged in a fight at Brother's hotel about a week ago and received injuries which were very serious but never rallied and died to-day as stated. An inquest was begun this evening by Coroner Moore but adjourned till Wednesday for evidence.


JASMIN - (Montreal) The body of a man supposed to be that of Jasmin who mysteriously disappeared from the Quebec steamer has been found in the St. Lawrence at Port Francis.

 

BINKS - (Ottawa) The body of James Binks who has been missing since Friday last was found floating today in the Ottawa opposite Stirling's brewery. He is supposed to have been drowned accidentally.

 

CHARRON - (Montreal) A child of Mr. Charron, of Anne street, fell from a gallery of the house on Saturday last which caused its death soon after.

 

GEYETCHE, MCDONALD, MORRISON - (Halifax) A violent thunderstorm raged at Middleton, Annapolis County, on Thursday night during which a barn owned by George Dodge was struck by lightning and destroyed with all its contents. A little boy named Geyetche was killed by lightning at Cape Anqui, CB. His brother was seriously injured. A man named McDonald was also killed at Margaree, and a woman named Morrison at Middle River, and two men are reported killed at Lochmond. A large railway bridge, 90 feet long, at Bailey's Brook, Antigonish County, was blown down by a gale.

 

STANTON - (Port Colborne) A two-year-old son of Patrick Stanton fell into the canal at Humberstone yesterday and was drowned. The body was recovered shortly after.

 

DUFFY - (Ottawa) A private dispatch received today conveys the sad intelligence of the death by drowning at Orchard Bank of Mr. A. J. Duffy of the Public Works Department. He was to have been married next week to Miss Bains.

 

LYNCH - The death of Mr. James Lynch who settled in Guelph the year it was founded, 1827, occurred at noon Saturday at the residence of Mr. Patrick Ryan.

 

August 20, 1879

 

BOWERS - (London) Early this morning the body of a woman who proved to be the wife of Alexander Bowers was found in the river under the L. & P.S.R. bridge by a county constable. How the unfortunate woman came to her death is a mystery. It is stated that she drank to excess and when in liquor was very excitable. Last night she drank heavily and retired to bed. This morning her husband missed her from his side and at once arose and set inquiries on foot which resulted in finding her as stated. Whether she fell off the bridge while wandering along the track, threw herself over to end her life, or was pitched over by anyone is the question. An inquest is being held.


EATON - (St. Thomas) On Thursday last a sudden demise occurred in this town. While an old lady named Mrs. Eaton was threading a needle she fell and expired at once. The old lady has resided in St. Thomas many years.

 

BALFOUR - Mr. W. Balfour, village Clerk of Mount Forest, died on Saturday evening, 9th instant, of heart disease from which he had been suffering for some time.

 

August 21, 1879

 

GARRETT - Died at 149 James street south, on Wednesday, 20th instant, John Garrett, aged 53 years. The funeral will take place on Friday, 22nd instant, from the above address, at 3 o'clock p.m.

It is our painful duty this morning to chronicle the death of one of our prominent business men and an old resident of Hamilton. Mr. John Garrett of the firm of J. Garrett & Co, wholesale dealer in boots and shoes, died very suddenly yesterday morning in his 55th year. He had been ailing for the past three years during which time he had been prescribed for by the ablest physicians both in Canada and the United States, but as the sequel shows, of no avail. The immediate cause of his death cannot be definitely stated further than that his system had been completely worn out by his prolonged illness.

He leaves a widow and five children, the eldest being a boy eleven years of age. His widow is a sister of Mr. John Bell of the firm of Thomson, Birkett, &; Bell. During the last two weeks a decided improvement in his condition was discernible, he having been able during that time to drive fifteen or twenty miles during the day, and even on Tuesday he was out driving, so that within a few days bright hopes of his recovery had been formed, only to be so soon shattered, as at about midnight a serious change was observable, and about four o'clock yesterday morning he breathed his last. The funeral will take place from his late residence on Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock.

Mr. Garrett's business career has .been one of marked success. He was born in the north of Ireland in 1824. He came to Canada from Manchester in 1852, and settled in Hamilton. In Manchester he received his business tuition with the largest firm there in the dry goods business. His first experience in the boot and shoe trade was with Kerr, Brown, & Co, with whom he continued for thirteen years. He commenced on his own account in 1865 with the late G. G. Forster as partner. His success since then has been undoubted, he having established a large and flourishing connection by his integrity and perseverance. The firm with which he has of late been identified was composed of the late John Garrett, John A. Orr and Robert H. Park.


During the last three years this business has been conducted by the surviving partners and in all probability it will be continued as usual under their management.

The deceased gentleman was a Presbyterian and an elder in the Central Presbyterian Church. He was a very liberal man in charities, but bestowed them in a quiet way.

 

LITTLE - Died on the evening of the 20th instant, at the residence of her father, 7 Grove street, Margaret Little, aged 7 years and 8 months. The funeral will take place from the above address at 2 o'clock this afternoon.

 

PARENT - (Quebec) Ludger Parent of Montmorency, who received an accidental gunshot wound in the throat several weeks ago, died to-day

 

DORRINGTON - (St. Catharines) A man named William Dorrington, 55 years of age, and a cabinet maker by trade, dropped dead last night in the yard in the rear of Coy's hardware store. A coroner's jury was empanelled this morning and a verdict of "death from the excessive use of intoxicating liquor" was returned.

 

MCCANN - (Toronto) An East End saloon keeper named James McCann died to-day of injuries received by falling from a buggy on Sunday last. The accident occurred on Queen street east.

 

ADAMSON - (Toronto) A young son of Mr. James Adamson fell from a wagon on Sunday last and sustained a fracture of the skull. The injured lad died this evening.

 

MCINTYRE - (Toronto) A boy named Mclntyre died very suddenly to-day in Sheppard's Lane in the western section of the city. An inquest will be held to-morrow

 

BARMAN - (Ottawa) A young man named Hector Barman was drowned yesterday evening in the Lievre River by the capsizing of a bark canoe.

 

ALLISON - A fight yesterday afternoon between two boys in Halifax resulted fatally, one of them named Rupert Lang having stabbed the other whose name was Allison, to the heart.

 

August 22, 1879

 

HORNING - Died at the residence of his father, 85 Bay street north, Willie, only son of William and Mary Horning, aged 1 year and 6 months and 2L days. The funeral will take place on Sunday at 3 o'clock p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.


CLARKE - (Lindsay) Mr. Thomas Clarke, a member of the Town Council, who had his leg badly crushed and received other injuries from a runaway team some time ago, died last night. He had been improving nicely, but was taken out for a boat sail one day, and owing to the impoverished state of his blood, the chills came over him which brought on dropsy.

 

STEVENSON - (Toronto) James Stevenson, a printer aged 35 years, hanged himself this morning in his brother-in-law's woodshed. He leaves a wife and four children. Drink was the cause.

 

EALY - On Saturday morning, a lad about 15 years of age, named William Ealy, in the employ of Robert Lynden in the Township of Townsend, went out to the field to bring up the horses, and his employer finding that he did not come at the usual time to breakfast, went to the stable and found the boy lying dead on the stable floor. An inquest was held but no trace of any injury could be found on the body. For some time past the boy had been very much inclined to sleep; in fact he slept night and day when not engaged at work. From these symptoms, a verdict was rendered that the deceased came to his death of stagnation of blood.

 

ROBINSON - On Monday night, says the Dunnville "Gazette", an accident occurred at Port Maitland by which a lad named Robinson lost his life. The schooner "J. McBride" was entering the harbour and threw out a line to fasten to the pier which the lad took hold of to put on the snubbing post. Just then the boom flew around, striking and killing him instantly. He was about twelve years old. Of course no blame attaches to anyone, and much sympathy is felt for the bereaved family.

 

WOOD - An infant child of Thomas Wood, East Garafraxa, was scalded to death last week.

 

MORAN - About five o'clock yesterday afternoon, a woman named Moran, residing on Dundurn street, was found lying in her bed dead. Her mother-in-law and a woman named Mrs. Lafferty were in the house during the day. At one o'clock the latter went out with the deceased woman's husband when he took his departure for the pail factory where he works. Mrs. Moran was ill in bed at the time. About an hour after Mrs. Lafferty's return, she went to the room and found her dead. She immediately sent for Dr. White. The circumstances surrounding the case are of a somewhat mysterious nature, and the evidence adduced at the inquest did not satisfy the coroner nor the jury as to the cause of death. It was shown that the woman was subject to fits, but the condition of the body when viewed by the jury did not justify them in arriving at the conclusion that death was produced in that way.


MORAN - Died on Thursday, the 21st instant, at Dundurn street, Mary Falvie, wife of Michael Moran, aged 37 years. Funeral on Saturday morning at 10 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

MACKAY - (Ottawa) Mrs. Mackay, widow of the late Hon. Thomas Mackay, died yesterday afternoon. She was immensely wealthy. Amongst other valuable properties she owned the Rideau Hall and grounds where she formerly resided.

 

August 23, 1879

 

CAMPBELL - (Montreal) The body of a man supposed to be that of the missing Donald Campbell of McDonald's tobacco factory, was found in the St. Lawrence to-day.

 

ALLAN - (Quebec) John Allan, aged 28 years, a native of Cork, an able-bodied seaman, was found dead this morning in his hammock on board the "Bellerophom".

 

SPROUL - (Toronto) William Sproul, a brakesman on the Grand Trunk, was killed at Brampton to-day. His body was brought to this city to-night.

 

RUSK - (Quebec) Mrs. Rusk, an inmate of the Protestant Home, while in a somnambulistic state, walked through the window this morning and received fatal injuries from the effects of which she died this afternoon.

 

ALEXANDER - Died at Grimsby, on the 22nd instant, the Rev. James Lynne Alexander, late incumbent of Binbrook and Saltfleet, in the 78th year of his age. Funeral on Monday at 11 a.m.

 

UPTHEGROVE - Died in this city, on the 23rd instant, Nellie Upthegrove, aged 8 weeks, youngest daughter of Edward Upthegrove. Funeral will leave her father's residence, 248 Barton street east, to-morrow (Sunday) at 4 o'clock p.m.

 

WALLACE - Mr. George Wallace, a pioneer of Weston, was found died in his bed yesterday. He was in his 74th year.

 

August 25, 1879

 

EAGLESHAM - Died in the Township of Barton, Main street east, on the 23rd instant, John Eaglesham, in the 55th year of his age. Funeral will leave his late residence, Main street east, this afternoon at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully invited to attend.

 

SCHMIDT - Died in this city, on Sunday, 24th August, after a long and painful illness which he bore with Christian patience, Mr. Carl Schmidt, formerly an employee of the G.W.R., aged 58


years. Funeral will leave his late residence, 176 East avenue north, on Tuesday afternoon, at 3:30 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this invitation without further notice.

 

GIBSON - (London) James Gibson, formerly a guardsman on the Great Western Railway who attended the picnic at Port Stanley yesterday and was struck by the home train at Richmond street crossing last night, died to-day from his injuries. The unfortunate man was removed to the hospital, His arm was found to be crushed but not seriously enough to warrant amputation. The back of his skull, however, was fractured and from this he died. His wife and mother arrived by the early train this morning, having been summoned from Windsor. Their grief at the fate of Gibson was heartrending to behold.

 

BAILLARD - (Montreal) A young child belonging to a carpenter named Baillard died of suffocation from a bone sticking in its throat.

 

August 26, 1879

 

GARDINER - (Brighton) Dr. Fife, coroner, held an inquest to-day upon the body of Charles Gardiner who was killed on the Grand Trunk at The Dangers on Saturday night last by the collision of two freight trains. The jury returned a verdict of "Accidentally killed and attach no blame to the railway employees who state that they did all that they possibly could under the circumstances to prevent the said collision".

 

RAYNOR - (Barrie) Robert Raynor, a young lad nine years old, living at Sunnidale, on Saturday, 16th instant, got the big toe of one of his feet torn off by coming between two planks and on last Saturday he died, lockjaw having set in on the previous day.

 

MALAMPHY - Mr. T. Malamphy, an old citizen of Hamilton, and for over twenty years an employee of the Great Western Railway, died suddenly of paralysis at his residence on Hess street on Monday morning. Some time ago he was feeling ill and his medical advisers recommended him to quit work for a lengthy period, but that advice he neglected to take. His sudden demise will be regretted by many friends.

 

WILLIAMSON - Died on the 26th instant, Catharine, the beloved wife of Richard Williamson, ice dealer, in the 55th year of her age. Funeral from her late residence, corner James and Ferrie streets, on Thursday, 28th instant, at 8:45 a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this invitation without further notice.

 

BOYD - Died at Memphis, Tenn., on Tuesday, the 26th instant, in his 28th year, Alexander Boyd, fifth son of the late James Boyd, Hamilton.


HEMPSTOCK - Died in this city, on the 26th instant, John, youngest son of William and Margaret Hempstock, aged 8 months. Funeral parents' residence, 156 Jackson street west, on Thursday, at 2 o'clock p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

GAMBLE - (Toronto) Information has been received of the death in Afghanistan of Captain John H. Gamble, son of Mr. Clark Gamble of this city. He died of cholera on the 14th of July last. Captain Gamble wag educated in the Upper Canada College and was very popular here.

 

NICHOLLS - Mr. Peter Nicholls, one of the oldest residents of Petersville, New London, breathed his last at his residence on Sunday night. He was one of the best known men in the village, having held the position of letter carrier for upwards of twenty-six years. He settled in Petersville twenty nine years ago. Mr, Nicholls was of a quiet and unassuming manner and was generally respected by all who knew him.

 

August 27, 1879

 

FENNELL - Died at Berlin, on Sunday, 24th instant, Maria Josephine, infant daughter of Mr. John Fennell, aged 9 months and 23 days.

 

COLLINS - Stephen Collins who was kicked by a horse at Belleville on Saturday night died this morning.

 

HAMILTON - (Montreal) An inquest was opened this afternoon on the body of Emma Hamilton, an unfortunate woman who died from injuries inflicted by a gang of roughs.

 

August 28, 1879

 

MAUGHAN - Ex-Sheriff Maughan died at his residence, Owen Sound, on Wednesday evening of consumption after a lingering illness. He was Sheriff of the County of Grey for about fifteen years.

 

JACK - (Brockville) About two o'clock this morning as the tug "Frank Perew" of Kingston was lying at Wells Island the mate sent one of the crew named John Jack of Kingston to light the signal lamp. He is since missing with the lamp. No doubt he fell overboard and was drowned.

 

IRWIN - (Montreal) David Irwin, a sailor on board the steam-ship "Brooklyn", fell into the St. Lawrence and was drowned.

 

LEVESQUE - (Cacouna, Que.) A horrible crime was committed in this quiet village to-night about nine o'clock, Frances Levesque, a young man 21 years of age from River Ouelte,


being murdered in cold blood in the street by a shoemaker named Dube with whom he had some words last night. Levesque and two other men were walking down the street to-night when they met Dube. Levesque, saying he was ready for him now and leaving the two men standing, went up to Dube who drew a shoemaker's knife and stabbed him in the abdomen. Levesque fell and expired in half an hour afterward. Dube is not yet arrested, but is in his own house which is well guarded.

 

GIROUX - (Quebec) David Giroux who was shot in the late labour riots in this city died at Levis during the night.

 

TIMBS - (Dundas) Fred Timbs who was killed at Morriston last week leaves a wife in this town.

 

SCOTT - On Monday evening between five and six o'clock, Alexander Scott, miller in the Ashbourne Mills, Bullock's Corners, dropped dead in Mr. W. J. Morden's store. Deceased had been complaining of a pain in the chest for some two years and had consulted a number of physicians without benefit. On Monday he had been assisting Mr. Morden to convey goods to Christie's corners, and after returning went into the store to take some pepper-sauce to relieve a sudden spasm. While opening the bottle he dropped on the floor and died immediately. He had been in Mr. Webster's employ about two years and a half, but strange to say nobody knew anything of him, whether he had a family or means, or even where he came from, and his papers throw no light on the subject, yesterday Coroner Walker held an inquest on the remains when a verdict of "death from congestion of the lungs" was returned.

 

MORROW - Died in this city, on the 27th August, James Alexander Morrow, aged 16 years and 2 months. Funeral will leave his father's residence, 105 King William street, on Friday, at half past three o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

CHAPMAN - Died at his residence The Willows, Burlington, Ontario, on Wednesday, August 27th, William Chapman, aged 80 years and 2 months. Funeral on Saturday at 3 p.m.

 

MASON - Died in South Norwich, on the 26th of August, John Mason, aged 59 years.

 

DAY - Died on Thursday, 28th instant, of convulsions, Ann Day, beloved and only daughter of Joseph and Sarah Day, aged 1 year. Funeral from 32 West avenue north, at 2 p.m., on Friday. Friends and acquaintances are respectfully requested to attend.


August 29, 1879

 

LOVELL - (Toronto) The inquest on the body of the girl, Sarah Lovell, at Mount Pleasant resulted in a verdict to the effect that she came to her death on the 12th of August by means of an irritant poison taken by herself or at the hands of others unknown to the jury for the purpose of procuring an abortion. The matter will not be allowed to rest here, but will be taken in hand by the County Crown Attorney, and a searching investigation made.

 

MCINTOSH - James McIntosh, a young man from Quebec, was recently killed by lightning in Saskatchewan.

 

RECKEN - (Guelph) An accident occurred at the Grand Trunk freight house here to-day whereby James Recken, brakesman, of Toronto lost his life. He was engaged in coupling cars and while stooping to pick up a coupling pin which had dropped, he was knocked down and run over. Deceased leaves a wife and three children. An inquest is being held.

 

BEAGLEY - An old resident of Woodstock, Mr. James Beagley, died this week. His aged partner in life died only three days before him.

 

OLIVER - On Wednesday last, says the London "Free Press", Mrs. Oliver, wife of Mr. John Oliver of this city, left London for a visit to her friends in Hamilton, apparently in her usual health, Yesterday Mr. Oliver received a telegram announcing her death. He has the sympathy of the public in his sad bereavement.

 

August 30, 1879

 

BOSWELL - (Kingston) The funeral of the late Rev. Dr. Boswell took place this afternoon and was largely attended, six clergymen acted as pallbearers. The Lord Bishop of Ontario officiated.

 

ORMISTON - (Bowmanville) Mr. Robert Ormiston, a nephew of Rev. Dr. Ormiston of New York, a respectable farmer residing in the Township of Darlington, was killed this morning. In company with his brother John, they were driving into town, having a high-spirited team of horses. When just inside the corporation, the team took fright at a woman who was carrying a straw tick, and ran away throwing both out. John also is seriously but not fatally injured.

 

LINGWOOD - (Guelph) While Harry Lingwood, aged 12 years, and his brother Freddie, aged 7  were walking on the stone wall on the banks of the River Speed here to-day, the latter accidentally fell into the water about 15 feet deep. Harry at once jumped in to save him, but being unable to


swim, he soon sank. A man hearing their screams came to the rescue and succeeded in saving the youngest. When the other little fellow's body was recovered soon after, it was found he was dead.

 

DAVIDSON - (Toronto) Thomas G. Davidson, aged 10 years, was drowned while bathing off the Queen's Wharf to-day.

 

AVERY, PETRINE - (Halifax) Angus Avery and David Petrine were drowned to-day by the upsetting of a boat near Torbay, Guysborough County. They had been to the shipwreck of "Joseph Milburg" at Gull Island and were returning home when the boat upset. Thomas Petrine, who was also in the boat, saved himself by clinging to a piece of wood. Avery's body has been recovered.

 

PAQUETTE - A verdict of "accidentally drowned" was returned at the inquest on the body of a youth named Paquette, drowned near Montreal.

 

MCKILLOP - Mr. Archibald McKillop of Wallacetown, died on Monday morning. He was over 80 years of age and one of the oldest settlers on the Back street.

 

PFEIFER - Mr. Frederick Pfeifer's little boy who was so badly scalded a few days ago died on Thursday evening after suffering very intense pain. It was thought at first he would recover, but a change occurred and he sank rapidly. The bereaved family have the sympathy of all in the loss of their child.

 

DUNCAN - Died in this city, on the 29th instant, Jane Duncan, relict of the late Henry Duncan, aged 64 years. Funeral from her late residence, 147 Mary street, on Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

September 1, 1879

 

DESJARDINS - A farmer named Desjardins, residing in the Township of Clarence, drove one day last week to Caledonia Springs to get a supply of mineral water. After getting it he left for home, and not turning up at the time expected, his family became anxious about him and reported the matter to the neighbours who turned out en masse on Saturday and went in search of the missing man. His dead body, as well as that of his horse, was found at the foot of a steep embankment. The road runs very close to the edge of the embankment, and it is supposed that Desjardins fell asleep and that the horse, getting out of the course, was precipitated with the driver a distance of several hundred feet. Death must have been instantaneous, his body being badly mutilated.


He leaves a wife and nine small children who rely on him for support. An inquest was held and a verdict returned in accordance with the facts.

 

RAINER - A peculiar case of lockjaw occurred in Barrie on Sunday last. A lad, nine years old, named Rainer, had the ill luck to stub his toe while running barefoot on the sidewalk eight or nine days ago. His parents dressed the injured part and thought nothing more of it until last Friday night when the lad showed signs of lockjaw. Medical aid was immediately called, but he rapidly became worse and died on Sunday at noon.

 

CAMPBELL - From the Thorold "Post" we learn of the death of Mr. Murdoch Campbell which took place at Prince Arthur's Landing on Tuesday last. Deceased was for some time a resident of Thorold and was the son of Mr. Kenneth Campbell of Roth, Ross-shire. He commenced his career by enlisting in the 93rd Highlanders, and two years afterwards got his discharge. He then engaged in railway work in England, and went to France in the employ of McKenzie, Brassey and Bates. In 1843, he came to Canada and engaged with the late John Brown and in time became general foreman. He continued in the employ of the firm until last fall when he was attacked by consumption. He went to the northwest to endeavour to recuperate, but it was too late, and he died at Prince Arthur's Landing. The body is expected to arrive in Thorold on Monday next for interment.

 

STEWART - Died on August 31st, at 122 John street north, Ida Louise, infant daughter of Charles and Alamedia Stewart, aged 5 months. Funeral took place from her parents' residence at 4 o'clock to-day.

 

ELLIS - Died in this city, on the 31st August, Frederick Joseph, infant son of George and Emma Ellis. Funeral from his parents' residence, No 263 York street, to-morrow, Tuesday, at 4:30 p.m. Friends are respectfully invited.

 

September 2, 1879

 

GLAZIER - Died in this city, at 120 Jackson street east, on September 1st, James Glazier, a native of County Kerry, Ireland, aged 32 years. Funeral from the above residence on Wednesday afternoon at 3:30 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

STEVENS - (Paisley) Two boys, aged six and eight years, sons of James Stevens of this place, were drowned this afternoon while bathing. The bodies were recovered.


CASEY - (Montreal) Jeremiah Casey, aged 13, was drowned while bathing in the canal near the city yesterday.

 

PARKER, MCMICKEN - (St. Catharines) Two young lads, aged about 15 years, the sons of James Parker and James McMicken, were drowned this Sunday afternoon while bathing in an old quarry on the mountain near St. David's. Their clothing was found nearby which led to a search for the bodies which were found in about twelve feet of water. That of one of the boys was standing upright on the bottom. It is supposed that one of them got beyond his depth and the other tried to save him, when as neither could swim, both were drowned. The occurrence is rendered doubly sad as they were cousins and the Parker family contemplated sailing for Europe on Thursday next.

 

ROWLANDS - (Kingston) The body of a man was found drowned in the St. Lawrence near Maitland. From the description telegraphed here, there is scarcely any doubt but that it is that of Mr. John Rowlands of this city, missing for several days. He was some years ago proprietor of the "Daily News".

 

September 3, 1879

 

BAILEY - Mr. David Bailey of Rawdon Township, while playing with his grandchildren yesterday, fell and instantly expired. Heart disease is the supposed cause of his death.

 

KER - Ex-Mayor Ker of Galt died on Tuesday afternoon at two o'clock. Mr. Ker was stricken with paralysis a few months ago and never rallied afterwards. He retained his consciousness to the last and passed peacefully away universally regretted by his fellow citizens among whom he occupied an honoured place for many years.

 

WOODROW - One of those sad events which from time to time we are called upon to chronicle happened this morning about 10 o'clock near Browne's wharf at the foot of MacNab street. The steamer "Passport"left the wharf at 9 o'clock for its regular trip to Montreal but on reaching the Beach, it was found that the Lake was too rough to allow her to proceed, and she was compelled to turn back. As she was approaching the wharf and while coming around behind the schooner "Highland Beauty" which was lying about one hundred yards out, a deck hand named John Woodrow was standing at the front gangway for the purpose of throwing the rope ashore. He stooped down to take hold of the rope, the end of which was hanging over the outside of the boat, and in doing so lost his footing and fell overboard. As the steamer was turning at the time, the unfortunate man must have been carried under and struck by the wheel almost immediately. The cry of 'man overboard' was at once raised and great excitement prevailed.


Under the instructions of the first mate, a boat was quickly lowered and manned, and was out on the water before the steamer touched the wharf. A second boat was also lowered and both cruised around for a long time but without success. The hooks on board the "Passport" were brought into requisition but no signs of the body could be discovered. Captain Irving made inquiries as to anyone in the vicinity having proper grappling hooks and accustomed to the work, and was directed to Thomas Cross and Wesley Lee who were at once sent for, and after some delay they set out.

Woodrow was a young man about 20 years of age and was a bright smart fellow and well liked on the boat. His mother, whose first husband is dead, lives in Kingston and was married again a short time ago to a man named Keelow who turns out to be a worthless and drunken wretch. Before her second marriage John and his brother lived with her and helped to support her, but they since left and have been boarding with the first mate of the "Passport". The latter seeing that the deceased was making very small wages as a clerk in a grocery store offered to take him on the boat and his offer was accepted. Young Woodrow, therefore ,had only been sailing since the 26th of July last, and the news of his sudden terrible death will no doubt be a hard blow to his mother who was, we are informed, very fond of him.

3 p.m.: The body has not yet been recovered. The "Passport" started out again at 2:15.

 

September 4, 1879

 

NELSON - Died on Sunday, 31st ultimo, at his residence in the Township of Puslinch, Mr.  Samuel Nelson, aged 57 years.

 

BRETON - The body of Simeon Breton, a bargeman, who was drowned in the canal, has been found.

 

BROWN - (West Winchester, Ontario) A most horrible double murder was committed near this place last night about nine o'clock. Robert Brown, a well-to-do and respected farmer and his daughter Ada, an innocent little girl of some twelve years, were literally chopped to death in their own house. It is stated by Mrs. Brown that the family, consisting of herself, Mr. Brown, her son Clark, Ada aged 12, and Minnie aged 8, were sleeping upstairs, Clark in a room over the main part of the house, and the others in a chamber over the kitchen, both chambers having separate stairs, that a man rapped at the front door of the kitchen. Her husband went down to the door and was attacked by the man. A struggle ensued. She went down, followed by the youngest girl and seeing some one struggling with her husband ran out the back door to give the alarm. The elder of the two girls being the last to come down was attacked at the foot of the stairs by the man and brutally murdered, her head being bashed in in a shocking manner in four or five pieces. The son Clark, who makes the foregoing statement, adds that he ran down the stairs from his room and


encountered the strange man as his father was falling dead, that he tried to shoot the man and seize him, but failed, that the man in passing out met his sister Ada and struck her with the axe, felling her to the floor, and immediately escaped. The brutal deed was performed with Brown's axe, found afterwards near the back kitchen door. No trace of the man can be found although many have been out searching. Brown was not known to have an enemy. No one as yet is suspected. Intense excitement prevails. The coroner is momentarily expected.

The inquest: Only two witnesses were examined and the inquest postponed till to-morrow morning at 8 o'clock. The evidence seems not to be against any stranger, but seems to point quite clearly to the son Clark. He will likely be arrested to-night. It is probable the jury will not get through with the inquest for a day or two.

 

DOYLE - (Halifax) The body of William Doyle, 8 years old, who has been missing for the past week, was found yesterday afternoon in Tully's dock. There will be an inquest.

 

BROWN - Died at Wallaceburg, on the 1st instant, John Adam, aged 7 weeks, infant son of J. J. Brown of this city.

 

September 5, 1879

 

KELLY - (St. Thomas) A stranger named Patrick Kelly who has been working for the C.S.R. at Waterford two or three weeks came to St. Thomas, drew his pay yesterday, and was found dead in the C.S.R. yard here at 12:30 this morning. His right shoulder and side were badly crushed and other cuts and bruises were found on the body. An unbroken bottle of whiskey in his right pocket and a broken one in the other told the story. He is supposed to have friends in Toronto but nothing was found on him to give any clue. An inquest was held this afternoon and verdict returned in accordance with the facts.

 

HENDERSON - The death is announced of Mr. John Henderson, one of the oldest settlers in the County of Halton. Deceased was a native of Roxburghshire, Scotland, and emigrated to this country in the years 1831 when he purchased and settled on the 'Springfield Farm' in the Township of Nelson where he lived continuously for about forty-eight years and from which he retired to the town of Milton only a few months before his death. He was, says the "Champion", one of the earliest settlers in that part of the township and was also one of the last survivors of the early pioneers of the section in which he spent the greater part of his life. He never actively engaged in any public duty, being naturally of a somewhat reserved manner, but by perseverance and frugality amidst the privations and hardships incidental to early Canadian life, secured a


competence for himself and family. Christmas of the current year would have witnessed the fiftieth anniversary of his wedding day. His partner in life as well as his family of five sons and four daughters all survive him and were all present on Monday last to pay a last tribute of respect to him who always evinced the liveliest interest in their welfare.

 

BULL - Died in Ancaster, on the 3rd instant, Ann, beloved wife of John Jones Bull, in her 83rd year. Funeral from her husband's residence on Saturday, 6th instant, at 1 o'clock.

 

September 6, 1879

 

HAMELON - A sad accident occurred at Buckingham yesterday morning by which Janiver Hamelon, a boy of 14 years, lost his life. The victim, with some four or five other boys about his own age, were throwing sticks into one of the apple trees in Mr. F. H. Murray's garden when one Blain in swinging a piece of scantling backwards, happened to strike deceased behind the ear, causing instantaneous death. Several persons witnessed the accident and hastened to the scene but could detect no signs of life when they arrived. A coroner's inquest was held, and after hearing the evidence, the jury returned a verdict of accidental death.

 

FLEWELLING - (St John, N.B.) The following are the particulars of the fatal accident at St. Martins. William Powers lost his cow in the woods and Mr. Flewelling went with him on a searching expedition. Powers took his breach-loading gun with him and during the search the two men sat down on a log. Mr. Flewelling saw a woodpecker flying past, and he grasped the gun and fired at it. The gun exploded and a piece of the barrel struck Mr. Flewelling in the head and smashed in the skull. He died in two hours. A piece of the gun also struck Mr. Powers in the face and considerably cut and bruised him. His injuries were not serious, however, and he was soon enabled to return to the village. The deceased was a popular young man about 26 years old. He leaves a wife and one child. Strange and sad to relate Mrs. Flewelling lost both her father and mother by accidents some years ago.

 

September 8, 1879

 

LAW - Died in St. Catharines on the 5th September, 1879, Hannah Law, relict of the late Rev. John Law, Methodist minister. The interment took place at Union Burying Ground, Whitby, on Sunday, the 7th instant.

 

SMITH - (Toronto) Yesterday Daniel Smith, aged 9 years, ran after and clambered on a coal cart on York street. The driver whipped him off and he fell on the road when a passing hack ran


over his head and tore the scalp completely off. The child will die and is now lingering in an unconscious state.

 

FARNCOMBE, GARVIN - Two boys named respectively Farncombe and Garvin were drowned at Newcastle, Ontario, last week.

 

TOLLEY - George Tolley, an artist, was drowned between Brockville and Kingston while being towed in a skiff by the propeller "Persia".

 

September 9, 1879

 

LATOUR - (Ottawa) A horrible accident occurred at Eddy's mills to-day about 7 a.m. A man named Latour, about 22 years of age, in the employ of Mr. Eddy, was placed as the driver of one of the horse cars. He had no experience of this work and did not manage the horses well. They became frightened and ran away, Latour being thrown under the car and literally cut in two. The remains were carried to his home. An inquest was held and a verdict of accidental death returned.

 

MCCARDLE - The funeral of Mrs. James McCardle, of Dundas, who died after a lingering illness, took place on Sunday and was largely attended by friends and acquaintances of the deceased lady and her husband, and a number from Hamilton were present. The remains were conveyed to the R. C. Church where the solemn service for the dead was performed by the Rev. Father O'Reilly, after which they were interred in the adjoining cemetery. The deceased was held in great respect as was fully manifested by the large turn-out at the funeral.

 

September 10, 1879

 

MERCER - Viola Mercer, a young widow, suicided yesterday at Castleton, Ontario, through unrequited love.

 

BROOKS - Rev. R. W. Wallace, of the Congregational Church, London, has received intelligence from Constantinople of the death of the only son of Rev. and Mrs. Charles H. Brooks, missionaries in that city. The child was ill only a couple of weeks. The many friends of the bereaved parents will hear with sorrow of their sad affliction. Mrs. Brooks is a sister of Rev. Mr. Wallace.

 

September 11, 1879

 

BROWN - Died at the residence of A. C. Fisher, Syracuse, N.Y., Alice C., daughter of A . J. Brown, of this city, aged 17 years and 4 months. Funeral at Syracuse to-day (Thursday) at 2 p.m.


COOMBS - (Brantford) The "Courier" says: We regret very much to learn of the death of Mr. George M. Coombs, only brother of the Rev. Mr. Coombs of Emmanuel Church in this city which took place at his residence, Hamilton, this morning, 9th instant. Mr. Coombs was attacked with typhoid fever a week ago last Wednesday and through fluctuations of hope and fear on the part of those near and dear to him he succumbed after twelve days' illness in the 32nd year of his age. He leaves a wife and 1 child to mourn his loss. Mr. Coombs has been engaged for the past eight years in the office of R. R. Gage, Esq., barrister, Hamilton, by whom he is deeply regretted as also by a numerous circle of friends who lament his loss. The Rev. Mr. Coombs and the wife and little one of the deceased have our sympathy in their sad bereavement.

 

SABOURIN - An old man named Sabourin, who was a consumptive patient in the St. Boniface Hospital, left Winnipeg a few days ago for his old home in Quebec. A dispatch was received on Friday last from Milwaukee stating that he had died there on his way east.

 

SULLIVAN, LANGDON - Yesterday afternoon about 4 o'clock another of those horrible

accidents which are growing all too common occurred at the new Baptist church now in course of erection on the corner of James and Jackson streets, and two men, respectable citizens, were without a moment's warning launched into eternity. The direct cause of the fearful occurrence may be stated in a few words. It was through no carelessness or inattention on the part of the unfortunate victims, and while it would be unfair to cast a reflection on any person while an enquiry is pending, the fact remains that John Sullivan and John Langdon met their deaths through being called upon to work on a defective scaffold.

The exact location of the tragic occurrence was the front of the building already mentioned, During the afternoon, a number of men were engaged working on a scaffold about fifty feet from the ground. The scaffold was constructed in the usual way, a framework of poles forming the outer side to which putlocks were stretched from the wall, and on these were laid a platform of planks. At the time of the accident five men were on the scaffold: Mr. Herald, inspector of the work; Thomas Taylor, foreman of the carpenters; David Stocks; John Sullivan; and John Langdon. Sullivan was engaged wheeling a barrow of stone along the scaffold when suddenly the putlocks cracked, then broke, and a section of the scaffold about twenty-four feet in length came crashing to the ground.

Sad to relate, Langdon and Sullivan fell with the wreck of stones and planks, and an instant after, they lay two helpless bleeding masses of inanimate clay. Sullivan died immediately, never moving after he struck the ground. His ill-fated companion showed some signs of life, still breathing when the crowd gathered round to examine the extent of the disaster. He had a terrible gash in the forehead and blood flowed freely from his mouth and ears.


Some of the bystanders, fearing that the blood would choke him, turned him over, but it was only too evident that the poor man's injuries were fatal. A moment after, the two bodies were gently lifted and carried out to the sidewalk where they were laid side by side awaiting the arrival of physicians for whom messengers had been speedily dispatched. It being plain that Sullivan was beyond earthly help, nothing remained but to convey his body to the dead house on King William street. Langdon was carried into Mr. McGrath's carpenter shop, corner of James and Jackson streets, where for a short time everything possible was done to alleviate his suffering.

During this time, however, he showed no sign of consciousness. A conveyance was procured in which he was taken to his home, 200 Mary street, Very Rev. V. G. Heenan attending him as well as number of physicians: Drs. Woolverton, Kittson, Henwood, Crooker, Ridley, and Griffin, being present. Medical aid was of no avail, however, and shortly after 5 o'clock Langdon breathed his last.

The scenes at the houses of the two men killed were terrible when the sad news of the disaster was brought to them of the disaster. Sullivan resided at 99 Catherine street with his wife and six children, the eldest only 12 years old and the youngest 18 months. The poor mother was frantic with grief when she learned that he who had left her but a short time before was now a mangled corpse. During all last evening the friends of the family were unremitting in their kind attention.

Mrs. Langdon's case is a peculiarly sad one. She is at present in a delicate state of health. She has three children, the youngest of whom is only a couple of weeks old. The shock was an awful one to her when her husband was brought home only to die a few minutes after.

 

LANGDON - Died on the 10th instant, from the effects of injuries received at the Baptist Church building, John Langdon, aged 28 years. Funeral from his late residence, Mary street near corner Murray, on Friday afternoon at 2:30. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

September 12, 1879

 

LOTTRIDGE - Died at the residence of George Lottridge, Saltfleet, the wife of George Lottridge, in the 59th year of her age. Funeral to leave residence, Saturday, 12th, at 10 o'clock a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

YOUNG - (Napanee) The body of John Young, son of Rev. Alex Young, late Presbyterian minister of this place, who was drowned yesterday while fishing near the Stone Mills by the capsizing of his boat, was found this forenoon. His father and mother, who were absent from home In Toronto, arrived to-day by the noon train. Great sympathy is felt for the bereaved parents.


WHALEY - Mr. James D. Whaley of Milverton, while on board of an excursion train homeward bound, in trying to pass from the smoking car to one of the other coaches, fell from the platform and received injuries from which he died on the following morning. The funeral took place on Sunday last and was one of the largest ever witnessed in that section. He was a member of the Masonic body of Stratford (G.R.C.) and also of the Milverton Lodge, 1.O.O.F., the members of the several orders from Millbank, Milverton, Listowel, and Stratford attending the funeral in large numbers, those from the latter place being conveyed by special train on the S.& H.R.

 

LEWIS - Died on Friday, 12th instant, at 80 Maria street, Susan Lewis, wife of James M. Lewis, aged 64 years. Funeral from 80 Maria street, on Sunday, 14th instant, at 3 p.m. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this invitation.

 

BOWES - Died on the 11th instant, Mr. Joseph Bowes, aged 73 years. Funeral from his late residence, 40 Bold street, on Sunday next, at 3 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

Many will regret to learn of the death of Mr. Joseph Bowes who has been caretaker of the Central School for upwards of twenty years past. His funeral will take place from his late residence, 40 Bold street, at 3 o'clock on Sunday afternoon.

 

September 13, 1879

 

ALLAN - Died at his residence, Burlington, on Friday, 12th September, Joseph Allan, aged 45 years. Funeral on Saturday at 3 p.m.

 

HANCOCK, RICHARDS - (Halifax) R. Hancock and J. Richards were drowned at Knight's Cove, Bonavista Bay, Nfld., by the upsetting of a fishing boat.

 

HARWEAL - Joseph Harweal of Conception Bay, Newfoundland, was drowned in the vicinity of Gull Island by the upsetting of a bait skiff. Four other persons in the boat were saved.

 

BURSTALL - By upsetting a lamp, a little boy of Mr. William Burstall, Toronto township, was burned so severely that he died.

 

DUNFIELD - Mrs. Polly Dunfield, aged 103 years, died at her grandson’s residence, Penobsquis, N.B. on Saturday night.


BRADSTREET - The unfortunate man, Mr. R. P. Bradstreet, who was struck on the head by a semaphore as the evening train was approaching the G.W.R. station here on Thursday night, expired about 7 o'clock last night. He remained insensible to the time of his death. Dr. Woolerton wag notified and an inquest will probably be held this afternoon.

 

SECORD - Died in Toronto, Saturday morning, Mrs Horace Secord of Goderich. - The funeral will take place from the Great Western station, Hamilton, at 3:30, Sunday afternoon. The remains will be brought to this city by special train. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend without further notice. Carriages will leave the corner of James and Merrick streets for the station at 2:46 p.m.

 

September 15, 1879

 

WHITNEY - (Port Colborne) A little girl, eight years old, daughter of Mr. Larcy Whitney, foreman of the stonecutters here, while playing near the canal this afternoon, fell in and was drowned. Her body was recovered shortly after.

 

MARINEAR - (Ottawa) A lady named Mrs. Marinear and her daughter were drowned by falling off an unprotected platform on their return home from a sail on the river. The husband had stayed behind to pay for the boat and did not find out the melancholy fate of his wife and daughter until he got home. A quantity of sawdust floating on the water had, it is supposed, deceived them into stepping on it and suffocating them before they could give the alarm.

 

WHITE - (Fredericton, N.B.) A man named White, 70 years of age, was overtaken by a train from St. John and instantly killed.

 

JOHNSON - (Granton) This morning William Johnson, descending a well which he had been digging on the farm of William Gunning, four miles from here, which was sixty feet deep, was overcome with foul air and fell to the bottom where he lay unconscious. His comrade attempted to descend but was drawn up nearly suffocated. Two others attempted to descend but failed. He was at last raised by grappling irons and medical aid having been summoned, every effort was made for four hours to resuscitate him without avail, one of his legs was broken. Johnson lived at Osborne and leaves a wife and seven children

.

MULLEN - (Bradford) A fatal accident occurred here last evening in Thomson, Smith &, Sons sawmill, causing the death of Richard Mullen, assistant engineer. One of the saws was stopped to be oiled, and when the engineer tried to start it again he found something wrong, and on looking, found the deceased with his head under the fantail of the saw. An inquest, in to be held to-morrow. Deceased leaves a wife and three children.


WELSH - A well known character in Stratford, John Welsh, bill poster, has gone to his long home. He came to Stratford from the County Mayo, Ireland, some ten or twelve years ago and he soon established a business for himself as a bill distributor and bill poster. About a month ago, his wife died, and since then the old man's health has been gradually failing. His age was about 65.

 

DODD - Died at Woodstock, on the 12th instant, of cholera infantum, Thomas Arthur, son of R. F. Dodd, aged 6 months and 3 days, grandson of Thomas Sylvester of this city.

 

LEMON - Died on the 15th instant, Jessie Gordon, infant daughter of Charles Lemon, barrister. The funeral will take place from the house, No 5 Catharina street, on Wednesday next, the 17th instant, at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

September 16, 1879

 

BOYLE - Died on the 14th instant, of heart disease, Ann Anderson Aberdeen, the beloved wife of Arthur Boyle, aged 40 years. Funeral from her late residence, 262 York street, to G.W.R. depot at 4 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation.

On Sunday evening a very sad occurrence took place in the western part of the city, the sudden death of Mrs. Boyle, wife of Mr. Arthur Boyle, druggist, 262 York street. The deceased lady had been in excellent health and her demise was altogether unexpected. Mrs. Boyle was a daughter of Dr. R. Aberdeen, of Chippawa. she had a wide circle of friends in the city, all of whom will sincerely mourn her death. The bereaved husband will meet with general sympathy in his affliction.

 

HARRISON - Died on the 15th instant, Selena Harrison, aged 67 years. Funeral from her late residence, 125 Hunter street west, to-morrow, 17th instant, at 4 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend without further notice.

 

September 17, 1879

 

THOMPSON - Mr W. B. Thompson of Kilbride, on Monday morning while sawing a piece of wood, felt a pain in his breast and was assisted into the house where he died in about half an hour. An inquest was held by Dr. Freeman, and the jury returned a verdict of "Disease of the heart".


GIBSON (St. Catharines) A young woman named Gibson committed suicide by jumping into the canal. Her body was afterwards recovered in the rear of the gas works. An inquest will be held to-morrow.

 

SATTERTHWAITE - Shortly after daybreak Tuesday morning, the body of a man was found lying at the western limits of the city on York street. It was recognized to be that of Mr. Thomas Satterthwaite, a whip-lash maker, who resided in the neighbourhood. Dr. Philp, coroner, was notified at once and he proceeded to hold an inquest into the cause of the man's death at Mr. Ryle's hotel, Burlington Heights, at 3 p.m.

Mrs. Mary Satterthwaite, sworn; The body of the person found is that of my husband. Saw him last about 12 o'clock last night. He was quite sensible and told us what he saw in the city. Think he had taken some liquor before coming home but was not much tipsy. Saw him at the toll gate. I went home and supposed he would follow. About 7 o'clock this morning heard that he was drowned but did not go to see. Felt too badly. Never saw him sitting on the edge of the bridge and cannot tell by what means he got in the water.

Robert Gross, sworn: Saw deceased about midnight at the toll gate which I attend. He remained till 3 a.m. I fell asleep and did not wake till after daylight when I found he was gone. He had taken some liquor but could walk pretty straight. Did not hear any scuffling, I was the first who saw deceased in the water.

John O'Neal, sworn: Saw deceased about dark, He went to the city, was the second who saw the body in the water. Would have awakened had there been any row.

Dr. Woolverton, sworn: Have made an examination of the body. The appearances are such as would be made in the case of death by drowning.

The jury brought in a verdict of "death from drowning".

 

MORDEN - A man named Calvin Morden, who was fined at the Police Court on Tuesday morning for drunkenness, was unable to pay and was therefore sent to jail. During his confinement he had a fit of delirium tremens from which he died this morning. Some strange reports have been circulated as to the manner of his death, but an inquest is being held this afternoon which will doubtless throw light upon the affair.

 

September 18, 1879

 

SMITH - Died in this city, on the evening of the 17th instant, suddenly of heart disease, Mrs. Hannah Smith, daughter of the late Col. Land, in the 67th years of her age. Funeral from her son-in-law's residence, R. J. Morgan, 51 East avenue south, on Saturday, the 20th at 2:30 p.m. Friends will please attend without further notice.

A very sudden and melancholy occurrence took place about nine o'clock last night. Mrs. Hannah


Smith, daughter of the late Col. Land, had gone to Toronto in the morning in company with her son-in-law, Mr. R. J. Morgan and his wife, and returned by the evening train. They walked up the hill and were turning to enter a street car standing in front of the office on Stuart street when Mrs. Smith suddenly exclaimed, "I cannot go any farther", and fell to the ground. Mr. Morgan picked her up and carried her into the waiting room of the street railway station and dispatched a messenger for a doctor in all haste. Drs. White and MacKelcan arrived in a few minutes, but too late to afford any assistance, as the unfortunate woman had expired almost immediately. The cause of her death was heart disease from which she had been suffering for about a year, and her medical adviser had stated that she might have a fatal attack at any moment. Acting on these facts, Dr. White deemed it unnecessary to hold an inquest. Mr. Baker, superintendent of the street railway, who was present, procured a cab, and the body of the deceased lady was taken to her son-in-law's residence, 51 East avenue south. She was 67 years of age and highly esteemed and respected by all who knew her, and sincere and universal sympathy is extended to the bereaved relatives.

 

FLUELLON - (Thorold) While two of Mr. James Fluellon's little girls were playing on some timbers in the canal above the guard lock here this afternoon, one aged six years fell into the water and was drowned before her little sister could give the alarm. The body was recovered about 45 minutes after.

 

WILKINSON - Died in this city, on the 17th instant, Richard Charles, son of Frank and Sarah Wilkinson, aged 1 month. Funeral from 135 Rebecca street, to-morrow afternoon, at 4 o'clock

 

ATKINSON - Mrs. Martha Atkinson, for over 46 years a resident of lot 35, 3rd concession. Biddulph, two miles from Lucan, died recently, aged 81 years.

 

September 19, 1879

 

PEPIN - (Quebec) J. B. Pepin died to-day from the effects of a fall from the roof of his house.

 

CREIGHTON - The death is announced of Mrs. Creighton, wife of Mr. G. K. Creighton, druggist, which occurred at her residence in this town (St. Thomas) yesterday morning. The deceased lady had been suffering from illness for nearly six months, but within the last few weeks the malady assumed a more serious form, and at intervals she endured the most intense pain with great fortitude.


September 20, 1879

 

HESISTON - (Guelph) James Hesiston, kicked by a horse on the Exhibition Grounds Wednesday last, died this morning from his injuries. Deceased leaves a large family of young children.

 

MCLACHLAN - (Halifax) A sudden death took place this morning a t Luneburg under peculiar circumstances. A young girl named Sophia McLachlan, 14 years old, was accused last Tuesday of robbing a lady who employed her as a sewing girl of a sum of money amounting to about $100. The accusation preyed upon her mind and she died suddenly this morning. At the inquest the medical evidence indicated as the cause of death paralysis of the heart, probably induced by strong excitement, and a verdict was rendered in accordance.

 

TURNER - Mr. E. O. Turner of Bryonston expired rather suddenly at the Western Hotel, London, on Wednesday, but as a physician pronounced the cause of death a natural one, no inquest was held.

 

REYNOLDS - Died in this city, on the 19th instant, Harry, son of George and Anne Reynolds, aged 9 years. Funeral will leave his father's residence, Robinson street, west of Locke, on Monday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock.

 

CHISHOLM, COWPER - (Owen Sound) The steamer "Northern Queen" arrived early this morning from Sault Ste Marie. She reports a sad accident between Bruce Mines and Thessalon River by which it is supposed that three persons were drowned; namely Mr. George Chisholm of Bruce Mines and his second son, and a Mr. Cowper of the Crown Lands office, Toronto. It appears that Mr. Chisholm and his son were engaged to take Mr. Cowper to Thessalon River in an open boat. Several days elapsed and no tidings being heard of them, a tug was sent in search, when Mr. Chisholm's trunk and the oars and rudder of the boat were found on the beach about halfway between Bruce Mines and Thessalon River. The boat has not yet been found, and as it was heavily ballasted with stone, it is supposed that it sank and that the three occupants were drowned. The weather was very stormy at the time.

 

LEPROPH - Mrs. LEPROPH, wife of Dr. Leproph, and a well known Canadian authoress of marked ability, died at Montreal yesterday.

 

September 22, 1879

 

DECIOCE - The son of James Decioce, six years of age, fell into the canal and drowned. (Montreal)


CARRALL - Hon. Dr. Carrall, Senator of British Columbia, died suddenly on Friday at the residence of his brother, Mr. H. J. Carrall, near Woodstock. The deceased was the son of the late James Carrall, for some twenty years sheriff of Oxford. He was born at Carrall's Grove, near Woodstock, in 1839 and therefore only 40 years of age. He studied at Trinity College, Toronto, and graduated as M.D. at McGill University, Montreal. He represented Caribou in the legislature of British Columbia from 1868 until the admission of that province into the Dominion in 1871, during a portion of which time he was one of the Local Executive. He was called to the Senate in December, 1871. In politics he was a strong Conservative.

 

FERGUSON - The death is announced from apoplexy of Mr, T. R. Ferguson, ex-MP for South Simcoe, at Cookstown, which took place on Thursday last. The late Mr. Ferguson for many years took an active part in the public affairs of the County of Simcoe, having several times been elected member of parliament for the South Riding. It is said his death may be traced back to an injury received at a political gathering in Bradford some years ago.

 

GIBBS - Shortly after 10 o'clock on Saturday night, the residents on Hunter street, near the R. C. School, were thrown into a state of great excitement over the information that a man living in that vicinity has deliberately taken his own life. The news spread rapidly, although at that late hour, and there was in a few minutes an excited crowd flocking in and around the house where the unfortunate man lay with the blood trickling from a frightful gash in his throat. A "Spectator" reporter repaired to the spot and gleaned the following particulars.

The man's name is Charles Gibbs and he has been living in the house, No 126 Hunter street east, in which he committed the deed, for about four years. He came to Hamilton about ten years ago and has been working at his trade as a blacksmith. However old age and the immoderate use of liquor had worn upon his constitution so that he was unable to obtain steady work. On Saturday night he went home as usual and retired early to bed. He got up again about 10 o'clock and went into the kitchen where his wife was still sitting up preparing some apples for the Sunday's use. Here he took a seat near the stove, remarking that he was cold.

He talked a little while with wife and said he was going to have a smoke. Nothing passed between them for a few minutes when Mrs. Gibbs heard the sound of trickling blood, and asked her husband what was the matter. He replied, "Nothing at all. It's all right". She got up and went over to him when she discovered to her horror that by means of a razor which he had taken from a shelf overhead, he had made a terrible cut right across his throat and the blood was spurting out in a rapid stream. She at once rushed out to a store across the road and gave the alarm. Other neighbours were also notified and messengers set off with all haste to summon medical aid. This arrived too late, for in a little over an hour the unfortunate man, who was in the interval suffering


the most severe pain, breathed his last. Doctors Wilson and Mackelcan and Griffin were shortly in attendance, but nothing could be done to save the man's life. Half a dozen stitches were made in the throat and all other proper measures taken, but to no avail. Mr. Gibbs, who was 75 years of age, had been feeling lonesome and despondent for some weeks back, but any idea that he would ever commit this rash act never as much as entered the minds of anyone.

He was an Englishman and had been in this country about thirty-five years. His wife was rendered frantic with the sudden and awful nature of her affliction. The deceased leaves a family of three children. Two of them are girls, at present in the United States, and the other, a young man who works in Wanzer's.

An inquest will be held this forenoon at 11:30 o'clock at the Rob Roy hotel.

 

September 23, 1879

 

MCCULLOUGH - Died at Gore's Landing, Rice Lake, on the 20th September, the Rev. William McCullough, Methodist minister, formerly of St. Catharines. Funeral will take place on Tuesday from the G.W.R. station on the arrival of the 10:19 train to St. Paul Street Church, and thence to the cemetery.

 

HODGINS, DAVIS - A strange co-incidence occurred on Sunday, being the burial of a sister and brother at the same time in Lucan cemetery. Their names were John Hodgins of London, aged 81 years, who died on Thursday night, and Mrs. Thomas Davis, of West Williams, aged 76, who died on Friday afternoon. Both funerals met at the same hour and the bodies were interred in the same graveyard. The service was very impressive, the church being filled with the friends and relatives of the deceased who were widely known and highly respected. A sister of the deceased is still living, aged 101 years.

 

AULT - (Winnipeg) A man named Ault died in the hospital a few days ago somewhat suddenly. He was a fever patient, but was recovering when he was seized with a haemorrhage of the bowels. The deceased was about 32 years of age, and leaves behind him a widow and five young children, all of whom are in the hospital, some of the little ones with the fever.

 

September 24, 1879

 

DICKSON - (Collingwood) A sad accident occurred here this afternoon by which a young man named Dickson, a brakesman on the H. & N.W.R., lost his life while in the act of coupling


a baggage car to an engine. He was struck in the chest and received internal injuries which caused death in twenty minutes. He is a single man and belonged formerly to Toronto.

 

DANDIE - (Oakville) Thomas Dandie, a painter, of Streetsville, who has been missing from here for two weeks, was found dead in a grove near this place this afternoon. An inquest will be held at 7 o'clock this evening.

 

GRIFFIN - (Port Burwell) This morning while Mr, Saunders Griffin was driving a young spirited horse, he was thrown from his sulky with such force as to crush his skull, and his demise is looked for hourly. Mr. Griffin was a retired farmer, an old municipal councillor, an energetic citizen, and a person very highly respected.

 

September 25, 1879

 

MCGREGOR - (St. Thomas) It becomes our province to chronicle in this issue the demise of one of the earliest pioneers of this section in the person of Mrs. Catherine McGregor, relict of the late John McGregor, who expired at the residence of her son, Archibald, in North Yarmouth on Saturday last, 20th instant. The deceased lady was born in Argyllshire, Scotland, in 1777, and had consequently attained her 103rd year. She was married to her husband in Scotland and the couple emigrated to this country in 1829, settling in the Township of Southwold on the McKillop farm. Two years subsequently they removed to North Yarmouth, taking up land in close proximity to the Glen which was then what may be fitly he described as a wilderness. Notwithstanding all the privations and toll, incidental to pioneer life which they were compelled to undertake, they accumulated considerable property. Mrs. McGregor proved an excellent helpmate in clearing the farm, and had few equals in the use of the sickle in harvest time, this being the mode of cutting grain in those days, she survived her husband 22 years.

The family of the deceased numbered fourteen, four of whom are still living, two sons and two daughters, he had 42 grandchildren, 122 great-grandchildren, and one great-great-grandchild. It may also be incidentally remarked here that one of her grand-daughters was blessed with 19 children, nearly all of whom are still living in the County of Elgin. Throughout life, Mrs. McGregor was a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church. Rev. K. McDonald of Belmont preached an impressive discourse on the occasion of the funeral. The remains were interred in St. Thomas cemetery on Monday, the hearse being followed by a numerous cortege of friends and relatives.

 

September 26, 1879

 

WILSON - (Montreal) Daniel Wilson, coal merchant, has met with his death by drowning in the canal. The body was found in the new canal basin to-day into which he had fallen, it is supposed,


the previous midnight, his buggy having upset over a height of 35 feet into the canal, owing to the darkness of the night and the absence of lights along the side of the water.

 

LECLAIR - (Montreal) The body of a son of Joseph Leclair who was drowned here lately was found to-day.

 

FULLER - James T. Fuller, proprietor of the International Hotel, Niagara Falls, and President of the village died at his home yesterday.

 

September 27, 1879

 

ROUTH - Died at Toronto, on the 26th instant, in his 17th year, Haviland, eldest son of the late W. Routh, Esq., of this city. Funeral will leave the G.W.R. station for the cemetery on the arrival of the 2:30 p.m. train from Toronto to-day. Friends of the family are invited.

 

WILLIAMS - (London) A young man named Williams, employed at the Ontario Car Works, died suddenly last night. While engaged in planing, he was suddenly seized with weakness and dropped down and expired. He was a sober man and an energetic Christian worker. The cause of his death was heart disease.

 

MURPHY - (Granton) Michael Murphy met with a severe accident which resulted in his death this afternoon. While feeding a threshing machine on the farm of James McMillan, Granton, he fell head-first into the cylinder and died a few minutes after being extracted. His father resides in London township.

 

DECOURCEY - (Toronto) A terrible tragedy is reported from Lambton Mills, a village a few miles north of the city. It appears two brothers named DeCourcey quarrelled about some money when Robert, aged 24, took up a gun and shot Edward, aged 21, dead. The murderer then tried to commit suicide, but medical aid was called and his life was saved for the gallows

 

SCHLERMERHORN - A few days since Frank Schlermerhorn of the Township of Blenheim was burning some brushwood, His little daughter, some six years of age, was with him. Her clothes caught fire and burnt her so badly that she died the same night. Mr. S who tore off her clothes got his hands badly burned.

 

ROGERS - Mr. William Rogers, blacksmith of Avonbank, died very suddenly the other day from the bursting of a blood vessel. He was in the act of shoeing a horse when he felt the shock, and straightened himself up. He handed his helper the knife he was using, saying that he had burst something. He was taken to his house nearby, and had just time to say farewell to his wife.


September 29, 1879

 

LANCELY - Died at the residence of Mrs. J, Ward, Clifton, on the 26th instant, aged 9 months and 14 days, William Ellis, son of Rev. J. E. Lancely, St. Thomas.

 

GONDRAN - (Quebec) A carter from St. Sauveur, named Gondran, while emptying a load of rubbish into the river St. Charles at the Gas Wharf early this morning, it is supposed, fell over and was accidentally drowned.

 

SWINTON - (St. Catharines) The death of another of the old and esteemed residents of the Niagara District in the person of the relict of the late John Swinton, Esq., of Niagara and mother of A. Swinton, Esq., and Mrs. Henry Carlisle. The deceased resided in the old town of Niagara over forty years and has been a resident in this city for two years. She passed away at the ripe old age of 80 years.

 

September 30, 1879

 

BULLEN - The funeral of the late W. F. Bullen took place at London on Monday afternoon, attended by a large concourse of friends. The pallbearers were Judge Elliott, Sheriff Glass, James H. Fraser, Esq., J. C. Meredith, Esq., James Cleghorn, Esq., R. Browne, Esq., L. Lawless, Esq., and Josiah Blackburn, Esq. The funeral service was conducted in an impressive manner by Rev. J. B. Richardson at the St. Paul's cemetery.

 

October 1, 1879

 

DISTIN - Died at Galt on Tuesday morning at 7 o'clock, W. L. Distin, aged 90 years and 2 months. Funeral on Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock from his late residence, Fiddes street, to Trinity Church cemetery.

 

TAYLOR - Died in this city, on October 1st, Sarah, third daughter of John Taylor, aged 28 years. The funeral will take place from her father's residence, 179 MacNab street north, Friday morning at 10 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please accept this intimation.

 

BYFORD - (Bishop's Mills) A sad accident occurred in this vicinity yesterday morning to a young man named Hugh Byford while attending to a threshing mill. It appears he was in the act of walking across the mill when his head struck a beam overhead, and losing his balance, he stepped into the cylinder, mangling his leg fearfully. Drs. Sparham and Potter were soon here from


Kemptville, and together with Dr. Kilbourne of this place soon had the limb amputated and fixed up, but the cords were so drawn from his body that he only survived the operation a short time. He died at 7:30 last night. He was much respected and his death has thrown a shadow over the whole neighbourhood.

 

WILLSON - Died at the residence of his son, Frank Willson, Jackson, Michigan, on the 27th September, Levi Willson, late sheriff of the County of Halton, Ontario, in the 75th year of his age.

 

October 4, 1879

 

RANGER - (Ottawa) A woman named Ranger called at the police station yesterday carrying in her arms a small child which appeared to be dead. Mrs. Ranger told the Chief of Police that her husband has struck her and that he had taken the child from her arms and thrown it on the floor. Dr. Whiteford was sent for, but previous to his arrival the infant showed signs of regaining consciousness. The doctor stated that it had evidently received injuries which might cause death. Ranger has been arrested.

 

LEWIS - (Widder) A young man named Lewis whose parents live in Toronto and who was on a visit here went out this evening to an adjoining bush to shoot. While drawing the gun towards him, having laid it down on a log, it accidentally went off. The contents struck him about the ear and the shot penetrating his brain caused instant death.

 

ANDERSON - (Montreal) This morning Dr. Anderson, dentist, who recently opened an office on Hollis street, was found dead in his office. An inquest will he held.

 

COLLINS - Mr. William Collins, residing in the southwestern part of Clifton, was taken suddenly in last Tuesday morning. Dr. McCarry of Drummondville was immediately sent for, but the unfortunate man died inside of half an hour. The cause of death was heart disease. Deceased was 45 years of age.

 

LARDEN - On Thursday, the 25th ultimo, says the Dunnville "Press", while B. Larden, an employee in Mr. Schofield's cabinet factory, was using a circular saw in cutting plank, the timber was caught in the upper part of the saw and thrown with great force against him, striking him in the breast. He died a few hours later.

 

CHIDLEY - Died in this city, on the 3rd instant, Ann, wife of Thomas Chidley, and mother of Mr. Alfred Chidley, in the 64th year of her age. Funeral from 77 West avenue north, on Sunday, at 2:30 p.m.


October 6, 1879

 

CAMERON - Died at his residence, Township of Stanley, County of Huron, on the 29th ultimo, Alexander Cameron, aged 85 years, a native of Lawers, Perthshire, Scotland, father of Hugh Cameron, Treasurer Hamilton Provident and Loan, and A. S. Cameron, barrister, of this city.

 

FALLON - (Ottawa) A man named Fallon from Point Alexander died of an epileptic fit at White's Mill, Pembroke, last night.

 

O'CONNOR - At the inquest on the body of Mr. O'Connor of Ferguson Falls, found dead in his buggy, a verdict of death from heart disease was returned.

 

HIVENS - (Toronto) The body of a man supposed to be George Hivens, a traveller doing business at No 4 Exchange Alley, was found this morning in a cistern near the post office. For several days he has been in attendance at the court house as a witness, but no one, so far as at present heard, saw him since yesterday afternoon. Deceased was in the habit of drinking, and about a year ago was under treatment in the inebriate department of the General Hospital. Coroner Riddell directed the body to be conveyed to the morgue where he will hold an inquest this evening.

 

LAVEAU - (Quebec) Mary Ann Laveau who was found drowned in the St. Charles River yesterday had walked in during a fit of temporary insanity.

 

DUMAS - (Montreal) J. B. Dumas was accidentally drowned to-day in a quarry in the village of St. Louis.

 

KILVINGTON - Died in this city, on the 5th instant, at 254 King street east, Emma young, eldest child of Thomas Kilvington, aged 5 years and 6 months. Funeral will take place to-morrow (Tuesday) afternoon, at 2 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

October 7, 1879

 

TOPP - (Toronto) The Rev. Dr. Topp, pastor of Knox Church, died this afternoon at the age of 65.

In our morning issue there was a brief announcement of the death of Rev. Alexander Topp, D.D., of Toronto. The following sketch of the deceased gentleman is from the "Mail".

The deceased was born in Scotland about 65 years ago and was educated at St. Andrew's University, Fifeshire, where he won great honours and his degree of D.D. He was pastor of Elgin church for some years, and on the resignation of Rev. Dr. Bums in 1856, he received a call to the pastorate of Knox church in this city and has held the position ever since. About a year ago, owing


to the heavy work involved in having the superintendence of a very large congregation, steps were taken to have a colleague appointed, and Rev. Dr. Inglis of Brooklyn was selected, but the death of the latter prevented the project being carried out. The names of other clergymen were then suggested but it was found impossible to fix upon a suitable person at the time. He was appointed Moderator of the General Assembly in 1876, and prior to that was Moderator of Toronto Presbytery. About the end of June of the present year, he visited Scotland to attend to family matters and while there symptoms of heart disease manifested themselves. This led to his seeking the advice of Dr. Keith and Dr. Balfour of Edinburgh who warned him of the precarious state of his health.

The labour of preaching to his old congregation at Elgin aggravated his disease and led to his thorough prostration during the remaining portion of his visit. He recovered sufficiently to return to this country about the end of August, and since then has resigned his position as pastor of Knox church congregation. He was a prominent delegate to the Pan Presbyterian assembly held in Ottawa and was always known as one who took a deep interest in the city churches. The resignation was under consideration of the Presbytery at the time of his decease. He leaves a widow and four daughters, two unmarried, one married in Scotland and one the wife of Mr. William Donaldson of this city. By his death the Presbyterian church in Canada loses one of its oldest and most Intellectual members and s loss will be greatly felt. He was one of the strongest advocates of the late Union which resulted very much from his forethought and Christian zeal.

 

October 8, 1879

 

MUSTARD - Mr. James Mustard of the 2nd concession of Tuckersmith, one of the pioneers of the country, died on the morning of October 3rd of inflammation of the bowels, aged 75.

 

ROTHWELL - The funeral of the late John Rothwell, late Secretary of the Guelph YMCA, took place on Monday. The body was taken to Walkerton. Thomas New and the aged mother of the deceased accompanied the remains.

 

HOOPER - The St Thomas "Times" regrets to chronicle the death of Mr. Thomas H Hooper, B.A., son of the late Rev. William Hooper, Bible Christian minister, which occurred at his father's residence on Friday last. The deceased was a young man of extraordinary promise. The remains were taken to Exeter for interment.

 

October 9, 1879

 

PHELPS - Died at St. Catharines, on the 7th instant, Joel Phelps, aged 79 years. Funeral will take place from the hospital Thursday morning, 9th instant, at 10 o'clock, to the burying ground at Drummondville.


DUPLESSIS - (Ottawa) Mr. Duplessis of the Intercolonial Department who had been prostrated with paralysis for some time died to-day.

 

October 10, 1879

 

WELCH - Mr. David Welch, one of the oldest residents of Saltfleet, died on Sunday last in the 82-nd year of his age. He was born in Ballinarobe, Mayo County, Ireland, in 1798, and came to Canada in 1837, living almost ever since in the township in which he died. One of his daughters is a member of the Community of St. Joseph, Toronto, and another is the wife of Mr. P. McGuire of this city.

 

MEADOWS - Mr. Thomas Meadows of St. Thomas visited his home in Kingston recently, and after a brief reunion with his brothers, suddenly expired. Medical men were called and pronounced death from heart disease.

 

TURNER - (Toronto) In spite of the efforts of the hospital physicians, Robert Turner, the man struck on the head by Smyth for improper intimacy with his wife, died at 11:30 last night. Dr. Riddell at once issued a warrant for an inquest which commenced at 11o'clock this morning and adjourned till afternoon in order to give time for a post mortem examination. Great sympathy is felt for Smyth who suffers a great deal at the jail and with difficulty can be got to let food or drink pass his lips. In spite of her conduct, he declares his wife, the mother of his five children, is as dear to him as ever. The woman, however, does not speak so fondly of her imprisoned husband, but mourns the loss of her paramour and speaks harsh words of the murderer.

 

October 11, 1879

 

ROCH - (Edwardsburg) Yesterday afternoon at one o'clock this village was thrown into a state of excitement by the cry that a man was killed. John Roch, of Johnston, an innkeeper, was here and indulged freely in drinking. He had gone but a few rods when he nearly fell out of the left hand side of his wagon. A man who was riding with him, it is said, tried to help him to straighten up, but he immediately swayed to the other side and fell on his head over which the hind wheels of the loaded wagon passed, fracturing the skull end inflicting fatal injuries. The unfortunate victim lingered till seven o'clock in the evening when death closed the scene.

 

SCHAEFER - Two children of Mr. Michael Schaefer were buried in a sand pit at Winterbourne to-day. One, a girl aged 5, was taken out dead. The other has a chance of recovery, though seriously hurt.


MCNELLY - (Duffin's Greek) A man named Joseph McNelly, of Rhode island, while attempting to get on a freight train in motion at the station here, by some means missed his hold and fell between the cars which passed over him, cutting off both legs and one arm and badly bruising his head. He died two hours afterwards.

 

October 13, 1879

 

SANDERCOCK - Died in this city, on Sunday, 12th instant, the beloved wife of Thomas Sandercock aged 58 years. Funeral will leave the late residence, No 8 Magill street, at 3 o'clock Tuesday afternoon. Friends and acquaintances are invited to attend.

 

COUGHLIN - Died on Sunday, the 12th instant, Julia, wife of Michael Coughlin, aged 58 years. Funeral will leave her late residence, foot of Victoria avenue, on Tuesday, 14th instant, at 9 o'clock a.m. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

STEAD - M. Stead for many years identified with architecture in St. John, N.B., died Friday. He superintended the erection of all the Dominion public buildings for years past and designed many of the churches which stand as monuments of his skill.

 

October 15, 1879

 

MACABE - (London) Henry Macabe, a farm labourer, was found dead yesterday morning in the hay loft of James Walker's barn in the Township of Westminster. An inquest was held and a verdict returned that death was caused by the excessive use of liquor, the stomach having been destroyed by alcoholic drink. Deceased, though a hard drinker, was an industrious man, 70 years of age. There being no friends to see to the matter, the coroner gave an order for his burial in Pond Mills cemetery.

 

DOER - On Saturday last, a two-year-old child of J. Doer of Nashwood, upset a saucer containing a few drops of hot coffee which scalded the child slightly in the breast. It soon proved fatal and medical aid was called, but to no avail. The child died on Monday from the effects

.

MCCLARY - (Cayuga) About four o'clock this afternoon, as a young lad named John McClary, was driving a team with a load of salt from Dean's station to this town, he fell off the wagon and one of the hind wheels passed across his breast, causing almost instant death.


BONE (Montreal) On Sunday a youth named David Bone, aged 19, was accidentally killed near the mouth of the Salmon River, three miles from Dunkirk. A younger brother wan out shooting ducks, and on his return David met the boat at the landing, and while reprimanding his brother for Sabbath breaking, took hold of the muzzle of the gun to draw it from the boat. In doing so the gun was discharged and a heavy load of buckshot struck him in the throat and passed out at the back of his head. His death was almost instantaneous.

 

CHISHOLM - Died in Detroit, on the 9th October, W. D. Chisholm, son of the late Col John Chisholm, formerly of Wellington square, Ontario, in the 64th year of his age.

 

October 16, 1879

 

FAIRBAIRN - (Toronto) The wife of a baker named Fairbairn, residing in St. Patrick's street, died this morning suddenly An investigation will be held this afternoon.

 

ZIRICKER - (Halifax) A two-year-old son of Hiram Ziricker of Dartmouth was scalded to death by upsetting a tub of hot water on himself.

 

WOOLSON - (Port Burwell) The body of a man, apparently about 30 years of age, dark hair, sandy whiskers, about five feet ten inches in height, was found on the beach here to-day. It is supposed to be the body of Captain Woolson who was drowned off the barge "Yankee" about the first of September off this port.

 

CROBB - (St. Catharines) The funeral of ex-alderman Joseph Crobb was very largely attended to-day, about ninety vehicles being in the cortege. The Oddfellows and Orangemen of which the deceased was an old and respected member turned out in force to pay their last respects to their late brother.

 

TAIT - Shortly before five o'clock lest evening, a very sad accident occurred at the G. B. Smith's wood yard by which a young lad named Richard Tait, about 12 years of age, lost his life. It appears that the boy, who was employed by Mr. Smith as a driver, was walking across a frame in which the splitting axe is placed when his foot slipped and he fell between the large revolving wheel and the side of the frame. The machine was working at full speed and as the poor boy fell, he was caught by the wheel and carried round to the other side of it where his body was terribly crushed. In fact so tightly was it wedged in that the belt was thrown off and the wheel ceased revolving. The other hands who were at work in the yard at once ran to where the unfortunate youth was fast in what proved to a death grasp and with as much promptness as possible released him. He was quite insensible, but still there were indications that he was alive, and without


delay he was taken to Dr. Griffin's office close by. There everything possible was done to resuscitate him. Examination showed that he was considerably bruised about the body, but Dr. Griffin gave it as his opinion the worst injuries were internal and held out scarcely any hope of his recovery. After a time he showed signs of reviving and an impromptu ambulance was obtained on which he was conveyed to the home of his parents on Burlington street. All possible remedies were applied to alleviate his suffering, but of no avail, and about nine o'clock he breathed his last. Dr. Woolverton, coroner, was notified and an inquest will be held on the body to-day.

 

WALKER - Died at his residence, 130 Hunter street east, October 16th, Mr. George Walker, carriage painter, in the 83rd year of his age. Funeral on Sunday, 19th, at 3 p.m. Friends will please accept this intimation without further notice.

 

WALKER Mr. George Walker, Hunter street east, who was so seriously injured some days ago, died about six o'clock this morning at his residence. The deceased, who had resided in the city for a long period, was 82 years of age.

 

October 17, 1879

 

HAZARD - (Shelbourne) Last evening about six o'clock a very melancholy accident happened about one mile east of this town. Mrs. Hazard set fire to a large dead hemlock tree that was standing near the house.The, roots had become loosened from the action of the fire and the. unfortunate woman apparently was anxious as to the direction which the tree would fall, fearing it would fall upon the house. Mr. Crossin and his wife were passing in a wagon and the woman asked them where they thought the tree would fall. While yet speaking, Mr. Crossin saw the tree totter and called to the woman to get out of the way while he meantime put the whip to his horses and barely got past when the tree dropped behind him, killing Mrs. Hazard instantly. She leaves a husband and three small children.

 

UNDERWOOD - (Parkhill) James Underwood of the Township of Stephen was thrown from his horse at Greenway and received internal injuries which proved fatal in a few minutes.

 

BURKE - (Ottawa) A man named Michael Burke was found dead on Bottaler street this evening. It is thought he committed suicide by taking Paris green, an inquest will be held to-morrow.

 

DURANT - (Halifax) A little daughter of Moses Durant of Athol, Cumberland county, was burned to death on Monday by her clothes catching fire from the stove.


BRYANSTON - (London) Mrs. Charlotte Bryanston, wife of R. Bryanston, died very suddenly last night on returning from a visit to Mount Pleasant cemetery. A few minutes after gaining her residence she expired. She was 66 years old.

 

THOMAS - John Thomas, an indigent from Springfield, died at the House of industry in St. Thomas last week from consumption. He was 64 years of age.

 

GRANDINE One of the oldest settlers in the person of Philip Grandine passed away on Tuesday last in his 78th year. Mr. Grandine was born in the state of New Jersey and came to Canada in 1812, settling for a short time at Niagara. He afterwards located in the county of Brant, near Paris, where he resided and carried on farming until with advancing years he retired from active work and has lived quietly in Brantford since.

 

HOLLAND - Died in this city, on the 17th instant, James Holland, a native of Kent, England, aged 56 years and 3 months. Funeral from his late residence, 27 John street north, on Saturday afternoon, at 4 o'clock. Friends and acquaintances will please attend.

 

MERCER - About 11 o'clock this morning as Mr. Thomas Wilson, 1iving on the corner of Herkimer and Queen streets, and Mr. Joseph Grimes, Concession street, were walking across the fields at the foot of the mountain and at the head of Locke street for the purpose of ascertaining some boundary stakes, they suddenly came upon the corpse of a woman lying extended on the ground. They were naturally quite shocked at the sight and Mr. Wilson at once set off with all speed to notify the police of what he had seen. A "Spectator" reporter, hearing his story, immediately drove out to the spot and arrived at the corner of Concession and Locke streets just as sergeant Castell, P.O. Coulter, and Mr. Wilson drove up along Concession street. The four then proceeded together into the field where the body had been found.

The farm is the property of Mr. Thomas Bush and on it and near where the dead woman was lying there was a stone house and barn. After driving around by a winding road, the four at length reached the spot. A ghastly spectacle here presented itself. Lying at full length on her back was a young woman apparently about 23 or 24 years of age. Her appearance and dress gave indication at once that she was of a good family. Discolouration had slightly set in in her face though not to such an extent but that the features were plainly recognizable. Her complexion was fair rather than otherwise and her hands were small and delicate. The cold chill of death had set in, but the hands were not stiff and the general appearance of the body showed that death had been comparatively recent. She wore on her right hand a white cloth glove and another was lying on the ground beside her. Her dress was of black cloth, well and fashionably made.


She had a fine gold ring on her finger and gold earrings in her ears. Her hat was of black straw with a red feather in it. The general appearance of the clothes and features of the girl drew forth the remark from those who saw her that she was surely of good birth. Her hands did not indicate that she had engaged in hard work of any kind. In her pocket were found a black lead pencil, a small empty purse, and a slip of paper upon which was some writing in pencil. The paper had been become so crumpled up that it was difficult to make out the words that were written upon it, but after considerable difficulty, the following was deciphered; O father, mother, and Rachel, I cannot get over this melancholy. My existence has become intolerable. Forgive your unfortunate daughter.

There was no name signed nor could anything be found upon her person that would give a clue to those present as to who the unfortunate girl was or where she came from. No signs of violence were discernible and judging from the note found in her pocket, this natural inference must be that she had killed herself, while suffering from pangs of remorse for something she had done. The place where she was lying was out of the way of ordinary travel, being about a quarter of a mile from the road, and several undulations in the intervening ground would hide her from the view of those passing by that way. The police acting under instruction from the Coroner, who was unable to go out, lifted the body into the wagon and conveyed her into the city to the King William street morgue. Pale and anxious faces gazed upon the corpse as it was being brought in and the inquiry went from lip to lip.

Later; The name of the unfortunate girl was Margaret Alice Mercer, daughter of Bertwistle Mercer, 52 Hunter street west. She left home apparently well at 9 o'clock this morning.

 

October 18, 1879

 

LEMAY - (Montreal) The body of Lemay who was drowned in the canal yesterday has been recovered.

 

CORBEAU - (Penetanguishene) A little boy, ten years of age, son of Mr. Thomas Corbeau, of this place, was accidentally drowned this morning near Beck's dock while accompanying another boy to obtain some barrels of water. They drove too far into the bay. The team, a valuable one, belonging to Mr. Charles Wright, was also drowned.

 

MERCER - Died in this city, on the 17th instant, Margaret Alice, second daughter of Mr. B. Mercer. Funeral will leave her father's residence, 52 Hunter street west, at half past 3 o'clock. Friends will please accept this intimation.

 

MCKINNON - Died suddenly at his residence, Caledonia, on the 16th October, Ronald McKinnon. Esq., a native of Mull, Argyllshire, Scotland in the 79th year of his age. Funeral on Monday at 2 p.m.


October 20, 1879

 

CARR - As Edward Carr, carpenter and mate on HMS troopship "Tamar", was working under the main chains of the ship on Saturday morning, he took a fit and fell stiff and helpless into the water. Two of his comrades instantly jumped in after him and succeeded in keeping him above water for a few minutes, but the man dragged them under so that they were obliged to let him go to save themselves. A diver went overboard as quickly as possible and brought the body up but life was extinct.

 

October 21, 1879

 

BROWN - (Guelph) Thomas Brown, living near the Bullfrog hotel on the Eramosa Road, met his death by choking yesterday morning by trying to swallow a large piece of meat. Deceased was 56 years of age, and leaves a wife and a family of grown up children.

 

CROWE - (Halifax) A. J. Crowe, aged 35, of London, a seaman on board the brig "Como" while working in the rigging this afternoon, fell a distance of eighteen feet, striking his head on the hatch and fracturing his skull fatally.

 

BREWSTER - (Clifton) Mrs. Brewster, the victim of the coal oil explosion which occurred at Niagara Falls on Saturday, died the following night from the effects of her injuries.

 

BELL - (Dorchester, N.B.) T. Wilson Bell of this place was found drowned in a well in the cellar of his house to-day. He went to the well to get a pail of water, and in reaching down, lost his balance and fell in.

 

FRASER - The wife of George Fraser, the foreman of the job department of the Belleville "Daily Ontario", died very suddenly of heart disease on Sunday evening.

 

October 22, 1879

 

BROOKS - A woman named Mrs. Brooks was burned to death at Lower Ottawa in attempting to blow out a coal oil lamp. It exploded, setting fire to her clothes, and burned her so severely that she has since died.

 

NEIL - (Toronto) As Mr. John Neil, aged 60, a highly respected old resident and a member of the large firm of Neil L Sons, foundry men, was driving over the northern track this evening, he was knocked out of his buggy by a train backing down and his body completely cut in two, no less than sixteen cars passing over him. The horse he was driving escaped.


BABCOCK (Lindsay) To-day a boy named Anthony Babcock, aged nine years, was drowned in the river here, He was playing on a pile of lumber and fell off into the w